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2008 - 2009 report Fisheries Centre. University of British Columbia 2009

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page 1 Fisheries Centre The University of British Columbia researching the options rebuilding ecosystems conserving aquatic life restoring fisheriespage 2 Table of Contents Director’s Introduction            2 Fisheries Centre Mission and Activities        3  Research Units  Aboriginal Fisheries                                      4  Ministry of Environment           5  Quantitative Modeling Group          6  Fisheries Economics Research Unit      8  Marine Mammal Research Unit     10  Project Seahorse      12  Sea Around Us Project     14  Policy and Ecosystem Restoration in Fisheries            16 Graduate Studies       18  Graduate Students      19  Graduate Theses Completed    24 Fisheries Centre Members       26  Core Faculty       26  Associated UBC Faculty     26  Emeritus Members      26  Adjunct Professors      26  International Advisory Council    27  FC Offi  ce Staff       27       Publications  Articles in Refereed Journals    28  Books and Technical Reports    34  Fisheries Centre Research Reports   34  Chapters in Books and Technical Reports  35  Miscellaneous Publications    38 Fisheries Centre Visitors      41 Funding        42page 3 Director’s Introduction The years 2008 and 2009 have been exciting in a number of ways. First, we hired, jointly with the Department of Zoology, Dr. David Close to the position of Assistant Professor and Distinguished Science Professor of Aboriginal Fisheries. This appointment provided faculty- level leadership to our Aboriginal Fisheries Research Unit and increased the number of faculty at our Centre to 10, a critical mass that would allow us to do even more! Second, Dr. Daniel Pauly fi nished his term as director and I was appointed. Third, our Centre underwent the usual 5-year review of academic units at UBC, which came just in time to give the new director some great ideas on how to keep up and improve the good work of the Centre. The Review Commig308 ee acknowledged our outstanding scholarly productivity while at the same time highlighting some of the areas that we, as a Centre, need to improve upon. The Review Commig308 ee report states “The scholarly productivity of the Fisheries Centre (FC) is exceptional and internationally recognized. However, the FC does not function as a unit with a common mission. All the indicators of scholarly productivity for FC faculty, scientifi c staff  and students are very strong”. We recognize that we could work more as a unit with a common mission and we have, since the review, put in place initiatives that will help us address this and other concerns of the Review Commig308 ee. The strategy has been to create avenues, both social and academic, where members of the centre can interact, with the hope that this will lead to more collaboration. We have also created various commig308 ees, with membership drawn from students, staff  and faculty, that allow as many of our members as possible to be involved in the running of the Centre.   We continue to make strong scholarly contributions to work on fi sh and fi sheries both nationally and internationally through our prolifi c publication records, extensive teaching and training programs, and our wide-ranging outreach activities, as documented in the rest of this Report.    I wish to use this opportunity on behalf of the former director Dr. Daniel Pauly and myself to thank all our members for the outstanding performance of the last two years. I look forward to many more promising years for the Fisheries Centre and all its members. Dr. Rashid Sumaila Director and Associate Professor UBC Fisheries Centrepage 4    Fisheries Centre    Mission and Activities We recall the Fisheries Centre’s mission statement, which was developed in 1993, slightly modifi ed since, and still relevant today: Our planet’s fi sheries have reached their ecological limits. As benefi ts from traditional resources decrease, pressure grows to exploit other resources, a process not necessarily compatible with ecosystem health. Policy and planning for ecosystem-based management must then be informed by knowledge of the interplay of human, biotic and environmental factors that affect ecosystem structure and function. Key requirements are suffi cient time-depth to capture biodiversity, abundance and trophic structure prior to depletion, identifi cation of the full range of benefi ts that healthy ecosystems provide to present and future generations and integration of the fi ne-scale knowledge of the maritime community with large-scale national and international fi sheries management. The Fisheries Centre promotes multidisciplinary study of aquatic ecosystems and broad-based collaboration with maritime communities, government, NGOs and other partners. We believe that the social capital developed through collaboration and the intellectual capital that increased knowledge of ecosystem function and values represents can lead to the re-investment in natural capital necessary to conserve and restore aquatic systems. As previously, this mission inspired, in 2008 and 2009, numerous research and outreach activities, both in- house and linked with outside organizations (see list of publications, p. 28-39).  This research and these outreach activities included convening international and domestic conferences and workshops, drawing researchers and policy-makers from around the world and locally.  However, our emphasis remained on the instructional supervision of master’s and doctoral students (see p. 18-25 or www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/students). To document these activities, in 2008-2009, the Fisheries Centre published 14  Fisheries Centre Research Reports (www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/publications/reports/fcrr.php) and 19 items in our Working Paper Series (www.fi sheries. ubc.ca/publications/working), both og286 en serving as basis for subsequent submission to peer-reviewed literature.  Also, we continued to publish FishBytes (www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/publications/fi shbytes), the Centre’s bimonthly newsleg308 er, which has been produced and distributed internationally since 1995. The Centre continued to host a weekly seminar from September to April, funded in part by the Province of British Columbia Ministry of Environment. The seminar allows the Centre to bring speakers from Canada and abroad, while providing our students with a forum for peer review of their work in progress (see box).  The Centre also hosted dozens of short and long-term Canadian and international visitors, who shared their expertise with the members (see p. 41). The Fisheries Centre also hosts a prestigious lecture series, the Larkin Lectures (www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/events/lectures), held in memory of the late Professor Peter Larkin and funded through an endowment established by his colleagues, family, and friends.  The Larkin Lecture for the 2008-2009 period was by Dr Ana Parma (2009; Sustainability in small-scale fi sheries: no recipe but one - play with the full deck). We are gratifi ed by the increased recognition of our activities, detailed in the next pages.                  The Fisheries Centre Friday seminars: Stimulating minds, stomachs and community The Fisheries Centre seminars, held Fridays from 11am-12pm during the winter session, are a weekly opportunity for the members of the Fisheries Centre to share in the latest aspects of fi sheries research and to fuel the esprit de corps of the Centre (the donuts beforehand only fuel the corps). The lecture series, organized by a current graduate student, is also offered as a course (FISH 500) for incoming Fisheries Centre students intended to foster critical thinking about the presentations. Each student is also expected to take the stage and reveal his or her own plans for future research. The diversity of speakers is wide; from quantitative modelers to NGO staff to the students themselves, the Fisheries Centre has benefi ted from the insights of a number of brilliant speakers. For instance, the 2008-2009 academic year began with David Close’s discussion of Pacifi c Lamprey and associated tribal restora- tion initiatives.The second term opened with Tom Reimchen’s talk: “Partitioning sources of fi sh mortality in an intact lake ecosystem.” In the fall of 2009, Tony Farrell discussed sea lice on juvenile pink salmon, and in the second term, Gordon Munro presented “Limits to the privatization of fi shery resources.” Fisheries Centre seminar coordinators: Sarika Cullis-Suzuki (2007-2008) and Brooke Campbell (2009)page 5 The Aboriginal Fisheries Research Unit (AFRU) conducts research to support more eff ective ecosystem and aquatic resource management, using a multi-disciplinary approach directed toward the maintenance of sustainable aquatic resources that support aboriginal communities.  The AFRU focuses research in the areas of aquatic chemical ecology, fi sh physiology, and the human dimensions of fi sheries. The approach is to assess biological questions that are required to improve aquatic resource management. In 2008, the Fisheries Centre welcomed Dr. David Close, who has since led and developed the AFRU. He is a citizen of the Cayuse Nation located on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.  AFRU reaches out to fi sheries organizations and prospective students and two aboriginal students joined the unit during 2009 (see below). Outreach to policy makers within aboriginal communities and the public is also pursued through focused lectures and fi sheries meetings, i.e., • Presentation entitled “Reintroduction of Pacifi c lamprey in the upper Umatilla River”, Western Division American Fisheries Society, May 4-9, 2008, Portland, Oregon. • Presentation entitled “What to look for in a mentor”, National Conference of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society, Oct. 30-Nov. 1, 2008, Anaheim, California. • Presentation entitled “Lamprey research update”, National Conference of the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society, May 18-21, 2009, Yakima, Washington. • Presentation entitled “Projected Eff ects of Climate Change on Aboriginal Fisheries: The Big Picture”, National Conference of the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society, 2009, Juneau, Alaska. • Presentation on “Tamaalwit, the Sacred Law”, First Nations Fisheries Council Meeting, 2009, Chehalis Band, Sto:lo Nation. In addition, AFRU continues to develop collaboration and provide advice for First Nations/ Native American Tribes, for example: • Sto:lo Nation: technical assistance on fi sheries; • Musqueam Nation: meetings on fi sheries issues; • Yakama Nation meeting on fi sheries issues; • Advice to Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fisheries. The AFRU brought on two new students during 2009: Brent Roberts - Campbell River Indian Band - is working on stress physiology in lamprey, and Wes Didier - BC Métis - is working on eulachon food web analysis. Both will be using the AFRU laboratory that Dr. Close, who is also affi  liated with the Department of Zoology, established in 2008-2009. In the coming years, the AFRU will continue to vigorously pursue funding from various sources, such that support will be available for more aboriginal graduate students and for postdoctoral fellows, thus turning the AFRU into a regional source of knowledge and initiatives on aboriginal fi sheries. Aboriginal Fisheries             www2.fi sheries.com/archive/projects/aborig_new/ Wes Didier David Closepage 6 The Fisheries Centre houses 12 members of the BC Government, Ministry  of Environment Fisheries Science Section. The section conducts research  on freshwater fi sheries management, fi sh habitat restoration, fi sh forestry interactions, and fi sh culture techniques.  