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The Staff Training and Development Program, 1991-2007, University of British Columbia Library Friesen, Margaret; Diers, Bailey 2010

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 1 Margaret Friesen  The Staff Training and Development Program, 1991-2007, University of British Columbia Library   I. Start Up  Organization:  A staff training and development committee was formed in 1991. The committee prepared a report and plan for staff development and launched the program in 1992. In 1995, Margaret Friesen was appointed Coordinator (50%) of Staff Training and Development.   Erik de Bruijn and Margaret Friesen described this comprehensive plan and program in a chapter “Investing in Human Resources: Staff Training and Development at the University of British Columbia Library” in Advances in Library Administration and Organization, volume 14, 1996 (JAI Press). This description included the goals and objectives of the program, as well as the program phases (or levels of training and development):  • Orientation • Skills training for the job • Reinforcement/enhancement of learned skills • Training for changing roles • Career development (advanced/specialized)  In 2000, a Task Group on Travel Funding recommended that the Librarians Travel Fund program be folded into the Staff Training and Development Program for a trial period. This program was later extended to 2004.  In 2005, a revised Library Staff Professional Development and Training Program was approved, with Margaret Friesen and Deborah Austin as Co-chairs of an advisory committee. Margaret Friesen continued to manage the program as Coordinator of Staff Training & Development to 2007.  Three library-wide training needs surveys were conducted:  1991, 1993, 2000.  II. Program  Annual reports summarize the plans and programs for the years 1992/3 through 2007. The following annual reports are appended:  1996-7, 1997-8, 1999/00-2006/07 Most of these reports were also posted to the staff intranet at https://staffinfo.library.ubc.ca/development/stdc/hist/    2 a. Courses: Scope  The list of program courses (appended) and training suppliers illustrates the comprehensiveness of the program from 1992 to 2007: • audience o all employee groups, librarians, management & professional, library support staff • phases of training and development o from orientation through advanced/specialized • breadth and depth of learning o including information resources and provision, management, technology, all subject and format specialties, employee relations, personal development, customer services, library services, health & safety, and many more • collaboration with campus suppliers o Human Resources - MOST Program, Continuing Studies, TAG, SLAIS, etc. • collaboration with professional associations o Association of Research Libraries, BCLA, etc. • variety of venues o from local hands-on training and "distinguished speaker series" to one-of-a kind international conference venues  b. Highlights: Projects and Trainers   Library-wide training working groups were formed for three big projects: • DRA Training Task Group, 1995-7 • ILS Training Working Group (Voyager), 2003-5 • UBCO Library Integration Project Training Working Group, 2005 This community of trainers contributed teaching and coaching expertise to library staff, a legacy visible not only internally, but also on campus.  The process of developing this community of trainers was described in the article "Building the Bridge as You Walk on it: Developing UBC’s Community of Trainers”, published in ARL 194, Oct. 1997, p. 8-9.  c. Other Highlights  These are described in more detail in the annual reports:  1996-8 Preparing staff for two major changes: the move to Koerner Library and the implementation of the new automated library system DRA.  Courses:  Facilitating Change (ARL Seminar)   Managing Personal Change and Transition   Conflict Resolution 1999/00 Electronic Resources (E.R.) Series  Health and Safety series (9 topics)  Drawing the Line (employee relations) 2000/2001 Referral Skills (Customer services)  Library-Wide Open Houses (cross-unit knowledge and understanding)  3  Health & Safety: Ergonomics  Media Copyright (Epp, Mitter) 2001/2002 Library Overview Training Series (LOTS): The Plan  Are we Losing Our Minds? (Kunin Colloquium) 2002/2003 Library Overview Training Series launched 2003/2004 Learning by Design: Voyager Training 2004/2005 Learning by Design 2: Voyager Trainning  SLAIS/UBC Library Distinguished Speakers Series 2005/2006 SLAIS/UBC Library Distinguished Speakers Series (Michael Geist, Heather Joseph)  Library Trends Workshops launched 2006/2007 Across the Desk, Across the World (intercultural communications)  Performance Management (Library Human Resources)  Appendix: Annual  Reports Page 4 1996/97-97/8 Annual Report 6 1999/00  In Common Cause: Furthering Learning and Research 10 2000/01 Room to Grow 17 2001/02 To See the Trees and the Forest: a Structured Training Series for All 22 2002/03 The Learning Cycle: Staff Training/Development and User Instruction 25 2003/04 Learning by Design: Voyager Training 29 2004/05 Learning by Design 2: Beyond Go-live Day with Voyager 32 2005/06 Participation in Teaching and Learning (with Appendix B: Special Events) 37 2006/07 Participation in Teaching and Learning   40 Appendix: List of programs and courses 1991-2007  Author Margaret Friesen: Chair of the Staff Training Committee, 1992 – 2005 Staff Training and Development Coordinator (50%), 1995-2007 Co-chair of Library Staff Professional Development and Training Program, 2005-07 Chair of the DRA Training Task Group, 1995-97 Chair of the ILS Training Working Group (Voyager), 2003-5 Subcommittee chair of the UBCO Library Integration Project Training Working Group, 2005 Member of the MOST Committee, 1994-98.  Summary prepared: January 2010 With assistance from Bailey Diers, SLAIS Co-op Student  4 Annual Report on Training and Development (1996/7 and 1997/8)  An active training and development program continues to support staff members as they manage and use new information technologies, accommodate changing work responsibilities, deal with financial restraint, cope with the need to reorganize and develop new services and teach information technologies to students, faculty and staff.  In its fifth year of programming, the Library’s Staff Training and Development program supported 248 sessions or courses for 1,339 participants. These training activities were expanded in the program’s sixth year, when a record-breaking 454 sessions for 3,201 participants were supported.  In the past two years, the program focussed especially on preparing staff for major changes in two areas: -the move of Humanities/Social Sciences, some Circulation and Processing staff from the Main Library and Library Processing Centre to the new Koerner Library, and -the implementation of the new automated library system, DRA. This colossal systematic training program on the four DRA applications consisted of 209 formal sessions (18 modules) presented by over sixty librarians and library assistants and attended by 2649 participants, an average of 12 modules per staff member.  Three staff training and development initiatives were undertaken specifically to help staff deal with change and transition. Senior managers attended a two-day Association of Research Libraries (ARL) seminar on site on Facilitating Change. Staff members attended two practical sessions on Managing Personal Change and Transition and Conflict Resolution.  Three computer skills courses were customized for staff and brought in-house through contracts with Continuing Studies. In the following year, two programs were brought in-house, tailored to the library’s environment: Employee Relations for library managers, and Customer Services for public service staff.  Implementation of DRA was the catalyst for bringing the ARL Training Skills Institute to campus to develop the training and presentation skills of a group of fifty trainers. In addition, this latter program achieved a number of related benefits: it crossed boundaries of levels of staff and functions in the Library, it developed a sense of community among the trainers and it identified a pool of talent for programming and presentation of training events for the future.  The time, effort and funds devoted to equipping the DRA trainers with new teaching techniques and skills in the previous year paid off.  