UBC President's Speeches and Writings

TEDxUBC 2019 : #NominateHer Ono, Santa Jeremy 2019-03-09

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
53169-Ono_Santa_TED_UBC_2019.pdf [ 840.44kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 53169-1.0378886.json
JSON-LD: 53169-1.0378886-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 53169-1.0378886-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 53169-1.0378886-rdf.json
Turtle: 53169-1.0378886-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 53169-1.0378886-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 53169-1.0378886-source.json
Full Text
53169-1.0378886-fulltext.txt
Citation
53169-1.0378886.ris

Full Text

5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 1/22Office of the PresidentTEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHerMarch 9, 2019Good morning!5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 2/22A few days ago, a very kind person indicated that he’d like to nominate me for a major prize. He said hefelt I deserved it and that it would bring credit and a spotlight on UBC if I were selected as the laureate. Itold him I was very flattered but would rather he think of nominating a younger person, preferably awoman.I’ve been very fortunate to win more than enough prizes, awards and medals over the years and wouldrather see others honoured.  Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate every single award I have received andcherish the memories of the ceremonies and dinners that come with the awards.But I think too many awards go to the same people and they should be spread to more people. Inparticular, far too many awards go to men.So, on the heels of International Women’s Day, the topic of my talk today is: #NominateHer5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 3/22Last year, Canadian optical physicist Donna Strickland won the Nobel Prize in Physics for her work onpulsed lasers. She was the first woman to win in 55 years.Of more than 900 Nobel Prize winners, only 50 have been women.The Nobel categories with the highest percentage of women are literature and peace, at about 12.5%each, only one-eighth of total winners.In the physics and economics categories, only one percent of winners have been women.But the Nobel Prizes aren’t the only culprits.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 4/22This graph from the Wall Street Journal showcases the number of female CEOs in the Fortune 500companies. There’s steady improvement, but not nearly as much as there should be. While this graphends in 2014, the current number of female CEOs has only risen to 25 out of 500 companies.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 5/22Let’s look at the Oscars. Across all categories, there have been more male winners than female nominees.Kathryn Bigelow is the only woman to win Best Director in the Academy Awards’ entire 90 year history.In fact, only five women have ever been nominated for the Best Director category. Similar numbers areseen in the British BAFTA awards.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 6/22The same biases are at play in the music world.This graph shows percentages of men and women who have been conductors in US Orchestras. As youcan see, only 5% of directors and 9% of conductors have been female.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 7/22There is a solution: either deliberately nominate women or hold gender-blind selections. I’ll explain whatthat means in a second.The number of female performers in orchestras has been rising over the years. This increase can beattributed in part to the use of blind auditions, where candidates and the jury are separated by a screen,making it difficult to identify the candidate’s gender.Candidates are sometimes even required to remove their shoes, since the sound of heels clacking couldidentify their gender. This can increase a woman’s chances of making it into the final round by 50%.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 8/22Let me illustrate with an example:Trombonist Abbie Conant was selected in a blind audition  (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blind_audition)  as the overwhelming choice for Principal Trombonist of the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra  (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munich_Philharmonic_Orchestra)  in 1980.After her audition, the orchestra’s then Guest Conductor Sergiu Celibidache  (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergiu_Celibidache)  exclaimed “That’s who we want!”After they made their selection, the selection committee were shocked to discover their winner, whomthey’d mistakenly invited to audition as “Herr Conant,” was a woman. For the next 13 years, Celibidachediscriminated against Conant. He demoted her to second trombone and refused to give her solos,claiming that “we need a man for solo trombone.” Conant successfully sued the Philharmonic fordiscrimination and for back pay when she discovered she’d been paid less than her male colleagues.