In addition, an active focus on conservation biology supports British Columbia’s goal of maintaining and enhancing the province’s fi sh and wildlife species and their habitats.   British Columbia has over 200,000 small (<1 ha) lakes, hundreds of larger lakes and wetlands, and thousands of kilometres of rivers and streams. This resource is the basis of a sport fi shery for more than 400,000 anglers. In addition, abundant freshwater habitats provide spawning and rearing opportunities for British Columbia’s salmon, steelhead and several other fi sh species native to BC. The province’s complex geography and glaciation history produced a province rich in natural resources and biodiversity. Managing these resources in a sustainable manner requires the development of ecosystem-based management tools along with data and Geographic Information Systems that support government and industry decision-making systems.    Freshwater habitat restoration is an area of research where British Columbia has been a world leader. Defi ning the relationships between habitat structure, nutrient dynamics and growth and survival of juvenile fi sh populations has allowed for the development of realistic restoration options for several ‘at risk’ lake and stream- dwelling fi sh populations. The partnership between the Province of BC and the Fisheries Centre and other units of the University of British Columbia has resulted in support for hundreds of graduate students as well as fostering a collaborative research environment between government scientists and university faculty for more than 50 years. This association will be of increasing importance as the stresses on our natural environment continue to increase, and the need for science-based decision-making assumes a greater role in government. Ministry of Environment              www.gov.bc.ca/env Theresa GodinShannon Harris Tom Johnston Steve McAdam Jordan Rosenfeld Art Tautz Debbie Aird Eric Parkinson Dan Hogan Adrian Clarkepage 7 The Quantitative Modeling Group develops innovative assessment methodologies and fi eld programs intended to improve single species and ecosystem management. The group focus on Bayesian statistical methods and dynamic population models focuses on fi sheries risk assessment, estimation, decision analysis and management strategy evaluation.  Dr. Villy Christensen (see SAUP pages) participates in this group working on ecosystem modeling and the further development of Ecopath with Ecosim.  Partnerships with colleagues within and outside UBC have generated a continuum of projects ranging from factors aff ecting species composition in small B.C. lakes to ecosystem management in the Gulf of Mexico. New and continuing projects in 2008-2009 • In collaboration with the Ecosystems Branch of the British Columbia Ministry of Environment individuals within the group are pursuing a number of fi eld based projects which include investigating recruitment failure and restoration options for white sturgeon, angler eff ort dynamics in small lake systems as well as meta-population structure and factors aff ecting species composition within these mixed species small lake systems. • The project with the Ecosystems Branch of the British Columbia Ministry of Environment continues to develop new mark-recapture models to estimate the abundance of Nechako River white sturgeon over the last decade taking into account also recapture eff ort data and micro-constituent based covariates for immigration and emigration. • Members of the group continue to participate in the POST project (hg308 p://www.postcoml. org) exploring the critical issue of downstream migration and early ocean survival of salmonid smolts.  Dr Mike Melnychuck recently defended his PhD thesis on estimating survival rates in juvenile salmonids. • Projects in collaboration with the NMFS in Honolulu Hawaii explore assessment and management options for the data limited Hawaiian bog308 omfi sh fi shery as well as the infl uence of meta-population structure on the assessment and management of the Hawaiian lobster fi shery. • Members collaborate with the Canadian department of Fisheries and Oceans on the joint statistical commig308 ee for Pacifi c hake assessment and have developed simulations to explore the potential eff ects on wild populations of introduced genetically modifi ed salmonids. • Ongoing studies of the Grand Canyon are aimed at understanding endangered species responses to ecosystem dynamics within regulated systems, improving stock assessments, as well as factors infl uencing recruitment dynamics, growth, survival, and ontogenetic habitat movement of salmonids. • An ecosystem management project for the Gulf of Mexico utilizes Ecopath with Ecosim to explore tradeoff s between commercial and recreational fi sheries and impacts of shrimp and menhaden fi sheries on other fi sheries. • Individuals participate in a PEW and Lenfest funded program investigating the issue of dedicated access in global fi sheries. • NMFS and the PFRP sponsor a global scale analysis of the status of large pelagic predators and management options for reducing fi shing mortality.    Quantitative    Modeling Group Steve Martell Assistant Professor Murdoch McAllister Associate Professor Carl Walters Headpage 8 Robert Ahrens Lecturer Nathan Taylor Post-doctoral Fellow Sylvie Guénette Honorary Research Associate • Recent collaboration with Barbara Block at the Hopkins Institute of Marine Science has resulted in the development of stock assessment methods for Atlantic bluefi n tuna incorporating start and endpoint tag recovery data from conventional and PSAT tagging programs.  A new project funded by the Lenfest Ocean Program extends this collaboration to develop stock, area, and seasonally-structured stock assessment models that are fi g308 ed to PSAT tag track and conventional tagging data records and genetic stock identifi cation of individual tagged fi sh.  Similar stock assessment models that are fi g308 ed to similar data for Pacifi c bluefi n tuna are also to be developed. • In collaboration with University of Washington, University of Florida, and USGS scientists, improved methods for fi g308 ing bioenergetics models to growth data from size-age and tagging studies are being developed; these methods promise to provide beg308 er estimation of seasonal changes in metabolic and feeding rates of fi sh. • Funding from the UK Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust is directed towards developing Bayesian assessment models to evaluate alternative management strategies for the control of red fox populations in the UK. • An Environmental Defense funded project aims to develop simulation models to evaluate the potential consequences of alternative harvest management policy options for Gulf of Mexico shrimp fi sheries.  The models developed will account for several diff erent shrimp species harvested and the seasonal and spatial aspects of shrimp population dynamics and fi shery operations.  Feed-back control policies that are based on annual and possibly in-season stock assessments of the main shrimp populations are also to be evaluated.  • Carl Walters is now the Grand Canyon Senior Ecologist, providing stock assessment and ecosystem modeling advice. • Carl Walters is leading an advisory panel for the Billfi sh Foundation to develop approaches for improving fi sheries management in the Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica. • A Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency  funded project on the Global Biodiversity Outlook . • Ecosystem modeling in the Baltic Sea funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, Sweeden. • A Lenfest Ocean Program project on improving ecosystem-based management of the Peruvian anchovy fi shery using Management Strategy Evaluation. • A project on the Gulf of Mexico Reef fi shed examining delayed-density dependence in snapper and the multi-species grouper fi shery.page 9 The Fisheries Economics Research Unit (FERU) has been very busy over the last two years. The total number of students affi  liated with FERU has increased to ten - eight of whom are full-time PhD students. As a testament to the quality of FERU graduates, two of our current PhD candidates have secured employment - one with the Department of Oceans and Fisheries Canada, the other with Hokkaido University, Japan - even before defending their theses.  The research group has also had welcome increases in it’s full-time research staff  with the addition of researcher Andrew Dyck and post-doctoral researchers Dr. Henrik Österblom and Dr. Ling Huang. The Fisheries Economics Research Unit has been instrumental in shaping fi sheries policy around the globe. Indeed, in the past two years FERU members have been involved in more than 20 journal papers, several book chapters and other publications. Some important contributions by FERU members over the past two years include: 1. Participated in  End of the Line documentary, described by the Economist as the “inconvenient truth of fi sheries” – Appearance by Rashid Sumaila 2. Omega 3 paper – co-authored by Rashid Sumaila 3. NAAFE Special Session on Global Ocean Economics Project – several of our members made presentations 4. Participation at a meeting at the British House of Commons on marine ecosystem management and conservation 5. Won a Leopold Leadership Fellowship 6. Won a Pew Fellowship for Marine Conservation  7. Visited the US Congress and made presentation to Congressman from Washington State and several congressional aides 8. Appears in a video with several notable celebrities including Leonardo Dicaprio and Prince Charles on the health of the earth’s oceans and climate change 9. Participated in a YouTube video with the WTO Boss, Pascal Lamy and the Executive Director of United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Achim Steinar. 