Skills learned in the TSI were applied to the design of other in- house programs such as customer services and ergonomics, as well as in the planning for the revised library instruction programs for students, faculty and staff.  Individualized training was provided to several hundred participants in each year in a variety of subjects, as diverse as the library’s specialists themselves, such as, information technology, media literacy, advanced cataloguing, marketing, research tools, management/leadership/supervisory skills, specialized information databases, data libraries, electronic texts and teaching tools, ergonomics, medical librarianship, business information sources, performance measures, government information files, interlibrary loan, presentation  5 skills, archives and records management, publishing.  The full range of computer skills courses offered by Continuing Studies Computer Skills program and the communications and organizational skills offered by the MOST program were supported.  In addition to the DRA training sessions, in-house trainers presented over one hundred seminars over two years in such diverse subjects as internet access, goal setting, performance reviews, the collective agreement, peer training, cataloguing, budget preparation and monitoring, new microforms technology, disability awareness, emergency preparedness and designing web pages.  Non-routine training methods included a distance education tutorial conducted by electronic mail, an audioconference piped into the Biomedical Communications Centre, learning from vendor demonstrations offered at the Z39.50 conference and at DRA training sessions and an open-house “show-and-tell” format to demonstrate new microforms/digital scanning technology. Additional tools were added to the trainers’ repertoire. The library purchased its own camcorder and related equipment to permit trainers to tape case studies for presentation and analysis. A web page for staff was designed to highlight the library’s staff training and development program and link it to MOST (Human Resources Management and Other Skills Training) and Continuing Studies course information.  In 1997, in addition to funding from the Staff Training and Development budget ($60,000), the Librarians’ Travel Grants Committee allocated $9,320 to 13 individuals to partially fund attendance at conferences and meetings of scholarly or professional societies, while $50,385 from the administrative travel budget permitted another 37 individuals to attend 46 meetings or conference sessions as representatives of the Library.  Margaret Friesen, Staff Training & Development Coordinator, 1998  6  In Common Cause:  Furthering Learning and Research Eighth Annual Report on the Staff Training and Development Program  For the Year Ending March 2000  “The UBC Library recognizes that its staff - librarians, management and professional staff, support staff, and student staff - are its most important resource in supporting the research and learning needs of the UBC community.  The Library is committed to attracting and retaining excellent staff at all levels, and to providing them with the training and development they need to fulfil their responsibilities.” (Furthering Learning and Research: a Strategic Plan for the UBC Library.  Draft, April 2000).  In its eighth year of programming, the Library’s Staff Training and Development (ST&D) Program supported 247 sessions or courses for 2,366 participants, an average of thirteen hours of instruction per staff member (FTE).   Forty trainers presented ninety percent of the formal training in 163 in-house sessions. Eighty- three percent of the activities covered four main topics:  Customer services Information resources and services Health and safety Information technology  Customer services Members of the Staff Training and Development Committee identified this topic as a priority training need for several services.  The training designs for two modules, Referral Skills and Telephone Courtesy, were undertaken in-house and presented in 5 sessions to 55 participants. Repeat sessions are planned, as well as a third module directed at circulation staff.    Information resources and services Staff members need training similar to what the Library offers its students and faculty with the Information Connections curriculum. Some of the same modules were spun off into the Electronic Resources (E.R.) series and designed specifically for library staff. In addition, 13 trainers from 5 different information/reference services conducted 23 sessions for recently hired graduate academic assistants (GAA’s), an average of 9 hours of training per GAA. Topics included orientation to the reference collection, access to library resources (web-based and print), electronic texts, government publications and others.  Finally, life sciences library staff members were treated to training on statistical information resources, designed specifically for them by the data librarian.  Health and safety Nine topics on health and safety were presented in 25 sessions to 709 participants. The range of topics included: disaster and emergency preparedness, fire safety, general health and safety, personal security, and ergonomics. The sessions for 170 student staff members included a segment on the appropriate use of technology.  Repeat sessions are planned for each quarter as new staff members are hired.    7 Information technology New system-wide computer program installations require system-wide relearning or updating. Systems staff tackled the training need by scheduling 65 sessions on the new NT software for 362 participants.  Simultaneously, a dozen Systems Authorized Library Support Staff (SALS) were identified and trained to solve computer hardware/software problems at the unit level.   Access and accountability Cross-unit DRA-related training continued at the introductory and intermediate levels for distributed services in cataloguing, circulation and interlibrary loan/document delivery/media services.  Two topics on financial accountability, one on accessing cost information for serials subscriptions and one on “taming the budget”, were also repeated.  Internal/external partnerships Learning opportunities turn up in many forms. Four vendors demonstrated their products and services to 76 participants. The Asian Library brought its workshop on CJK products and technologies to the newly refurbished Dodson Room and attracted a full house, including 40 library participants, as well as faculty and student researchers. Thirty participants attended the Library Lecture, presented by Dr. Colin Steele, University Librarian, Australian National University. The Vancouver Online Users Group program on WebCT attracted a sell-out crowd from the region, including 20 UBC library participants.   The program on employee relations, Drawing the Line, was brought in-house and presented by the University’s Human Resources advisors and CUPE 2950 president to supervisory library assistants. The University’s Organizational and Training Development office provided free courses on such topics as Breaking Down Racism, Disability Awareness, and Selection Interviewing.  This year 52 library participants attended six of these sessions.  The Library’s orientation program, introduced last year and developed fully this year, includes both internal and external sponsors. The first phase, the University-wide orientation program, introduces UBC to all new faculty, librarians and support staff. The second phase introduces the Library to its new staff. Twelve new recruits have completed the entire orientation program.  Campus resources Seven percent of this year’s learning activities took place on campus. The three main sources for training are Human Resources’ Organizational Training and Development (MOST program), Continuing Studies Computers & Technology Programs, and the UBC Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG). Computer skills programs attracted 28 participants to 16 sessions.  The MOST program, in addition to the free courses mentioned above, attracted 45 participants to 22 different topics. TAG courses were both taken and given: UBC librarians taught 8 courses and 12 librarians attended 3 courses. The Library Information Skills Training (LIST) program is a regular offering of the MOST program and is taught by the Information Services librarian.   Off-campus training resources Some learning needs are matched with training resources from off-campus.  This year 71 participants attended 34 different sessions off-site.  