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2010 - 2011 report 2012

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Fisheries Centre The University of British Columbia researching the options rebuilding ecosystems conserving aquatic life restoring fisheries page 1 Table of Contents Director’s Introduction            2 Fisheries Centre Mission and Activities        3 Research Units  Aboriginal Fisheries                                      4  Ministry of Environment           5  Quantitative Modeling Group          6  Fisheries Economics Research Unit      8  Marine Mammal Research Unit     10  Project Seahorse      12  Sea Around Us Project     14  Policy and Ecosystem Restoration in Fisheries           16  Nereus Project - Predicting the Future Ocean  18  Changing Ocean Research Unit     20 Graduate Studies       21  Graduate Students      22  Graduate Theses Completed    27 Fisheries Centre Members       28  Core Faculty       28  Associated Faculty                 28  Emeritus Members      28  Adjunct Professors      28  International Advisory Council    29  FC Offi  ce Staff       29  Publications  Articles in Refereed Journals    30  Books and Technical Reports    35  Fisheries Centre Research Reports   36  Chapters in Books and Technical Reports  36  Miscellaneous Publications    40 Fisheries Centre Visitors      43 Funding        44 page 2 Director’s Introduction T he years 2010 and 2011 have been very exciting for those of us here at the Fisheries Centre. We welcomed two new faculty members, increasing the number of faculty at our Centre to twelve. First, we hired Dr Sang-Seon Yun, who comes to us from Kunsan National University in Korea, and is working with the Aboriginal Fisheries Research Unit in examining chemical communication systems of fi shes. We also welcomed National Geographic Fellow Dr William W.L. Cheung, who obtained his PhD at UBC in 2007 and has returned to work on global change biology and fi sheries. In July 2011, we launched our new website - more a ractive, easier to navigate, and a site that all Fisheries Centre members can be proud of. In conceptualizing the site, we recognized that it was important to feature the Centre’s publications prominently. So, in addition to creating an extensive Publications section on the site, we allo ed space on the homepage and on each Faculty, Staff , and Student profi le to highlight our members’ exceptional contributions to the research community. It is our hope that the site will act as a common resource, bringing members from our diff erent Research Units together and a racting many outside visitors. Over the past two years, we were also honoured to receive a number of very distinguished guests, including the Honourable Gail Shea, Federal Ministor of Fisheries, who visited shortly a er the grand opening of the Blue Whale Project at the Beaty Biodiversity Museum. Ms. Claire Dansereau, Deputy Minister of Fisheries, came to discuss further collaboration between the Fisheries Centre and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the Honourable Keith Ashfi eld, Canada Minister of Revenue, also toured the FC in 2010. In 2011, Dr Daniel Pauly, Dr Gordon Munro, and myself were invited to meet with the Prince of Wales to off er feedback on the Prince’s Charities’ International Sustainability Unit. This honour speaks to the global infl uence of the Centre and its consequential role in the development of strategies for sustainable fi sheries management. Here at the Fisheries Centre, we will continue to persevere in our scholarly productivity and outreach eff orts, with the goal of cultivating local and international fi sheries awareness. I would like to off er my thanks to our Faculty, Staff , and Students, for their continued hard work and perseverance. Dr Rashid Sumaila Director and Professor UBC Fisheries Centre Tel: 604-822-0224 Fax: 604-822-8934 FCDirector@fi sheries.ubc.ca page 3    Fisheries Centre    Mission and Activities We recall the Fisheries Centre’s mission statement, which was developed in 1993, slightly modifi ed since, and still relevant today: Our planet’s fi sheries have reached their ecological limits. As benefi ts from traditional resources decrease, pressure grows to exploit other resources, a process not necessarily compatible with ecosystem health. Policy and planning for ecosystem-based management must then be informed by knowledge of the interplay of human, biotic and environmental factors that affect ecosystem structure and function. Key requirements are suffi cient time-depth to capture biodiversity, abundance and trophic structure prior to depletion, identifi cation of the full range of benefi ts that healthy ecosystems provide to present and future generations and integration of the fi ne-scale knowledge of the maritime community with large-scale national and international fi sheries management. The Fisheries Centre promotes multidisciplinary study of aquatic ecosystems and broad-based collaboration with maritime communities, government, NGOs and other partners. We believe that the social capital developed through collaboration and the intellectual capital that increased knowledge of ecosystem function and values represents can lead to the re-investment in natural capital necessary to conserve and restore aquatic systems. As previously, this mission inspired, in 2010 and 2011, numerous research and outreach activities, both in- house and linked with outside organizations (see list of publications, p. 30-42).  This research and these outreach activities included convening international and domestic conferences and workshops, drawing researchers and policy-makers from around the world and locally. However, our emphasis remained on the instructional supervision of master’s and doctoral students (see p. 22-26 and www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/ students). To document these activities, in 2010-2011, the Fisheries Centre published 8 Fisheries Centre Research Reports (www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/ publications/fcrrs) and 19 items in our Working Paper Series (www. fi sheries.ubc.ca/publications/working-papers), both o en serving as basis for subsequent submission to peer-reviewed literature.  We also continued to publish the Centre’s bimonthly newsle er, FishBytes (www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/newsle er), which has been produced and distributed internationally since 1995, and has been “paperless” since January 2010. The Centre continued to host a weekly seminar from September to April. The seminar allows the Centre to bring speakers from Canada and abroad, while providing our students with a forum for peer review of their work in progress (see box).  The Centre hosted dozens of short and long-term Canadian and international visitors, who shared their expertise with our members (see p. 43). The Fisheries Centre also hosts a prestigious lecture series, the Larkin Lectures (www.fi sheries. ubc.ca/about-us/larkin-lectures), held in memory of the late Professor Peter Larkin and funded through an endowment established by his colleagues, family, and friends.  The Larkin Lecture for the 2010-2011 period was by Dr Daniel Bromley (2011; Is Fisheries Policy Pertinent? Some doubts from the academy). We are gratifi ed by the increased recognition of our activities, detailed in the next pages.  The Fisheries Centre Friday seminars: Stimulating minds, stomachs and community The Fisheries Centre seminars, held Fridays from 11am-12pm during the winter session, are a weekly opportunity for the members of the Fisheries Centre to share in the latest aspects of fi sheries research and to fuel the esprit de corps of the Centre (the donuts beforehand only fuel the corps). The lecture series, organized by a current graduate student, is also offered as a course (FISH 500) for incoming Fisheries Centre students intended to foster critical thinking about the presentations. Each student is also expected to take the stage and reveal his or her own plans for future research. The diversity of speakers is wide; from quantitative modelers to NGO staff to the students themselves, the Fisheries Centre has benefi ted from the insights of a number of brilliant speakers. For instance, the 2010-2011 academic year began with Rashid Sumaila’s discussion, “The costs of adapting global marine fi sheries to climate change.” The second term opened with Milo Adkison’s talk: “Implications of marine-derived nutrients for salmon manage- ment.” In the fall of 2011, Wilf Swartz presented “Fisheries subsidies negotiations at the WTO: a witnesses’ account,” and in the second term, Fred Le Manach discussed the dangers created by international markets on local resources and human populations. Fisheries Centre seminar coordinators: Brooke Campbell (2009-2010 ) and Andres Cisneros (2010-2011) page 4 The Aboriginal Fisheries Research Unit (AFRU) conducts research to support more eff ective ecosystem and aquatic resource management, using a multi-disciplinary approach directed toward the maintenance of sustainable aquatic resources that support aboriginal communities.  The AFRU focuses research in the areas of aquatic chemical ecology, fi sh physiology, and the human dimensions of fi sheries. The goal is to improve aquatic resource management through the assessment of important biological questions. Dr David Close, who leads the AFRU, came to the UBC Fisheries Centre in 2008. He is a member of the Cayuse Nation, located on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon. The AFRU reaches out to fi sheries organizations and prospective students. Outreach to policy makers within aboriginal communities and the public is pursued through focused lectures and fi sheries meetings. In addition, the AFRU continues to develop collaboration and provide advice for First Nations/Native American Tribes, for example: •Sto:lo Nation: technical assistance on fi sheries; •Musqueam Nation: meetings on fi sheries issues; •Yakama Nation meetings on fi sheries issues; •Advice to Columbia River Inter- Tribal Fisheries. In 2011, the AFRU welcomed PhD candidate Junho (June) Eom. Interested primarily in comparative physiology and ecology, his research is concerned with verifying sex pheromones of white sturgeon. He is using the AFRU laboratory that Dr Close, who is also affi  liated with the Department of Zoology, established in 2008- 2009. Other researchers making use of the lab include Wes Didier - BC Métis - who is investigating endocrine control of sex development in lamprey, a basil vertebrate which appears to have a unique ancestral control system that could be the precursor of higher vertebrate endocrine systems, and Brent Roberts - Campbell River Indian Band - who is working on stress physiology in lamprey. In 2012, the AFRU laboratory will welcome MSc student Satbir Rai. In the coming years, the AFRU will continue to vigorously pursue funding from various sources, such that support will be available for more aboriginal graduate students and for postdoctoral fellows. The goal is for AFRU to function as a regional source of knowledge and initiatives on aboriginal fi sheries. Aboriginal Fisheries  www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/research-units/ aboriginal-fi sheries-research-unit Wes Didier PhD Student David Close Director Sang-Seon Yun Assistant Professor Junho (June) Eom PhD Student Brent Roberts MSc Student page 5 T he Fisheries Centre houses 10 members of the BC Government, Ministry  of Environment Aquatic Conservation Science Section. The section conducts research  on freshwater fi sheries management, fi sh habitat restoration, fi sh forestry interactions, and fi sh culture techniques.  In addition, an active focus on conservation biology supports British Columbia’s goal of maintaining and enhancing the province’s fi sh and wildlife species and their habitats. British Columbia has over 200,000 small (<1 ha) lakes, hundreds of larger lakes and wetlands, and thousands of kilometres of rivers and streams. This resource is the basis of a sport fi shery for more than 400,000 anglers. In addition, abundant freshwater habitats provide spawning and rearing opportunities for British Columbia’s salmon, steelhead and several other fi sh species native to BC. The province’s complex geography and glaciation history produced a province rich in natural resources and biodiversity. Managing these resources in a sustainable manner requires the development of ecosystem-based management tools along with data and Geographic Information Systems that support government and industry decision-making systems.  Freshwater habitat restoration is an area of research where British Columbia has been a world leader. Defi ning the relationships between habitat structure, nutrient dynamics and growth and survival of juvenile fi sh populations has allowed for the development of realistic restoration options for several ‘at risk’ lake and stream- dwelling fi sh populations. The partnership between the Province of BC and the Fisheries Centre and other units of the University of British Columbia has resulted in support for a large number of graduate students as well as fostering a collaborative research environment between government scientists and university faculty for more than 50 years. This association will be of increasing importance as the stresses on our natural environment continue to increase, and the need for science-based decision-making assumes a greater role in government. Ministry of Environment   www.gov.bc.ca/env Art Tautz Debbie Aird Eric Parkinson Dan Hogan Jordan Rosenfeld Theresa Godin The Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC Shannon HarrisTom Johnston Steve McAdamDivya Varkey The Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC page 6 T he Quantitative Modeling Group develops innovative assessment methodologies and fi eld programs intended to improve single species and ecosystem management. The group focus on Bayesian statistical methods and dynamic population models is aimed at assisting fi sheries risk assessment, estimation, decision analysis and management strategy evaluation. Dr Villy Christensen participates in this group working on ecosystem modeling and the further development of Ecopath with Ecosim.  Partnerships with colleagues within and outside UBC have generated a continuum of projects ranging from factors aff ecting species composition in small B.C. lakes to ecosystem management in the Gulf of Mexico.  The group received a major stimulus in 2011 with funding organized by Murdoch McAllister from the NSERC Canadian Capture Fisheries Research Network (CCFRN).  The network grant funds graduate students to work on management strategy evaluation for a series of case studies in BC Fisheries, ranging from Pacifi c salmon to Dungeness crabs. New and continuing projects in 2010-2011 • In collaboration with the Ecosystems Branch of the British Columbia Ministry of Environment individuals within the group are pursuing a number of fi eld based projects which include investigating recruitment failure and restoration options for white sturgeon, angler eff ort dynamics in small lake systems as well as meta-population structure and factors aff ecting species composition within these mixed species small lake systems. • The project with the Ecosystems Branch of the British Columbia Ministry of Environment continues to develop new mark-recapture models to estimate the abundance of Nechako River white sturgeon over the last decade taking into account also recapture eff ort data and micro- constituent based covariates for immigration and emigration. • Members of the group continue to participate in the POST project (h p://www.postcoml. org) exploring the critical issue of downstream migration and early ocean survival of salmonid smolts.  Dr Mike Melnychuk and Dr Erin Rechisky recently defended PhD theses on estimating survival rates in juvenile salmonids. • Projects in collaboration with the NMFS in Honolulu Hawaii explore assessment and management options for the data limited Hawaiian bo omfi sh fi shery as well as the infl uence of meta-population structure on the assessment and management of the Hawaiian lobster fi shery. • Members collaborate with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada on the joint statistical commi! ee for Pacifi c hake assessment and have developed simulations to explore the potential eff ects on wild populations of introduced genetically modifi ed salmonids. • An ecosystem management project for the Gulf of Mexico utilizes Ecopath with Ecosim to explore tradeoff s between commercial and recreational fi sheries and impacts of shrimp and menhaden fi sheries on other fi sheries. • Individuals participate in a PEW and Lenfest funded program investigating the issue of dedicated access in global fi sheries. • NMFS and the PFRP sponsor a global analysis of the status of large pelagics and options for reducing fi shing mortality, as documented in the PhD of Robert Ahrens. • In collaboration with University of Washington, University of Florida, and USGS scientists, improved methods for fi ! ing bioenergetics models to growth data from size-age and tagging studies are being developed; these methods promise to provide be! er estimation of seasonal changes in metabolic and feeding rates of fi sh. • Funding from the UK Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust is directed towards developing Bayesian assessment models to evaluate alternative management strategies for the control of red fox populations in the UK. • An Environmental Defense funded project aims to develop simulation models to evaluate the potential consequences of alternative harvest management policy options for Gulf of Mexico  Quantitative Modeling Group Steve Martell Associate  Professor Carl Walters Head Tom Carruthers Research Associate Murdoch McAllister Associate Professor Sylvie Guénette Honorary Research Associate Ricardo Amoroso PhD Student page 7 Meaghan Darcy PhD Student Ben Nelson PhD Student Rachel Neuenhoff PhD Student Divya Varkey Post Doctoral Fellow Hiroshi Okamura Visiting Scientist shrimp fi sheries.  The models developed will account for several diff erent shrimp species harvested and the seasonal and spatial aspects of shrimp population dynamics and fi shery operations.  