10. Former Graduate (Ahmed Khan) co-authors paper on global seafood sustainability in Science magazine’s policy forum. FERU members cover a diverse range of topics, in the past two years, in particular, these diverse interests have begun fl eshing out the group’s global vision. Global databases of landed value, fi shing costs, subsidies, employment and recreational fi shing combined with micro-level studies in regions from British Columbia, Canada to Malaysia and Samoa display that the Fisheries Economics Research Unit’s collective understanding of the economics of world fi sheries are unparalleled. The research interests of current FERU members are outlined on the adjacent page:           Fisheries Economics           Research Unit Rashid Sumaila, WTO Director General Pascal Louise Teh recording fish catches in Pulau Banggi, Malaysia Liesbeth van der Meer Rashid Sumaila Director Gordon Munro Professor Emeritus Henrik Österblom Andrew Dyckpage 10 g32    www.feru.org Ben: Valuation of direct uses of Fij i’s coral reef ecosystems Louise: Socio-economic factors that eff ect small-scale fi shing activities Nigel: Incorporating cultural and spiritual values into decision-making Dale: Bioeconomic modeling of Fraser River sockeye salmon Gaku: Bioeconomic and game theoretic model of Pacifi c sardine Megan: Game-theoretic analysis of resource allocation with multiple objectives Roseti: Spatial modeling of W. Central Pacifi c tuna Andres: Estimation of global recreational fi shing activity Wilf: Mapping of international trade and consumption of fi sheries products Ling: Econometric fi sheries applications Andrew: Economic impact analysis of world fi sheries Liesbeth: Analysis of the retail trade of fi sheries products Henrik: IUU fi shing Gordon: Subsidies amd access rights to fi sheries Rashid: All of the above and the study of discounting and natural resource sustainability We wish to thank our collaborators and partners both in research and funding, especially, the Sea Around Us project, the Pew Charitable Trusts, Conservation International, SSHRC, WWF, Kingfi sher Foundation. Ben Starkhouse Louise Teh Nigel Haggan Dale Marsden Gakushi Ishimura Megan BaileyRoseti ImoAndres CisnerosWilf Swartz FERU members Gaku Ishimura (bottom right) and Megan Bailey (top) with other students participating in a Game Theory and Fisheries course run by Marko Lindroos at the University of Helsinki Rashid Sumaila, Ahmed Khan (FERU alumni) and Dale Marsden enjoying time off at the FAME conference in Denmark Ling Huang  page 11 Dominic Tollit Research Associate David Gummeson Research Assistant Mandy Wong Research Assistant Andrew Trites Director Rebecca Barrick Research Assistant Rod MacVicar Research Assistant Chad Nordstrom Research Assistant David Rosen Research Associate Pamela Rosenbaum Manager The Marine Mammal Research Unit (MMRU) is an integral component of the Fisheries Centre and works with other departments and institutions, combining specialties in a coordinated eff ort to provide independent research and advice on mag308 ers related to marine mammals. Members investigate interactions between humans and marine mammals, marine mammals as indicators of ecosystem change, and the natural history, biology and conservation of marine mammals. MMRU research focuses on fi ve areas: population dynamics, energetics and physiology, dietary analyses, behaviour and ecology, and simulation modeling. The multi-disciplinary research program addresses these questions through captive and fi eld studies, data and laboratory analyses, and publications and outreach. Captive animal studies. Four Steller sea lions and six northern fur seals housed at the Vancouver Aquarium participated in studies to investigate a number of hypotheses explaining their population declines in the wild. Controlled feeding experiments with the Steller sea lions examined diff erent diet regimes (through changes in food intake or food quality) on aspects of health, hormone balance and reproduction. Experiments also tested and refi ned a number of techniques to estimate energy expenditure in wild sea lions (e.g., accelerometers and heart rates), and to detect prey composition (e.g., via DNA analysis and changes in tissue biochemistry). Studies with the young northern fur seals determined how these animals survive in the cold North Pacifi c in their fi rst years of life. Five additional sea lions swam and dove freely while accompanying scientists in the fi eld at the Open Water Research Station in Port Moody. The Open Water studies investigated diving physiology, energetics, and swimming biomechanics, with the ultimate aim of determining foraging decisions and food requirements of the wild population. The animals also tested and validated a number of technologies that can be used to study the foraging behaviour of sea lions in the wild. Collectively, the captive animal studies are resolving questions concerning the nutritional and energetic consequences for marine mammals facing changes in their environment, including changes in prey availability. The animals are a valuable scientifi c resource, and are being studied in collaboration with renowned international scientists.      Marine Mammal           Research Unit Morgan Davies Research Assistant Volker Deecke Research Associate Brian Battaile Post-doctoral Fellowpage 12 Ruth Joy Biostatistician Renee LaRoi Web Designer Field studies. Field work was undertaken in Alaska and British Columbia in 2008 and 2009. Research in Alaska focused on killer whale predation, fur seal foraging behaviour, fur seal growth, and sea lion diets.  Field studies in British Columbia focused on sea lion diets, incidence of entanglement, harbour porpoise feeding behaviour, and humpback whale abundance and foraging ecology. Data analysis. Mathematical models are increasingly used to understand the dynamics of Steller sea lions and their interaction with fi sheries. Models were used to identify Steller sea lion critical habitat, as well as the distribution of key fi sh species consumed by sea lions — with the ultimate goal of estimating the extent of competition between fi sheries and sea lions. Other models estimated seasonal pag308 erns of sea lion growth and food consumption, the economic cost to fi sheries of marine mammal critical habitat designations, and compared trends in pinniped populations in the eastern North Pacifi c to determine the relative importance of bog308 om-up versus top-down factors. Laboratory analysis. Other studies undertaken in 2008 and 2009 included developing a DNA technique to identify prey from sea lion scats, and assessing whether a relationship exists between diet, stress and population trends and distribution of Steller sea lions. We also continued a collaborative study with the Faculty of Engineering to develop an implantable tag to track sea lions. Publications and Outreach.   MMRU researchers published 34 papers during the past two years. Administratively, MMRU continued to oversee the North Pacifi c Universities Marine Mammal Research Consortium, which unites marine mammal research at the Universities of Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon State. MMRU also continued to host an annual Symposium on B.C. Marine Mammals, which provides a forum for local researchers, members of the fi shing industry, ecotourism operators, and the public to meet and discuss current issues and research related to marine mammals in British Columbia. MMRU graduate students also participated in the annual symposium of The Society for Marine Mammalogy’s Student Chapter, Northwest Region, which includes students from universities in Washington, Oregon, B.C., and Alaska. Rowenna Flinn Researcher Wendi Contois Research Assistant Rob Williams Post-doctoral Fellow Edward Gregr Researcher Ryan Coatta Research Assistant        www.marinemammal.org/MMRU2page 13 Amanda Vincent Director Project Seahorse P roject Seahorse is an interdisciplinary and international organization commig308 ed to conservation and sustainable use of the world’s coastal marine ecosystems. Our vision is a world in which marine ecosystems are healthy and well-managed.  We cooperate with many stakeholders, collaborators and partners, using seahorses as a focus of our work to fi nd marine conservation solutions.  We have active projects in seven countries, but particularly in the Philippines, through our in-country colleagues at the Project Seahorse Foundation for Marine Conservation.  We also work locally, documenting, for example, the extent of human impact on British Columbia’s marine environment. The diversity and quality of Project Seahorse management and research has resulted in international recognition including, in 2008, an award for ‘Best Field Conservation Project’ from the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums (BIAZA). Part of our success comes from our appreciation of the interdependencies between marine life and human communities. We begin with biological research and work outwards through concentric rings of pressure on marine populations, actively engaged with ecosystems, fi shing and other human impacts, trade in marine products, policy development and public outreach. Seahorses: Project Seahorse is considered the foremost authority in the world on the family of fi sh that includes about 300 species of seahorse, pipefi sh, seadragon and pipehorse (Syngathidae).  Project Seahorse Director, Amanda Vincent, was the fi rst biologist to study seahorses underwater, the fi rst to discover their huge trade, the fi rst to identify the threatened status of seahorses, and the fi rst to launch seahorse conservation measures.  Most recently, we have been investigating the life history, genetic fl ow, ecology (specifi cally movement and spatial use) and conservation of European and Philippines seahorses.  In particular, a PhD student completed a thesis showing (among other things) that seahorses, which have extensive parental care, still disperse in the plankton.  Another team member produced research identifying fi ve new seahorse species from Indonesian waters and the Red Sea.  One of these pygmy species is so small, at 11mm, that it is a contender for the smallest fi sh species in the world.  Ecosystems: Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are an important conservation tool for protecting marine ecosystems from overfi shing and habitat loss.  Project Seahorse has been on the cug308 ing edge of MPA research for over a decade in implementing no-take reserves (more than 33 to date) and testing their eff ectiveness (using long-term data sets).  Our research productivity in this domain continues to grow with the completion of four more PhDs relating to MPAs, one in collaboration with First Nation communities in Canada and three representing a suite of anthropological, ecological and resource management studies Sara Lourie Research Associate Janelle Curtis Research Associate Jean Marcus Postdoctoral Scientist Heather Koldewey Associate Director Project Seahorse Foundation: First row: Franco Villaruel, Hermes Cosicol, Noel VitorSecond row (standing): Pert Auxilio, Hazel Panes, Mia Apurado, Lourdes Labrada, Angelie Nellas, Virginia Masendo and JR Dongallo Back row: Reaan Catitig, Alfie Bartolo, Gerry Sucano, Daniel Suarez, Amado Blanco (PSF Director) and Ron Kirby Manit Janna Rist Program Managerpage 14 Lana Gunnlaugson Administrative Assistant Maï Yasué  Post Doctoral Scientist Chloe Shen Administrative Manager Eve Robinson Research Assistant www.projectseahorse.org from the central Philippines.  