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 9/22You can read more about Ms Conant’s story in Malcol  Gladwell’s Blink. Her story shows that blindauditions can help, but they are not a panacea – women will still face discrimination – subtle and not-so-subtle – even if they do overcome those initial barriers.Because of that discrimination – the initial discrimination that causes women to be rejected at the startand the discrimination once they overcome those hurdles – many drop out along the way. This is called“the Leaky Pipeline.”The Leaky Pipeline is a metaphor used to describe the phenomenon that members of specificdemographics do not continue their progression towards certain careers, ‘leaking out of the pipeline’ atdifferent stages. In other words,5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 10/22The metaphor is that if you pour water (young girls) into a pipe, and it leaks along its length (girls andwomen exit at various times), very little water (professional women leaders) will emerge at the end ofthe pipeline.Therefore, there will be fewer women who have been successful enough to be nominated for awards orhonours.The Leaky Pipeline theory is often attributed to women in STEM fields. According to the National ScienceFoundation, nearly 50 percent of people currently searching for jobs in sciences or engineering arewomen. But only about fifteen percent of employed engineers are women. (I would like to add that hereat UBC we also make a concentrated effort to focus on retention of women in undergraduate, mastersand doctoral levels.)According to the National Institutes of Health, research grants awarded to first-time male grantees onaverage are $40,000 more than grants awarded to first-time female grantees, enough to make or break aproject, or even a career.The problem lies not in the lack of people or ability, but in the refusal to acknowledge and recognize andfacilitate these women’s accomplishments. This is best phrased by Dame Jocelynn Bell Burnell.Dame Jocelynn (who once noted that when she became a professor of physics she doubled the numberof female professors of physics in the U.K.) is an astrophysicist who was herself passed over for a NobelPrize for her discovery of radio pulsars – still a point of major controversy.She said – ‘If a third of Argentinian astrophysicists are women, it doesn’t seem to me there’s a problemwith women’s brains. It’s something to do with the culture in the different countries that produces thisenormous change. The limiting factor is culture, not women’s brains, and I regret that it’s still necessaryto say that.’5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 11/22There is a pressing need to challenge gender discrimination ingrained in our culture.Throughout this talk, I’ve been mentioning some of the countless women who had to challengediscrimination to be recognized for their abilities. Here are some more.The figures up here may be familiar to some of you. These are Katherine Goble, Mary Jackson andDorothy Vaughan, along with the actresses who portrayed them in the award-winning movie HiddenFigures. These women, who worked for NASA in the 1950s and 60s, were instrumental in the success ofprojects such as the launch of Apollo 11.Hidden Figures, and the Margot Shetterly book it was based on, illustrate the challenges anddiscrimination these women had to face both working as scientists and in gaining recognition for theirwork. Katherine Goble was only awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2015, at 97 years of age.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 12/22Unfortunately, many other women were not lucky enough to receive credit for their accomplishments intheir lifetimes.Chien Shiung Wu was dubbed the ‘First Lady of Physics’. Her male colleagues, Chen Ning Yang and TsungDao Lee, won the Nobel Prize for theorizing that parity may not exist with Beta Decay – while Wu was theone who ended up proving this theory.Wu remarked, ‘I wonder whether the tiny atoms and nuclei, or the mathematical symbols, or the DNAmolecules have any preference for either masculine or feminine treatment.’5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 13/22Marie Bracquemond was one of the Les Trois Grandes Dames – three great ladies – of impressionism,along with Berthe Morisot and Mary Cassatt. All three women had to face the challenges of genderdiscrimination in their time – such as not being allowed out without a male chaperone – but Marie wasarguably the most disadvantaged. Not having the financial means or social status, she learned from anold painter in her town, and was largely self-taught otherwise. She married Felix Bracquemond, an artistwho was well recognized, more so than Marie. While artists such as Monet and Degas recognized hertalent and became her mentors, Felix grew resentful of her talents. Discouraged by her husband’sresentment and the lack of interest in her works, Marie quit painting in 1890. Most of what history knowsof her comes from an unpublished short biography written by her son Pierre.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 14/22You all know the game Monopoly, even if you haven’t played it. But how many of us know the history ofthis famous board game?The stenographer Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Magie invented The Landlords’ Game in 1904, as a commentaryagainst big-name monopolists that held a lot of America’s wealth.Thirty years later, Charles Darrow produced his own version of the board game and sold it to the ParkerBrothers. He did not credit Lizzie Magie, and gave the game a new name –  Monopoly.The Parker Brothers later offered Lizzie Magie five hundred dollars and no royalties, along with the offerthat they would produce the original version of The Landlords’ Game with its anti-monopolistic message.Magie agreed, but made very little money since Darrow’s Monopoly was more popular by far.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 15/22As of today, Monopoly has sold nearly three hundred  illion copies, but very few know the nameElizabeth Magie.There’s similar lack of recognition in sports. According to University of Toronto researcher JenessaBanwell, only 16 per cent of head coaches in Canadian universities and 16 per cent of Canadian nationalteam head coaches are women.Olympian Hayley Wickenheiser (shown here) is one of those few –she’s the first woman in the NHL tohold an operations role as assistant director of player development for the Toronto Maple Leafs, andshe’s part of Canada’s working group on Gender Equity in Sport.The working group is one of several efforts in Canada and elsewhere to change this situation.