Feed-back control policies that are based on annual and possibly in-season stock assessments of the main shrimp populations are also to be evaluated. • Carl Walters is now the Grand Canyon Senior Ecologist, providing stock assessment and ecosystem modeling advice. • He also leads an advisory panel for the Billfi sh Foundation to develop approaches for improving fi sheries management in the Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica. • A Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency project on the Global Biodiversity Outlook. • Ecosystem models in the Baltic Sea funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, Sweden. • A Lenfest Ocean Program project on improving ecosystem-based management of the Peruvian anchovy fi shery using Management Strategy Evaluation. • Dr Tom Carruthers is working on the spatial population dynamics modeling of Gulf of Mexico grouper, using a range of operating models that account for off shore ontogeny and protogynous life histories, and intends to evaluate management strategies for this multi-species, multi- component fi shery. His other research interests include the optimization of spatial tuna fi shing in the Atlantic using multi-species dynamics models, and the simulation testing of data-limited stock assessment methods. Dr McAllister has a set of collaborative projects including: • Collaboration in a landscape scale manipulative experiment to evaluate angler eff ort responses to diff erent management methods for B.C. small lakes fi sheries with partners including the Freshwater Fisheries Society of B.C., The B.C. Ministry of the Environment, The Ontario Ministry of the Environment and academic partners from SFU (Dr Wolfgang Haider) and U. Calgary (Dr John Post, PI). • Collaboration in a Canada-wide NSERC funded strategic network on Canadian Capture Fisheries with collaboration between academics, industry members and government scientists from across the country.  Six of the research projects in this network are based at UBC with involvement also of Drs. Trites, Walters, Sumaila, Christensen, and Martell. • Collaboration with US NOAA scientists at the SE Fisheries Science Centre in a research project on evaluating management approaches for Gulf of Mexico reef fi shes (including work with Dr Carruthers on Gulf of Mexico grouper fi shery modeling). • Collaboration with the B.C. Ministry of the Environment in a study to evaluate variations in habitat use at diff erent life history stages of Fraser River white sturgeon from the analysis of fi n ray and waterbody microchemistry (co-PI Steve McAdam). • Collaboration with U. of Stanford (PI Dr Barbara Block) and the Lenfest Ocean Program on developing a mixed stock seasonal time step spatial model for Atlantic bluefi n tuna using data from archival tagging studies, otilith microchemistry studies, and conventional tagging and stock assessment data. • Collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans Canada scientists in developing stock assessments of B.C. Bocaccio, Quillback, and inside waters yelloweye rockfi sh, B.C. outside waters lingcod, Fraser River eulachon and east coast redfi sh stocks and evaluating the impacts of seal and sea lion predation on some of these stocks. Mike Hawkshaw PhD Student Rachel Louton PhD Student Brett van Poorten PhD Student Sarah Hawkshaw PhD Sudent Shannon Obradovich PhD Student Tom Porteus   PhD Student Rachel Chudnow MSc Student www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/research-units/quantitative-modeling-group page 8 T hrough its research, training, and partnerships, FERU aims to advance the management of global aquatic resources and work towards ‘healthy’ ecosystems for the benefi t of both current and future generations. The unit employs an interdisciplinary approach to investigating economics and management of marine and freshwater capture fi sheries as well as aquaculture resources. FERU’s research is local, regional, national and international in scope, and involves biologists, mathematicians, managers, computer scientists, economists and other social scientists from around the world. In the past two years, FERU members have been involved in over 45 peer-reviewed journal articles, among other publications, and continue to be instrumental in shaping global fi sheries policy. New and continuing contributions in 2010-2011 include: • FERU Director Dr Ussif Rashid Sumaila had the pleasure of meeting with Prince Charles at a workshop organized at St. James Palace in March 2011. The workshop was a part of the Prince’s eff orts to protect the world’s oceans through the Prince’s Charities’ International Sustainability Unit. Prince Charles highlighted research by the FERU and the Sea Around Us project on harmful fi sheries subsidies during his closing remarks. Dr Sumaila was also among ten people chosen to address the Prince’s Charities International Sustainability Unit Marine Programme Launch in February 2012. • Rashid Sumaila, along with a multi-disciplinary team that included fellow Fisheries Centre members William Cheung, Vicky Lam, and Daniel Pauly, received international a$ ention for the ground-breaking report “Climate change impacts on the biophysics and economics of world fi sheries,” published in Nature Climate Change in 2011. The study garnered a$ ention from national and international media outlets, and earned Rashid Sumaila  an invitation to speak at the third Oceans Day, organized as part of the  United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) 17th Conference of the Parties (COP 17). • Rashid Sumaila organized “Climate Change: Altering the Physics, Ecology, and Socioeconomics of Fisheries” at the Washington Convention Centre, which took place February 18, 2011. The emphasis of this meeting was on eff ective mitigation and adaptation strategies to ensure sustainable marine fi sheries well into the future. • In April 2011, Rashid Sumaila participated in a workshop on the creation of an ocean health index in Santa Barbara, California, gave a presentation entitled “Whose fi sh are you catching – yours or the future generations’?” in San Diego, and participated in a workshop on joint management of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem in Windhoek, Namibia. • FERU members participated in the International Symposium on the Ocean, Green Shipping, and Sustainable Energy, April 28-29, 2011, at the Institut Océanographique de Paris. • Vicky Lam, Rashid Sumaila, Andrew Dyck, Daniel Pauly, and Reg Watson made waves with the release of  “Construction and fi rst applications of a global cost of fi shing database,” published in the ICES Journal of Marine Science in 2011. The article highlighted the team’s eff orts           Fisheries Economics           Research Unit Louise Teh PhD Student Rashid Sumaila, Daniel Pauly, and Gordon Munro were among only eight academics invited in March 2011 to provide feedback on Prince Charles’s efforts to protect the world’s oceans through the Prince’s Charities’ ISU. Pauly (far right) and Sumaila (middle right) are pictured here with Prince Charles and Rod Fujita. Rashid Sumaila Director Gordon Munro Professor Emeritus Henrik Österblom Postdoc Andrew Dyck Researcher Ling Huang Postdoc Ngaio Hotte Researcher page 9 Nigel Haggan PhD Student Dale Marsden PhD Student Megan Bailey PhD Student Roseti Imo PhD Student Liesbeth van der Meer MSc Student in developing the database and off ered an overview of fi shing cost pa erns at national, regional, and global scales. The database has vast implications for assessing the economic status of fi sheries and the impact of diff erent management policy scenarios at diff erent spatial scales. • Dr Gordon Munro, Professor Emeritus of Economics, delivered the keynote address at the Danish Environmental Economic Council in September 2011. His presentation highlighted the historical and present challenges of managing international fi sh stocks. • Rashid Sumaila appeared in the journal Science, co-authoring an article titled “Scenarios for Global Biodiversity in the 21st Century.” It explores changes in future scenarios of biodiversity, using metrics such as species extinctions, species abundance and community structure, habitat loss and degradation, and shi! s in the distribution of species. The article suggests that future scenarios of biodiversity focus on integrating predictions of biodiversity changes with feedback to societal responses. The research interests of current FERU members are diverse and include: We wish to thank our collaborators and partners both in research and funding, especially the Pew Charitable Trusts, Conservation International, SSHRC, WWF,  the Sea Around Us Project, the United Nations, the World Bank, and the Kingfi sher Foundation. Wilf Swartz PhD Student Andrés Cisneros- Montemayor PhD Student Louise: Socio-economic factors that eff ect small-scale fi shing activities Nigel: Incorporating cultural and spiritual values into decision-making Dale: Bioeconomic modeling of Fraser River sockeye salmon Megan: Game-theoretic analysis of resource allocation with multiple objectives Roseti: Spatial modeling of W. Central Pacifi c tuna Andres: Estimation of global recreational fi shing activity Wilf: Mapping of international trade and consumption of fi sheries products Ling: Econometric fi sheries applications Andrew: Economic impact analysis of world fi sheries Liesbeth: Analysis of the retail trade of fi sheries products Henrik: Illegal, unreported, and unregulated fi shing Gordon: Subsidies and access rights to fi sheries Rashid: All of the above; also discounting and natural resource sustainability www.feru.org PhD candidate Megan Bailey samples rockfish in the Strait of Georgia page 10 T he Marine Mammal Research Unit (MMRU) is an integral component of the Fisheries Centre and works with other departments and institutions in a coordinated eff ort to provide independent research and advice on ma ers related to marine mammals. Members investigate interactions between humans and marine mammals, marine mammals as indicators of ecosystem change, and the natural history, biology and conservation of marine mammals. MMRU research focuses on fi ve areas: population dynamics, energetics and physiology, dietary analyses, behaviour and ecology, and simulation modeling. The multi- disciplinary research program addresses these questions through captive and fi eld studies, data and laboratory analyses, and publications and outreach. ● Captive Animal Studies. Studies focused on energetics and nutrition were undertaken at the Vancouver Aquarium on Steller sea lions, northern fur seals, harbour seals and Pacifi c white-sided dolphins.   Some of the research focused on determining whether metabolism changes with season, and whether it in turns aff ects seasonal food requirements.  Other studies investigated a number of hypotheses explaining population declines of sea lions and fur seals in the wild. Controlled feeding experiments examined diff erent diet regimes (through changes in food intake or food quality) on aspects of health, hormone balance and reproduction. Experiments also tested and refi ned a number of techniques to estimate energy expenditure in wild sea lions (e.g., accelerometers and heart rates), and to detect prey composition (e.g., via DNA analysis and changes in tissue biochemistry). Research was also undertaken at the Open Water Research Laboratory with fi ve sea lions trained to participate in free-swimming research conducted in a " ord near Port Moody. The Open Water studies investigated aspects of diving physiology, energetics, and swimming biomechanics, with the ultimate aim of determining foraging decisions and food requirements of the wild population. The animals also tested and validated a number of technologies that can be used to study the foraging behaviour of sea lions in the wild.      Marine Mammal        Research Unit David Rosen    Research  Associate Brian Battaile    Research Associate Pamela Rosenbaum Manager Andrew Trites Director John K. Ford Adjunct Professor Jane C. Watson Adjunct Professor Martin Haulena Adjunct Professor Michael Grigg Adjunct Professor Steller sea lion Steller Shuttle Steven Raverty Adjunct Professor Frances C. Robertson PhD Candidate Tiphaine Jeanniard du Dot PhD Candidate Ben Nelson PhD Candidate Rachel Neuenhoff PhD Candidate Austen Thomas PhD Candidate Alex Dalton MSc Candidate Tabitha Hui MSc Candidate page 11 Collectively, the captive animal studies are resolving questions concerning the nutritional and energetic consequences for marine mammals facing changes in their environment, including changes in prey availability. The animals are a valuable scientifi c resource, and are being studied in collaboration with the Vancouver Aquarium and renowned international scientists. ● Field Studies. Field work was undertaken in Alaska and British Columbia in 2010 and 2011. Research in Alaska focused on northern fur seal foraging behaviour, fur seal growth, and sea lion diets.  Field studies in British Columbia focused on feeding behaviour of Pacifi c white- sided dolphins, harbour seals, and northern resident killer whales. ● Data Analysis. Mathematical models are increasingly used to understand the dynamics of marine mammals and their interaction with fi sheries. Models were used to identify Steller sea lion critical habitat, as well as the distribution of key fi sh species consumed by sea lions — with the ultimate goal of estimating the extent of competition between fi sheries and sea lions. Models were also used to estimate carrying capacity of South American fur seals, and to compare population trends of Steller sea lions and northern fur seals in Alaska. Swimming paths of fur seals in the Bering Sea were reconstructed to identify foraging areas and the infl uence of oceanography on foraging decisions.  Other analyses estimated the food requirements of North Atlantic right whales and Pacifi c white-sided dolphins, and assessed the eff ects of seismic testing on bowhead whale behaviour in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea. ● Laboratory Analyses. Other studies undertaken in 2010 and 2011 included developing a DNA technique to identify prey from harbour seal scats, and assessing whether a relationship exists between diet, stress and population trends and distribution of northern fur seals. ● Publications and Outreach.   MMRU researchers published 26 papers during the past two years. Administratively, MMRU continued to oversee the North Pacifi c Universities Marine Mammal Research Consortium, which unites marine mammal research at the Universities of Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon State. MMRU also continued to host an annual Symposium on B.C. Marine Mammals, which provides a forum for local researchers, members of the fi shing industry, ecotourism operators, and the public to meet and discuss current issues and research related to marine mammals in British Columbia. MMRU graduate students also participated in the annual symposium of The Society for Marine Mammalogy’s Student Chapter, Northwest Region, which includes students from universities in Washington, Oregon, B.C., and Alaska.        www.marinemammal.org/MMRU2 New MMRU Students Fall 2010 Chad Nordstrom MSc Candidate Beth Atwood MSc Candidate Susana Cardenas MSc Candidate Sarah Fortune MSc Candidate Carling Gerlinsky MSc Candidate Barbara Koot MSc Candidate Erin Rechsteiner MSc Candidate Jody Danielson Research Assistant Renee LaRoi Web Designer Mandy Wong MSc Candidate Rebecca Barrick Research Assistant Morgan Davies Research Assistant Wendi Contois Research Assistant Brianna Wright MSc Candidate Brandon Russell Research Assistant page 12 Project Seahorse P roject Seahorse is an interdisciplinary and international marine conservation group dedicated to securing a world where marine ecosystems are healthy and well-managed. By working to protect seahorses, Project Seahorse supports marine conservation more broadly. We generate cu ing-edge research and turn our fi ndings into highly eff ective conservation interventions — usually in collaboration with other researchers, governments, and local communities. Our innovative and nimble approach has made us very successful, especially in light of our small size and limited resources. Recognizing the interdependencies between marine life and human communities, we begin with biological research on seahorses and work outwards through concentric rings of pressure on marine populations, actively engaging with ecosystems, fi shing and other human impacts, trade, policy development, and public outreach. Seahorses Project Seahorse uses seahorses as fl agship species to generate action for coastal oceans.  Our group is considered the world’s foremost authority on seahorses and their relatives (Syngnathidae). Amanda Vincent pioneered the study of seahorses in the wild, uncovered the enormous global trade in these animals, and mounted the fi rst conservation response. With 25 years of global expertise, we protect these important animals and increase scientifi c understanding of their biology, life history, taxonomy, trade, and threats.  