The Philippines’ long cultural experience with marine tenure, identifi ed in the anthropological study, may explain that nation’s advanced engagement with MPAs.  We have, further, completed a set of papers that explore the interface between societal and scientifi c placement of MPAs, recognizing that the former can produce an ecologically valid array of MPAs.  Fisheries Assessment: Project Seahorse’s fi sheries management eff orts are directed at promoting fi shing practices that consider impacts on both ecosystems and human communities.  Finding a balance requires biological and socio-economic knowledge and integration of research initiatives with marine management.  Among other projects, one of our PhD students just defended a thesis investigating bycatch in tropical shrimp fi sheries (Mexico) which retains a large number of small species, including seahorses.  Another PhD student is evaluating the social and economic impacts of a small-scale fi shery involving a threatened seahorse species (Philippines). Communities: Engagement of human communities who depend on marine resources is a critical part of marine conservation.  Project Seahorse assists people living in coastal villages in the Philippines, from organizing and empowering local stakeholders to generating action for sustainable management.  In particular, Project Seahorse initiated and has fostered an alliance of 1000 small-scale fi shing families who have developed the capacity to insist on media and political ag308 ention for their management concerns. Trade: Seahorses are valuable globally and are traded around the world for use in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), aquaria, and for curiosities. Project Seahorse has long been active in Hong Kong – the world’s largest entrepôt for TCM products - where we have catalyzed the creation of an advisory council comprising the TCM industry, academia, government, public institutions and non- governmental organizations. We have been supporting national agencies responsible for ensuring that exports do not exceed sustainable levels.  To this end, we developed a web resource (www.hippocampusinfo.org) for CITES offi  cials, researchers and resource managers. Policy:  Project Seahorse works with governments and non-governmental organizations to help develop policies with marine conservation benefi ts. Our technical advice led 172 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) signatory nations to begin, for the fi rst time, regulating international trade in some marine fi shes of commercial importance, and catalyzed development of innovative international management measures that serve multiple species simultaneously. We are very grateful to all our partner organisations and donors, and particularly to the Zoological Society of London (UK), John G. Shedd Aquarium (USA), and Guylian Chocolates (Belgium) for their extraordinary      support. Regina Bestbier Research Assistant Sarah Bartnik Research Biologist Marjorie Sorenson Research Assistant Melissa Evanson Senior Research Assistant Philip Molloy Postdoctoral Scientist Danika Kleiber PhD Studentpage 15 Sea Around Us Project The Sea Around Us is a collaboration between the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, and the Pew Environment Group, Washington, D.C., USA, devoted to assessing the impact of fi sheries on the world’s marine ecosystems, and proposing policies to mitigate these impacts. The project started in mid 1999, and thus celebrated its tenth anniversary in July 2009.  In early 2005, we issued a fi ve-year retrospective which emphasized the wide scope of our work, and our productivity.  We recently issued a similar ten-year retrospective, emphasizing that our scope has become even wider, more focused on fi sheries economics and public policy, and that our productivity has increased more that threefold – at least as measured by the number of peer-reviewed contributions authored and co-authored by our members.  The reason for this massive increase is obvious: it took us several years to create the complex of global databases (and/or GIS ‘layers’) that allow inferences on the global ocean. Now that this complex is in place, it has become more straightforward to see global pag308 erns and/or trends that were previously not visible, to assess them, and to develop policies to deal with them. Daniel Pauly Principal Investigator Villy Christensen Associate Professor Shawn Booth Research Assistant Number of peer-reviewed articles with Sea Around Us members as fi rst (black) or co-authors (grey), 2000-2009.  Note the more than threefold increase in the second 5-year period relative to the fi rst. Thus, as a fi rst example, we can now deal with global catches not only in term of the ‘offi  cial’ global landings assembled and disseminated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, but in terms of their Illegal Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) components, which add to the global catch, and with the fi shing eff ort, the gears and the costs (including subsidies) required to generate that catch, along with its economic value and its disposition through international trade. Also, we can infer long-term trends, because most of our databases start in 1950, and thus span over half a century. Moreover, in some cases where the science allows this, we project these trends into the future. Zoraida Alojado Research Assistant Marina Campbell Administrationpage 16 www.seaaroundus.org Arash Tavakolie Senior .NET Developer Reg Watson Senior Research Fellow Dirk Zeller Senior Research Fellow Maria Lourdes Palomares Research Fellow Sherman Lai Programmer Grace Ong Administration  Illustrating the scope of the Sea Around Us through global ‘layers’, each representing a type of data used and/or contributed to, and which, when jointly analyzed, represent the entire range of ocean issues. This applies specially to the studies we performed in 2008-2009 on the potential eff ects of global warming on biodiversity and fi sheries, our second example.  The key results we obtained here was that the eff ects of global warming on marine biodiversity will be major in the Arctic, along the Antarctic Convergence and throughout the intertropical belt, where numerous species will be extirpated in the next half century.  For fi sheries, we predicted a near constancy of global catches (other things being equal), with increased catches in high northern latitudes, and declining catches in the tropics.  However, those results did not yet account for a number of factors, notably reduced oxygen concentrations and acidifi cation, thus providing reasons for more comprehensive analyses in 2010 and beyond.  Overall, the availability of the  Sea Around Us databases not only allows for more, deeper work by project members, including a host of productive graduate students, but has also generated a fl urry of off ers of collaboration, resulting in a spectrum ranging from the very fruitful (e.g., with National Geographic) to the sensitive, requiring diplomacy (“No, you can’t have ALL our data, but we can talk about what you actually need, and which you can use given that you give proper credit”). They establish that the Sea Around Us has become an internationally respected player in both the scientifi c and policy arenas of global fi sheries. Not too bad for a ten-year old! Jennifer Jacquet Post Doctoral Fellow Ashley McCrea-Strub Post Doctoral Fellow Sarah Harper Research Assistantpage 17 Policy and Ecosystem Restoration in Fisheries Policy and Ecosystem Restoration in Fisheries (PERF) is a research group dedicated to restoring aquatic ecosystems and ensuring sustainable fi sheries. By developing integrative research tools for historically-based restoration and ecosystem-based management, PERF aims to devise and evaluate sustainable fi sheries policies. The group also explores the human dimensions of fi sheries by examining social-economic factors, cultural values, institutions, ethics and governance. Tony Pitcher and his team evaluate the trade-off s associated with policy options using ecosystem simulations, ecological economics, biodiversity and cultural indicators, historical and traditional knowledge, cognitive science and participatory workshops. The group pioneers interdisciplinary research in the theory and practice of restoration ecology for marine and freshwater ecosystems from around the globe and close to home. We highlight six accomplishments for PERF in 2008-2009: (1) An Exploratory Workshop grant was awarded by the UBC Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, bringing over 50 international participants to discuss the Strait of Georgia. “The Sea Ahead” comprises a new approach to policy that maximizes sustainable future benefi ts in the face of risks from climate change, while “The Sea Before Us” incorporates historically-based reconstruction research; (2) Two major papers contributing to the development of historically-based restoration theory (Optimal Restorable Biomass and a cost/benefi t analysis of restoration) were published in Ecological Modeling with former PERF member Dr Cameron Ainsworth. A comparative analysis of resilience in two coastal communities (BC and Indonesia) using the concept of the Maximum Dexterity Fleet was presented at a conference held at FAO in Rome and later published in Marine Policy; (3) Jamie Slogan organized a 5-day international workshop on Primer 6, a Multivariate Statistics tool for Ecologists and Environmental Scientists. The next three items extend ‘Rapfi sh’, a rapid appraisal method invented in the PERF group: (4) Four years of research with Dr Daniela Kalikoski and Pramod Ganapathiraju culminated in an evaluation of compliance by 53  countries with the UN Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries  published in Nature and detailed in a report published by WWF. In allied work, evalua- tions of progress in implementing ecosystem-based management were published in Marine Policy; (5) Working with Dr David Agnew and others at the Marine Resources Assessment Group, London, UK, a world-wide estimation of the amount of illegal and unreported fi shing was published in PlosOne; (6) The “anchor points/infl uence factors” semi-Bayesian method,  pioneered by PERF, uncovered over 1.5 million tonnes per year of previously unreported catch in the Arafura Sea, Indonesia. Six workshops in the region were led by former     member Dr Tonny Wagey, working with an international team of scientists, fi shers and FAO. Robyn Forrest (Australia) successfully completed her PhD thesis on New South Wales shark fi sheries and is now a stock assessment scientist with DFO. Megan Moody (Nuxalk Nation