The range of courses and venues varies from year to year, depending on which events come to town. This year’s attractions were the Serials  8 Cataloging Cooperative Training Program, the Art Libraries conference and the Medical Library Association/Canadian Health Libraries Association conference and workshops.  Finally, one-of-a-kind learning activities for library staff mirror the “distinctive learning, outstanding teaching and leading-edge research”1 specialities on campus. For example, library specialists received support for training in such topics as archives, data librarianship, distance education library services, electronic texts, instructional design, intercultural communications, interlibrary loan and media services, statistical information resources, systems development and web design.   The common cause The Library’s Staff Training and Development Plan provides the framework for matching learning needs with training activities.  Although the Plan was developed some years ago, its guiding principles and goals are still congruent with the Library’s current strategic plan. Trainers learn and they, in turn, pass on their knowledge to others in the common cause of furthering learning and research at UBC.  Appendix 1. Staff Training and Development Program Participation 1999/2000    Margaret Friesen Staff Training and Development Coordinator May 2000                                                  1 Furthering Learning and Research: a Strategic Plan for the UBC Library (April 2000 draft), 4.  9   10 Room to Grow: People and their Training Programs Ninth Annual Report on the Staff Training and Development Program  For the Year Ending March 2001  “The UBC Library recognizes that its staff - librarians, management and professional staff, support staff, and student staff - are its most important resource in supporting the research and learning needs of the UBC community.  The Library is committed to attracting and retaining excellent staff at all levels, and to providing them with the training and development they need to fulfil their responsibilities.” (Furthering Learning and Research: Implementing the UBC Library’s Strategic Plan 2000-2003, March 2001)   In support of the research and learning needs of the UBC community, the library provides all- season staff training and development programs to match the disparate learning needs of its staff. Training designs are created for specialist and non-specialist alike in technical and non-technical subjects. Programs are offered in-house, on campus or off-campus.  This year the Staff Training and Development Committee took stock of its program selections by conducting a survey. Staff were asked to indicate their participation rates, reasons for participation or non-participation, and priorities for training. The results of the survey indicated that many existing programs are valued, considered to be relevant, and perceived to contribute to career development. The survey responses also revealed a few gaps in training programs at the overview level. These are identified in the relevant sections below and will be addressed in future programming.  In the ninth year of programming, the Library’s Staff Training and Development (ST&D) Program supported 394 sessions or courses for 2261 participants.   In-house programs More than forty trainers presented 88% percent of the formal training in-house in 267 sessions, an average of 11 hours of in-house training per staff member (FTE). Ninety-two percent of the in-house activities covered seven main topics, directly related to the library’s mission and values:  Customer services Information resources and services Teaching/instruction Preservation of the collection Employee relations Orientation to the library Health and safety  Some programs are tried and true. Perennials include the Information Services Electronic Resources Series, the Customer Services Series, the Cataloguing Skills training programs and the five modules of the Health and Safety Orientation program.   Customer services Repeat sessions of Borrower Services, CircPlus (including interlibrary loan/media services), Referral Skills and Telephone Communication Skills were presented in 13 sessions to 97 participants. Student trainers from the Disability Resource Centre presented two sessions on Disability Awareness to 40 participants. An identified gap in training for customer services is the  11 lack of an overview course on communication skills, to ensure a uniformly high standard of behavioural skills in dealing with customers and co-workers.   Information resources and services The popular Electronic Resources (E.R.) Series sold out all of its 16 sessions with 506 participants attending. This series covered topics on e-journals, e-reserves, navigating the web and online reference resources. In addition, 13 trainers from 5 library units presented 30 hours of training sessions for recently hired graduate academic assistants (GAA’s). Topics included orientation to the reference collection, access to library resources (web-based and print), electronic texts, government publications and others.  These excellent courses are targeted primarily at frontline information services staff. An identified gap in training is the lack of an overview course on the Library and UBC web sites for staff who are not on the frontline. The course would include training on access protocols, structures, definitions and web links. It would enable all staff to work from a common understanding of how the library’s information resources appear to the customer and to see how their particular work fits into the total library and university landscape.   Without preparatory functions in acquisitions, cataloguing and serials control, information services would have little to show. Ongoing training in these technical services is necessary as new staff members are hired, functions are decentralized or systems are changed. This year, catalogue librarians and paraprofessionals concentrated the training on the Asian language cataloguing group who had recently moved into a new location and were setting down their own roots in a new environment.  Non-specialists in both public and technical services would also gain confidence in their referral skills by viewing the technical processing panorama. An identified gap in training is the lack of an overview session on technical services for these generalists, with stepping stones to guide them through the sequential maze of library processing functions.   Support for information technology skills training is a continuous need. Some of this training takes place in formal classes. However, much of the ongoing coaching and problem solving occurs informally at the unit level, in consultation with Systems Authorized Library Support Staff (SALS), information services and library systems specialists.  Two training gaps were identified. One is the lack of an overview session on the library’s online systems that would explain how all the pieces ---functions, views, vocabulary, modules --- fit together. The other is a brief overview session on computer literacy from the ground up, to be scheduled as soon as possible after a new staff member is hired. This session would not duplicate what most new recruits know already about hardware and software, but rather feature any new elements that are unique to the library’s particular computer environment.   Teaching/instruction Twenty-one UBC librarians took advantage of ten different high-quality instructional skills workshops offered by the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG). Reciprocally, librarians also taught courses for TAG, The Library Information Skills Training (LIST) program,  12 offered through the Organizational Training and Development (OTD) programs, and the bi- monthly University-wide Orientation sessions. The teaching tips they learned in the field were shared with others in a Teaching Liaison Group “Institute”.   Preservation of the collection Three sessions on preservation were presented to 53 participants. An overview session, Care of the Collections, covered general procedures and was open to all library staff. The next level of training, a session on Book Repairs, was customized for the fifteen branch or unit staff members who are most directly responsible for the care of the collection in their respective libraries. These caretakers learned some specific techniques for repairing worn and torn books, as well as some appropriate strategies to use when assessing the need for and level of repairs, in consultation with the Mending Assistant and Assistant University Librarian for Collections.     