We serve as the IUCN’s Red List Authority on seahorses, pipefi shes and sticklebacks, and our assessments are critical in informing conservation action for these fi shes. Recently, we produced a synthesis of global knowledge on the management and conservation of these species and an analysis of the importance of seahorses and pipefi sh to the diets of marine predators. In 2011, one of our PhD students completed a thesis that used interviews with small-scale fi shers in central Philippines, where overfi shing is endemic, to reconstruct historical fi sheries and thereby understand how seahorse populations have changed over the past four decades. Her analyses have broad applications to the use of data from narrative accounts. Ecosystems/shallow seas Building on decades of research on mangrove, seagrass, coral, and estuarine habitats, Project Seahorse explores new ways to manage and conserve these threatened marine ecoystems. Recently, our team has found ways to do conservation more eff ectively without sacrifi cing rigour. One recent study demonstrates how to detect trends in marine protected area (MPA) recovery by monitoring only a small subset of all fi shes on coral reefs. Another study shows that MPAs established by local communities can protect marine species and habitats as, or nearly as, eff ectively as those established using rigorous scientifi c planning tools. In 2011 we partnered with Selfridges, one of the world’s largest department stores, to establish a 53-hectare marine protected area in Danajon Bank, Philippines. This marks the 34th MPA we have catalyzed in the region, all of them locally managed. The Marine Protected Area (MPA) Workshop took place in Cebu City, Philippines on June 27-29 2011 James Hehre PhD Candidate Amanda Vincent Director Tyler Stiem Communications Manager Christina Czembor Research Assistant Tuya Ochir Administrative Officer Janelle Curtis Research Associate Sara Lourie Research Associate Janna Rist Program Manager page 13 www.projectseahorse.org Fisheries Using biological and socio-economic knowledge and integrating research eff orts with marine management, Project Seahorse promotes sustainable fi shing practices that balance their impact on both ecosystems and human coastal communities. We develop management briefi ngs to help governments to use their marine resources eff ectively and sustainably, and we work with small-scale fi shers to protect fi sh populations and ecosystems and improve food security. Our team recently published landmark research on the impact of shrimp trawl fi sheries on small marine fi shes and other animals that are caught as bycatch. We also investigated the economic, social, and ecological dynamics of Sri Lanka’s wild seahorse trade — one of the largest in the world — to ensure it is sustainable. And as part of our collaboration with Selfridges, Project Seahorse provided input into “Project Ocean,” a high-profi le sustainable seafood campaign launched in the United Kingdom. This included hosting a day-long series of multimedia presentations to educate the public about seahorses and marine conservation. Trade and policy In 2002, Project Seahorse was instrumental in generating a landmark global agreement (under the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES) that forbids countries to export more seahorses than wild populations can bear. This, the fi rst-ever global agreement on exports of marine fi shes of commercial importance, created a new international tool for fi sheries management. It also eff ectively acknowledged that marine fi sh are wildlife as well as economic commodities. Project Seahorse actively provides critical information to many levels of the trade network, from customs offi  cials, to traditional medicine practitioners, to aquarists. In 2011 we assisted the CITES Animals Commi# ee to assess how eff ectively the 175 signatory states are meeting sustainable trade requirements. We also published “A global review of seahorse aquaculture” (and its role in seahorse conservation), produced a mammoth Fisheries Centre Research Report (h# p://fi sheries.ubc.ca/publications/trade-seahorses-and-other-syngnathids-countries- outside-asia-1998-2001) on seahorse trade outside Asia , and published a paper on the trade of seahorses and their relatives in Malaysia and Thailand. Outreach In 2010 Amanda Vincent, Director of Project Seahorse, was one of six fi nalists for the Indianapolis Prize for Animal Conservation (h# p://indianapolisprize.org), the world’s largest award for extraordinary conservation eff orts.  In 2010-11, our expertise was represented in numerous media, from the Wall Street Journal to Conservation, from National Geographic Television to BBC. Acknowledgements We are enormously grateful to our partner organizations and donors, including but not limited to Zoological Society of London (UK), John G. Shedd Aquarium (USA), and Guylian Belgian Chocolate for their vital support. Chloe Shen Administrative Manager Marjorie Sorenson Research Assistant Melissa Evanson Senior Research Assistant Sarah Foster Research Associate Danika Kleiber PhD Candidate Philip Molloy Post Doc Research Associate Kerrie O’Donnell PhD Candidate Maï Yasué    Post Doc Scientist Regina Bestbier Research Assistant Tarah Brachman Program Manager Iain Caldwell PhD Candidate Sian Morgan Research Associate Stefan Wiswedel Research Assistant Jennifer Selgrath PhD Candidate page 14 Sea Around Us Project T he Sea Around Us project is devoted to studying and documenting the impact of fi sheries on marine ecosystems throughout the world’s oceans. With the maturing of the approaches and methods the project has developed since its start, in mid- 1999, the project is now able to sustain a high rate of scientifi c productivity. Thus, the number of publications project members have authored or co-authored in the period covered here is in excess of 65 peer-reviewed journal articles (see list of publications on p. 30) and a very large number of related book chapters and other publications. Particularly notable among our journal articles were the contributions by Tremblay- Boyer et al. (2011), which used EcoTroph, a model newly developed by our French colleague Didier Gascuel to infer changes in the biomass of high-level predators in the world ocean since 1950, and the review by Sumaila et al. (2011) of the potential economic eff ects of global warming on fi sheries, which build on earlier work by William Cheung, who has now returned to the Fisheries Centre. A good example of our non- peer reviewed publications is the report entitled “Too Precious to Drill”, edited by Deng Palomares and Daniel Pauly (2011), on the marine biodiversity of Belize, which also documents our close linkages with, and commitment to, developing countries. However, the major emphasis of the Sea Around Us project in the 2010-2011 period was undoubtedly the catch reconstruction work that we do, which has brought us, as of December 2011 within striking distance of our goal of reconstructing the catch of all maritime countries and territories of the world in 2012. Our reconstructions all start in 1950, to provide a strong contrast to the present, and include catches by all fi sheries sectors. Thus, besides the traditional focus on commercial fi sheries, reconstructions also account for subsistence and recreational fi sheries, and discards by industrial trawl fi sheries, to cite some examples of catches that are frequently omi ed from the statistics that countries submit to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO). The Sea Around Us has previously shown that much of the data presented by FAO on behalf of its member countries are problematic. Therefore, the project has developed and applied a methodology for ‘reconstructing’ real catches from coastal countries based on detailed analysis of the peer-reviewed and grey literature and the use of assumption- based interpolations (Zeller et al., 2007). This provides a more comprehensive portrayal of historical fi sheries catch data for all sectors than what is otherwise available. Such reconstructions have shown, for example, that Tanzania’s offi  cial reported fi sheries data prior to the year 2000 excluded all catches for Zanzibar, despite this island group having a dedicated fi sheries agency collecting data. Due to such underreporting, actual Villy Christensen Associated Faculty Daniel Pauly Principal Investigator Jennifer Jacquet Post Doctoral Fellow Ashley McCrea-Strub Post Doctoral Fellow Reg Watson Senior Research Fellow Dirk Zeller Senior Research Fellow Arash Tavakolie Senior .NET Developer Maria Lourdes Palomares Senior Research Fellow Kristin Kleisner Post Doctoral Fellow William Cheung Associated Faculty Rashid Sumaila Associated Faculty page 15 www.seaaroundus.org Zoraida Alojado Research Assistant Shawn Booth Research Assistant Devon O’Meara Research Assistant Sarah Harper Research Assistant Grace Ong Administrative Coordinator Debbie Shon Research Assistant total catches taken by Tanzanian fi shers are around 70% higher than offi  cial statistics lead one to believe (Jacquet et al., 2010). However, missing catch data are not only an issue for developing countries. The fi sheries of the nine highly developed coastal countries surrounding the Baltic Sea in north-eastern Europe appear to catch over 30% more than is reported by the countries’ offi  cial statistics (Zeller et al., 2011a), while certain ecosystems, such as the High Arctic, are even more neglected in countries’ offi  cial records, as illustrated by the near total absence of arctic fi sheries catches in the offi  cial data provided by the USA, Canada and Russia (Zeller et al., 2011b). Our approach to deriving total catch time series estimates shows that the incorporation of historical ‘anecdotes’ (i.e., isolated observations) and local studies in catch reconstructions can provide crucial baselines. With the 2012 completion of our coverage of all maritime countries and territories, we will be fi nally able to promptly quantify the actual contribution of fi sheries to food security of the world, examine region-specifi c trajectories of fi sheries catches (likely to strongly diff er from those derived from the FAO database), and jointly with our new global database on fi shing capacity help se le issues of the impact of fi sheries on stocks. Megan Bailey Newsletter Editor Grace Pablico Research Assistant (Database) Aylin Ulman Research Assistant Robin Ramdeen Research Assistant Kyrstn Zylich Research Assistant Stephanie Lingard Research Assistant Illustrating the Exclusive Economic Zones of the different maritime countries and their overseas territories, covering 40% of the ocean, and 90% of the marine catch. The different colors refer to the status of historic catch reconstructions, of which an example for Belize is provided here (Zeller et al., 2011c; see p. 39). page 16 Policy and Ecosystem Restoration in Fisheries T he Policy and Ecosystem Restoration in Fisheries (PERF) group examines fi sheries and ecological science at the nexus of policy, with explicit analysis and modelling of the human dimensions. As such, PERF researches issues at the interface of the natural and social sciences, such as historically based restoration, social-ecological systems, ecosystem modelling, environmental values and decision-making, and sustainability policy. Collaborations with other academics (in Canada, USA, Portugal, Norway, Chile), government (Fisheries and Oceans Canada), NGOs (Sustainable Fisheries Partnership), and consultants (MRAG, UK and Greenward Consulting, Australia) a est to the broad reach of the research. Four students completed their PhDs and research has been conducted in the Antarctic, Canada, Eritrea, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the USA, variously focusing on the human dimensions of fi sheries; coral reef fi sheries; seamounts; small-scale fi sheries; illegal, unregulated, and unreported fi sheries; impacts of harvesting and climate change on polar marine ecosystems; zooplankton dynamics; fi sh compensation habitats; and ecosystem modelling. During this period, Dr Tony Pitcher completed a multi-disciplinary review of seamounts, together with colleagues from institutes at Scripps, Woods Hole, Sea le and Oregon: a special Mountains in the Sea issue of the journal Oceanography was published in 2010. In a visit to Horta, Azores, Portugal, he continued work with Fisheries Centre alumnus Dr Telmo Morato on a Seamount Ecosystem Evaluation Framework, extending a worldwide analysis of the status, threats and ecology of seamounts. Funded by the Martha Piper Research Fund, Dr Pitcher led an interdisciplinary international project in a workshop that enhanced the way that the human dimensions of fi sheries are represented in a rapid appraisal technique, reported on a new website at Rapfi sh.org. He continued work with MRAG, UK and the Sea Around Us project on estimating total fi shery catches for over 60 countries, including discards, small-scale, recreational and unreported catches. With the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership, based in Hawaii, he followed up earlier work on compliance with the UN Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. Dr Pitcher also participated in a workshop at the University of Concepcion, Chile on ecosystem-based management for hake and grenadier fi sheries, contributed to an IPSO workshop in Oxford, UK, presented at the Salish Sea Conference in Vancouver, gave research seminars in Norway, Portugal and Chile, and was invited to join the Marine Planning Advisory Council, Haida Gwaii. Notably, Tony Pitcher’s journal, Fish and Fisheries, continues to lead the fi eld with an impressive impact factor of 6.4. In 2010-2011, Research Associate Dr Mimi Lam completed no fewer than ten manuscripts now in various stages of publication, while editing a Special Feature on The Privilege to Fish for the journal Ecology and Society. Dr Lam has been elected as a Member-at-Large for the Ecological Society of America (ESA) Governing Board, a er serving three years as Chair of the Traditional Ecological Knowledge Section and Diversity Representative of the Education and Human Resources Commi ee. She has been recently appointed as an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, and has been invited to join the Global Ecological Integrity Group, the Natural History Network, the NSF Climate, Adaptation, Mitigation, and e-Learning (CAMEL) project and the Institute for Environmental Learning Advisory Councils. At the ESA Annual Meetings, she organized a sense of place symposium, special session, and biocultural event, gave an invited paper in a Natural History symposium, and in 2011 was profi led in a Focus on Ecologists display in Austin, Texas. Tony J. Pitcher Head Mimi Lam Research Associate Daniela Kalikoski Associate member Cameron Ainsworth Associate member David Agnew Associate member Divya Varkey PhD Candidate page 17 In 2010, she presented an invited talk in a Revolutionary Ecology symposium and also organized a special session in Pi sburgh, PA. She gave research seminars in Canada, Chile, the Czech Republic, Norway, Portugal, and the USA, delivered guest lectures on fi sheries policy and governance in three courses at UBC and an undergraduate mentoring program in environmental biology at the University of Missouri. Mimi was awarded two long-range planning grants from the ESA and was a co-PI on the UBC Martha Piper Research Fund on valuing the human dimensions of fi sheries. Dr Divya Varkey successfully defended her PhD thesis on ecosystem modeling, marine protected areas and management of coral reef fi sheries in Raja Ampat, Indonesia. She has been awarded an NSERC Industrial Postdoctoral Fellowship to conduct research with the BC government building Bayesian infl uence models for lake fi shery management. Dr Lydia Teh presented her research on a fuzzy-logic approach to small-scale fi shers and marine protected areas in Malaysia at two conferences: the North American Association of Fisheries Economists in Hawaii and the International Marine Conservation Congress, in Victoria, BC.  She successfully defended her PhD thesis in 2011. Pramod Ganapathiraju successfully defended his PhD thesis, which showed that, in many countries, penalties are not suffi  cient to deter illegal fi shing and that Monitoring, Control and Surveillance systems are evaluated as poor. As output from his 2008 fi eld trip to India, the thesis also reports that unreported and illegal fi shing amounts to 0.9 to 1.5 million tonnes per year, including almost a million tonnes of previously unrecognized discards. Carie Hoover’s PhD thesis, which will be submi ed in early 2012, focuses on the joint impacts of fi shing, hunting and climate change in Hudson Bay (Arctic: narwhal, beluga, polar bears) and the Antarctic Peninsula (Antarctic: krill, icefi sh). Lingbo Li has discovered a regime shi  in her multivariate analysis of zooplankton dynamics in the Strait of Georgia, working in collaboration with colleagues in UBC Oceanography and DFO. Her fi ndings were presented at an international conference in Pucon, Chile. Using her marine ecosystem model, she has also continued to investigate the potential impacts of transgenic coho salmon should they be introduced and escape to the Strait of Georgia; results were presented at the Salish Sea Conference, Vancouver. Rajeev Kumar has continued his modelling work in support of ecosystem-based management of the fi sheries of Mille Lacs, Minnesota, US, a large lake popular for its walleye fi sheries. He has been using both ecosystem and single-species modelling using EwE and ADMB so ware to compare MSY estimated using the two methods.  