and Canada) completed her MSc on eulachon in Pacifi c coastal marine ecosystems and is now taking up consultancy work on eulachon. Dr Mimi E. Lam joined the PERF group as a Research Associate in 2009. She leads an initiative in the human dimensions of fi sheries using theoretical insights from ecology and cognitive science. She organized 3 AAAS symposia and currently chairs the Traditional Ecological Knowledge Section of the Ecological Society of America (ESA) and is profi led in ESA’s Focus on Ecologists series. Dr Lam is Guest Editor of an Ecology and Society Special Feature, “The Privilege to Fish”, and gave two invited presentations at the Ocean   Dr. Tony J. Pitcherpage 18 Management Research Network 2009 conference in Og308 awa. Her recent grants are from the Gordon and Beg308 y Moore Foundation, UBC, the BC Ministry of Advanced Education and ESA. Eny Buchary (PhD student: Indonesia) completed her thesis on a traditional sardine fi shery in the Bali Strait, Indonesia. The work identifi ed policy options for responsible use of sardine resources by exploring issues in multiple domains: biological, ecological, socio-cultural, economic and institutional. Part of the work was  presented at a conference at FAO, Rome. She gained travel awards from GLOBEC and SSHRC. Dawit Tesfamichael (PhD student: Eritraea) researches the past, present and future of Red Sea fi sheries. He uses evaluation and modeling techniques from Rapfi sh, ecosystem simulation, and the estimation of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) catch, informed by his extensive fi eldwork and interview data from coastal communities throughout the region. Divya Varkey (PhD student: India) works on modeling and ecosystem-based management of coral reef fi sheries, sponsored by a Packard EBFM project in Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia. She helped to organize “Oceans Past II”, an international conference on the history (and future) of marine animal populations (HMAP); “The Sea Ahead”, a workshop using history to plan the future of fi sheries in the Strait of Georgia; and “Ecopath 25 years”, an international conference. She published an analysis of IUU in Raja Ampat and was awarded a UBC Scholarship and the John R Grace Fellowship. Carie Hoover (PhD student: USA) researches the ecosystem eff ects of climate change in the Antarctic Peninsula and Hudson Bay. Global climate forecasts are integrated with ecosystem simulations showing how top predators may be impacted. The   Hudson Bay research is in collaboration with DFO, Winnipeg as part of an   International Polar Year project: Global Warming and Arctic Marine Mammals. She has also expanded her research to include an economic analysis of whale hunts in   Nunavut to show its importance to regional communities. Pramod Ganapathiraju (PhD student: India) works on illegal fi shing and factors contributing to compliance with the UN Code of Conduct for Responsible Fishing. Pramod spent 11 months performing fi eldwork in India, sponsored by the 2007 Cosmos International Travel Award, MRAG Ltd. and the UK Government. Interviews and estimates of IUU were made in all of the maritime coastal states of India, including the remote Andaman Islands, where illegal fi shing appears to be rife. Final estimates of total catches identify over a million tonnes per annum of unreported catch. Rajeev Kumar (PhD student: India) built and fi g308 ed a detailed ecosystem model for Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota. During fi eld trips to the site, he liaised with the Department of Natural Resources, the sponsor for this research, on the choice of model parameters and practical research questions to be addressed. Rajeev also presented new sog286 ware to dis- play the diet matrix in ecosystem modelling at a sog286 ware conference in Portland, Oregon. Lydia Teh (PhD student: Canada/Malaysia) continued her fi eldwork tracking   habitat and fi shing grounds use by small-scale fi shers in the Semporna Islands and Pulau Banggi, Sabah, Malaysia, She is using the data to develop a fuzzy logic approach to the establishment of MPAs. Lydia’s fi eldwork is sponsored by the 2008 UBC Cosmos International Travel Award. Lingbo Li (PhD student: China) works on modeling the lower trophic levels in the Strait of Georgia ecosystem and was awarded an NSERC Postgraduate Scholarship. She ag308 ended the 17th Annual BC Marine Mammal Symposium in Vancouver, a GLOBEC meeting in Victoria, the Puget Sound Georgia Basin Ecosystem   Conference in Seag308 le, and the Canadian Conference for Fisheries Research in Halifax. Jamie Slogan (PhD student: Canada) joined the PERF group to research the long-term community dynamics of intertidal and sub-tidal marine species on fi sh compensation habitat in Burrard Inlet. Jamie dives and works with EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd, a company responsible for the restoration of the shoreline at the Vancouver Convention Centre. He has been awarded an NSERC Industrial Post-Graduate Scholarship and an Al MacDonald Life-long Learning Award. hg308 p://sites.google.com/site/ferrfcpage 19 Graduate Studies Fisheries Centre students come from all over the world. The 48 PhD and 25 MSc students at the FC during 2008 and 2009 came from at least 25 countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Eritrea, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Philippines, Peru, Samoa, Singapore, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the USA . Since the Fisheries Centre is not an admig308 ing unit at UBC, our students are supervised or co-supervised by a FC faculty member, and admig308 ed to UBC Graduate Studies through other departments, primarily Resource Management and Environmental Studies (RMES) and Zoology, but also Geography and Oceanography.  Over the past two years, RMES and Zoology have provided a second home to 37% and 58% of FC students, respectively, with the rest fi nding second homes at other departments. Students’ research covers a wide range of topics related to the FC Mission: Restoring fi sheries, conserving aquatic life, rebuilding ecosystems: Researching the options. Student research topics usually comprise knowledge from a variety of disciplines. Thesis topics include understanding species life history and population dynamics of key resource species; fi sheries, ecosystem and bioeconomic modeling; quantifying the impacts of overfi shing, non-selective fi sheries and climate change; evaluating possible mitigation tools and policy options; historical reconstructions and future projections of populations and catches; and economic valuations. During 2008 and 2009, 15 doctoral and 10 master’s students completed their thesis research. A list of these graduates and their thesis titles is on pages 24-25. Thesis abstracts can be seen at                                       www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/graduated.php. Since 2008, all UBC PhD graduates have prepared short lay-language summaries describing their doctoral reseach. Fisheries Centre summaries are at www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/ FCdoctoralcitations. In addition to their research eff orts, students play an important role in the day to day life of the Fisheries Centre. A student representative participates in faculty meetings thereby ensuring that students’ interests are considered in all decision making. Students organize the weekly FC Seminar Series and coff ee breaks, help out with events such as the biennial Larkin Lecture and holiday celebrations, coordinate building- wide composting, edit FishBytes and the newsleg308 ers of various groups, and coordinate fora for discussion. Fisheries Centre students are known to tackle rather ambitious projects that og286 en involve travel to far parts of the globe. In the fi eld, students gain hands-on experience with the fauna, markets, fi shery systems, etc., that are the focus of their research. Our students are gaining an increased understanding of the implications of their work for all stakeholders involved. Engaging in diverse projects spanning the globe has allowed our students to make strong connections with their global peers, working alongside NGOs, local communities, fi shing industry associations and scientists. Despite the diversity of students’ research and fi eld sites, the overarching perspective echoes the Fisheries Centre’s goal to reconcile fi sheries and conservation. To achieve its goal, the Fisheries Centre promotes the multidisciplinary study of fi sheries, and aims to provide its graduate students with a strong background in quantitative aspects of fi shery science and in all aspects of aquatic conservation biology. Analytical tools developed in a broad spectrum of parent subjects, including biology, oceanography, economics, engineering, mathematics, sociology, planning and policy are employed in order to assess, appraise and forecast the impacts of both human and natural processes on fi shery resources. Fisheries policy and management problems under study include assessment and management of artisanal and commercial food capture fi sheries, recreational fi sheries, coastal and watershed management, aquaculture biology and engineering, confl ict resolution and the co-management of shared fi shery resources, and the conservation of endangered exploited species in both marine and freshwater environments. Faculty members teach a number of graduate credit courses, on such topics as quantitative analysis and modeling, economics, and aquatic policy. These FISH courses are detailed on the graduate program web page www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/grad. www.fi sheries.ubc.ca/gradpage 20 Graduate Students * Thesis completed by December 2009  Robert Ahrens (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2004*) Project: Global analysis of apparent trends in abundance and recruitment of tunas and billfi sh vulnerable to pelagic longline gear. Supervisors:  Dr Carl Walters and Dr Villy Christensen Pamela Allen (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2006*) Project: Quantifying seasonal changes in growth and consumption of Steller sea lions from captive records Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Jonathan Anticamara (Philippines) PhD RMES (start 2002*) Project: Ecology and implications of           recovering degraded reef communities within no-take marine reserves Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Megan Bailey (Canada) PhD RMES (start 2008) Project: Economics of tuna fi sheries in the western and central Pacifi c Ocean Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila FishBytes Editor 2009  Natalie Ban (Canada) PhD RMES (start 2003*) Project: Multiple perspectives for               envisioning marine protected areas Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent  Lucas Brotz (Canada) MSc Oceanography (start 2007) Project: Trends in global jellyfi sh              populations Supervisors:  Dr Daniel Pauly and