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 16/22Similar efforts are going on in other fields. But we can’t be complacent. Gender inequality persists in fartoo many professions. It diminishes institutions, entire regions, nations and the world. Sadly, while clearprogress has been made toward gender equity in certain sectors, gender inequality is actually increasingin some parts of the world. And in too many professions, there is little progress here at home. It iseveryone’s responsibility, but especially for men in prominent positions, to take action and address thesituation.On a more positive note, while we still have a long way to go, we have been making more steps towardsgender equality. Just a couple days ago, I had the pleasure of co-hosting the event Women in Science,Health and Innovation, in conjunction with the Consulate Generals of France, Germany, the Netherlands,Switzerland, UK, US, and Neuroethics Canada.It was a privilege to meet these amazing scientists and to hear about their fascinating research. I lookupon it as a positive sign that opportunities such as this are becoming more common.But we can’t be complacent. Gender inequality persists in far too many professions. It diminishesinstitutions, entire regions, nations and the world. Sadly, while clear progress has been made towardgender equity in certain sectors, gender inequality is actually increasing in some parts of the world. Andin too many professions, there is little progress here at home. It is everyone’s responsibility, butespecially for men in prominent positions, to take action and address the situation.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 17/22Some men are doing so.Otto Hahn, the co-discoverer of nuclear fission, nominated his research colleague Lise Meitner for theNobel Prize over ten times for the same discovery. Other scientists who took the initiative to nominateMeitner include Max Planck, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Arthur Compton and Max Born.  But despitethe efforts of Meitner, Hahn and other scientists, Meitner never won a Nobel Prize.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 18/22Pierre Curie refused to accept the Nobel Prize unless his research partner and wife Marie Curie was alsoawarded. This made her the first woman to win a Nobel Prize.But she was an exception. Only two other women have won the Nobel Prize in Physics in the last hundredyears, and only one has won the prize in Economics.It can seem discouraging, but we can make a positive change.1. First, we need to first address the barriers women specifically face in winning awards, beingrecognized for their accomplishments and in the workplace. We need to step up and challengediscrimination anywhere we see it. Men especially may need to take a step back to allow womenmore space in the workplace, and help speak out in the face of discrimination.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 19/222. Second, we need to mentor upcoming talent, as men or women, to impart knowledge and supportthat would help young women excel in their fields.3. Third, we need to make ourselves aware of our biases, and attack these unconscious biases thatprevent women from being hired, promoted or awarded. We can do this by using methods such asgender-blind selections. Blind auditions have greatly increased the number of women in Orchestras inthe last thirty years. Gender-blind application trials have been conducted in several fields, includingbusiness and tech, and have proven very successful. We should implement these methods whereverpossible to mitigate gender biases in all fields.4. Lastly, #NominateHer wherever and whenever possible, especially in situations where it’s clear thatwomen are under-represented. If we fall short on this very basic responsibility, we are doing a greatdisservice.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 20/22I want my daughters to live in a more equalized world, where they can be acknowledged based on theirmerit rather than their gender. We must fight for gender equality, so that no woman is excluded ordiscouraged from a field  she excels in, so that no breakthroughs are lost through the barriers of sexism,and no one who deserves a chance is passed up for their gender.We owe it to the next generation to take steps to ensure that every girl today can fulfill her potentialtomorrow.Nominate her, not me.Thank you.5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 21/22Latest UpdatesThe Liberal Arts in the 21st Century: More Important Than Ever  (https://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/05/08/the-liberal-arts-in-the-21st-century-more-important-than-ever/)15th Annual UBC Okanagan Learning Conference Keynote Closing Remarks  (https://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/05/08/15th-annual-ubc-okanagan-learning-conference-keynote-closing-remarks/)Shaping UBC Okanagan’s Future  (https://president.ubc.ca/blog/2019/04/29/shaping-ubc-okanagans-future/)5/9/2019 TEDxUBC 2019: #NominateHer | Office of the Presidenthttps://president.ubc.ca/homepage-feature/2019/03/09/tedxubc-2019-nominateher/ 22/22Congress 2019: Canada’s biggest academic conference is coming to UBC  (https://president.ubc.ca/blog/2019/04/16/congress-2019/)UBC gets global recognition for sustainability impact  (https://president.ubc.ca/blog/2019/04/03/ubc-a-living-laboratory-for-sustainability/)Follow Professor Ono on social media  (http://facebook.com/ubcprez)   (http://instagram.com/ubcprez)   (https://twitter.com/ubcprez)Office of the President7th Floor, Walter C. Koerner Library1958 Main MallVancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z2Website president.ubc.ca  (https://president.ubc.ca)Email presidents.office@ubc.ca  (mailto:presidents.office@ubc.ca)Find us on  (https://www.facebook.com/ubcprez)    (https://twitter.com/ubcprez)    (http://www.youtube.com/user/UBC)    (https://www.instagram.com/ubcprez/)  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.53169.1-0378886/manifest

Comment

Related Items