Jamie Slogan continued tracking the eff ectiveness of the fi sh compensation habitat satisfying a legal requirement at the inception of the Vancouver Convention Centre in Burrard Inlet. The results? It works! He presented his work at the Salish Sea Conference, Vancouver, and was awarded three scholarships by the Association of Professional Biologists, by NSERC (Industrial Partnership), and by the UBC Faculty of Science. A er a period of leave, Dawit Tesfamichael has almost completed his PhD thesis, exploring an ecosystem model of  the Red Sea using information from interviews conducted in Eritrea, Sudan, and Yemen in 2008. h p://sites.google.com/site/ferrfc Lydia Teh PhD Candidate Pramod Ganapathiraju PhD Candidate Carie Hoover PhD Candidate Lingbo Li PhD Candidate Rajeev Kumar PhD Candidate Jamie Slogan PhD Candidate Dawit Tesfamichael PhD Candidate page 18 Nereus Program - Predicting the Future Ocean N ereus – Predicting the Future Ocean is a new research program started in cooperation between the Nippon Foundation and UBC in 2010, and fully operational from the autumn of 2011. The Nereus Program is planned with a duration of nine years, 2010-2019, and is focused on developing capacity to predict what the future may bring: will there be seafood and a healthy ocean for our children and grandchildren to enjoy? How will the future look, and what can we do to develop policies that are robust to the combined eff ects of climate change and overfi shing? Nereus builds on a complex data and modeling framework, which integrates much of the information that has been assembled through the Sea Around Us Project and the Fisheries Economic Research Unit over the last decade. The modeling framework (which is based on the Quantitative Group’s work) includes, among others, ocean climate models, food web and fi sheries models, biogeographic models, and rules for management and governance, and it will vastly expand our capacity to answer global ocean policy questions. The work is done in close partnership with Princeton, Duke, Cambridge, and Stockholm universities, and the World Conservation Monitoring Centre of the United Nations Environment Programme. The program supplements the central work of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC), which is focused on how emissions will impact the global environment. We add to this by predicting how climate change may impact life in the ocean (e.g., fi sh, marine mammals, and birds) and the people that rely on these resources. Our research focus is on mitigating impact – how can we develop governance systems that are resilient to the impact of climate change? Mike Pan Visualization Expert David Le Administrative Assistant Dalai Felinto Visualization Expert Villy Christensen Director Yoshitaka Ota Co-Director Jeroen Steenbeek Senior Programmer Audrey Valls Nereus Fellow Marta Coll Postdoctoral Researcher Chairman Yosei Sasakawa, Nippon Foundation, and Prof. Stephen Toope, UBC President, signed the Memorandum of Understanding that formally established the Nereus Program in Tokyo on Dec. 6, 2011. page 19 On the science side, the predictions are heavy. We build on years of modeling and synthesis experience from leading researchers, and we analyze global data at a level that stretches the boundaries of science. Producing the science is, however, just the start – we also need to make the science accessible and relevant for policy makers. Our traditional means of sharing this information – using spreadsheets, tables, and scientifi c reports – are OK for communicating between scientists, but not with policy makers. Realizing this, we have teamed up with “gamers” to make the science more accessible through 3-dimensional visualizations, presenting a more stimulating virtual underwater world. We use a 3D gaming engine as an interface for the scientifi c models in order to present a science-based view of how the oceans once looked, how they look now, and how they may look in the future depending on our actions. The Nereus Program was offi  cially launched in December 2010 in Tokyo when the Chairman of the Nippon Foundation, Mr. Yohei Sasakawa, and UBC President Stephen Toope signed the Memorandum of Understanding that formally established the nine-year cooperation. www.nereusprogram.org Visualizing change in the Baltic Sea. Contrasts current situation with rebuild by year 2020, and evaluates four different scenarios for years 2100. Developed in cooperation with the Baltic Nest Institute and the Stockholm Resilience Centre. page 20 Changing Ocean Research Unit www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/research-units/changing-ocean-research-unit T he Changing Ocean Research Unit (CORU) is a new research unit as of 2011. Led by Dr William Cheung, who joined the Fisheries Centre as an Assistant Professor in September 2011, the unit aims to study the eff ects of global change on marine ecosystems, biodiversity and fi sheries. The unit assesses the biophysical and socio-economic vulnerabilities and impacts of marine climate change, and identifi es mitigation and adaptation options. Currently, CORU includes three PhD students: Miranda Jones (University of East Anglia), Tina Kerby (UEA) and Vicky Lam (UBC), and one research associate: Jose Fernandes (UEA). The unit collaborates closely with other research units in the Fisheries Centre.  Dr Cheung’s research focuses on assessing impacts of fi shing and climate change on marine ecosystems and their goods and services, and studying ways to reconcile trade-off s in their management. Specifi cally, he develops empirical and numerical simulation models to examine the impacts of climate change on marine biodiversity and fi sheries, globally and in various regional seas. Dr Cheung’s work is currently funded by the National Geographic Society, UK’s Ecosystem Service for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) Program, and the European Union (FP7). His main projects include developing a new class of the Dynamic Bioclimate Envelope Model that incorporates trophic interactions, assessing the eff ects of interactions between warming, de-oxygenation, ocean acidifi cation and overfi shing on global fi sheries, assessing historical and future eff ects of climate change on fi sheries in the U.K. and investigating the trade-off s in ecosystem services for poverty alleviation in managing coastal fi sheries in Kenya. These projects involve international collaborations, including Princeton University, NOAA, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, CEFAS, University of East Anglia, Stockholm Resilience Centre, and Wildlife Conservation Society.  In 2011, Dr Cheung contributed his scientifi c expertise to a number of international assessment reports and to local and international organisations. Notably, Dr Cheung was invited by the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC) to be a lead author for the IPCC’s Fi h Assessment Report (Chapter 6 – Ocean Systems). He is a contributing author of the UNEP’s Global Environmental Outlook – 5 report and Global Biodiversity Outlook – 3 report published by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). He also serves as scientifi c advisor for WWF Canada, SharkTruth and is a member of the IUCN Groupers and Wrasses Species Specialist Group. In 2011, Dr Cheung gave keynotes, talks and seminars in numerous international and regional conferences and meetings, including: •Invited presentation in the Asia Pacifi c Economic Cooperation, Blue Economy Forum, “Projecting impacts of climate change on marine living resources in the Asia Pacifi c region”, Xiamen, China, 4 – 10 October 2011. •Invited lecture in the Ocean Acidifi cation Workshop, “Projecting eff ects of ocean acidifi cation on fi shes and fi sheries”, Tromsø, Norway, 27 – 29 September 2011. •Panelist talk and discussion, “Is biodiversity going the way of the Dodo?” – The Royal Society Summer Science Week discussion Forum, 8 July 2011. •Plenary speech in Advance in Marine Ecosystem Modelling and Research Symposium, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, 26-29 June 2011  In the coming years, CORU will continue its collaboration with other Fisheries Centre research units and international organizations with the goal of shedding light on the impacts of global change on marine ecosystems, proposing solutions, and promoting public awareness. William Cheung Head Miranda Jones PhD Student Vicky Lam PhD Student Tina Kerby PhD Student Jose Fernandes Research Associate Fisherman in Wasini Marine Park, coast of Kenya (Photo credit: Frédéric Le Manach 2011) page 21 www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/grad Graduate Studies F isheries Centre students come from all over the world. The 47 PhD and 22 MSc students at the FC during 2010 and 2011 came from 24 countries: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Eritrea, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Malaysia, Mexico, Ireland, Peru, Samoa, Singapore, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the USA . Since the Fisheries Centre is not an admi! ing unit at UBC, our students are supervised or co-supervised by a FC faculty member, and admi! ed to UBC Graduate Studies through other departments, primarily Resource Management and Environmental Studies (RMES) and Zoology, but also Geography and Oceanography. As of 2012, a fi sheries stream will have been created in the RMES program, allowing RMES Masters and PhD students to focus primarily on fi sheries management, conservation and governance.  This stream will be administered by the Fisheries Centre and students will be supervised by Fisheries Centre faculty members.  It will include a new mandatory 6 credit fi sheries core course FISH 520, to be taught jointly by Fisheries Centre faculty members. Students’ research covers a wide range of topics related to the FC Mission: Restoring fi sheries, conserving aquatic life, rebuilding ecosystems: Researching the options. Student research topics usually comprise knowledge from a variety of disciplines. Thesis topics include understanding species life history and population dynamics of key resource species; fi sheries, ecosystem and bioeconomic modeling; quantifying the impacts of overfi shing, non-selective fi sheries and climate change; evaluating possible mitigation tools and policy options; historical reconstructions and future projections of populations and catches; economic valuations, and more. During 2010 and 2011, 7 doctoral and 6 master’s students completed their thesis research. A list of these graduates and their thesis titles is on page 27. Thesis abstracts can be seen at www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/students/alumni. Since 2008, all UBC PhD graduates have prepared short lay-language summaries describing their doctoral research. Fisheries Centre summaries are at www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/FCdoctoralcitations. In addition to their research eff orts, students play an important role in the day to day life of the Fisheries Centre. A student representative participates in faculty meetings thereby ensuring that students’ interests are considered in all decision making. Students organize the weekly FC Seminar Series and coff ee breaks, help out with events such as the biennial Larkin Lecture and holiday celebrations, coordinate building-wide composting, and edit FishBytes and the newsle ers of various groups. Fisheries Centre students are known to tackle rather ambitious projects that o$ en involve travel to far parts of the globe. In the fi eld, students gain hands-on experience with the fauna, markets, fi shery systems, etc., that are the focus of their research. Our students are gaining an increased understanding of the implications of their work for all stakeholders involved. Engaging in diverse projects spanning the globe has allowed our students to make strong connections with their global peers, working alongside NGOs, local communities, fi shing industry associations and scientists. Despite the diversity of students’ research and fi eld sites, the overarching perspective echoes the Fisheries Centre’s goal to reconcile fi sheries and conservation. To achieve its goal, the Fisheries Centre promotes the multidisciplinary study of fi sheries, and aims to provide its graduate students with a strong background in quantitative aspects of fi shery science and in all aspects of aquatic conservation biology. Analytical tools developed in a broad spectrum of parent subjects, including biology, oceanography, economics, engineering, mathematics, sociology, planning and policy are employed in order to assess, appraise and forecast the impacts of both human and natural processes on fi shery resources. Fisheries policy and management problems under study include assessment and management of artisanal and commercial food capture fi sheries, recreational fi sheries, coastal and watershed management, aquaculture biology and engineering, confl ict resolution and the co-management of shared fi shery resources, and the conservation of endangered exploited species in both marine and freshwater environments. Faculty members teach a number of graduate credit courses, on such topics as quantitative analysis and modeling, economics, and aquatic policy. These FISH courses are detailed on the graduate program web page www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/grad. page 22 Graduate Students Susana Cardenas (Peru) MSc Zoology (start 2008) Project: Recovery of South American fur seals in Peru Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites  Iain Caldwell (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2006) Project: Movement of a sedentary fi sh in response to environmental change Supervisor:  Dr Amanda Vincent  Brooke Campbell (Canada) MSc RMES (start 2007*) Project: Clarifying historic trends in the marine aquaculture sector: a spatially- refi ned bo om-up reconstruction of global production Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Leah Biery (USA) MSc Zoology (start 2010) Project: Using enhanced shark catch data to estimate the magnitude, global distribution and species composition of the shark fi n trade Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly  Lucas Brotz (Canada) MSc Oceanography (start 2007*) PhD Zoology (start 2011) Project: Trends in global jellyfi sh populations Supervisors:  Dr Evgeny Pakhomov (MSc only) and Dr Daniel Pauly Lisa Boonzaier (South Africa) MSc Zoology (start 2011) Project: Eff ectiveness of marine protected areas for conserving biodiversity Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Megan Bailey (Canada) PhD RMES (start 2008) Project: Economics of tuna fi sheries in the western and central Pacifi c Ocean Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila FishBytes Editor 2009-2012 Dalal Al-Abdulrazzak (Kuwait) PhD Zoology (start 2009) Project: Historical ecology of Persian Gulf fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Brajgeet Bhathal (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Analysis of fi shing impacts on India’s marine ecosystems and exploration of possible policy scenarios Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Elizabeth Atwood (USA) MSc Zoology (start 2008) Project: Investigating nutritional stress in northern fur seals Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Dyhia Belhabib (Canada) PhD RMES (start 2011) Project: Fisheries and food security Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Ricardo Amoroso (Argentina) PhD Zoology (start 2011) Project: Management strategy evaluation for the British Columbia herring fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Steve Martell Andres M. Cisneros-Montemayor (Mexico) MSc RMES (start 2008*) PhD RMES (start 2010) Project: Ecosystem and economic modeling Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Rachel Chudnow (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2010) Project: The cost of fi sheries research: a case study of the BC Area A dungeness crab fi shery, and what can be learned from international experience. Supervisor: Dr Villy Christensen page 23  James Hehre (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2009) Project: Ecological impacts of seaweed farming on coral reefs in the central Philippines Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Mike Hawkshaw (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: Inter-cohort density dependence and cyclic age zero survival of cyprinids Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters Nigel Haggan (Northern Ireland) PhD IIS (start 2006) Project: Mapping cultural and spiritual values of coastal ecosystems Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila  Carie Hoover (USA) PhD RMES (start 2006) Project: Eff ects of climate change on polar ecosystems Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher  Anna Hall (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2004*) Project: Eff ects of tidal mixing on porpoise distribution: Implications for foraging Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Sarah Hawkshaw (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2011) Project: Evaluating management strategies for the salmon troll fi shery on the West Coast of Vancouver Island Supervisor: Dr Murdoch McAllister Aaron Greenberg (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2010) Project: Dungeness crab fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Steve Martell Krista Greer (Canada) MSc RMES (start 2011) Project: Calculating the carbon emissions of the world’s fi shing fl eets since 1950 Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly  Meaghan Darcy (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Management strategy evaluation for a multi-species, multi-sector fi shery in the Hawaiian Islands Supervisor: Dr Steve Martell  Wes Didier (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2009) Project: Testing for stresses that may be aff ecting fecundity of eulachon Supervisor: Dr David Close Danielle Edwards (Canada) PhD RMES (start 2011) Project: Fishing fl eet dynamics and fi sheries management policy evaluation for the BC small boat groundfi sh fl eet Supervisor: Murdoch McAllister Alex Dalton (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2010) Project: How much energy does it take to power a northern fur seal and what is the best way to measure that? Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr David Rosen Junho (June) Eom (Korea) PhD Zoology (start 2011) Project: The sex pheromone Acipenser transmontanus in White Sturgeon Supervisor: Dr David Close  Pramod Ganapathiraju (India) PhD RMES (start 2005*) Project: A global study on incentives and disincentives to IUU fi shing and compliance with the FAO Code of Conduct Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Rhona Govender (South Africa) MSc Zoology (start 2009) Project: A global estimate of the catch of small-scale fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Carling Gerlinsky (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2010) Project: How do sea lions manage their oxygen and respond to diff erent prey patches while diving? Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr David Rosen No Photo Available page 24  Rajeev Kumar (India) PhD RMES (start 2006) Project: Simulation modeling of Mille Lacs Lake ecosystems in support of EBM Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Danika Kleiber (Canada/USA) PhD RMES (start 2009) Project: Gender, marine resource use and community conservation in the Danajon Bank, Central Philippines Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Tabitha Hui (Singapore) MSc Zoology (start 2007*) Project: The Steller sea lion, its prey and its prey fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Roseti Imo (Samoa) PhD RMES (withdrew in 2011) Project: Spatial policy analysis for albacore management in the western central Pacifi c Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila and Dr Carl Walters Vicky Wing Yee Lam (Hong Kong) PhD RMES (start 2008) Project: Global fi sheries economics in the face of change in climate and energy prices Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Tiphaine Jeanniard du Dot (France) PhD Zoology (start 2009) Project: Eff ects of environmental changes on fi tness and foraging effi  ciency of fur seals: an energetic approach Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Frédéric Le Manach (France) PhD RMES, joint with UMR Ifremer - IRD UM2 (start 2011) Project: Global fi sheries, seafood trade, and food security: ethics and human rights in relationships between developed and developing countries Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly (UBC) and Dr Philippe Cury (UMR) Shannon Obradovich (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: Survey methodologies and management strategy evaluation for BC inshore rockfi sh Supervisor: Dr Murdoch McAllister Chad Nordstrom (Canada) MSc Zoology (2008) Project: Linking foraging northern fur seals with oceanographic features in the eastern Bering Sea Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Steve McAdam (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Examination of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) recruitment failure and identifi cation of restoration options Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters Lingbo Li (China) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: Examining climate change impacts on the Strait of Georgia marine ecosystem Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Dale Marsden (Canada) PhD RMES (start 2003) Project: Bioeconomic analysis of Fraser River sockeye salmon fi sheries management Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Rachael Louton (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2007) Project: Evaluation of alternative management regimes for shrimp fi sheries in the Gulf of Mexico Supervisor: Dr Murdoch McAllister Benjamin Nelson (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2010) Project: Multi-species modeling of predator/prey interactions between pinnipeds and Pacifi c salmon in the Strait of Georgia Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr Murdoch McAllister Rachel Neuenhoff  (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2011) Project: Multi-species modeling to determine how gray seal predation impacts Atlantic cod fi shery recovery and exploring management options that mitigate predation eff ects Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Barbara Koot (Canada) PhD RMES (start 2011) Project: Seasonal distribution and relative abundance of threatened and endangered whales in British Columbian waters, from passive acoustic data Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites, Dr John Ford, and David Hannay page 25 Tom Porteus (UK) PhD Zoology (start 2006) Project: Use of Bayesian methods to evaluate strategies for control of terrestrial vertebrate pest species Supervisor: Dr Murdoch McAllister Kerrie O’Donnell (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2005*) Project: Evaluating recovery options for data-limited seahorse fi sheries in the Philippines Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Michelle Paleczny (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2008) Project: The eff ect of commercial fi sheries on global seabird populations Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly  Jamie Slogan (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: Long-term community dynamics of marine fi sh compensation habitat in Burrard Inlet, BC. Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher  Jennifer Selgrath (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2006) Project: Ecosystem resilience in coastal fi shing grounds Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Frances Robertson (UK/Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: The eff ects of behaviour, age, status, environmental parameters and exposure to seismic operations on the observed distribution of bowhead whales in the Alaskan Arctic Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Laurenne Schiller (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2011) Project: A global analysis of tuna and bill- fi sh capture fi shery landings on the high seas from 1950 to present Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Brent Roberts (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2009) Project: The physiological mechanism for response to stress in the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus Supervisor: Dr David Close Wilf Swartz (Canada/Japan) PhD RMES (start 2008) Project: How does international trade aff ect marine fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Louise Teh (Malaysia) PhD RMES (start 2007*) Project: Investigating the discount rates of small-scale fi shers in the Sulu-Sulawesi Marine ecoregion Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Lydia Teh (Malaysia) PhD RMES (start 2007*) Project: Zoning MPAs using a fuzzy logic system: case study of small-scale reef fi sheries in Sabah, Malaysia Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Austen Thomas (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2010) Project: Foraging/spatial ecology of top predators in marine ecosystems Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Dawit Tesfamichael (Eritrea) PhD RMES (start 2002) Project: Ecosystem based fi sheries management of the Red Sea Supervisors: Dr Daniel Pauly and Dr Tony Pitcher Laura Tremblay-Boyer (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2007*) PhD Zoology (start 2010) PhD Project : Importance of resource availability to apex predators: the White Sturgeon Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly (MSc) and Dr Steve Martell (PhD) Audrey Valls (France) PhD Zoology (start 2009) Project: Using ecosystem models to provide be# er predictions of global changes in marine biodiversity through the 21st Century Supervisor: Dr Villy Christensen Liesbeth van der Meer (Chile) MSc RMES (start 2009) Project: Fish retail contribution to the global economy Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila page 26 Beth Young (USA) MSc Zoology(start 2007*) Project: The ability of heart rate to predict metabolism in Steller sea lions Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr David Rosen Mandy Wong (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2007) Project: Do El Niño-southern oscillation events positively aff ect the diet of the Hawaiian monk seal Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr Dominic Tollit Divya Varkey (India) PhD RMES (start 2005*) Project: Ecosystem modelling of coral reefs in Raja Ampat Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher  Bre!  van Poorten (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Eff ects of interspecifi c competition on recruitment processes in rainbow trout and Pygmy Pikeminnow Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters FC students and researchers at the North American Association of Fisheries Economists conference in Honololulu, Hawaii (May 2011) Brianna Wright (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2010) Project: How do fi sh-eating killer whales fi nd their primary prey, Chinook salmon? Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr Dominic Tollit page 27 Graduate Theses Completed* *Thesis abstracts are available online at www.fi sheries.ubc.ca.  Lucas Brotz (Canada) MSc Oceanography Title: Trends in global jellyfi sh populations Supervisors:  Dr Evgeny Pakhomov and Dr Daniel Pauly Brooke Campbell (Canada) MSc RMES Title: Clarifying historic trends in the marine aquaculture sector: a spatially- refi ned bo$ om-up reconstruction of global production Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Pramod Ganapathiraju (India) PhD RMES A global study on incentives and disincentives to IUU fi shing and compliance with the FAO Code of Conduct Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Anna Hall (Canada) PhD Zoology Title: Eff ects of tidal mixing on porpoise distribution: Implications for foraging Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites 2011 2010 Andres Cisneros (Mexico) MSc RMES Title: The economic benefi ts of ecosystem-based marine recreation Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Laura Tremblay-Boyer (Canada) MSc Zoology Title: Eff ects of global fi sheries on the biomass of marine ecosystems: a trophic-level-based approach Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Divya Alice Varkey (India) PhD RMES Title: Ecosystem modelling of coral reefs in Raja Ampat Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Beth Young (USA) MSc Zoology Title: The ability of heart rate to predict metabolism in Steller sea lions (Eumatopias jubatus) Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr David Rosen Tabitha Hui (Singapore) MSc Zoology Title: The Steller sea lion, its prey and its prey fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Louise Teh (Malaysia) PhD RMES Title: Investigating the discount rates of small-scale fi shers in the Sulu-Sulawesi Marine ecoregion Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Lydia Teh (Malaysia) PhD RMES Title: Zoning MPAs using a fuzzy logic system: case study of small-scale reef fi sheries in Sabah, Malaysia Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Kerrie O’Donnell (USA) PhD Zoology Title: Uniting historic perspectives, human behaviour, and habitat use to assess the future for overfi shed seahorses Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent page 28 Fisheries Centre Members Faculty Dr U. Rashid Sumaila, Director Professor, Fisheries Centre Fisheries Economics Dr William Cheung Assistant Professor, Fisheries Centre Global Change Biology & Fisheries Dr Villy Christensen, Associate Director Professor, Fisheries Centre Ecosystem Modeling Dr David Close Assistant Professor, Fisheries Centre & Zoology Aboriginal Fisheries Dr Steven Martell Associate Professor, Fisheries Centre Quantitative Fisheries Stock Assessment Dr Murdoch McAllister Associate Professor, Fisheries Centre Bayesian Statistical Methods Dr Daniel Pauly Professor, Fisheries Centre & Zoology Tropical & Global Fisheries Issues Dr Tony J. Pitcher Professor, Fisheries Centre & Zoology Ecosystems, Rapid Appraisal and Schooling Dr Andrew Trites Professor, Fisheries Centre Marine Mammals and Fisheries Dr Amanda Vincent Associate Professor, Fisheries Centre Canada Research Chair in Marine Conservation Dr Carl Walters Professor, Fisheries Centre & Zoology Modeling, Assessment and Ecosystems Dr Sang-Seon Yun Assistant Professor, Fisheries Centre Chemical Communication Systems of Fishes Associated UBC Faculty Dr Kai Chan Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability Ecosystem Services & Biodiversity Dr Douglas Harris Law Fisheries Law Dr Sco!  Hinch Forest Sciences and Institute for Resources & Environment Forests & Fisheries Dr Linc Kesler First Nations House of Learning Aboriginal Fisheries Dr David (Ralph) Ma! hews Sociology Fisheries Sociology Dr Charles Menzies Anthropology Fisheries Anthropology Dr Richard Paisley Law Fisheries Law Dr Royann Petrell Chemical & Biological Engineering Fishery Engineering Dr William Rees School of Community & Regional Planning Ecological Economics Adjunct Professors & Associated Faculty Outside UBC Dr Cameron Ainsworth National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Ecosystem Restoration Dr Jackie Alder UNEP, Nairobi Environmental Policy Implementation Dr Claire Armstrong University of Tromsø Fisheries Economics Mr Josef Bauer Commercial Fisherman (retired) Dr Ratana Chuenpagdee Dalhousie University Fisheries Economics Marie Étienne AgroParisTech Hierarchical modeling in fi sheries Dr John K. B. Ford DFO, Nanaimo Marine Mammals Dr Robyn Forrest DFO, Nanaimo Management Strategy Evaluation Dr Michael Grigg National Institutes of Health (NIH) Biochemistry Dr Martin Haulena Vancouver Aquarium Veterinarian Dr Don Ludwig Fisheries Mathematics Dr Gordon Munro Fisheries Economics Dr William Neill Fisheries Limnology Dr Tom Northcote Fisheries Biology Emeritus Members Dr Colin Clark Commercial Fisheries Management Dr Brian Elliot Environmental Sociology Dr Les Lavkulich Fisheries Education  Dr Paul LeBlond Fisheries Oceanography page 29 Dr Douglas E. Hay DFO, Nanaimo Pelagic Fisheries Dr Glen Jamieson DFO, Nanaimo Invertebrate Fisheries Dr Jacquelynne King DFO, Nanaimo Fisheries Climaatology Dr Josh Korman Ecometric Research Inc. Adaptive Management Dr Rosemary Ommer University of Victoria Fisheries Sociology Mr Eric Parkinson BC Ministry of Environment Fisheries Management Dr Ian Perry DFO, Nanaimo Fisheries Oceanography Dr Stephen Raverty BC Agriculture and Lands Pathologist - Fish & Mammals Dr Laura Richards DFO, Nanaimo Fisheries Assessment Dr Jordan Rosenfeld BC Min. Environment Stream Ecology Dr Jon Schnute DFO (retired) Fisheries Mathematician Dr Richard Sims EBA Engineering Consultant Environmental Science Mr Alan Sinclair DFO (retired) Management Strategy Evaluation Dr John Stockner Eco-Logic Ltd Limnology & Oceanography Dr Arthur Tautz BC Fisheries, Vancouver GIS, Sports Fisheries Dr John Volpe University of Victoria Sustainable Aquaculture Dr Jane Watson Malaspina College, Nanaimo Marine Mammals International Advisory Council Dr Philippe Cury CRH/IRD Sete, France Dr Douglas DeMaster National Marine Fisheries Service Sea! le, USA Dr Cornelia Nauen European Union Brussels, Belgium Dr Ana Parma Centro Nacional Patagónico Chubut, Argentina Dr Yvonne Sadovy University of Hong Kong Hong Kong, China Dr Anthony D. M. Smith CSIRO Marine & Atmospheric Research Hobart, Tasmania Ann Tautz Administration Support Thank you, Ann, for 25 great years, and best wishes for your retirement! Erin Bedard FC Graduate Program Assistant Marina Campbell Administration Support Janice Doyle Administration Support FC Office Staff page 30 Publications ARTICLES IN REFEREED JOURNALS 2011 Ahrens, R., Walters, C.J., and Christensen, V. (2011) Foraging arena theory. Fish and Fisheries, 13(1): 41-59. Ainsworth, C.H., Samhouri, J.F., Busch, D.S., Cheung, W.W.L., Dunne, J., and Okey, T.A. (2011) Potential impacts of climate change on Northeast Pacifi c marine foodwebs and fi sheries. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 68: 1217- 1229. Andersen, S.C., Flemming, J.M., Watson, R., and Lotze, H.K. (2011) Global Expansion of Invertebrate Fisheries: Trends, Drivers, and Ecosystem Eff ects. Fisheries Research, 6(3): e14735. Anticamara, J.A., Watson, R., Gelchu, A., and Pauly, D. (2011) Global fi shing eff ort (1950-2010): Trends, gaps, and implications. Fisheries Research, 107: 131-136. Bowles, E., Schulte, P.M., Tollit, D.J., Deagle, B.E., and Trites, A.W. (2011) Proportion of prey consumed can be determined from faecal DNA using real-time PCR. Molecular Ecology Resources, 11: 530-540. Caldwell, I., Correia, M., Palma, J., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2011) Advances in tagging syngnathids, with the eff ects of dummy tags on behaviour of Hippocampus gu! ulatus. Journal of Fish Biology, DOI: 10.1111/j.1095- 8649.2011.02983.x. Carruthers, T.R., McAllister, M.K., and Taylor, N.G. (2011) Spatial surplus production modelling of Atlantic tunas and billfi sh. Ecological Applications, 21: 2734-2755. Carruthers, T.R., Ahrens, R.N.M., McAllister, M.K., and Walters, C.J. (2011) Integrating imputation and standardization of catch rate data in the calculation of relative abundance indices. Fisheries Research, 109(1): 157-167. Carruthers, T.R., Walters, C.J. (2011) Evaluating methods that classify fi sheries stock status using only fi sheries catch data. Fisheries Research, DOI: 10.1016/f. fi shres.2011.12.011. Cheung, W.W.L., Dunne, J., Sarmiento, J.L., and Pauly, D. (2011) Integrating eco-physiology and plankton dynamics into projected changes in maximum fi sheries catch potential under climate change in the Northeast Atlantic. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 68: 1008-1018. Christensen, V., Steenbeek, J., and Failler, P. (2011) A combined ecosystem modeling and value chain approach. Ecological Modelling, 222: 857-864. Close, D. A., Yun, S.-S., and McCormick, S. D. (2011) Reply to Thornton et al: Lamprey possess a highly specifi c corticosteroid signaling system. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108: E6. Coll, M., Piroddi, C., Albouy, C., Ben Rais Lasram, F., Cheung, W. W. L., Christensen, V., Karpouzi, V. S., Guilhaumon, F., Mouillot, D., Paleczny, M., Palomares, M.L., Steenbeek, J., Trujillo, P., Watson, R., and Pauly, D. (2011) The Mediterranean Sea under siege: spatial overlap between marine biodiversity, cumulative threats and marine reserves. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 21(4): 465-480. Colle# e, B.B., Carpenter, K.E., Polidoro, B.A., Juan-Jordá, M.J., Boustany, A., Die, D.J., Elfes, C., Fox, W., Graves, J., Harrison, L., McManus, R., Minte-Vera, C.V., Nelson, R., Restrepo, V., Schratwieser, J., Sun, C., Amorim, A., Peres, M.B., Canales, C., Cardenas, G., Chang, S., Chiang, W., Leite, N., Harwell, H., Lessa, R., Fredou, F.L., Oxenford, H.A., Serra, R., Shao, K., Sumaila, R., Wang, S., Watson, R., and Yáñez, E. (2011) High value and long-life: double jeopardy for tunas and billfi shes. Science, 333: 291-292. Dowd, M., and Joy, R. (2011) Estimating behavioral parameters in animal movement models using a state-augmented particle fi lter. Ecology, 92: 568-575. Espinosa-Romero, M.J., Gregr, E.J., Christensen, V., Walters, C., and Chan, K.M.A. (2011) Representing mediating eff ects and species reintroductions in Ecopath with Ecosim. Ecological Modeling, 222: 1569-1579. Fulai, S., Flomenho$ , G., Downs, T.J., Grande-Ortiz, M., Graef, D., Scholtens, B., Mol, A.P.J., Sonnenfeld, D.A., and Spaargaren, G. Editors, Goel, R.K., Hsieh, E.W.T., Scrieciu, S., Steurer, R., Polzin, C., Kostka, G., Ancev, T., Pirgmaier, E., Boons, F., Robèrt, K.-H., Bryant, C., Zhou, K., Acharya, S.R., Huberman, D., Sonwa, D.J., Mycoo, M., Guan, D., Hubacek, K., Sumaila, U.R., Lopez-Ruiz, H.G., Jolley, G.J., Dougherty, M.L., Pilon, A.F., Prakash, R.I., Tambunan, T., and Hermann, S. (2011) Is the concept of a green economy a useful way of framing policy discussions and policymaking to promote sustainable development? Natural Resources Forum, 35(1): 63-72. Gascuel, D., Guéne# e, S., and Pauly, D. 2011. The trophic-level based ecosystem modeling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 68(7): 1403-1416. Gleiss, A.C., Jorgensen, S.J., Liebsch, N., Sala, J.E., Norman, B., Hays, G.C., Quintana, F., Grundy, E., Campagna, C., Trites, A.W., Block, B.A., and Wilson, R.P. (2011) Convergent evolution in locomotory pa# erns of fl ying and swimming animals.  