Open Collections

UBC Library and Archives

Research Data Management Survey, UBC : Humanities and Social Sciences : Report Barsky, Eugene; Adam, Sheryl; Farrar, Paula; Meredith-Lobay, Megan; Mitchell, Marjorie; Naslund, Jo-Anne; Sylka, Christina Feb 10, 2017

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
494-Barsky_E_et_al_Research_Data_Report.pdf [ 1.43MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 494-1.0342865.json
JSON-LD: 494-1.0342865-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 494-1.0342865-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 494-1.0342865-rdf.json
Turtle: 494-1.0342865-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 494-1.0342865-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 494-1.0342865-source.json
Full Text
494-1.0342865-fulltext.txt
Citation
494-1.0342865.ris

Full Text

1	  Research	  Data	  Management	  Survey,	  UBC	  -­‐	  Humanities	  and	  Social	  Sciences	  –	  Report	  	  February	  10,	  2017	  	  Eugene	  Barsky,	  Sheryl,	  Adam,	  Paula	  Farrar,	  Megan	  Meredith-­‐Lobay,	  Marjorie	  Mitchell,	  Jo-­‐Anne	  Naslund,	  and	  Christina	  Sylka	  	  UBC	  Library	  and	  UBC	  ARC	  Contact	  –	  eugene.barsky@ubc.ca	  	  	  	  	  Executive	  Summary	  	  Background	  In	  June	  2016,	  the	  Tri-­‐Council	  Agencies	  released	  a	  statement	  regarding	  Digital	  Data	  Management	  for	  grant	  applications1.	  In	  preparation	  to	  support	  researchers	  facing	  new	  requirements,	  UBC	  librarians	  on	  both	  the	  Vancouver	  and	  Okanagan	  campuses	  initially	  surveyed	  faculty	  in	  the	  Sciences	  in	  Fall	  2015,	  	  to	  determine	  both	  the	  actual	  practices	  of	  Research	  Data	  Management	  (RDM)	  employed	  by	  these	  researchers,	  and	  areas	  where	  the	  researchers	  would	  like	  help.	  Acknowledging	  disciplinary	  differences,	  a	  second	  survey	  was	  administered	  to	  faculty	  and	  graduate	  students	  in	  Humanities	  and	  Social	  Sciences	  in	  October	  2016.	  	  The	  results	  of	  these	  surveys	  will	  assist	  the	  University	  in	  making	  evidence-­‐based	  decisions	  about	  what	  expertise	  will	  be	  needed	  to	  support	  and	  assist	  faculty	  in	  improving	  their	  data	  management	  practises	  to	  meet	  new	  requirements	  from	  funding	  bodies.	  	  	  Findings	  Researchers	  are	  collecting	  and	  working	  with	  a	  wide	  variety	  of	  data	  ranging	  from	  numerical	  and	  text	  data	  to	  multimedia	  files,	  software,	  instrument	  specific	  data,	  geospatial	  data,	  and	  many	  other	  types	  of	  data.	  	  Researchers	  identified	  four	  broad	  areas	  where	  they	  would	  like	  additional	  help	  and	  support:	  	  1.	  	   Data	  Storage	  (including	  preservation	  and	  sharing)	  2.	  	   Data	  Management	  Plans	  3.	  	   Data	  Repository	  access	  4.	  	   Data	  Education	  (workshops,	  and	  personalized	  training)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  	  Tri-­‐Agency	  Statement	  of	  Principles	  on	  Digital	  Data	  Management	  -­‐	  	  http://www.science.gc.ca/eic/site/063.nsf/eng/h_83F7624E.html?OpenDocument	  	  	  2	  These	  areas	  present	  opportunities	  for	  the	  Library	  and	  campus	  partners	  to	  bolster	  research	  excellence	  by	  supporting	  strong	  RDM	  practices	  of	  Faculty,	  Students	  and	  Staff.	  	  	  Recommendations	  1.	  	   The	  Library	  continues	  to	  collaborate	  with	  VPR’s	  Advanced	  Research	  Computing	  (ARC)	  unit,	  UBC	  Ethics,	  UBC	  IT	  Services,	  and	  other	  campus	  partners	  to	  plan	  and	  coordinate	  services	  for	  researchers	  around	  the	  management	  of	  research	  data.	  2.	  	   