Employee relations University-wide sessions were held to brief managers and employees on the new CUPE 2950 contract, pay equity updates and job re-evaluation systems. Two programs were brought in- house. Human Resources advisors and the CUPE 2950 president reviewed the changes in the contract with 55 managers and supervisors and briefed 55 staff members on pay equity developments. In fall, 135 CUPE members and their managers attended campus wide training sessions on the re-evaluation phase of the job evaluation process. The always-popular Selection Interviewing workshop, offered by Human Resources, attracted 12 library managers and supervisors.   Orientation to the library The first phase, the University-wide orientation program, introduces UBC to all new faculty, librarians and support staff. The second phase introduces the Library to its new staff. This year three new learning segments were added: a Virtual Tour of the Library, guided by the Information Services librarian; a Welcome to the Library meeting with the University Librarian; and library-wide Open Houses for novice and seasoned alike. All three events present opportunities to broaden views and contacts. In the pilot year, 43 new staff members took the virtual tour, 15 met the University Librarian close up, and 121 staff members clicked on the Open House online registration form for the venue of their choice. These 45-minute tours and talks will now become perennial, with gates opened twice a year in 24 library units/divisions.   Health and safety The library’s Health and Safety Orientation Series is also a repeating series, presented three times a year as new staff members are hired. These sessions are mandatory for all staff and cover topics on health and safety policies and procedures, disaster and emergency preparedness, fire safety, personal security, and ergonomics. For student employees, a segment on the appropriate use of technology is included. In total, eleven sessions were held for 196 participants.  The health and safety topic of the year was “ergonomics”. Two special guests emerged as trainers and mentors. In April 2000, Dr. Lance Rucker was the guest speaker at the First Library Staff Training and Development Colloquium. In a most engaging and entertaining lecture, Rucker described and illustrated the risks of repetitive stress injury in the practice of dentistry and measures taken to reduce injury and risk. He also demonstrated the ergoLogic Keyboard,  13 an invention he pioneered as a result of his research and practice into ergonomics. The second guest trainer, Gina Agelidis (Ergonomics Program Officer, University Health, Safety and Environment), not only co-presented an in-house session on ergonomics but also followed up with expert individual and group consultations.   Collaborators, partners and networks Teaching and learning opportunities crop up all over and in many forms. Two e-Library symposia in April and November drew faculty and staff, including 71 library staff, from all over campus to standing-room-only sessions. Four vendors of new and improved electronic collections demonstrated their products. The world of Asian library cataloguing was explained in an informative session on the conversion from the Wade-Giles to the Pinyin romanization system (Chinese characters into romanized letters).  The competing interests of creators and users were bared in a session titled Media Copyright and Distributed Learning: Is Technology Beating the Law? Mary Anne Epp and Niina Mitter, media library specialists from Langara College Library, described the current dilemma: the ease with which instructional materials can be adapted from one format to another, and the concomitant requirement to exercise due diligence in observing copyright laws while doing so. Finally, two staff members chose self-paced distance learning programs, designed by the Association of Research Libraries Office of Leadership & Management Services (ARL/OLMS) Online Lyceum.   Campus training resources Nine percent of this year’s learning activities took place outside the library but still on campus. The three main sources for training are: -Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG). -Continuing Studies Computers & Technology Programs -Human Resources’ Organizational Training and Development (MOST and other programs)  TAG’s outstanding 3-day Instructional Skills Workshop attracted several librarians. The Continuing Studies computer skills programs attracted 50 participants to 18 sessions, primarily in spreadsheet applications, word processing and internet publishing. The MOST program attracted 127 participants to 49 different topics on communication, interpersonal and management/supervisory skills development.   Off-campus training resources Three percent of the library’s learning needs were matched with training resources from off- campus.  This year 68 participants attended 50 different sessions off-site.  The range of courses and venues varies from year to year, depending on which events come to town. This year’s attractions were the Association for Media and Technology in Education in Canada conference, several B.C. Library Association Continuing Education workshops, the OCLC Cataloguing workshop, the Fast Forward Media Showcase and the Langara College Library Technician Program courses.   Finally, one-of-a-kind learning activities for library staff mirror the diverse research and teaching interests on campus. Library specialists dug into such topics as: archives management, Asian library resources and services, data librarianship, distance education library services, electronic  14 licensing, electronic reference service, electronic texts, fine arts librarianship, instructional design, intercultural communications, law librarianship, management practices, medical library resources, music librarianship, presentation skills, report writing, science and technology librarianship, statistical information resources, systems development and training/teaching methods.   Summary: The library clearly supports relevant learning opportunities for its staff. Most of the training programs are delivered in-house by committed library trainers. Top-notch campus and off- campus resources supplement these in-house resources. However, learning is never static and training programs need to evolve as learning needs are identified. The proposed overview series of programs will provide additional opportunities for staff to grow.  Acknowledgements: Thank you to the more than forty in-house trainers, scores of external trainers, collaborators, and  partners who enrich our programs. We appreciate the financial support from the Library Staff Training and Development fund, the Job Skills Training Program, the Librarians Travel fund, and the Teaching and Learning fund (Disability Awareness sessions). Thank you to the dedicated members of the Staff Training & Development Committee for your advice and support.   Margaret Friesen, Staff Training and Development Coordinator May 2001  Appendix 1. Staff Training and Development Program Participation 2000/2001  Staff Training and Development Committee: Sheryl Adam  Julie Clarke  Richard Hare  Sally Taylor Desiree Baron  Leonora Crema  Lotte Illichmann  Rick Welch Doug Brigham  Donna Curtis  Peggy-Lynn MacIsaac Suzan Zagar  Helen Chow  Margaret Friesen (chair) Dwight Tanner   15  16   17 To See the Trees and the Forest: a Structured Training Series for All Tenth Annual Report on the Staff Training and Development Program For the Year Ending March 2002  A primary activity of this year’s Staff Training and Development Committee was to plan the curriculum for the “library overview series”, a structured training program on the library’s functions and services at the introductory level.  Generally, staff members are recruited for a specific function or service and will learn these functions/services in-depth within the unit or department. Until now, no structured training program was available in-house for them to explore other library services, at least not early in their employment.   This new training series provides an overview of the UBC library's functions and services, information which may not otherwise be gleaned from the specialized training/learning programs that are offered within the unit or in advanced level cross-unit training programs. This general knowledge will contribute to a common understanding of the library’s mission and goals, foster cross-unit fertilization, communication, and career development and permit everyone to see the trees and the forest.   