UBC Library and Archives

Chronicles of Pride Kirkness, Verna J. Apr 15, 1986

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CHRONICLES OF PRIDE UBC MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY APRIL 15, 1986 This evening is a tribute to contemporary Native Indian people who through their achievements are helping to secure the future of our people. The "Chronicles of Pride" features examples of these leaders, many of whom have been engaged throughout their lifetimes in ensuring our advancement. They are characterized not only as leaders but as ambassadors. Among those featured this evening is Chief Simon Baker who received very recently one of the highest honours that can be bestowed upon an Indian. He was made an honorary chief of the Sechelt Tribe. In awarding him this honour, mention was made of the many tributes he has received over the years for his ambassadorship both of his own culture and of the human spirit. Those of us who know George Manuel know how well he deserved to be named Ambassador-at-Large by indigenous people allover the world. For his service to his people here in Canada and to the world, he was twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. As further recognition of his leadership, George received an honorary doctorate from UBC in 1984. In 1964, two women were recognized and honoured for their extensive involvement and service to their people. I believe both are here this evening: Mildred Gottfriedson of the Salish-Shuswap tribe, Kamloops, won the Mother-of-the-Year award. Dorothy Francis, a Saulteaux originally from the Prairies, received from Chatelaine Magazine the Golden Key Award for service to her people. One could go on citing particular Indian people for their achieve­ ments but it is sufficient to say that our people, both young and old, are represented in many walks of life, and are contributing in various - 2 ­ ways to our advancement. Among these are our politicians, artists, authors, entrepreneurs, lawyers, teachers, judges, nurses, to name a few. Leadership is the hallmark of our past, our present and our future. The measurement of success in the Indian world is regarded in terms of IIHow much service we have rendered to our people. 1I The tribute this evening is not only to those whose portraits appear here--for they are but a symbol of achievement and commitment. The following message appeared in the Indians of Canada Pavilion at Expo 67 and seems appropriate to the occasion: Walk in our moccasins, the trail of our past Live with us in the here and now Talk with us by the fires of the days to come. We are a people with a past but more importantly, we are a people of the present. Our achievements speak to the future of those yet unborn. Congratulations and sincere thanks go to Patricia Richardson Logie for her vision, her time and effort in presenting the message of the modern day Indian. ---......----.---~ ....- ...-------- ---.------.-~-----


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