UBC	  ensures	  that	  a	  robust	  infrastructure	  is	  available	  to	  researchers	  to	  store,	  preserve,	  and	  share	  their	  research	  data.	  3.	  	   UBC	  implements	  a	  campus-­‐wide	  service	  to	  support	  a	  Data	  Management	  Repository	  (or	  suite	  of	  repositories)	  which	  would	  	  include	  the	  Abacus	  Dataverse	  (currently	  operated	  by	  the	  Library).	  	  	  Conclusions	  A	  more	  detailed	  statistical	  analysis	  is	  underway,	  but	  initial	  results	  show	  that	  the	  majority	  of	  survey	  respondents	  indicated	  that	  they	  need	  assistance	  with	  storage	  and	  security	  of	  research	  data,	  with	  crafting	  data	  management	  plans,	  with	  a	  centralized	  research	  data	  repository,	  and	  with	  workshops	  about	  research	  data	  best	  practices	  for	  faculty	  and	  especially	  for	  graduate	  students.	  Further,	  understandings	  of	  the	  particular	  needs	  or	  habits	  within	  specific	  research	  disciplines	  will	  provide	  insights	  into	  how	  these	  researchers	  think	  about,	  and	  work	  with	  data	  and	  can	  also	  identify	  areas	  for	  future	  research	  and	  investigation.	  Finally,	  this	  survey	  has	  provided	  a	  fuller	  understanding	  of	  the	  RDM	  needs	  and	  perceived	  barriers	  and	  benefits	  which	  can	  now	  enable	  more	  targeted	  and	  nuanced	  conversations	  between	  librarians,	  researchers,	  and	  IT	  research	  support	  personnel.	  These	  results	  will	  	  assist	  the	  Library	  and	  other	  campus	  partners	  with	  the	  development	  of	  specific	  programs	  and	  infrastructure	  to	  bolster	  a	  strategic	  direction	  for	  RDM	  support.	  	  	  Research	  Data	  Research	  data	  and	  survey	  instrument	  are	  available	  open	  access:	  Barsky,	  Eugene;	  Farrar,	  Paula;	  	  Meredith-­‐Lobay,	  Megan;	  Mitchell,	  Marjorie	  ;	  Naslund,	  Jo-­‐Anne;	  Sylka,	  Christina	  ,	  2017-­‐02-­‐03,	  "UBC	  Research	  Data	  Management	  Survey:	  Humanities	  and	  Social	  Sciences",	  http://hdl.handle.net/11272/10430	  	  	  	  	  3	  Introduction	  Increasingly,	  public	  funding	  agencies	  and	  publishers	  are	  developing	  policies	  around	  research	  data	  management	  (RDM),	  sharing,	  and	  preservation.	  These	  policies	  have	  the	  potential	  to	  impact	  researchers’	  RDM	  practices.	  	  In	  the	  US	  and	  UK,	  funding	  mandates	  require	  that	  research	  groups	  have	  	  data	  management	  plan	  (DMP)	  in	  order	  to	  secure	  funding.	  Similar	  mandates	  by	  the	  Canadian	  Tri-­‐Council	  Agencies	  were	  outlined	  in	  June	  2016	  by	  the	  Tri-­‐Agency	  Statement	  of	  Principles	  on	  Digital	  Data	  Management.	  In	  order	  to	  create	  services	  that	  align	  with	  the	  needs	  of	  our	  faculty,	  researchers	  at	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  administered	  a	  survey	  to	  all	  ranks	  of	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Applied	  Science	  (School	  of	  Community	  &	  Regional	  Planning,	  and	  School	  and	  Architecture	  &	  Landscape	  Architecture	  only),	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Arts,	  UBC	  Sauder	  School	  of	  Business,	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Education,	  and	  the	  Irving	  K.	  Barber	  School	  of	  Arts	  &	  Science	  (Arts	  only);	  to	  determine	  researchers’	  practices	  and	  attitudes	  toward	  creating,	  managing,	  storing	  and	  sharing	  their	  research	  data.	  	  