A. The Library Overview Series (the forest) The plan for the overview series identified eight core topics that every one in the organization should know something about. Two topics are already included in existing orientation programs. The remaining six topics required new training designs and will be presented in four new workshops to be piloted in 2002.  The core topics are: 1. Computer literacy orientation 2. Library health and safety orientation  3. Communications with customers and colleagues 4. Library web site 5. University of B.C. web site 6. Technical services 7. Online library system 8. Circulation (with finale: Strategic Plan)  1. Computer literacy orientation Individual learning needs will be assessed as soon as possible after a new staff member is hired and arrangements made to match these needs with training resources. The training plan and program will not duplicate what new staff members know already about hardware and software, but rather will be tailored to fit the individual and/or will introduce any new information or skills that are unique to the library’s particular computer environment.   2. Library health and safety orientation  18 Subtopics include health and safety orientation, ergonomics, emergency preparedness, personal security, fire extinguisher procedures, safety committee orientation. Some courses are offered in- house two or three times a year; some programs are sponsored by the University Health, Safety and Environment Office. Good ergonomic practices are reinforced through individual coaching sessions.  3. Communications with customers and colleagues This course is scheduled as the first of four new courses in the overview series. Our people, customers and staff, are our most important resource. Effective communication skills with people are central to the library's mission and services. This course provides a foundation for all communications with customers and colleagues, whether face-to-face, by telephone or by e-mail, whether external or internal.  4. Library/University of BC web sites The second new course will introduce staff members, front line or not, to the library and university environments "on the internet". The course will identify key library and campus departments and services, their corresponding web sites and navigation peculiarities. One of the learning objectives is to place the staff member's specialized function/service into the context of the broader library and university enterprise.  5. Technical services/online library system overview The third new course will enable non-specialists in both public and technical services to learn something about the technical processing steps from beginning to end, e.g., to follow the book from its selection to its place on the shelf (or electronic shelf).  Simultaneously, staff will learn how these processing steps are recorded and tracked online in the various modules, acquisitions, cataloguing, serials, circulation. The course also clarifies technical vocabulary that may not generally be known.  6. Circulation overview This fourth new course will introduce non-specialists to some key services for users: borrowing materials, interlibrary loan services, reserve procedures. It also includes a demonstration of behind-the-scenes functions of borrower services, e.g., establishing the category of a user, tracking the status of a book, recording user information, etc.   7. Finale To wrap up the overview series, a 20-minute segment on the library’s organizational structure and its strategic plan will be appended to the circulation course.  Training designs for these programs are in progress and pilot courses will be scheduled in fall 2002. Upon completion of these four courses, expert and novice alike will have: • reviewed the principles of the library's mission and values • reviewed guidelines for communicating effectively with customers and colleagues • gained a common understanding at an overview level of the library's services, functions, vocabulary, online applications, university context.   B. Staff training and development highlights of 2001/02 (the trees)  19  1. In-house programs  Eighty seven percent of the formal training in-house took place in 206 sessions, an average of 11 hours of in-house training per staff member. Nearly 60% of the in-house training covered the following key library services in depth: circulation, information/reference, instruction, interlibrary loan/document delivery.  132 participants, including student assistants, attended health and safety orientation sessions. 100 staff members participated in the library-wide open houses (44 sites), scheduled 4 times a year. 90 staff members attended a 2-day course on project management to assist them in undertaking the work of the task groups designated in the strategic plan, Furthering Learning and Research: Implementing the UBC Library’s Strategic Plan 2000- 2003.  Five special events attracted large and diverse audiences: • Are we losing our minds? how to get and keep the skilled people we need (guest speaker Dr. Roslyn Kunin) • The 3rd eLibrary Symposium • Opening of the Chung Collection (guest speaker Dr. Wally Chung) • Opening of the Learning Commons • Ways of seeing: UBC filmmakers showcase recent productions (Raymond Hall, presenter, UBC Authors Week special event)  Some other noteworthy programs included: • several advanced courses on Stats Canada and government information resources • a new program on Windows NT Explorer file management, designed by Rick Welch and Suzan Zagar • orientation training week for graduate academic assistants (20 topics)   The number and variety of vendor presentations scheduled in the last year demonstrates the extent to which the library's resource are electronic and accessible online. Demonstrations by vendors included the electronic resources of Lexis-Nexis, Cambridge Scientific, netLibrary/Coutts, Virtual Reference Manager, ChemAbs Sci Fi Scholar, IEEE, OCLC, and more.   2. Campus training resources As in past years, 9% of the year’s learning activities took place outside the library but still on campus. The three main training venues (with participant numbers) were: • Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth (10 programs, 31 participants) • Continuing Studies Computers & Technology (CSCT) programs (19 courses, 55 participants) • Organizational Training and Development (OTD) (25 courses, 55 participants) Other campus courses were sponsored by the University Health, Safety and Environment, the Equity Office, Continuing Studies non-credit and UBC credit programs.   3. Off-campus training resources  20  Four percent of the library's training activities (70 participants) took place off campus, reflecting the diverse research, teaching and service specialties of the staff. Staff members attended courses/sessions on intercultural studies, interlibrary loan, archival studies, serials processing, map and media resources, accounting, information technologies, library instruction, presentation skills and on a wide range of subjects, including data information, education, fine arts, and health information.   4. The library’s instructors Library staff presented twelve sessions for the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth and participated as speakers in the third e-Library Symposium. At least 40 staff members presented 120 programs to other library staff and a notable 1325 sessions to students and faculty in every discipline on campus.   Summary: The library provides year-round staff training and development programs to enable its staff to support the research and learning needs of the UBC community. The curriculum evolves as learning needs are identified. This year we focussed on the non-specialist staff member, the big picture and cross-unit understanding. We planned the library overview training series so that every one can know something about the forest, as well as the trees.  Appendix 1. Staff Training and Development Program Participation 2001/02  Margaret Friesen, Staff Training and Development Coordinator May 2002 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Acknowledgements: The Job Skills Training Program (for CUPE 2950 staff) supported 94 participants, who not only attended on-campus programs sponsored by CSCT and OTD, but also off-campus courses delivered by BC Institute of Technology, Langara College, Vancouver Community College, Vancouver School Board - Adult Education, and the Women’s Resource Centre at Robson Square.  