Dr    Evgeny Pakhomov Eny Buchary (Indonesia) PhD RMES (start 2001*) Project: In search of viable policy options for responsible use of marine resources in the Bali Strait, Indonesia Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher  Iain Caldwell (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2006) Project: Movement of a sedentary fi sh in response to environmental change Supervisor:  Dr Amanda Vincent  Brooke Campbell (Canada) MSc RMES (start 2007) Project: Clarifying historic trends in the   marine aquaculture sector: a spatially- refi ned bog308 om-up reconstruction of global production Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Ella Bowles (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2007*) Project: Quantifying Steller sea lion diet   using real-time PCR Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr Trish Schulte Dalal Al-Abdulrazzak (Kuwait) MSc Zoology (start 2009) Project: Historical ecology of Persian Gulf fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly  Louise Blight (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2007) Project: Using stable isotope analysis to compare ancient and modern change events in marine foodwebs [transferred to Forestry in 2008] Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent  Brajgeet Bhathal (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Analysis of fi shing impacts on In- dia’s marine ecosystems and exploration of possible policy scenario Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Elizabeth Atwood (USA) MSc Zoology (start 2008) Project: Investigating nutritional stress in Northern Fur Seals Supervisor: Dr Andrew Tritespage 21 Luciano Dalla Rosa (Brazil) PhD Zoology (start 2003*) Project: Habitat modeling of                 humpback whales in British Columbia and the Antarctic Supervisors:  Dr John Ford and Dr Andrew Trites Robyn Forrest (Australia) PhD RMES (start 2002*) Project: Simulation models for strategic E-B decision-making in the data-limited        fi sheries of New South Wales, Australia Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Fishbytes Editor 2008  Sarah Foster (Canada/New Zealand) PhD RMES (start 2004*) Project: Assessing the impacts of shrimp trawling on small fi sh species Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent  Meaghan Darcy (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Management strategy evaluation for a multi-species, multi-sector fi shery in the Hawaiian Islands Supervisor: Dr Steve Martell  James Hehre (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2009) Project: Ecological impacts of seaweed farming on coral reefs in the central        Philippines Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Mike Hawkshaw (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2005*) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: Inter-cohort density dependence and cyclic age zero survival of cyprinids Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters Anna Hall (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2004) Project: Eff ects of tidal mixing on porpoise distribution: Implications for foraging Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Nigel Haggan (Northern Ireland) PhD RMES (start 2006) Project: Mapping cultural and spiritual values of coastal ecosystems Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Sarika Cullis-Suzuki (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2006*) Project: Eff ectiveness of regional fi sheries management organizations Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly  Eli Guieb (Philippines) PhD McGill (start 2002*) Project: Cultural issues behind marine    protected areas Supervisors: Dr Amanda Vincent, Dr Colin Scog308  and Dr Monica Mulrennan Andres M. Cisneros-Montemayor  (Mexico) MSc RMES (start 2008) Project: Economic and ecological implica- tions of ecosystem-based marine recreation Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila  Carie Hoover (USA) PhD RMES (start 2006) Project: Eff ects of climate change on polar ecosystems Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher   Pramod Ganapathiraju (India) PhD RMES (start 2005) Project: A global study on incentives and disincentives to IUU fi shing and compliance with the FAO Code of Conduct Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Rhona Govender (South Africa) MSc Zoology (start 2009) Project: A global estimate of the catch of small-scale fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly  Wes Didier (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Testing for stresses that my be       aff ecting fecundity of eulachon Supervisor: Dr David Close Susana Cardenas (Peru) MSc Zoology (start 2008) Project: Recovery of South American fur seals in Peru Supervisor: Dr Andrew Tritespage 22 Megan Moody (Canada) MSc RMES (start 2004*) Project: Historical analysis of current and past Pacifi c Coast eulachon status and the possible reasons for its decline Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Vicky Wing Yee Lam (Hong Kong) PhD RMES (start 2008) Project: Global fi sheries economics in the face of change in climate and energy prices Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila  Pamela Lestenkof (USA) MSc Zoology (2004) Project: Fine scale diving behaviour of lac- tating northern fur seals [withdrew in 2009] Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites  Rajeev Kumar (India) PhD RMES (start 2006) Project: Simulation modeling of Mille Lacs Lake ecosystems in support of EBM Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Josh Korman (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2005*) Project: Factors in infl uencing recruitment dynamics, growth, survival, and ontogenetic habitat movement of salmonids in large river systems Supervisors: Dr Steve Martell and Dr Carl Walters Danika Kleiber (Canada/USA) PhD RMES (start 2009) Project: Gender, marine resource use and community conservation in the Danajon Bank, Central Philippines Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Aaron Keech (USA) MSc Zoology (start 2005*) Project: Analyses of corticosterone and  triiodothyronine hormones to assess             nutritional stress in Steller sea lions Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Michael Melnychuk (Canada) PhD  Zoology (start 2004*) Project: Ecology of juvenile salmon river and early ocean migrations: Assessment of mortality pag308 erns with active and passive acoustic telemetry Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters and Dr Villy Christensen Steve McAdam (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Examination of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) recruitment failure and identifi cation of restoration options Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters Lingbo Li (China) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: Examining climate change impacts on the Strait of Georgia marine ecosystem Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Dale Marsden (Canada) PhD RMES (start 2003) Project: Bioeconomic analysis of Fraser River sockeye salmon fi sheries management Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Jennifer Jacquet (USA) PhD RMES (start 2005*) Project: Fish as food in an age of               globalization Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Rachael Louton (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2007) Project: Evaluation of alternative            management regimes for shrimp fi sheries in the Gulf of Mexico Supervisor: Dr Murdoch McAllister  Gakushi Ishimura (Japan) PhD RMES (start 2004*) Project: Economic analysis of Pacifi c sardine fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Tabitha Hui (Singapore) MSc Zoology (start 2007) Project: Competition between fi sheries and Steller sea lions Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Roseti Imo (Samoa) PhD RMES (start 2006) Project: Spatial policy analysis for albacore management in the western central Pacifi c Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila and Dr Carl Walterspage 23 Tom Porteus (UK) PhD Zoology (start 2006) Project: Use of Bayesian methods to evaluate strategies for control of terrestrial       vertebrate pest species Supervisor: Dr Murdoch McAllister Kerrie O’Donnell (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Evaluating recovery options for data-limited seahorse fi sheries in the      Philippines Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Max Thilo Stoeven (Germany) Visting PhD Student, Christian Albrechts Universität zu Kiel (2008 -2009) Project : Demand for renewable resource Supervisor: Dr Rashid SumailaAndrea Rambeau (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2006*) Project: Defi ning parameters for                    a migrating, intermixing population of  humpback whales in British Columbia Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr John Ford Ben Starkhouse (USA) MSc RMES (start 2006*) Project: Quantifying and valuing extractive resources of Fij i’s coral reefs Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Chiara Piroddi (Italy) MSc Zoology (start 2005*) Project: The application of Ecopath with Ecosim to the study of two populations of dolphins in the Eastern Ionian Sea, Greece Supervisor: Dr Villy Christensen  Jamie Slogan (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: Long-term community dynamics of marine fi sh compensation habitat in Burrard Inlet, BC. Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Michelle Paleczny (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2008) Project: The eff ect of commercial fi sheries on global seabird populations Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Shannon Obradovich (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: Survey methodologies and        management strategy evaluation for BC inshore rockfi sh Supervisor: Dr Murdoch McAllister Frances Robertson (UK/Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2008) Project: The eff ects of behaviour, age, status, environmental parameters and exposure to seismic operations on the observed distri- bution of bowhead whales in the Alaskan Arctic Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites  Jennifer Selgrath (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2006) Project: Ecosystem resilience in coastal   fi shing grounds Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent  Marivic Pajaro (Philippines) PhD RMES (start 2002*) Project: Biological, social and economic indicators of eff ectiveness in community- managed marine protected areas Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Brent Roberts (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2009) Project: The physiological mechanism for response to stress in the sea lamprey,       Petromyzon marinus Supervisor: Dr David Close No Photo Avaliable Wilf Swartz (Canada/Japan) PhD RMES (start 2008) Project: How does international trade aff ect marine fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila  Erin Rechisky (USA) PhD Zoology (start 2004*) Project: Early marine survival and             migration of endangered Pacifi c salmon in the Columbia and Fraser Rivers Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters Chad Nordstrom (Canada) MSc Zoology (2008) Project: Linking foraging northern fur seals with oceanographic features in the eastern Bering Sea Supervisor: Dr Andrew Tritespage 24 Beth Young (USA) MSc Zoology(start 2007) Project: The ability of heart rate to predict metabolism in Steller sea lions Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr David Rosen Mandy Wong (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2007) Project: Do El Niño-southern oscillation events positively aff ect the diet of the       Hawaiian monk seal Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr Dominic Tollit Chad Wilkinson (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2005*) Project: Population study on west-slope  cug308 hroat trout and bull trout in a closed river system of the southern BC Rockies Supervisor: Dr Steve Martell Coleg308 e Wabnitz (France/Germany) PhD Geography (start 2003*) Project: The ecological role of green sea turtles and the mapping of their foraging grounds in the wider Caribbean region. Supervisors: Dr Daniel Pauly and Dr Brian Klinkenberg Divya Varkey (India) PhD RMES (start 2005) Project: Ecosystem modelling of coral reefs in Raja Ampat Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Liesbeth van der Meer (Chile) MSc RMES (start 2009) Project: Fish Retail contribution to the global economy Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Laura Tremblay-Boyer (Canada) MSc Zoology (start 2007) Project :  Impacts of global fi sheries on the biomass of marine ecosystems since 1950 Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Lydia Teh (Malaysia) PhD RMES (start 2007) Project: Zoning MPAs using a fuzzy logic system: case study of small-scale reef       fi sheries in Sabah, Malaysia Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Louise Teh (Malaysia) PhD RMES (start 2007) Project: Investigating the discount rates of small-scale fi shers in the Sulu-Sulawesi Marine ecoregion Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila  Breg308  van Poorten (Canada) PhD Zoology (start 2005) Project: Eff ects of interspecifi c competition on recruitment processes in rainbow trout and Pygmy Pikeminnow Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters Dawit Tesfamichael (Eritrea) PhD RMES (start 2002) Project: Ecosystem based fi sheries          management of the Red Sea Supervisors: Dr Daniel Pauly and Dr Tony Pitcherpage 25 Graduate Theses Completed* *Thesis abstracts are available online at www.fi sheries.ubc.ca. Marivic Pajaro (Philippines) PhD Resource Management and Environmental Studies Title: Indicators of eff ectiveness in community-based marine protected areas Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Chiara Piroddi (Italy) MSc Zoology Title: An ecosystem-based approach to study two dolphin populations around the island of Kalamos, Ionian Sea, Greece Supervisor: Dr Villy Christensen Erin Rechisky (USA) PhD Zoology Title: Migration and survival of juvenile Pacifi c salmon determined by a large- scale telemetry array and implications for their conservation Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters Ben Starkhouse (USA) MSc Resource Management and Environmental Studies Title: What’s the catch: uncovering the catch volume and value of Fij i’s coral reef-based artisanal and subsistence fi sheries Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Coleg308 e Wabnitz (France/Germany) PhD Geography Title: Marine turtle conservation and ecosystem based management with a focus on green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and seagrass ecosystems Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly and Dr Brian Klinkenberg Chad Wilkinson (Canada) MSc Zoology Title: Sportfi sh population dynamics in an intensively managed river system Supervisor: Dr Steve Martell Sarah Foster (Canada/New Zealand) PhD Resource Management and Environmental Studies Title: Is bycatch a big problem for small fi sh? Assessing and addressing the impacts of tropical shrimp trawling on small fi sh species Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Eli Guieb (Philippines) PhD McGill Title: Community, marine rights, and sea tenure: a political ecology of marine conservation in two Bohol villages in central Philippines Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent and Dr Colin Scog308  and Dr Monica Mulrennan Gaku Ishimura (Japan) PhD Resource Management and Environmental Studies Title: Transboundary management of a fi sh stock under climate variability: the case of Pacifi c sardine in the California current ecosystem Supervisor: Dr Rashid Sumaila Jennifer Jacquet (USA) PhD Resource Management and Environmental Studies Title: Fish as food in an age of globalization Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Josh Korman (Canada) PhD Zoology Title: Early life history dynamics of rainbow trout in a large regulated river Supervisors: Dr Steve Martell and Dr Carl Walters Mike Melnychuk (Canada) PhD Zoology Title: Mortality of migrating Pacifi c salmon smolts in southern British Columbia, Canada Supervisors: Dr Carl Walters and Dr Villy Christensen Robert Ahrens (Canada) PhD Zoology Title: A global analysis of apparent trends in abundance and recruitment of large tunas and billfi shes inferred from Japanese longline catch and eff ort data Supervisors: Dr Carl Walters and Dr Villy Christensen Pamela Allen (Canada) MSc Zoology Title: Seasonal oscillations in the mass and food intake of Steller sea lions Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Jonathan Anticamara (Philippines) PhD Resource Management and Environmental Studies Title: Ecology of recovering degraded reef communities within no-take marine reserves Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Ella Bowles (Canada) MSc Zoology Title: Determining the relative amounts of prey in Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) diet using real-time PCR Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr Trish Schulte Eny Buchary (Indonesia) PhD Resource Management and Environmental Studies Title: In search of viable policy options for responsible use of sardine resources in the Bali Strait, Indonesia Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Sarika Cullis-Suzuki (Canada) MSc Zoology Title: High seas, high risk: a global evaluation of the eff ectiveness of regional fi sheries management organizations Supervisor: Dr Daniel Pauly Luciano Dalla Rosa (Brazil) PhD Zoology Title: Modeling the foraging habitat of humpback whales Supervisor: Dr John Ford and Dr Andrew Trites 2009page 26 2008 Natalie Ban (Canada) PhD Resource Management and  Environmental Studies Title: Multiple perspectives for   envisioning marine protected areas Supervisor: Dr Amanda Vincent Robyn Forrest (Australia) PhD Resource Management and  Environmental Studies Title: Simulation models for estimating productivity and trade-off s in the  data-limited fi sheries of New South Wales, Australia Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Aaron Keech (USA) MSc Zoology Title: Fecal triiodothyronine assay validation using captive Steller sea lions (Eumetopias Jubatus) and subsequent application to free-ranging populations to examine nutritional stress Supervisor: Dr Andrew Trites Mike Hawkshaw (Canada) MSc Zoology Title: Methods for estimation of cyclic recruitment variation in pygmy northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus   oregonensis) of south central British Columbia Supervisor: Dr Carl Walters Megan Moody (Canada) MSc Resource Management and  Environmental Studies Title: Eulachon past and present Supervisor: Dr Tony Pitcher Andrea Rambeau (Canada) MSc Zoology Title: Determining abundance and stock structure for a widespread migratory animal: The case of humpback whales (Megaptera Novaeangliae) in British Columbia, Canada Supervisors: Dr Andrew Trites and Dr John Fordpage 27 Fisheries Centre Members Faculty Dr U. Rashid Sumaila, Director Associate Professor, Fisheries Centre Fisheries Economics Dr Villy Christensen Associate Professor, Fisheries Centre Ecosystem Modeling Dr David Close Assistant Professor, Fisheries Centre & Zoology Aboriginal Fisheries Dr Steven Martell Assistant Professor, Fisheries Centre Quantitative Fisheries Stock Assessment Dr Murdoch McAllister Associate Professor, Fisheries Centre Bayesian Statistical Methods Dr Tony J. Pitcher Professor, Fisheries Centre & Zoology Ecosystems, Rapid Appraisal and Schooling Dr Daniel Pauly Professor, Fisheries Centre & Zoology Tropical & Global Fisheries Issues Dr Andrew Trites Professor, Fisheries Centre Marine Mammals and Fisheries Dr Amanda Vincent Associate Professor, Fisheries Centre Canada Research Chair in Marine Conservation Dr Carl Walters Professor, Fisheries Centre & Zoology Modeling, Assessment and Ecosystems Emeritus Members Dr Les Lavkulich Fisheries Education  Dr Paul LeBlond Fisheries Oceanography Dr Don Ludwig Fisheries Mathematics Dr Patricia Marchak Forests & Fisheries Dr Gordon Munro Fisheries Economics Dr William Neill Fisheries Limnology Dr Tom Northcote Fisheries Biology Associated UBC Faculty Dr Jo-Ann Archibald First Nations House of Learning Aboriginal Issues & Education Dr Brian Elliot Sociology Environmental Sociology Dr Douglas Harris Law Fisheries Law Dr Scog308  Hinch Forest Sciences and Institute for Resources & Environment Forests & Fisheries Dr David (Ralph) Mag308 hews Sociology Fisheries Sociology Dr Charles Menzies Anthropology Fisheries Anthropology Dr Diane Newell History History of Fishers Communities Dr Richard Paisley Law Fisheries Law Dr Royann Petrell Chemical & Biological Engineering Fishery Engineering Dr William Rees School of Community & Regional Planning Ecological Economics Dr Richard Vedan First Nations House of Learning Aboriginal Fisheries Adjunct Professors & Associated Faculty Outside UBC Dr Jackie Alder Consultant Coastal Zone Management Dr Claire Armstrong University of Tromsø Fisheries Economics Dr Martin Castonguay DFO, Quebec Fisheries Biology Dr Ratana Chuenpagdee Dalhousie University Fisheries Economics Dr John K. B. Ford DFO, Nanaimo Marine Mammals Dr Martin Haulena Vancouver Aquarium Veterinarian Dr Douglas E. Hay DFO, Nanaimo Pelagic Fisheries Dr Glen Jamieson DFO, Nanaimo Invertebrate Fisheries Dr. Jacquelynne King DFO, Nanaimo Fisheries Climaatology Dr Mimi Lam Consultant Aboriginal Fisheries Dr Rosemary Ommer University of Victoria Fisheries Sociology Dr Stephen Raverty BC Agriculture and Lands Pathologist - Fish & Mammals Dr Jon Schnute Fisheries Mathematicianpage 28 Dr John Spence BC Science Council Industry and Fisheries Dr Laura Richards DFO, Nanaimo Fisheries Assessment Dr Jordan Rosenfeld BC Min. Environment Stream Ecology Dr Max Stocker DFO, Nanaimo Fisheries Assessment Dr Arthur Tautz BC Fisheries, Vancouver GIS, Sports Fisheries Dr John Volpe