This	  survey	  covered	  typical	  aspects	  of	  RDM	  and	  provides	  a	  benchmark	  to	  measure	  progress	  against	  the	  Tri-­‐Agency	  Policy	  on	  research	  data.	  	  The	  survey	  served	  three	  purposes:	  1.   Determine	  baseline	  current	  RDM	  practices.	  2.   Gather	  researchers’	  requirements	  for	  RDM.	  3.   Raise	  awareness	  for	  the	  prospective	  service	  and	  gauge	  interest	  levels	  for	  the	  proposed	  Library	  role	  in	  RDM.	  	  Methodology	  The	  survey	  questions	  were	  created	  in	  collaboration	  with	  nine	  other	  Canadian	  research	  libraries	  (Portage	  Canadian	  RDM	  Survey	  Consortium)2,	  thereby	  allowing	  comparative	  analysis	  across	  institutions,	  regions	  and	  the	  entire	  country	  if	  required.	  Hereby	  is	  the	  list	  of	  participating	  institutions:	  ●   Dalhousie	  University	  ●   McGill	  University	  ●   Queen’s	  University	  ●   Ryerson	  University	  ●   University	  of	  Alberta	  ●   University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  ●   University	  of	  Ontario	  Institute	  of	  Technology	  ●   University	  of	  Ottawa	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  2	  Canadian	  RDM	  Survey	  Consortium	  -­‐	  https://portagenetwork.ca/about/network-­‐of-­‐expertise/rdm-­‐survey-­‐consortium/	  	  4	  ●   University	  of	  Toronto	  ●   University	  of	  Waterloo	  ●   University	  of	  Windsor	  	  The	  research	  team	  at	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  (UBC)	  sent	  an	  electronic	  survey	  via	  email	  to	  all	  ranks	  of	  faculty	  and	  graduate	  students	  in	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Applied	  Science	  (School	  of	  Community	  and	  Regional	  Planning,	  and	  School	  and	  Architecture	  and	  Landscape	  Architecture	  only),	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Arts,	  UBC	  Sauder	  School	  of	  Business,	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Education	  and	  the	  Irving	  K.	  Barber	  School	  of	  Arts	  &	  Science	  (Arts	  only),	  to	  understand	  their	  research	  data	  management	  (RDM)	  and	  research	  data	  sharing	  practices.	  The	  survey	  was	  available	  online	  at	  https://survey.ubc.ca/s/research-­‐data-­‐2016	  from	  Monday,	  26	  September	  2016	  until	  Monday,	  17	  October	  2016.	  Completion	  of	  the	  survey	  was	  voluntary	  and	  could	  be	  accessed	  from	  anywhere	  with	  an	  internet	  connection.	  	  Surveyed	  researchers	  also	  had	  the	  option	  to	  provide	  contact	  information	  to	  facilitate	  future	  collaborations,	  but	  this	  was	  not	  a	  requirement.	  	  	  The	  survey	  instrument	  consisted	  of	  28	  questions	  in	  total.	  These	  included	  questions	  seeking	  demographic	  information,	  with	  a	  number	  of	  questions	  gathering	  richer	  data	  depending	  upon	  prior	  answers.	  Questions	  were	  multiple-­‐choice	  (one	  answer),	  multiple-­‐choice	  (multiple	  answers)	  and	  free	  comment.	  The	  UBC	  research	  team	  carried	  out	  both	  qualitative	  and	  quantitative	  analyses	  of	  the	  data,	  and	  the	  results	  are	  outlined	  in	  detail	  below.	  	  	  Results	  Participants:	  The	  survey	  had	  101	  respondents,	  most	  of	  whom	  were	  ongoing	  Faculty	  members.	  You	  can	  see	  below	  that	  20.7	  percent	  were	  at	  the	  rank	  of	  Full	  Professor	  with	  37	  percent	  at	  the	  Assistant	  or	  Associate	  Professor	  rank.	  