Nature Communications, 2: 352. Hansen, G.J.A., Ban, N., Jones, M.L., Kaufman, L., Panes, H.M., Yasué, M., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2011) Hindsight in marine protected area selection: A comparison of ecological representation arising from opportunistic and systematic approaches. Biological Conservation, 144: 1866-1875. Harper, S. Bevacqua, D., Chudnow, R., Giorgi, S., Guillonneau, V., Le Manach, F., Sutor, T. and Sumaila, U.R. (2011) Fuelling the fi sheries subsidy debate: agreements, loopholes and implications. Fisheries Research, 113(1): 143-146. Hastings, K.K., Jemison, L.A., Gela# , T.S., Laake, J.L., Pendelton, G., King, J.C., Trites, A.W., and Pitcher, K.W. (2011) Cohort eff ects and spatial variation in age-specifi c survival of Steller sea lions from southeastern Alaska. Ecosphere 2, 111: DOI: 101890/ES11-0. Heymans, S. J. J., Mackinson, S., Sumaila, R., Dyck, A., and Li# le, A. (2011) The impact of subsidies on ecological sustainability and future profi ts from North Sea fi sheries. PLoS ONE, 6(5): e20239. Hill, N.A.O, Rowcliff e, J.M., Koldewey, H.J.,  and Milner-Gulland, E.J. (2011)  The Interaction between Seaweed Farming as an Alternative Occupation and Fisher Numbers in the Central Philippines. Conservation Biology, DOI: 10.1111/ j.1523-1739.2011.01796. page 31 Pauly, D. (2011) Forward – Selected Contribution from the First International Marine Conservation Congress, 19-24 May 2009. Bulletin of Marine Science, 87(2): 159-160. Pauly, D. (2011) Toward a Conservation Ethic for the Sea: steps in a personal and intellectual odyssey. Bulletin of Marine Science, 87(2): 165-175. Perry, I.R., Ommer, R.E., Barange, M.,  Jento! , S., Neis, B., and Sumaila, U.R. (2011) Marine social-ecological responses to environmental change and the impacts of globalization. Fish and Fisheries, 12(4): 427-450. Piroddi, C., Bearzi, G., Gonzalvo, J., and Christensen, V. From common to rare: the case of the Mediterranean common dolphin. Biological Conservation, 144(10): 2490-2498. Riesch, R. and Deecke, V.B. (2011) Whistle communication in mammal-eating killer whales (Orcinus orca): further evidence for acoustic divergence between ecotypes. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, DOI: 101007/s00265- 011-1148-8. Soto, K.H., and Trites, A.W. (2011) South American sea lions in Peru have a lek-like breeding system. Marine Mammal Science, 307: 306-333. Sumaila, U.R., Cheung, W.W.L., Lam, V.W.Y., Pauly, D., and Herrick, S. (2011) Climate change impacts on the biophysics and economics of world fi sheries. Nature Climate Change, 1: 449-456. Sumaila, U.R., and Huang, L. (2011) Managing Bluefi n Tuna in the Mediterranean Sea. Marine Policy, 36: 502-511. Taylor, N.G., McAllister, M.K., Lawson, G.L., Carruthers, T., and Block, B.A. (2011) Atlantic bluefi n tuna: a novel multistock spatial model for assessment population biomass. PLoS ONE, 6(12): 1-10. Teh, L.C.L., and Sumaila, U.R. (2011) Contribution of marine fi sheries to worldwide employment. Fish and Fisheries, DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-2979.2011.00450.x. Teh, L.S.L., and Teh, L.C.L. (2011) A fuzzy logic approach to marine spatial management. Environmental Management, 47(4): 536-545. Teh, L.S.L., Teh, L.C.L., and Sumaila, U.R. (2011) Low discounting behaviour among small-scale fi shers in Fij i and Sabah, Malaysia. Sustainability, 3: 897-913. Teh, L.S.L., Teh, L.C.L., and Sumaila, U.R. (2011) Quantifying the overlooked socio-economic contribution of small-scale fi sheries in Sabah, Malaysia. Fisheries Research, 110(3): 450-458. Thomas, A.C., Lance, M.M., Jeff ries, S.J., Miner, B.G., and Acevedo-Gutiérrez, A. (2011) Harbor seal foraging response to a seasonal resource pulse, spawning Pacifi c herring.  Marine Ecology Progress Series, 441: 225-239. Tremblay-Boyer, L., Gascuel, D., Watson, R., Christensen, V., and Pauly, D. (2011) Modelling the eff ects of fi shing on the biomass of the world’s oceans from 1950 to 2006. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 442: 169-185. Vincent, A.C.J. (2011) Saving the shallows: focusing marine conservation where people might care. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 21(6): 495-499. Vincent, A.C.J., Foster, S., and Koldewey, H.J. (2011) Conservation and management of seahorses and other Syngnathidae. Journal of Fish Biology, 78(6): 1681-1724. Jacquet, J., Boyd, I., Carlton, J.T., Fox, H., Elizabeth Johnson, A., Mee, L., Roman, J., Spalding, M., and Sutherland, W.J. (2011) Scanning the oceans for solutions. Solutions, 2(1): 38-55. Jacquet, J., Hauert, C., Traulsen, A. and Milinski, M. (2011) Shame and honour drive cooperation. Biology Le! ers, 7: 899-901. Jones, T.T., Hastings, M., Bostrom, B., and Pauly, D., Jones, D. (2011) Growth of captive leatherback turtles Dermochelys coriacea with inferences on growth in the wild: implications for population decline and recovery. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 399: 84-92. Keith, D.A., Martin, T.G., McDonald-Madden, E., and Walters, C. (2011) Uncertainty and adaptive management for biodiversity conservation. Biological Conservation, 144: 1175-1178. Kleiber, D., Blight, L.K., Caldwell, I., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2011) The importance of seahorses and pipefi shes in the diet of marine animals. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, 21(2): 205-223. Lam, V.W.Y., Sumaila, U.R., Dyck, A., Pauly, D., and Watson, R. (2011) Construction and potential applications of a global cost of fi shing database. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 68(9): 1996-2004. Liu, Y., Sumaila, U.R., Volpe, J.P. (2011) Potential Ecological and Economic Impacts of Sea Lice from Farmed Salmon on Wild Salmon Fisheries. Ecological Economics, 70(10), 1746- 1755. McCrea-Strub, A., Kleisner, K., Sumaila, U.R., Swartz, W., Watson, R., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (2011) Potential Impact of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Commercial Fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico. Fisheries, 37(7): 332-336. McCrea-Strub, A., Pauly, D. Oil and fi sheries in the Gulf of Mexico. Ocean and Coastal Law Journal, 16(2): 473-480. McCrea-Strub, A., Sumaila, U.R., Zeller, D., Nelson, J., and Pauly, D. (2011) Understanding the cost of establishing marine protected areas. Marine Policy, 35(1): 1-9. Mouillot, D., Albouy, C., Guilhaumon, F., B. Rais, Lasram, F., Coll, M., DeVictor, V., Douzery, E., Meynard, C., Pauly, D., Tomasini, J.A., Troussellier, M., Velez, L., Watson, R., and Mouquet, N. (2011) Protected and threatened components of fi sh biodiversity in the Mediterranean Sea. Current Biology, 21(12): 1044-1050. Mulsow, J., Reichmuth, C. Gulland, F.M.D., Rosen, D.A.S., and Finneran, J.J. (2011) Aerial audiograms of several California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) measured using single and multiple simultaneous auditory steady-state response methods. Journal of Experimental Biology, 214: 1138- 1147. Norse, E., Brooke, S., Cheung, W.W.L., Clark, M.R., Ekeland, I., Froese, R., Gjerde, K.M., Haedrich, R.L., Heppell, S.S., Gomes, T.M., Morgan, L.E., Pauly, D., Sumaila, R., and Watson, R. (2011) Sustainability of deep-sea fi sheries. Marine Policy, 36: 307-320. Österblom, H., Constable, A., Fukumi, S. (2011) Illegal fi shing and the organized crime analogy. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 26(6): 261-262. Österblom, H., Sumaila, U.R. (2011). Toothfi sh crises, actor diversity and the emergence of compliance mechanisms in the Southern Ocean. Global Environmental Change-Human and Policy Dimensions, 21(3): 972-982. page 32 Walker, K.A., Trites, A.W., Haulena, M., and Weary, D.M. (2011) A review of the eff ects of diff erent marking and tagging techniques on marine mammals. Wildlife Research, 39(1): 15-30. Williams, R., Gero, S., Bejder, L., Calambokidis, J., Kraus, S.D., Lusseau, D., Read, A.J., and Robbins, J. (2011) Underestimating the damage: interpreting cetacean carcass recoveries in the context of the Deepwater Horizon/BP incident. Conservation Le! ers, 4(3): 228-233. Williams, R., Hedley, S.L., Branch, T.A., Bravington, M.V., Zerbini, A.N., and Findlay, K.P. (2011) Chilean blue whales as a case study to illustrate methods to estimate abundance and evaluate conservation status of rare species. Conservation Biology, 25: 526-535. Williams, R., Krkošek, M., Ashe, E., Branch, T.A., Clark, S., Hammond, P.S., Hoyt, E., Noren, D.P., Rosen, D.A.S., and Winship, A. (2011) PLoS ONE, 6: e26738. 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Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 68(12): 2194-2203. Zeller, D., Booth, S., Pakhomov, E., Swartz, W., and Pauly, D. (2011b) Arctic fi sheries catches in Russia, USA and Canada: Baselines for neglected ecosystems. Polar Biology, 34 (7): 955-973. Zeller, D., Rossing, P., Harper, S., Persson, L., Booth, S., and Pauly, D. (2011a) The Baltic Sea: estimates of total fi sheries removals 1950-2007. Fisheries Research, 108: 356-363. 2010 Ainsworth, C.H., and Pitcher, T.J. (2010) A bioeconomic optimization approach for rebuilding marine communities: British Columbia case study. Environmental Conservation 36(4): 1-11. Alder, J., Cullis-Suzuki, S., Karpouzi, V., Kaschner, K., Mondoux, S., Swartz, W., Trujillo, P., Watson, R., and Pauly, D. (2010) Aggregate performance in managing marine ecosystems of 53 maritime countries. Marine Policy, 34: 468-476. Anticamara, J.A., Zeller, D., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) Spatial and temporal variation of abundance, biomass and diversity within marine reserves in the Philippines. Diversity and Distributions, 16(4): 529-536. Ashe, E., Noren, D.P., and Williams, R. (2010) Animal behaviour and marine protected areas: incorporating behavioural data into the selection of marine protected areas for an endangered killer whale population. Animal Conservation, 13: 196-203. Bailey, M., Sumaila, U.R., and Lindroos, M. (2010) Application of game theory to fi sheries over three decades. Fisheries Research, 102: 1-8. Brown, C.J., Fulton, E.A., Hobday, A.J., Matear, R., Possingham, H., Bulman, C., Christensen, V., Forrest, R.E., Gehrke, P.C., Gribble, N.A., Griffi  ths S.P., Lozano-Montes, H., Martin, J.M., Metcalf, S., Okey, T.A., Watson, R., and Richardson, A.J. (2010) Eff ects of climate-driven primary production change on marine food webs: implications for fi sheries and conservation. Global Change Biology, 16(4): 1194-1212. 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Chuenpagdee, R., and Sumaila, R. (2010) Fisheries governance and governability. Fish and Fisheries, 11(3): 234. Cisneros-Montemayor, A.M., and Sumaila, U.R. (2010) A global estimate of benefi ts from ecosystem-based marine recreation: potential impacts and implications for management. Journal of Bioeconomics, 12: 245–268. Cisneros-Montemayor, A.M., Sumaila, U.R., Kaschner, K., and Pauly, D. (2010). The global potential for whale watching. Marine Policy, 34(6): 1273-1278. page 33 Foster, S., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) Using life history information to assess potential eff ects of shrimp trawling on small fi shes. Journal of Fish Biology, 76(10): 2434-2454. Freire, K., and Pauly, D. (2010) Fishing down Brazilian marine food webs, with emphasis on the East Brazil large marine ecosystem. Fisheries Research, 105(1): 57-62. Gasalla, M.A., Rodrigues, A.R., Duarte, L.F.A., and Sumaila, U.R. 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Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 163(1-4): 531-538. Dyck, A., and Sumaila, U.R. (2010) Economic impact of ocean fi sh populations in the global fi shery. Journal of Bioeconomics, 12(3): 227-243. Falcão, M. P., Sumaila, U.R., and Geldenhuys, C.J. (2010) Policy impact on resource use and conservation in Miombo woodland, Pindanganga, Mozambique. Journal of Horticulture and Forestry, 2(8): 180-189. Flowers, H.J.,  van Poorten, B.T., Tetzlaff , J.C., and Pine, W.E. III. (2010) Bioenergetic approach to describing Gulf sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus) growth in two Florida rivers. The Open Fish Science Journal, 3: 80-86. Forrest, R.E., McAllister, M.K., Dorn, M., Martell, S.J.D., and Stanley, R. (2010) Hierarchical Bayesian estimation of productivity and reference points for Pacifi c rockfi shes (Sebastes spp.) under alternative assumptions about the stock-recruit function. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 67: 1611-1634. Foster, S., and Vincent, A.C.J. 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(2010) Using a fi sheries ecosystem model with a water quality model to explore trophic and habitat impacts on fi sheries stock: A case study of the blue crab population in Chesapeake Bay. Ecological Modelling, 221(7): 997-1004. McAllister, M.K., Stanley, R., Starr, P. (2010) Using experiments and expert judgment to model trawl survey catchability for Pacifi c rockfi shes: application to B.C. bocaccio (Sebastes paucispinis). U.S. Fishery Bulletin, 108: 282-304. Molloy, P., Anticamara, J.A., Rist, J., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) Frugal conservation: What does it take to detect changes in fi sh populations? Biological Conservation, 143(11): 2532- 2542. Morato, T., Pitcher, T.J., Clark, M.R., Menezes, G., Tempera, F., Porteiro, F., Giacomello, E., and Santos, R.S. (2010) Can We Protect Seamounts For Research? A Call for Conservation. Oceanography, 23(1): 190-199. Munro, G. (2010) The Economics of Overcapacity and the Management of Capture Fishery Resources: A Review. International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, 4: 93-122. O’Donnell, K., Pajaro, M., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) How does the accuracy of fi sher knowledge aff ect seahorse conservation status? Animal Conservation, 13(6):526-533. O’Donnell, K., Pajaro, M., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) Improving conservation and fi shery assessments with local knowledge: future directions. Animal Conservation, 13(6): 539-540. Osman, L.P., Moreno, C.A., and Trites, A.W. (2010) Growth rates and diff erential investment in male and female Juan Fernández fur seal pups. Journal of Mammalogy, 91: 1188- 1196. Österblom, H., Sumaila, U.R., Bodin, O., Sundberg, J.H., and Press, A.J. (2010). Adapting to regional enforcement: fi shing down the governance index. PLoS ONE, 5(9): e12832. Pajaro, M., Mulrennan, M, Alder, J., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) Developing MPA Eff ectiveness Indicators: Comparison Within and Across Stakeholder Groups and Communities. Coastal Management, 38(2): 122-143. Pajaro, M., Mulrennan, M., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) Toward an integrated marine protected areas policy: connecting the global to the local. Environment, Development and Sustainability, 12(6): 945-965. Pauly, D. (2010) John Leslie Munro (1938-2009) – a pioneer of tropical fi sheries science. Fish and Fisheries, 11: 117-118. Pauly, D., and Froese, R. (2010) Account in the dark. Nature Geoscience, 3(10): 662-663. Pereira, H.M., Leadley, P.W., Proença, V., Alkemade, R., Scharlemann, J.P.W., Fernandez-Manjarrés, J.F., Araújo, M.B., Balvanera, P., Biggs, R., Cheung, W.W.L., Chini, L., Cooper, H.D., Gilman, E.L., Guéne$ e, S., Hur$ , G.C., Huntington, H.P., Mace, G.M., Oberdorff , T., Revenga, C., Rodrigues, P., Scholes, R.J., Sumaila, U.R., and Walpole, M. (2010) Scenarios for Global Biodiversity in the 21st Century. Science, 330(330): 1496-1501. Perry, A.L., Lunn, K.E., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) Fisheries, large- scale trade, and conservation of seahorses in Malaysia and Thailand. Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 20(4): 464-475. Pershing, A.J., Christensen, L.B., Record, N.R., Sherwood, G.D., and Stetson, P.B. (2010) The Impact of Whaling on the Ocean Carbon Cycle: Why Bigger Was Be$ er. PLoS ONE, 5(8): e12444. Piroddi, C., Bearzi, G., and Christensen, V. (2010) Eff ects of local fi shery and ocean productivity on the Northeastern Ionian Sea ecosystem. Ecological Modelling, 221(11): 1526- 1544. Pitcher, T.J., and Lam, M. (2010) Fishful thinking: rhetoric, reality and the sea before us. Ecology and Society, 15(2): 12-39. Pitcher, T.J., Clark, M.R., Morato, T. and Watson. R. (2010) Seamount Fisheries: do they have a future? Oceanography, 23(1): 134-144. Pitcher, T.J., Morato, T., Stocks, K. and Clark, M.C. (2010) Seamount Ecosystem Evaluation Framework (SEEF): a tool for global seamount research and data synthesis. Oceanography, 23(1): 123-125. Richmond, J.P., Jeanniard du Dot, T., Rosen, D.A.S., and Zinn, S.A. 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(2010) Discount factors and the performance of alternative fi sheries management systems. Fish and Fisheries, 11(3): 278-287. Sumaila, U.R., and Hannesson, R. (2010) Ghoti: Maximum economic yield in crisis? Fish and Fisheries, 11(4): 461-465. Sumaila, U.R., Khan, A., Dyck, A.J., Watson, R., Munro, G., Tyedmers, P., and Pauly, D. (2010) A bo$ om up re- estimation of global fi sheries subsidies. Journal of Bioeconomics, 12: 201–225. page 35 Williams, R., Okey, T.A., Wallace, S.S., and Gallucci, V.F. (2010) Shark aggregation in coastal waters of British Columbia. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 414: 249-256. Yasué, M., Kaufman, L., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) Assessing ecological changes in and around marine reserves using community perceptions and biological surveys. Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 20(4): 407-418. Sumaila, U.R., Khan, A., Teh, L., Watson, R., Tyedmers, P., and Pauly, D. (2010) Subsidies to high seas bo! om trawl fl eet and the sustainability of deep sea benthic fi sh stocks. Marine Policy, Volume 34(3): 495-497. Swartz, W., Sala, E., Tracey, S., Watson, R., and Pauly, D. (2010) The spatial expansion and ecological footprint of fi sheries (1950 to present). PLoS ONE, 5(12): e15143. 