Thank you to the more than forty library trainers, scores of external trainers, collaborators and partners who enrich our programs. We acknowledge the financial support for the Kunin Colloquium from the UBC Librarians and Archivists Association, the Library Administration, the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, and the Langara Library Technician Program. Finally, thank you to the dedicated members of the Staff Training and Development Committee for their advice and support.  Staff Training and Development Committee: Doug Brigham, Donna Curtis (to Feb. 2002), Margaret Friesen (chair), Heather Hettiarachchi, Lotte Illichmann, Peggy-Lynn MacIsaac, Jo-Anne Naslund, Simon Neame, Jane Shinn, Dwight Tanner, Elaine Thorson, Rick Welch, Suzan Zagar   21 Appendix 1: Participation 2001/02     22 The Learning Cycle: Staff Training/Development and User Instruction in 2002/3  Highlights of the library’s training and development program  A. In-house (119 sessions, 1,039 participants)  1. The Library Overview Training Series • First series was held in November 2002 (24 attendees) • The 4 modules of the training series are: • Communications with customers and colleagues • Library/University of BC web sites • Technical services/online library system overview • Circulation overview, with Finale: Strategic plan: mission and values • The next series is scheduled for May 2003 • See annual report for 2002 for a description of the series/modules. http://www.library.ubc.ca/staff/stdc/report02.html  2. Finding articles 101 • 23 staff members attended this session, adapted from the Information Connections course  3. Graduate academic assistant training • A 5-day program, August 26-30, 2002, on 35 topics was scheduled for eight GAA’s in Humanities & Social Sciences. Some sessions, e.g., communications skills, services to persons with disabilities were open to all GAA’s.  4. Cataloguing • A regularly-scheduled program, presented by Rick Welch and others, provides practical hands-on training on record creation for ordering and for course records (29 participants)  5. Supervisory Skills (Carollyne Conlinn) • Two 2-day workshops were scheduled in April and June 2002 (30 participants). Two follow- up drop-in sessions were also held in September and October 2002.   6. Orientation open houses – library wide • 45 minute sessions were scheduled in June and December 2002 (33 sites, 86 participants)  7. Special event: UBC Authors Week • 40 participants attended William New’s informative and entertaining speech “Walking with a bicycle: the Encyclopedia of Literature in Canada Project”.  8. MyUBC • Two sessions presented by Information Services attracted 60 participants  9. Health & safety orientation • 87 participants attended   23 10. Vendors • 7 vendor demonstrations, including Ebsco, Swets Blackwell, attracted 122 participants.   B. Campus partners  97 participants attended 62 sessions on campus, primarily at Continuing Studies, Organizational Training and Development and the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth.   C. Off-campus venues  85 participants attended training and development venues off-site, some local (Vancouver Community College Oakridge, Langara College, Vancouver School Board).  Off-site courses and conferences included topics on archives, law librarianship, health libraries, serials cataloguing, interlibrary loan, information technology, assertiveness skills training and dealing with difficult people.  D. Funding  The Job Skills Training Program (for CUPE 2950 staff) supported 67 individuals for both on campus and off-campus courses. Staff training and development funds and librarians’ travel funds supported 133 individuals.   Summary: When library staff learn from others, whether in-house or off-site, they incorporate this knowledge into what they teach others, staff, students, faculty. In 2002/3, 1,221 staff participants and 28,230 student participants engaged in this learning cycle.  Thank you to the dedicated members of the Staff Training and Development Committee for their advice, support and training designs. Thank you to all trainers, with special thanks to the Library Overview Training Series presenters: Doug Brigham, Aleteia Greenwood, Peggy-Lynn MacIsaac, Jo-Anne Naslund, Simon Neame, Catherine Quinlan, Jane Shinn, Rick Welch.  Margaret Friesen, Staff Training and Development Program, May 2003  Staff Training and Development Committee: Doug Brigham  Simon Neame Margaret Friesen (chair) Jane Shinn Heather Hettiarachchi  Dwight Tanner Lotte Illichmann  Elaine Thorson Peggy-Lynn MacIsaac Rick Welch Jo-Anne Naslund  Suzan Zagar   24 Appendix: Participation 2002/3    25 Learning by design: Voyager training at UBC Library Staff Training and Development Program Annual Report 2003-04  Design and structure --- planned, focused, accelerated --- was the only way. The implementation schedule for the new Integrated Library System “Voyager” was fast-tracked and the training and learning schedules would need to keep pace as well. It was understood that some of the learning would take place informally in cluster-based workplaces but it was also clear that this methodology of learning alone would not suffice for a project of this size and complexity.   Organizational context In November, the ILS Steering Committee established the Training Working Group (TWG) with trainers drawn from each of the modules: OPAC (public web catalogue), circulation, cataloguing, acquisitions, and serials. Most of the TWG trainers were also members of the Library Staff Training and Development Committee with considerable expertise in designing in- house training programs. Given the expert but limited training resources of the vendor and this in-house pool of talent, the TWG determined that the vendor’s training would likely be concentrated at the level of “train-the-trainers” and that the majority of the modular training would be provided by UBC library trainers.   Training plan and structure Working back from the go-live-date of May 3, 2004, the TWG prepared a training schedule for each module, estimating audience size, level of expertise needed (basic, intermediate, advanced) and the duration of the course for each level of expertise.   Room bookings in the newly furnished “learning space” were staked out for 48 teaching days and registration lists were compiled to ensure that everyone who needed to be trained would be trained in a timely way.   Weekly meetings of the TWG and written action plans ensured continuity, pacing, sharing of plans, materials and expertise. Communications by e-mail between meetings clarified issues. Simultaneously, Steering Committee planners developed workflow policies and procedures and funneled them to the trainers for incorporation into the training design.   Design as focus Trainers were encouraged to aim their training design at a specific target group - the intermediate level of staff in their particular function. This focus would make the design process manageable, would conserve the energy of the trainers and concentrate the content of the course on essential first steps in operating the new system.   The course design could be expanded to add content for the expert trainee or scaled down to accommodate trainees who needed to know a little about a few things in a particular module. The design would also be readily adaptable for future learning, recognizing the iterative nature of workflow decision-making, the integrated nature of Voyager itself and the probability of Voyager enhancements.   26 Endeavor trainers customized and modeled the Voyager training designs for the train-the-trainers sessions, modular training, overview sessions and delivered scripts, outlines, handouts, and exercises.   The library’s trainers, some experienced, some new, adapted the scripts and training materials to suit their audiences and local workflows. They created templates for course outlines, scripts and a standard “look” for the training materials. They developed handouts, web FAQ’s, Viewlets (animated visual demos) and exercises.   Various training and learning methodologies were used: formal train-the-trainer sessions, training sessions modeling typical intermediate-level training designs, face-to-face and telephone consultations between Endeavor trainers and library trainers, facilitated workshops to solve specific organization or workflow issues, planned functional group meetings, ad hoc discussions, and coaching.  