The	  largest	  single	  category	  of	  respondents	  was	  Graduate	  Students	  at	  27.2	  percent.	  	  5	  Departments:	  The	  survey	  participants	  came	  from	  a	  wide	  range	  of	  departments	  at	  UBC,	  with	  the	  majority	  of	  responses	  coming	  from	  the	  Vancouver	  campus.	  	  The	  figure	  below	  shows	  departments	  with	  the	  most	  responses	  (please	  see	  the	  full	  dataset	  for	  the	  entire	  list).	  	  Additionally	  there	  was	  healthy	  participation	  from	  researchers	  in	  Business,	  Community	  and	  Regional	  Planning,	  Psychology,	  History,	  Education,	  Music,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  Okanagan	  campus.	  	  	  Number	  of	  Research	  Projects	  per	  Researcher:	  Overall,	  while	  most	  researchers	  (51.4	  percent)	  had	  only	  1-­‐2	  ongoing	  research	  projects,	  20.8	  percent	  had	  3-­‐5	  projects	  and	  8.3	  percent	  had	  more	  than	  5	  projects	  during	  the	  last	  year.	  	  	  	  Funding/Grants:	  While	  it	  was	  anticipated	  that	  most	  researchers	  receive	  various	  SHHRC	  funds	  (36.9	  percent	  received	  SHHRC	  Insight	  grants),	  there	  is	  a	  variety	  of	  other	  funding	  that	  UBC	  researchers	  are	  receiving,	  6	  including	  CIHR,	  CFI,	  MITACS,	  NSERC,	  and	  Hampton.	  23.8	  percent	  of	  the	  researchers	  did	  not	  receive	  any	  funding/grants	  during	  the	  last	  year.	  	  	  Size	  of	  Data:	  Planning	  for	  infrastructure	  needs	  was	  an	  important	  consideration	  in	  designing	  this	  survey.	  It	  was	  suspected	  that	  most	  researchers	  did	  not	  work	  with	  large	  datasets,	  and	  indeed	  only	  around	  2.8	  percent	  created	  more	  than	  1TB	  in	  their	  work.	  	  Most	  researchers	  work	  within	  the	  long	  tail	  of	  research	  data,	  while	  40.7	  percent	  use	  less	  than	  10GB.	  	  Types	  of	  Data:	  The	  types	  of	  research	  data	  reported	  by	  respondents	  were	  not	  surprising	  given	  the	  disciplinary	  focus	  of	  the	  survey.	  	  There	  was	  a	  marked	  emphasis	  on	  textual	  data,	  with	  81.9	  percent	  of	  researchers	  working	  with	  this	  type	  of	  research	  data.	  The	  next	  largest	  category	  was	  numerical	  data,	  44.4	  percent,	  7	  likely	  referencing	  the	  statistical	  work	  undertaken.	  	  Other	  notable	  results	  were	  36.1	  percent	  of	  respondents	  worked	  with	  multimedia	  formats,	  and	  19.4	  percent	  worked	  with	  software	  data.	  	  	  Data	  Storage	  Options:	  The	  results	  indicate	  that	  respondents	  use	  a	  variety	  of	  storage	  options	  for	  their	  data.	  	  We	  were	  not	  surprised	  to	  see	  50	  percent	  of	  the	  researchers	  using	  commercial	  cloud	  services,	  e.g.	  Amazon	  or	  Dropbox	  to	  keep	  their	  data.	  It	  was	  also	  very	  obvious	  that	  computer	  and	  laptop	  hard	  drives	  (51.4	  and	  63.9	  percent)	  and	  external	  hard	  drives	  (55.6	  percent)	  are	  the	  most	  popular	  storing	  media	  for	  research	  data.	  It	  is	  alarming	  to	  see	  45.8	  percent	  storing	  their	  data	  on	  flash	  drives	  and	  only	  2.8	  percent	  using	  a	  data	  repository.	  	  8	  	  	  Metadata/Data	  Documentation:	  It	  seems	  that	  UBC	  researchers	  are	  divided	  about	  the	  quality	  of	  their	  metadata	  documentation,	  with	  48.6	  percent	  being	  happy	  with	  metadata	  practices	  and	  51.4	  percent	  not.	  	  	  