6 p. Swartz, W., Sumaila, U. R., Watson, R. and Pauly, D. (2010) Sourcing seafood for the three major markets: the EU, Japan and the USA. Marine Policy, 34(6): 1366-1373. Tissot, B.N., Best, B.A., Borneman, E.H., Bruckner, A.W., Cooper, C.H., D’Agnes, H., Fitzgerald, T.P., Leland, A., Lieberman, S., Amos, A.M., Sumaila, U.R., Telecky, T.M., McGilvray, F., Plankis, B.J., Rhyne, A.L.,  Roberts, G.G., Starkhouse, B., and Stevenson, T.C. (2010) How U.S. ocean policy and market power can reform the coral reef wildlife trade. Marine Policy, 34(6): 1385-1388. Todd, S.K., Holm, B., Rosen, D.A.S., and Tollit, D.J. (2010) Stable isotope signal homogeneity and diff erences between and within pinniped muscle and skin. Marine Mammal Science, 26: 176-185. van Poorten, B.T. and McAdam, S.O. (2010) Estimating diff erences in growth and metabolism in two spatially segregated groups of Columbia River white sturgeon using a fi eld-based bioenergetics model. The Open Fish Science Journal, 3: 132-141. van Poorten, B.T., and Walters, C.J. (2010) Estimation of bioenergetic parameters for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using capture-recapture data with comparison to estimates from a laboratory- based model. The Open Fish Science Journal, 3: 69-79. Varkey, D.A., Ainsworth, C.H., Pitcher, T.J., Goram, J., and Sumaila, U. R. (2010) Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fisheries Catch in Raja Ampat Regency, Eastern Indonesia. Marine Policy, 2: 228-236. Villasante, S., and Sumaila, U.R. (2010) Estimating the eff ects of technological effi  ciency on the European fi shing fl eet. Marine Policy, 34(3): 720-722. Viviant, M., Trites, A.W., Rosen, D.A.S., Monestiez, P., and Guinet, C. (2010) Prey capture a! empts can be detected in Steller sea lions and other marine predators using accelerometers. Polar Biology, 33: 713-719. Wabnitz, C.C., Balazs, G., Beavers, S., Bjorndal, K.A., Bolten, A.B., Christensen, V., Hargrove, S., and Pauly, D. (2010) Ecosystem structure and processes at Kaloko Honokohau, focusing on the role of herbivores, including green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas), in reef resilience. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 420: 27-44. Walters, C., Christensen, V., Walters, W., and Rose, K. (2010) Representation of multi-stanza life histories in Ecospace models for spatial organization of ecosystem trophic interaction pa! erns. Bulletin of Marine Science, 86(2): 439-459. Wielgus, J., Zeller, D., Caicedo-Herrera, D., and Sumaila, U.R. (2010) Estimation of fi sheries removals and primary economic impact of the small-scale and industrial marine fi sheries in Colombia. Marine Policy, 34(3): 506-513. BOOKS AND TECHNICAL REPORTS 2011 Biery, L., Palomares, M.L.D., Morisse! e, L., Cheung, W.W.L., Harper, S., Jacquet, J., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (2011) Sharks in the seas around us: How the Sea Around Us Project is working to shape our collective understanding of global shark fi sheries. A report prepared for the Pew Environment Group by the Sea Around Us Project. Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 53 p. Cheung, W.W.L., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (2011) Projected species shi" due to climate change in the Canadian Marine Ecoregions. Report to Environment Canada. Vancouver, 47 p. Christensen, V., and Maclean, J.(eds) (2011) Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries: A Global Perspective. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 342 p. Harper, S., O’Meara, D., Booth, S., Zeller, D., and Pauly, D. (2011) Fisheries catches for the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem since 1950. Report to the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem Project. BOBLME-Ecology-16, 97 p. King, J.R., McAllister, M.K., Holt, K.R., and Starr, P.J. (2011) Lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus) stock assessment and yield advice for outside stocks in British Columbia.  Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat Research Document 2011/051. 118 p. Kleisner, K., and Pauly, D. (2011) Performance in managing marine resources in the Bay of Bengal. Report to the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem Project. BOBLME-Ecology-17, 146 p. McAllister, M. and Duplisea, D. E. (2011). Production model fi # ing and projection for Atlantic redfi sh (Sebastes fasciatus and Sebastes mentella) to assess recovery potential and allowable harm. Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat Research Document 2011/057. vi + 75 p. Munro, G. (2011) On the Management of Shared Living Marine Resources. Prepared for the Danish Conference on Environmental Economics. Skodsborg, Denmark. Palomares, M.L.D., Chaitanya, D., Harper, S., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (2011) The Marine Biodiversity and Fisheries Catches of the Pitcairn Group. A report prepared for the Global Ocean Legacy project of the Pew Environment Group by the Sea Around Us Project. Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 42 p. van Poorten, B., Arlinghaus, R., Daedlow, K., and Haertel-Borer, S.S. (2011) Social-ecological interactions, management panaceas, and the future of wild fi sh populations. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 6 p., DOI: 1073/pnas.1013919108. 2010 Christensen, V. (contributing author) (2010) Global Environment Facility. Transboundary Waters Assessment Programme (TWAP) Volume 5: Methodology for Assessment of Large Marine Ecosystems. page 36 Christensen, V. (contributing author) (2010) Global Environment Facility. Transboundary Waters Assessment Programme (TWAP) Volume 6: Open Ocean Assessment Methodology. Christensen, V. (contributing author) (2010) PBL. Rethinking Global Biodiversity Strategies. Exploring structural changes in production and consumption to reduce biodiversity loss. A contribution to the project on The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB). Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency  (PBL), 168 p. Christensen, V., Lai, S., Ahrens, R., Valls, A., Zeller, D., and Pauly, D. (eds) (2010) Indicators for Outlook Reports on the State of Marine Biodiversity in Regional Seas. Report to UNEP, Activity SSFA/2010/DEPI/MCEB/003, Nairobi, 113 p. Christensen, V., Walters, C.J., Ahrens, R., Alder, J., Buszowski, J., Christensen, L.B., Cheung, W.W.L., Dunne, J., Froese, R., Karpouzi, V., Kastner, K., Kearney, K., Lai, S., Lam, V., Palomares, M.L.D., Peters-Mason, A., Piroddi, C., Sarmiento, J.L., Steenbeek, J., Sumaila, R.,Watson, R., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D., (eds) (2010) Database-driven models of the world’s large marine ecosystems. Sustainable Development of the World’s Large Marine Ecosystems during Climate Change: A commemorative volume to advance sustainable development on the occasion of the presentation of the 2010 Göteborg Award. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland, 232 p. Kam, S.P., Badjeck, M.C., Teh, L.S.L., Teh, L.C.L., Bé Năm, V.T., Hiền, T.T., Huệ, N.T., Phillips, M., Pomeroy, R., and Sinh, L.X. (2010) Economics of adaptation to climate change in Vietnam’s aquaculture sector: A case study. Report to the World Bank. Pauly, D. (2010) Five Easy Pieces: How fi shing impacts marine ecosystems. Island Press, Washington, D.C., xii + 193 p. Pauly, D. (2010) Gasping Fish and Panting Squids: Oxygen, Temperature and the Growth of Water-Breathing Animals. International Ecology Institute, Oldendorf/Luhe, Germany, xxviii + 216 p. Sherman, K., Pauly, D., Christensen, V., Sumaila, R., O’Reilly, J., Hyde, K., Belkin, I., Seitzinger, S., Sutinen, S., Olsen, S., Hennessey, T., Juda, L., Hoagland, P., Jin, D., Aquarone, M., and Adams, S. (2010) Methodology for assessing changing conditions of the world’s large marine ecosystems. Report to the GEF Transboundary Water Assessment Program. Staudigel, H., Koppers, A.A.P., Lavelle, J.W., Pitcher, T.J., and Shank, T. (eds) (2010) Mountains in the Sea. Oceanography, 23(1): 213 p. Sumaila, U.R., and Cheung, W.W.L. (2010) Cost of adapting fi sheries to climate change. World Bank Discussion Paper Number 5. The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank. Washington, DC, USA. van Poorten, B.T. (2010) Eff ort response of urban anglers to varying stocking frequency and density: fi ndings from the 2009 Fishing in the City program and projections for optimal stocking. Report to the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC, Report 9, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Wieckowski, K.M., Marmorek, D.R., Christensen, V., and Preikshot, D. (2010) Beaufort ERI: Integrated ecosystem modeling workshop proceedings (December 15 to 17, 2009). Prepared for Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Workshop proceedings prepared by ESSA Technologies Ltd., Vancouver, BC for the Arctic Aquatic Research Division, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 2011 Bernard, D.R., Jeff ries, S.J., Knapp, G., and Trites, A.W. (2011) An independent, scientifi c review of the Biological Opinion (2010) of the National Marine Fisheries Service Fisheries Management Plan for the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands management areas, Vol. 11- 16. In: Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Special Publication, 136 p. Buchary, E., Pitcher, T.J., and Sumaila, U.R. (2011) Under- reporting sardine catches as a strategy against poverty in the Bali Strait, Indonesia, p. 203-223. In: Ommer, R.E., Perry, I., Cury, P., and Cochrane, K. (eds) World Fisheries: A Social-ecological analysis. Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. Baum, J.K., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2011) Seahorse trade in Mexico, p. 57-77. In: Vincent, A.C.J., Giles, BG., Czembor, C.A., and Foster, S.J. (eds). Trade in seahorses and other syngnathids in countries outside Asia (1998-2001). Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. 2011 Brotz, Lucas (2011). Changing Jellyfi sh Populations: Trends in Large Marine Ecosystems. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(5), 105 p. Christensen, V., Lai, S., Palomares, M.L.D., Zeller, D., and Pauly, D. (eds) (2011) The State of Biodiversity and Fisheries in Regional Seas. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(3), 88 p. Harper, S., and Zeller, D. (eds) (2011) Fisheries Catch Reconstructions: Islands, Part II. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(4), 143 p. Palomares, M.L.D., and Pauly, D. (eds) (2011) Too Precious to Drill: the Marine Biodiversity of  Belize. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(6), 175 p. Vincent, A.C.J., Giles, B.G., Czembor, C.A., and Foster, S.J. (eds) (2011) Trade in Seahorses and Other Syngnathids in Countries Outside Asia (1998-2001).  Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(1), 181 p. 2010 Moody, M., and Pitcher, T.J. (2010) Eulachon (Thaleichthys pacifi cus): Past and Present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(2), 197 p. Palomares, M.L.D., and Pauly, D.  (eds) (2010) Marine Biodiversity in Southeast Asian and Adjacent Seas: Part 1.  Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(3), 96 p. Rossing, P., Booth, S., and Zeller, D. (eds) (2010) Total Marine Fisheries Extractions by Country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-Present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(1), 263 p. CHAPTERS IN BOOKS AND TECHNICAL REPORTS FISHERIES CENTRE RESEARCH REPORTS page 37 Baum, J.K., and Vincent, A.C.J. (2011) Seahorse trade in South America, p. 102-128. 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Cheung, W., Lam, V., Palomares, M.L.D., Watson, R., Pauly, D. (2011) Diversity of commercially exploited fi sh and invertebrates in Regional Seas, p. 24-26. In: Christensen, V., Lai, S., Palomares, M.L.D., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (eds) The State of Biodiversity and Fisheries in Regional Seas. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(3). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Cheung, W.W.L., Lam, V., Sarmiento, J.L., Kearney, K., Watson, R., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (2011) Global-warming induced changes in the catch potential of Regional Seas, p. 50-54. In: Christensen, V., Lai, S., Palomares, M.L.D., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (eds) The state of biodiversity and fi sheries in Regional Seas. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(3). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Cheung, W.W.L., Lam, V., Sarmiento, J.L., Kearney, K., Watson, R. and Pauly, D. 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Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Trujillo, P., Harper, S. and Zeller, D. (2011) Reconstruction of Naurru’s fi sheries catches: 1950-2008, p. 63-71. In: Harper, S. and Zeller, D. (eds) Fisheries catch reconstructions: Islands, Part II. Fisheries Centre Reports 19 (4). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Watson, R. (2011) Fisheries landings from Regional Seas, p. 32-34. In: Christensen, V., Lai, S., Palomares, M.L.D., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (eds) The State of Biodiversity and Fisheries in Regional Seas. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(3). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Watson, R., Sumaila, U.R., and Zeller, D. (2011) How much fi sh is being extracted from the oceans and what is it worth? p. 59-71. In: Christensen, V., and Maclean, J. (eds) Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries: A Global Perspective. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. Zeller, D., Graham, R., and Harper, S. (2011c)  Reconstruction of total marine fi sheries catches for Belize, 1950-2008, p. 142-151. In: Palomares, M.L.D., Pauly, D. (eds) Too Precious to Drill: the Marine Biodiversity of Belize. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 19(6). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. 2010 Alder, J. and Pauly, D. (2010) Future of Fisheries, p. 120-121. In: Hoekstra, J.M., Molnar, J.L., Jennings, M., Revenga, C., Spalding, M.D., Boucher, T.M., Robertson, J.C., Heibel, T.J. and Ellison, K. (eds) The Atlas of Global Conservation: Changes, challenges and opportunities to make a diff erence. University of California Press, Berkeley, USA. Bailey, M., and Ishimura, G. (2010) Defi ning sustainability of fi shery resources. Sustainability Science, Vol. 1. United Nations University Press, Tokyo, Japan. Bailey, M., Quaatey, S., Armah, A.K., Jacquet, J., Khan, A., Alder, J. and Sumaila, U.R. (2010) Meeting socioeconomic objectives in Ghana’s sardinella fi shery, p. 293-308. In: Nanag, D.M. and Nunifu, T.K. (eds) Natural Resources in Ghana: Management, Policy and Economics. Nova Publishers, Hauppauge, New York, USA. Bale, S., Rossing, P., Booth, S., Wowkonowicz, P. and Zeller, D. (2010) Poland’s fi sheries catches in the Baltic Sea (1950- 2007), p. 165-188. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S. and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18 (1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Bale, S., Rossing, P., Booth, S. and Zeller, D. (2010) Denmark’s marine fi sheries catches in the Baltic Sea (1950-2007), p. 36-62. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S. and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18 (1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Cabanban, A., Capuli, E., Froese, R. and Pauly, D. (2010) An annotated checklist of Philippine fl atfi shes: ecological implications, p. 15-31. In: Palomares, M.L.D. and Pauly, D. (eds) Marine biodiversity in Southeast Asian and Adjacent Seas: Part 1. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(3). University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Christensen, V. and Cury, P. (2010) Using ecological indicators to assess the health of marine ecosystems: the North Atlantic, p. 336-352. In: Jorgensen, S.E., Costanza, R. and Xu, F.-L. (eds) CRC Handbook on Indicators of Ecosystem Health, 2nd Edition. CRC, Lewis Publishers, USA. Cox, A. and Sumaila, U.R. (2010) A Review of Fisheries Subsidies: Quantification, Impacts, and Reform, p. 99-112. In: Gra on, Q., Hilborn, R., Squires, D., Tait, M., and Williams, M. (eds) Marine Fisheries Conservation and Management. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. Dulvy, N.K., and Forrest, R.E. (2010) Life histories, population dynamics and extinction risks in chondrichthyans, p. 639-679. In: Carrier, J., Musick, J., and Heithaus, M. (eds) The Biology of Sharks and their Relatives II.  Physiological Adaptations, Behavior, Ecology, Conservation and Management of Sharks and Their Relatives. CRC Press, Boca Raton, USA. Harper, S., Shibaev, S.V., Baryshnikova, O., Rossing, P., Booth, S. and Zeller, D. (2010) Russian fi sheries catches in the Baltic Sea from 1950-2007, p. 189-224. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S. and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18 (1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. page 40 Herrick, S.F., Hannesson, R., Sumaila, U.R., Ahmed, M., and Torres, J.P. (2010) Global production and economics of small, pelagic fi sh, p. 256-274. In: Checkley, D., Alheit, J., Oozeki, Y., and Roy, C. (eds) Climate Change and Small Pelagic Fish. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. Huang, R., Cheung, W., Lam, V., Palomares, M.L.D., Sorsogon, P.M. and Pauly, D. (2010) Toward an account of the biodiversity in Chinese shelf waters: the role of SeaLifeBase and FishBase, p. 2-14. In: Palomares, M.L.D. and Pauly, D. (eds) Marine biodiversity in Southeast Asian and Adjacent Seas: Part 1. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(3). University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Ishimura, G. and Bailey, M. (2010) Defi ning sustainability of fi shery resources, p. 294-304. In: Komiyama, H., Takeuchi, K., Shiroyama, H. and Mino, T. (eds) Sustainability Science Vol 1. United Nations University Press, Tokyo, Japan. Metuzals, K., Baird, R., Pitcher, T., Sumaila, U.R., and Ganapathiraju, P. (2010) One Fish, Two Fish, IUU, and No Fish: Unreported Fishing Worldwide, p. 165-181. In: Gra! on, Q., Hilborn, R., Squires, D., Tait, M.,  and Williams, M. (eds) Marine Fisheries Conservation and Management. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. Palomares, M.L.D. and Pauly, D. (2010) Ecosystem size spectra as indicator for Regional Seas, p. 45-46. In: Christensen, V., Lai, S., Palomares, M.L.D., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (eds) Marine Biodiversity in Southeast and Adjacent Seas: Part 1. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(3). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Pauly, D. (2010) If you didn’t like overfi shing, you sure won’t like global warming (Symposium Keynote), p. 1-6. In: Costa, A. and Creswell, L. (eds) Proceedings of the 62nd Meeting of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute, Cumaná, Venezuela, November 2009. GCFI.  62, Fort Pierce, Florida, USA. Pauly, D. (2010) The state of fi sheries, p. 118-120. In: Sodhi, S.N.S. and Ehrlich, P.R. (eds) Conservation Biology for All. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK. Perry, R.I., Ommer, R.E., Allison, E., Badjeck, M.-C., Barange, M., Hamilton, L., Jarre, A., Quiñones, R., and Sumaila, U.R. (2010) Interactions between changes in marine ecosystems and human communities, p. 221-251. In: Barange, M., Field, J., Harris, R., Hofmann, E., Perry, I., Werner, C. (eds) Global Change and Marine Ecosystems. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK. Persson, L. (2010) Sweden’s fi sheries catches in the Baltic Sea (1950 – 2007), p. 225-263. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S., and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Rossing, P., Bale, S., Harper, S., and Zeller, D. (2010) Baltic Sea fi sheries catches for Finland (1950-2007), p. 85-106. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S., and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Rossing, P., Hammer, C., Bale, S., Harper, S., Booth, S., and Zeller, D. (2010) Germany’s marine fi sheries catches in the Baltic Sea (1950-2007), p. 107-126. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S., and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Rossing, P., Plikshs, M., Booth, S., Veitch, L., and Zeller, D. (2010) Catch reconstruction for Latvia in the Baltic Sea from 1950 – 2007, p. 127-144. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S., and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Sumaila, U.R., Cisneros-Montemayor, A.M., Dyck, A., Watson, R. (2010) The global economic value of the marine ecosystem, p. 325. In: Christensen, V., and McField, J. (eds) Ecosystem approaches to fi sheries: a global perspective. Cambridge University Press, New York, USA. Tsikliras, A.C., Tsalkou, E., Pauly, D., and Stergiou, K.I. (2010) Trends in trophic level of farmed fi sh in Mediterranean countries, p. 684. In: Rapport du 39e Congrès de la Commission Internationale pour l’Exploration Scientifi que de la Mer Méditerranée. Veitch, L., Booth, S., Harper, S., Rossing, P., and Zeller, D. (2010) Catch reconstruction for Estonia in the Baltic Sea from 1950-2007, p. 63-84. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S., and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Veitch, L., Toliusis, S., Booth, S., Rossing, P., Harper, S., and Zeller, D. (2010) Catch reconstruction for Lithuania in the Baltic Sea from 1950–2007, p. 145-164. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S., and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Zeller, D., Booth, S., Bale, S., Rossing, R., Harper, S., and Pauly, D. (2010) Fisheries catches from the Baltic Sea Large Marine Ecosystem: 1950-2007, p. 7-38. In: Rossing, P., Booth, S., and Zeller, D. (eds) Total marine fi sheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 18(1). Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS 2011 Bailey, M., Sumaila, U.R., and Martell, S.J.D. (2011) Can cooperative management of tuna fi sheries in the Pacifi c solve the growth overfi shing problem? Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2011-01, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Hoover, C., Bailey, M., Higdon, J., Ferguson, S.H., and Sumaila, R. Estimating the economic value of narwhal and beluga hunts in Hudson Bay, Nunavut. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2011-05, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. page 41 Le Manach, F., Harper, S., Harris, A., Hosch, G., Lange, G.-M., Strub, A.M., Zeller, D., and Sumaila, R. (2011) Who gets what? Developing a new framework for EU fi sheries partnership agreements by example of Madagascar. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2011-04, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Li, L., Mackas, D., Hunt, B., Schweigert, J., Pakhomov, E., Perry, I., Galbraith, M., and Pitcher, T.J. (2011) Large changes in Zooplankton communities in the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia, during 1990-2007. The 5th International Zooplankton Production Symposium. Pucon, Chile. Palomares, M.L.D., Bailly, N., and Pauly, D. (2011) Small is beautiful. Action Diver 2011/2012: 8-10. Pauly, D. (2011) Beyond duplicity and ignorance in global fi sheries. Pacifi c Ecologist 20: 32-36 [abbreviated version of the same-title article in Scientia Marina 73(2): 215-223, 2009]. Pauly, D. (2011) Focusing one’s microscope. The Science Chronicles (The Nature Conservancy), January 2011: 4-7. Pauly, D. (2011) Foreword, p. 13-14. In: K.I. Stergiou,  K. Karachle, A.C. Tsikliras and E. Mamalakis. Shouting fi shes – Fishes from the Greek Seas: Biology, fi sheries and management. Patakis Press, Athens, Greece [In Greek, with  foreword in English]. Pauly, D. (2011) Foreword, p. 15-17. In: R. Chuenpagdee (ed.) World Small-Scale Fisheries: Contemporary Visions. Eburon, Del! . Pauly, D. (2011) On baselines that need shi! ing. Solutions - for a sustainable and desirable future 2(1): 14. Pauly, D. (2011) Small-scale fi sheries: an evaluation of their role in the coastal zones of the world. Abstract, p. 61. In: Book of Abstracts, International Symposium on Integrated Coastal Zone Management, Institute of Marine Research, Norway. Pitcher, T. and Cheung, W.L. (2011) Hong Kong Trawl Ban triggered by Fisheries Centre team. FishBytes 16(4): 1-2. Sumaila, U.R., and Bailey, M. Sequential fi shing of western central Pacifi c Ocean tuna stocks (2011). Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2011-02, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Teh, L.S.L., Teh,  L.C.L., and Sumaila, U.R. (2011) Time preference of small-scale fi shers in open access and traditionally managed reef fi sheries. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2011-03, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Watson, R., Zeller, D., and Pauly, D. (2011) Spatial Expansion of EU and non-EU fi shing fl eets into the global ocean, 1950 to the present. A report commissioned by WWF Netherlands, Sea Around Us Project, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 14 p. 2010 Bailey, M. (2010) All about bycatch at the 61st Tuna Conference. FishBytes, 16(3): 6-7. Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Bailey, M., and Swartz, W. Ge$ ing out of the offi  ce and onto the fi shing grounds. FishBytes, 16(5): 3-4. Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Bawumia, M., and Sumaila, U.R. (2010 Fisheries, Ecosystems and Piracy: A Case Study of Somalia. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-04, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Cheung, W.W.L., Booth, S., Zeller, D., and Pauly, D. (2010) Impact of climate change on US marine fi sheries with emphasis on the Gulf and Southeast Atlantic States. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-12, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Christensen, V. (2010) Report of the Training Course: Ecosystem Modeling for Fisheries Management (TCEMFM2010), 8-12 March 2010, ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen, Denmark, 20 p.  Christensen, V., Steenbeek, J., and Failler, P.  (2010) A Combined Ecosystem and Value Chain Modeling Approach for Evaluating Societal Cost and Benefi t of Fishing. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-06, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Cisneros¬-Montemayor, A.M., Sumaila, U.R., Kaschner, K., and Pauly, D. (2010) The Global Potential for Whale Watching. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-05, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Ishimura, G., Herrick, S., and Sumaila, U.R. (2010) Can There be Stable, Cooperative Management of a Transboundary Fish Stock Under Climate Variability? The Case Study of the Pacifi c Sardine Fishery in the California Current. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-02, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Ishimura, G., Herrick, S., and Sumaila, U.R. (2010) Fishing Games Under Climate Variability: Transboundary Management of Pacifi c Sardine in the California Current System. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-01, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lam, V.W.L., Sumaila, U.R., Dyck, A.J., Pauly, D., and Watson, R. (2010) Construction and potential applications of a global cost of fi shing database. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-13, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Le Guilloux, E., and Pauly, D. (2010) Description synthétique des pêcheries françaises en 2007. Prepared for the French Ministry of Fisheries. Bloom Association and Sea Around Us, with assistance from IFREMER, IRD and MNHN, 32 p. Lescrauwaet, A.-K., Debergh, H., Vincx, M., and Mees, J. (2010) Historical Marine Fisheries Data for Belgium. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-08, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. McCrea-Strub, A., Zeller, D., Sumaila, U.R., Nelson, J., Balmford, A., and Pauly, D. (2010) Understanding the cost of establishing Marine Protected Areas. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-09, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Pauly, D. and Collaborators. (2010) Sea Around Us: Ten-Year Retrospective, 1999 to 2009. Sea Around Us Project, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 58 p. Pauly, D. 2010. Con grandes áreas protegidas, se podría controlar la pesquería - Entrevista con Patricia Blanco Picado.  Crisol (Revista de Ciencia y Tecnologia de la Universidad de Costa Rica), 23(Mayo): 44-47. page 42 The Federal Minister of Fisheries, the Honourable Gail Shea, visited the Fisheries Centre on August 24, 2010. (Photo Credit: Grace Ong 2010) Pauly, D. (2010) Drinking Zeno’s Coff ee. FishBytes 16(5): 1. Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Pauly, D. (2010) En Primera Persona. Revista Informativa del Fondo Europeo de la Pesca en España (7): 14 [Interview]. Pauly, D. (2010) Mil miliones de indios no comen pescado y no parece que tengan carencias. El Diario Vasco. April 17, 2010, p. 6 [Interview with Javier Meaurio] Pauly, D., and Palomares, M.L.D. (2010) An Empirical Equation to Predict Annual Increases in Fishing Effi  ciency. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-07, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Pauly, D. (2010) Le poisson n’est pas un produit de masse, mais un produit occasionnel qui doit rester festif. L’Encre de Mer No. 26/27 : 14-15. Pauly, D. 2010. Response to “Ask the Ecologist”. Ecology Briefs – Boletin Informativo del Centro Internacional de Ecologia 2(1): 3 [also in  Spanish; see www.ivic.gob.ve/ecologia/CIET/ index.php?mod=boletin.php]. Pauly, D. (2010) The Seafoodprint and the revival of the primary production required. Sea Around Us Newsle! er, September/October (61): 5-6. Pauly, D. (2010) La surpêche mène au désastre comme une pyramide fi nancière (Propos recueillis par Etienne Dubuis). Le Temps (Genève), Mercredi, 2 Octobre, p. 16. Pauly, D. and Zeller, D. (2010) Habitat Ocean: How to Save the Ocean’s Biodiversity. Summary of Working Group 3, p. 63-64. In: XVII Malente Symposium “More than Water – Ocean and Global Responsibility”, October 12-14, 2008, Lübeck, Germany. Pauly, D. (2010) Las zonas reservadas son una condición para la supervivencia de los peces y pescadores. Noticias de Gipulzkoa, April 17, 2010, p. 13 [Interview with Arantzazu Zabaleta]. Pitcher, T.J. (2010) Eight Major Target Species in World Seamount Fisheries. Oceanography, 23(1): 130-131. Pitcher, T.J. (2010) Floor for the Mapping. Review of “Ocean Globe” by J. Bremen. Oceanography, 23(3): 145-146. [book review]. Staudigel, H., Koppers, A.A.P., Lavelle, J.W., Pitcher, T.J. and Shank, T.M. (2010) Defi ning the Word “Seamount”. Oceanography, 23(1): 20-21. Staudigel, H., Koppers, A.A.P., Lavelle, J.W., Pitcher, T.J. and Shank, T.M. (2010) From the Guest Editors: Mountains in the Sea. Special Issue. Oceanography, 23(1): 18-19. Staudigel, H., Koppers, A.A.P., Lavelle, J.W., Pitcher, T.J. and Shank, T.M. (2010) Seamount sciences: Quo Vadis? Oceanography, 23(1): 212-214. Trites, A.W., and Coombs, A.P. (2010) Summer haulouts are breeding sites: Redefi ning the reproductive strategy of Steller sea lions. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010- 11, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Trites, A.W., Flinn, R., Joy, R., and Ba$ aile, B. (2010) Was the decline of Steller sea lions in the Aleutian Islands from 2000 to 2009 related to the Atka mackerel fi shery? Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2010-10, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Vincent, A.C.J. (2010) Oil Spill increases threats to syngnathids. Species, 52: 26-27. page 43 Fisheries Centre Visitors Milo Adkison University of Alaska Fairbanks Host: FISH 500 Camille Albouy University of Montpellier, France Host: Villy Christensen Honourable Keith Ashfi eld National Revenue, ACOA, and the Atlantic Gateway Host: Fisheries Centre Sebastian Baust Brandenburg University of Technology, Germany Host: Daniel Pauly (Supervisor: Dirk Zeller) Fikret Berkes University of Manitoba Host: FISH 500 Daniele Bevacqua Italian Society of Ecology, Italy Host: Murdoch McAllister Trude Borch Norwegian Institute of Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research Host: FISH 500 Trevor A. Branch University of Washington Host: FISH 500 Camilla Bra" land University of Tromsø, Norway Host: FISH 500 Daniel Bromley University of Wisconsin- Madison Host: FISH 500 Dennis Brown Fisherman and author Host: FISH 500 Brooke Campbell Canadian International Development Agency Host: FISH 500 Joshua Cinner James Cook University, Australia Host: FISH 500 Chien-Pang Chin National Taiwan University, Taiwan Host: Murdoch McAllister Phil Clapham NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Centre Host: FISH 500 Marta Coll Institute of Marine Sciences, Spain Host: Villy Christensen Chris Costello UC Santa Barbara Host: FISH 500 Kendyl Crawford Virginia Host: Daniel Pauly Claire Dansereau Fisheries and Oceans Canada Host: FISH 500 Shanggui Deng Zhejiang Ocean University, China Host: Fisheries Centre Delphine Dura La Salle, France Host: Daniel Pauly (Supervisor: Dirk Zeller) Marie-Pierre Etienne AgroParisTech College, France Host: Murdoch McAllister Damien Gillis Independent fi lmmaker Host: FISH 500 Sabrina Giorgi University of Paris- Dauphine, France Host: Rashid Sumaila Stephanie Green Simon Fraser University Host: FISH 500 Victoire Guillonneau University of Paris- Dauphine, France Host: Daniel Pauly Quentin Hanich Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security Host: FISH 500 Doug Hay Fisheries and Oceans Canada Host: FISH 500 Mark Hemmings Plymouth University, UK Host: Daniel Pauly (Supervisor: Dirk Zeller) John Hocevar Greenpeace Host: FISH 500 Anders Knudby Simon Fraser University Host: FISH 500 Hiroyuki Kurota National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries, Japan Host: Murdoch McAllister Frédéric Le Manach Plymouth University, UK Host: Daniel Pauly (Supervisor: Dirk Zeller) Qiang Li Zhejiang Ocean University, China Host: Fisheries Centre Huaqing Lu Zhejiang Ocean University, China Host: Fisheries Centre Marc Mangel UC Santa Cruz Host: FISH 500 Loren McClenachan Simon Fraser University Host: FISH 500 Jessica Meeuwig University of Western Australia Host: Daniel Pauly Sharon Melin Alaska Fisheries Science Center Host: FISH 500 Kristi Miller Fisheries and Oceans Canada Host: FISH 500 Erlend Moksness Norway Institute of Marine Research Host: FISH 500 Marcela Nascimento UNICAMP, Brazil Host: Villy Christensen John Nightingale Vancouver Aquarium Host: FISH 500 Henrik Osterblom Stockholm University, Sweden Hosts: Villy Christensen and Rashid Sumaila Steve Palumbi Stanford University Host: FISH 500 Ian Perry Fisheries and Oceans Canada Host: FISH 500 Randall Peterman Simon Fraser University Host: FISH 500 Evelyn Pinkerton Simon Fraser University Host: FISH 500 Martin Quaas University of Kiel, Germany Host: FISH 500 Anne Reij broek Wageningen University, Netherlands Host: Rashid Sumaila Jon Schnute Fisheries and Oceans Canada Host: FISH 500 Shio Segi University of Alaska Host: FISH 500 Honourable Gail Shea Fisheries and Oceans Canada Host: Fisheries Centre Alan Sinclair Department of Fisheries and Oceans Host: FISH 500 Weihua Song Zhejiang Ocean University, China Host: Fisheries Centre Max Stöven University of Kiel, Germany Host: FISH 500 Samuele Tecchio Institute of Marine Sciences, Spain Host: Villy Christensen Marian Torres Spanish Institute of Oceanography Host: Villy Christensen Ryan Vachon University of Colorado at Boulder Host: FISH 500 Marjo Vierros United Nations University, Japan Host: FISH 500 Bernard Walrut Barrister, Adelaide, Australia Host: FISH 500 Bill Wareham David Suzuki Foundation Host: FISH 500 Jack Whalen Aalto University, Finland Host: FISH 500 Changwen Wu Zhejiang Ocean University, China Host: Fisheries Centre Listed below are some of the visitors to the UBC Fisheries Centre in 2010-2011. These and other Canadian and international visitors  came to present seminars, a end workshops, and collaborate with FC researchers. page 44 The 2010-2011 Fisheries Centre Report was produced by Grace Ong, Carmel Ohman, and Daniel Pauly with input from the Fisheries Centre units and members. Some of our major funders are (since 1993, in thousands of dollars): North Pacifi c Marine Science Foundation (30,299), The Pew Charitable Trusts (21,232), Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (3,228), Province of BC Ministries of Fisheries (1,763), Environmental and Advanced Education (1,763) John G. Shedd Aquarium (1,505), Chocolaterie Guylian N.V., Belgium (1,276), U.S. Department of Commerce (628) and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council (481). Funding                     	                    	         R es ea rc h  fu n d in g (m il li o n  $ ) Year External research funding of the Fisheries Centre (1993-2011) page 45 Fisheries Centre Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory (AERL) The University of British Columbia 2202 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C. Canada  V6T 1Z4 Tel:  +1 604 822 2731 Fax: +1 604 822 8934 E-mail: offi  ce@fi sheries.ubc.ca www.fi sheries.ubc.ca

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