The schedule Two main series of training schedules were planned. The first series of 57 sessions, scheduled between November and March, addressed the learning needs of the following groups:  • experts and trainers, to configure the system, design workflows and learn how and what to train (train-the-trainers sessions by Endeavor) • general audience, a Voyager overview session for a “bird’s eye view” of the integrated system (Endeavor trainer) • modular training for advanced cataloguing staff, the first group to go live (library trainers) and modular introductory training for serials staff • general audience, “Windows Tune-up” (library trainer).  The bulk of the schedule for modular training (56 sessions) took place in April/May. OPAC and Circulation trainers alone presented 30 sessions. Acquisitions and Serials trainers commenced training for central technical services staff and, along with Cataloguing trainers, presented intermediate and basic levels of training for branch staff.   Summary of schedule      Sessions Teaching hours Teaching days Participants Nov. - March  57 173 29 777 April - May  56 124 21           805 Total 113 297 50        1,582  The program In 50 days, 7 Endeavor trainers and 42 UBC Library trainers taught 113 courses to 300 staff members. Staff members averaged 13 hours of learning each, a total of 3895 participant hours. Go-live-day came, the Voyager system worked, staff provided services in Voyager and trainers and learners celebrated.    27 Wrap-up and sustainability The Training Working Group continues to support a program of repeat, refresher, and advanced training sessions. A repository of training materials and documentation is being assembled for adaptation to future learning needs. The training plan recognizes that learning is an evolving process, pervasive, cooperative, broad in scope, and that much of the operational training will take place informally in small groups. The design and structure makes all Voyager training, whether formal or informal, more sustainable. With focus, planning, attention and design, learning is accelerated and improved.   Thanks to the Steering Committee for your confidence and support, to the Endeavor and UBC Library trainers for your creativity and durability, and to the Training Working Group for your guidance and expertise.  Margaret Friesen, Chair, Training Working Group  Training Working Group Members: Sheryl Adam, Information Services Tim Atkinson, Library Administration Doug Brigham, Systems Danielle Bugeaud, Cataloguing Carol Elliott, Ambit Consulting Margaret Friesen, Humanities & Social Sciences (Chair) Tomoko Goto, Asian Library Kat McGrath, Serials Jane Shinn, Circulation Elaine Thorson, Acquisitions Rick Welch, Technical Services  Appendix: List of trainers --------------------------------------------- Postscript During the Voyager training phase, library services and other training activities did not stop. The staff training and development program continued to support a learning program that responded to individual and library needs.   In-house training activities (110 teaching hours) covered the topics of e-resources, chat reference, cataloguing, collections, reference services, instruction, two series of the Library Overview Training Series and “boot camp” for graduate academic assistants.  Campus venues provided learning opportunities for 89 participants and off-site venues provided a wide range of learning opportunities for another 131 participants.  Margaret Friesen, Staff Training and Development Coordinator   28 Appendix: Staff Training and Development Program Participation 2003/4  (year ending March 31, 2004)     29 Learning by design 2: beyond go-live day with Voyager Library Staff Development and Training Program Annual Report 2004-05  Go-live day arrived May 3, 2004 --- the Voyager system worked, staff provided services in Circulation and the OPAC, and 42 trainers and 300 learners celebrated together on May 20th.  By this time, learners had attended 113 courses in 50 days, averaging 13 hours of learning each. From May to July, training took place primarily behind the scenes, in 20 advanced sessions for experts in Acquisitions, Serials, Cataloguing and Circulation.   Between October and December, the Endeavor trainers returned in person and via WebEx to present 5 sessions on customized reports, XML/XSL, Unicode and EDI. At the same time, acquisitions, systems and bibliography staff geared up to learn EDI and the iApprove (Coutts) online ordering system.    Voyager and iApprove     Sessions Teaching hours Teaching days Participants In-house April-May 56 124 21 805 In-house trainers  May-Dec 20 48 11 227 Endeavor trainers  Oct-Dec 5 33 7 37 Voyager total 81 205 39 1069 iApprove (Coutts) 9 15 4 105  Follow-up coaching within units was not formally tracked but it has been estimated at a minimum of 50 hours of supervisors' time in processing functions between April and July alone.   Other staff development and training activities continued as well, with 49 courses presented in- house on a variety of topics. Campus venues provided learning opportunities for 177 participants and off-site venues provided opportunities for another 151 participants. See appendix for details.  Margaret Friesen Library Staff Professional Development and Training Program  Appendix:  Activities and participation 2004/5 (year ending March 31, 2005) Special events 2004-05  30  31   32  Participation in Teaching and Learning Annual Report on the Library Staff Development and Training Program 2005/6  A. A new framework for funding library professional development  New guidelines and criteria for funding professional development activities were approved in March 2005 and the program was launched in April.  171 requests for individual activities were approved, as follows: • 95 approvals for librarians • 17 for management and professional staff • 59 for library assistants/CUPE 2950 staff (the majority were funded from the Job Skills Training Program).  Library commitments totalled $70,000 and Job Skills Training Program funds were approved in the amount of $11,000. The programs funded 46 events involving travel, 3 online/webcast courses and 122 local conferences/workshops on a wide range of topics and for a variety of knowledge/skills development.  In addition to the paid individual activities above, the program sponsored several group events: • Library Human Resources   Application of the CUPE 2950 Contract (3rd session)   New Student Assistant Orientation Workshops (4)   Performance Management Workshops (3) • Library Trends Workshops (2), presented by library staff • Library-Wide Open Houses (13 sites) • SLAIS/UBC Library Distinguished Speakers Series (St. John's College)   Michael Geist, "Canada's Choice: Copyright, Culture and the Internet"   Heather Joseph, "SPARC Futures"  At year end, the ARL Management Institute was being planned.   B. Cross-unit in-house activities - other  82% of all training activities took place in-house and were sponsored, designed and/or delivered by various committees, individual trainers, branches and others. In addition to the above- mentioned events, the following venues attracted over 1,100 participants:  • eLibrary Committee - 4 sessions • GAA Orientation - 41 sessions (Humanities & Social Sciences, Sciences, Life Sciences) • IKBLC Liaison Group Update - 2 sessions • Information/Reference/Instruction Workshops - 38 sessions (various trainers) • RefWorks - 9 sessions ( including several train-the-trainers sessions) • Technical Services/Systems - 16 sessions (including Meridian) • UBCO - 27 sessions in public, technical services, collections development (UBCO Transition Committee)  33 • Vendors' demos - 11 sessions  C. Training partners, collaboration, information literacy  Primary training venues on campus were:  Continuing Studies  Organizational Training and Development (MOST courses)  Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG)   The Library collaborated with SLAIS in sponsoring two series: SLAIS/UBC Library Colloquia and SLAIS/UBC Library Distinguish Speakers Series. The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre sponsored 5 webcasts in partnership with campus and off-campus organizations (see list at http://www.ikebarberlearningcentre.ubc.ca/ikblc-webcast.html).  