Data	  Sharing:	  Current	  Data	  Sharing	  Practices	  The	  survey	  suggests	  that	  attitudes	  towards	  open	  sharing	  of	  data	  are	  not	  entirely	  positive.	  	  Many	  researchers	  are	  sharing	  data	  only	  if	  someone	  asks	  (40.6	  percent),	  while	  36.2	  percent	  are	  not	  sharing	  their	  data	  at	  all.	  	  Only	  5.8	  percent	  deposit	  their	  data	  in	  an	  online	  repository,	  either	  institutional	  or	  discipline	  based.	  9	  	  	  Willingness	  to	  Share	  Data	  Most	  researchers	  are	  willing	  to	  share	  their	  data	  if	  not	  affected	  by	  restrictions	  or	  embargoes,	  with	  58	  percent	  by	  personal	  request,	  46.4	  percent	  by	  restricted	  access	  online,	  and	  23.2	  percent	  by	  uploading	  to	  an	  institutional	  data	  repository;	  however,	  13	  percent	  are	  not	  interested	  in	  sharing	  their	  data.	  	  	  	  Embargoes	  and	  Other	  Barriers	  to	  Sharing	  Data	  Researchers	  need	  to	  publish	  and	  be	  credited	  with	  their	  research	  before	  sharing	  their	  data,	  with	  36.2	  percent	  of	  the	  responders	  mentioning	  this	  as	  an	  issue.	  The	  sensitivity	  of	  data	  was	  cited	  as	  the	  main	  reason	  why	  47.8	  percent	  of	  researchers	  do	  not	  share	  their	  research	  data.	  However,	  26.1	  percent	  of	  UBC	  researchers	  would	  not	  object	  	  share	  their	  data.	  	  10	  	  	  Benefits	  of	  Sharing	  Data	  Not	  surprisingly,	  most	  of	  UBC	  researchers	  (71	  percent)	  feel	  that	  sharing	  their	  data	  enhances	  reproducible	  and	  collaborative	  scholarship.	  Many	  researchers	  have	  very	  favourable	  opinions	  regarding	  open	  data:	  56.5	  percent	  feel	  that	  sharing	  data	  moves	  their	  research	  field	  forward;	  63.8	  percent	  feel	  that	  sharing	  data	  helps	  to	  train	  new	  scientists;	  and	  53.6	  percent	  feel	  that	  sharing	  data	  helps	  to	  increase	  their	  research	  impact:	  	  11	  Data	  Management	  Plans:	  Data	  management	  plans	  typically	  address	  questions	  about	  research	  data	  types	  and	  formats;	  standards	  to	  be	  used	  for	  describing	  data;	  ethics	  and	  legal	  compliance.	  When	  asked	  whether	  the	  researchers	  could	  draft	  a	  data	  management	  plan	  as	  part	  of	  a	  grant	  application,	  only	  8.8	  percent	  felt	  that	  they	  could	  do	  it	  themselves,	  while	  91.2	  percent	  would	  prefer	  assistance.	  	  When	  asked	  if	  data	  management	  plans	  were	  made	  part	  of	  grant	  applications	  from	  funding	  bodies	  such	  as	  SSHRC,	  CIHR,	  and	  NSERC,	  how	  interested	  would	  researchers	  be	  in	  specific	  services,	  it	  was	  found	  that	  most	  of	  the	  RDM	  services	  being	  considered	  at	  UBC	  are	  of	  significant	  interest	  to	  UBC	  researchers.	  Specifically:	  	  ●   Help	  with	  preparing	  Data	  Management	  Plans	  (79	  percent),	  	  ●   Personalized	  consultations	  for	  data	  management	  best	  practices	  (78	  percent),	  	  ●   Data	  preservation	  (72	  percent),	  	  ●   Workshops	  for	  Faculty	  and	  Graduate	  students	  on	  data	  management	  (69	  and	  66	  percent),	  	  ●   Data	  repository	  (65	  percent)	  ●   Data	  Storage	  and	  backup	  (65	  percent).	  	  	  Moreover,	  help	  with	  Metadata	  (58	  percent)	  and	  Assigning	  Persistent	  digital	  identifiers	  -­‐	  DOIs	  (50	  percent)	  is	  also	  of	  interest	  to	  UBC	  researchers	  in	  the	  humanities	  and	  social	  sciences.	  	  12	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.494.1-0342865/manifest

Comment

Related Items