In addition to attending sessions on campus, librarians and other staff members taught courses in TAG, SLAIS, provided face-to-face demos/consultations at the University-Wide Orientation sessions and other campus orientation venues, and taught 26,515 students and faculty members in classrooms and labs in the Library and in departmental facilities.   D. Summary  The library's teaching and learning program in 2005/06, for staff and for users, is summarized, as follows: • 1,735 library participants at 379 training sessions • 75+ library trainers • 26,515 student/faculty attendees at 1,455 classroom/outreach sessions  Thank you to the 75+ trainers in 2005-06 for your expertise and dedication in presenting these programs.   Appendix A: Library Staff Development and Training Program, Participation 2005/06 Appendix B: Special Events (a Partial List)  Prepared by Margaret Friesen Co-Chair, Library Staff Development and Training Program  Library Staff Development and Training Committee: Deborah Austin, Co-chair, Chris Ball, Margaret Friesen, Co-chair, Anne Miele, Leeta Sokalski  34   35 Appendix B  Special Events (a Partial List)  eLibrary Committee D-space (Fleishauer, Hives) Functional Requirements for Bib Records (Andrews) Google Scholar (Hives) Instant Messaging (Millar, Neame, Ure)  GAA Boot Camp, August 29-September 2, 2005  IKBLC Liaison Group Update (Neame, Poole, Quinlan)  IKBLC Webcasts Diabetes Research 2006, March 11, 2006 Living the Global City Series:  Archi-tising: The Culture of Selling Condominium Vancouver, Nov. 15, 2005  The Participatory City, Nov. 21, 2005 The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre - Phase 1 Official Opening, Oct. 3, 2005 BC Regional Community Service Learning Conference, June 17, 2005  Information/Reference/Instruction Training and Development Arts Outreach (Colenbrander) E-journals (Adam, Kirchner, McGrath) Government Publications Resources (Luebbe, etc.) Government Publications Roundtable on UN Publications (Friesen) Humanities & Social Sciences Instruction Tune-ups (Adam, etc.) Map Refreshers (Ross) Nesstar Pilot (Luebbe, Lesack) Science Outreach (Lindstrom) Sciences Cross-Training (Adcock, Taylor, Greenwood, etc.) Simon Fraser University Instruction Librarians - Exchange (Humanities & Social  Sciences, Adam, Giltrow, etc.)  Library Trends Currents and Convergence (Colenbrander, George, Hintz) Data Services Models and Trends (Luebbe, Lesack, Messer)  SLAIS/UBC Library Colloquia Practicum and Coop (SLAIS students) The Digital Divide (Dowding, SLAIS) Libraries and Open Access (Colenbrander, HSS and others) FBI and Patron Records (Airoldi, SLA, SLAIS) School Libraries (Naslund, Education, and Wilson, MacMillan) Taiwan Archives (Chang, NAC)  36 Public Memory, Archival Memory and Advocating Archives (Cox, U of Pittsburgh SIS) Indexing and Information Needs (Mai, U of Washington Information School) Librarians as Censors (Curry, SLAIS) There and Back Again (Pearson, author) Archival Description and the Apparatus of Authenticity (MacNeil, SLAIS) InvisibleTexts: the Screenplay in Literary Culture (Mota, English) Qu'est-ce que la documentation? (Day, Indiana University) Getting Personal: Personalization of Support for Interaction with Information (Belkin, Rutgers)  SLAIS/UBC Library Distinguished Speakers Series Canada's Choice: Copyright, Culture and the Internet (Michael Geist) SPARC Futures (Heather Joseph)  Town Halls Budgets (Tee, Ward) Merit Awards Forum (Ward)  University-Wide Orientation (for new staff), bi-monthly (Atkey, Dunbar)  Vendors' demos Coutts CSA Illumina EBSCO Euromonitor Inernational Gibson Library Connections Harbour Publishing Proquest Thomson Scientific  37  Participation in Teaching and Learning 2006/7 Annual Report on the Library Staff Development and Training Program  1. Staff Development  a. Individual training/development requests  132 requests for individual activities were approved, as follows: 78 approvals for librarians 9 for management and professional staff 45 for library assistants/CUPE 2950 staff (the majority were funded from the Job Skills Training Program)  Library commitments for these individual events totalled $72,687 and Job Skills Training Program funds were approved in the amount of $8,941. The programs funded: 60 events involving travel 6 online/webcast courses 66 local conferences/workshops on a wide range of topics and for a variety of knowledge/skills development purposes.  In addition to the paid individual activities above, the program sponsored several group events: ARL Management Institute (a two-day course, 17 attendees) Communications: Across the Desk, Across the World (3 sessions, 46 attendees) Library Human Resources: Performance Management (2 sessions, 25 attendees) Library Trends Series Workshops (3 sessions, 53 attendees)  b. Cross-unit in-house training and development activities - other  87% of all training activities took place in-house and were sponsored, designed and/or delivered by various committees, individual trainers, branches and others. In all, 117 events/sessions were reported, with 1,360 participants. It is estimated that more than 40 library trainers taught for nearly 200 hours. See Appendix A: Detailed Summary.  2. Teaching and Learning (Instruction) on campus  In addition to attending sessions themselves, librarians and other staff members taught courses for the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG), the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies (SLAIS), presented 7 orientation sessions at University- Wide Orientation sessions (for Organizational Development & Learning), and taught 1,492 sessions to 28,581 students and faculty members in classrooms, labs, in the Library and in departmental facilities. Altogether, library staff presented 1,506 sessions to 28,795 students, faculty members and staff (outside the library).    38 Summary: 1. Staff development: 1,559 library staff participants at individual and group sessions 2. Teaching and Learning: 28,795 students/faculty participants at 1,506 sessions   Prepared by Margaret Friesen Co-Chair, Library Staff Development and Training Committee  Appendix A: Detailed Summary   39   40 Staff Training and Development Program, UBC Library Appendix : List of programs and courses 1991-2007 (Note: these documents have been deposited in the University Archives)     Folder Number  Courses - List:  15 Courses - Calendars  16 ARL   26 CABI School  17 CircPlus   18 Colloquium - Kunin  19 Communications    Telephone Communication Skills, 2000/01 20 Coutts   21 Disability Awareness  22-24 DRA/Netcat (Integrated Library System - see Inventory) 26 E.R. Training Series (electronic resources) 25 Employee Relations  26 Financial Management 26 FOIPOP (Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy) 26 GAA Training  26 Grand Rounds (Woodward Library)  Health and Safety 2001 + 27  Emergency Preparedness    Earthquake Preparedness   Ergonomics 28   Ergonomics Task Group 29   Courses (3 sessions/year) 30   Risk Assessments 31  Orientation 31  Personal Safety/Security 32 In-house - other  32 Intercultural Communications 32 Job Skills Training Program 32 Langara College Library Technician Program 33 Library Overview Training Series (LOTS) (8 topics, 4 sessions, 2 orientations)   November 2002: series 1; May 2003: series 2 34  Module: Communication skills 35  Module: Library Website/University Website 36  Module: Technical Services/Online library system 36  Module: Circulation (with Library mission, values) 36  Module: Computer skills inventory - orientation and checklist 37  Diana Cooper drawings 32 Library Trends Series   Management  38  Conflict Management 39  Teamwork  32 Map Library Conference  41   Courses page 2  40 MOST courses (University Human Resources) 41  Program course catalogues, 1993-2000 41  Selection Interviewing 42 Open Houses (orientation program) 2000-2001 + 43 Orientation program - initial 44 Peer to Leader (management skills) 45 Preservation  46 Referral Skills  47 Special Events    BCLA, Webcasts, Library-wide sessions,    SLAIS/UBC Lib Distinguished Speakers Series 48 Supervisory Skills  49 TAG   50 Technology  49 University-wide Orientation 49 Vancouver Community College Oakridge Computer Centre 49 Vendors - Ebsco, Web2Knowledge, LexisNexis  Voyager (Integrated Library System) see inventory 50  April 2004-March 2005, and undated 51  January 2004-March 2004 52  May 2003-December 2003 53  Participants 54 Voyager - UBCO  49 WILU     

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