University of Victoria Sustainable Aquaculture Dr Scog308  Wallace David Suzuki Foundation, Vancouver Fisheries Conservation Dr Jane Watson Malaspina College, Nanaimo Marine Mammals FC Office Staff Ann Tautz Administration Support Janice Doyle Administration Support International Advisory Council Dr Philippe Cury CRH/IRD Sete, France Dr Douglas DeMaster National Marine Fisheries Service Seag308 le, USA Dr Cornelia Nauen European Union Brussels, Belgium Dr Ana Parma Centro Nacional Patagónico Chubut, Argentina Dr Yvonne Sadovy University of Hong Kong Hong Kong, China Dr Anthony D. M. Smith CSIRO Marine & Atmospheric Research Hobart, Tasmaniapage 29 Publications ARTICLES IN REFEREED JOURNALS Agnew, D., Pearce, J., Pramod, G., Peatman, T., Watson, R., Beddington, J.R. and Pitcher, T.J. (2009) Estimating the worldwide extent of illegal fi shing. Public Library of Science One 4(2): e4570. Alder, J., Cullis-Suzuki, S., Karpouzi, V., Kaschner, K., Mondoux, S., Swartz, W., Trujillo, P., Watson, R. and Pauly, D. (2009) Aggregate performance in          managing marine ecosystems in 53 maritime  countries. Marine Policy 34(3): 468-476. Ban, N.C. (2009) Minimum data requirements for designing a set of marine protected areas, using commonly available abiotic and biotic datasets. Biodiversity and Conservation 18(7): 1829-1845. Ban, N.C. and Vincent, A.C.J. (2009) Beyond marine reserves: Exploring the approach of selecting areas where fi shing is permig308 ed, rather than prohibited. Public Library of Science ONE 4(7): e6258. Ban, N.C., Caldwell, I.R., Green, T.L., Morgan, S.M., O’Donnell, K. and Selgrath, J.C. (2009) Diverse Fish- eries Require Diverse Solutions. Science 323: 338-339. Ban, N.C., Hansen, G.J.A., Jones, M. and Vincent, A.C.J. (2009) Systematic marine conservation planning in data-poor regions: Socioeconomic data is essential. Marine Policy 33(5): 794-800. Ban, N.C., Picard, C. and Vincent, A.C.J. (2009) Comparing and integrating community-based and science-based conservation approaches to prioritizing marine areas for protection. Conservation Biology 23(4): 899-910. Carrier, P.C., Rosenfeld, J.S. and Johnson, R. (2009) A         simple method to correct for electrofi shing capture       effi  ciency bias using mark-recapture. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 16: 139-146. Cheung, W.L.W., Close, C., Lam, V.W.Y., Sarmiento, J., Kear- ney, K., Watson, R. and Pauly, D. (2009) Projections of global marine biodiversity impacts under climate change scenarios. Fish and Fisheries 10: 235-251. Christensen, V., Ferdaña, Z. and Steenbeek, J. (2009)          Spatial optimization of protected area placement                incorporating ecological, social and economical criteria. Ecological Modelling 220: 2583-2593. Christensen, V., Walters, C., Ahrens, R., Alder, J., Buszows- ki, J., Christensen, L., Cheung, W.L., Dunne, J.,          Froese, R., Karpouzi, V., Kastner, K., Kearney, K., Lai, S., Lam, V., Palomares, D., Peters-Mason, A., Piroddi, C., Sarmiento, J.L., Steenbeek, J., Sumaila, U.R., Watson, R., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (2009) Database-driven models of the world’s large marine     ecosystems. Ecological Modelling 220: 1984-1996. Clarke, S.C., McAllister, M.K. and Kirkpatrick, R.C. (2009) Estimating legal and illegal catches of Kamchatka salmon from trade and market data. ICES Journal of Marine Science 66(3): 532-545.  Courteney, W.R., Colleg308 e, B., Essington, T., Hilborn, R., Orr, J., Pauly, D., Randall, J.E. and Smith-Vaniz, W. (2009) Risk of introductions of marine fi shes: reply to Briggs. Fisheries 34: 181-186. Duan, L.J., Li, S.Y., Liu, Y., Moreau, J. and Christensen, V. (2009) Modeling changes in the coastal ecosystem of the Pearl River Estuary from 1981 to 1998. Ecological Modelling 220: 2802-2818. Ebeling, J. and Yasue, M. (2009) The eff ectiveness of market- based conservation in the tropics: Forest certifi cation in Ecuador and Bolivia.  Journal of Environmental Management 90(2): 1145-1153. Ferenbaugh, J., Strauss, R., Tollit, D., Chen, Z. and Diamond, S. (2009) Exploring the potential of otolith micro- chemistry to enhance diet analysis in pinnipeds. Marine Biology 156: 2235-2246. Foster, S.J. and Vincent, A.C.J. (2009) Tropical shrimp trawl fi sheries: Fishers’ knowledge of and ag308 itudes about a doomed fi shery. Marine Policy 34: 437-446. Gerber, L.R., Morisseg308 e, L., Kaschner, K. and Pauly, D. (2009) Should whales be culled to increase fi shery yields? Science 323: 880-881. Heymans, J.J., Sumaila, U.R. and Christensen, V. (2009) Policy options for the northern Benguela ecosystem using a multi-species, multi-fl eet model. Progress in       Oceanography 83: 417-425. Hindle, A.G., Horning, M., Mellish, J.A.E. and Lawler, J.M. (2009) Diving into old age: muscular senescence in a large-bodied, long-lived mammal, the Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii). Journal of Experimental     Biology 212: 790-796. Hori, B.D., R.J. Petrell, A.W. Trites and T. Godbey. (2009) Lamination for subdermal implant fi xation.                  Journal of Biomedical Materials Research: Part B -       Applied Biomaterials 91B: 17-25. Jacquet, J. (2009a) What can conservationists learn from       investor behavior? Conservation Biology 23: 518-519. Jacquet, J., Hocevar, J., Lai, S., Majluf, P., Pelletier, N., Pitcher, T., Sala, E., Sumaila, U.R. and Pauly, D. (2009)  Conserving wild fi sh in a sea of market based eff orts. Oryx 44(1): 45-56. Jacquet, J.L. (2009b) Silent water: A brief examination of the marine fi sheries crisis. Environment, Development and Sustainability 11: 255-263. Jeanniard du Dot, T., D.A.S. Rosen and A.W. Trites. (2009) Energy re-allocation during and ag286 er periods of nutritional stress in Steller sea lions: low-quality diet reduces capacity for physiological adjustments. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 89: 516-530.page 30 Jeanniard du Dot, T., Rosen, D.A.S., Richmond, J.P., Kitaysky, A.S., Zinn, S.A. and Trites, A.W. (2009) Changes in glucocorticoids, somatotropic and thyroid hormones as indicators of nutritional stress and subsequent refeeding in Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus). Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology 152: 524-534. Jenkins, D.J.A., Sievenpiper, J.L., Pauly, D., Sumaila, U.R. and Kendall, C.W.C. (2009) Are dietary recom- mendations for the use of fi sh oils sustainable?           Canadian Medical Association Journal 180: 633-637. Leung, E.S., Rosenfeld, J.S. and Bernhardt, J.R. (2009) Habitat eff ects on invertebrate drig286  in a small trout stream: implications for prey availability to      drig286 -feeding fi sh. Hydrobiologia 623: 113–125. Lusseau, D., Bain, D.E., Williams, R. and Smith, J.C. (2009) Vessel traffi  c disrupts the foraging behavior of southern resident killer whales Orcinus orca.      Endangered Species Research 6: 211-221. Ma, H., Townsend, H., Zhang, X., Sigrist, M. and Chris- tensen, V. (2009) Using a fi sheries ecosystem model with a water quality model to explore trophic and habitat impacts on fi sheries stock: A case study of the blue crab population in Chesapeake Bay. Ecological Modelling 221(7): 997-1004.  Marsden, D., Martell, S. and Sumaila, U.R. (2009)             Retrospective bioeconomic analysis of Fraser River  sockeye salmon fi shery management. Fisheries Research 1-2: 32-41. Martell, S., Walters, C.W. and Sumaila, U.R. (2009)             Industry-funded fi shing licence reduction good for profi ts and conservation. Fish and Fisheries 10: 1-12.  Melnychuk, M.C. and Christensen, V. (2009) Methods for estimating detection effi  ciency and tracking acoustic tags with mobile transect surveys. Journal of Fisheries Biology 75: 1773-1794. Mora, C., Myers, R.A., Coll, M., Libralato, S., Pitcher, T.J., Sumaila, U.R., Zeller, D., Watson, R., Gaston, K.J. and Worm, B. (2009) Management eff ectiveness of the world’s marine fi sheries. PLoS Biology 7(6): 1-11. Morato, T., Bulman, C. and Pitcher, T.J. (2009) Modelled eff ects of primary and secondary production enhancement by seamounts on local fi sh stocks. Deep-Sea Research Part II 56: 2713-2719. Nadeau, J.L., Curtis, J.M.R. and Lourie, S.A. (2009)        Preservation causes shrinkage in seahorses: implications for biological studies and for                  managing sustainable trade with minimum size limits. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems 19(4): 428-438. Naud, M.J., Curtis, J.M.R., Woodall, L.C. and Gaspar, M.B. (2009) Mate choice, operational sex ratio, and social promiscuity in a wild population of the long-snouted seahorse Hippocampus gug308 ulatus. Behavioral Ecology 20(1): 160-164. Naujokaitis-Lewis, R.I., Curtis, J.R., Arcese, P. and Rosenfeld, J.S. (2009) Prioritizing research for species at risk: sensitivity and infl uence of spatial and non-spatial             parameters in population viability analysis.  Conservation Biology 23: 225-229.  Neira, S., Moloney, C., Cury, P., Mullon, C. and Christensen, V. (2009) Mechanisms aff ecting recovery in an upwelling food web: the case of the southern Humboldt. Progress in Oceanography 83: 404-416. Nunoo, F.K.E., Boateng, J.O., Ahulu, A.M., Agyekum, K.A. and Sumaila, U.R. (2009) When trash fi sh is treasure: The case of Ghana in West Africa. Fisheries Research 96: 167- 172. Palomares, M.L.D. and Pauly, D. (2009) The growth of   jellyfi shes. Hydrobiologia 616: 11-21. Pauly, D. (2009) Beyond Duplicity and Ignorance in Global  Fisheries. Scientia Marina 73(2): 215-223. Pauly, D., Graham, W., Libralato, S., Morisseg308 e, L. and Palo- mares, M.L.D. (2009) Jellyfi sh in ecosystems, online da- tabases and ecosystem models. Hydrobiologia 616: 67-85. Pine, W.E., III, Walters, C., Kitchell, J.F. and Martell, S.J. (2009) Counterintuitive responses of fi sh populations to  management actions: some common causes and  implications for predictions based on ecosystem  modeling.  Fisheries 34(4): 165-180. Pitcher, T.J., Kalikoski, D., Pramod, G. and Short, K. (2009) Not Honouring the Code. Nature 457: 658-659. Randall, J.E. and Lourie, S.A. (2009) Hippocampus tyro, a new seahorse (Gasterosteiformes: Syngnathidae) from the Seychelles. Smithiana Bulletin 10: 19-21 Rea, L. D., Berman, M., Rosen, D.A.S. and Trites, A.W. (2009) Seasonal diff erences in biochemical adaptation to  fasting in juvenile and subadult Steller sea lions   (Eumetopias jubatus). Physiological and Biochemical  Zoology 82: 236-247. Rosen, D.A.S. (2009) Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus and   nutritional stress: evidence from captive studies.  Mammal Review 39: 284-306. Rosenfeld, J.S. and Taylor, J. (2009) Prey abundance, channel structure and the allometry of growth rate potential for juvenile trout. Fisheries Management and Ecology 16: 202-218. Sharp, R. and Sumaila, U.R. (2009) Quantifi cation of U.S. marine fi sheries subsidies. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 29: 18-32. Sharp, R. and Sumaila, U.R. (2009) Quantifi cation of U.S. Marine Fisheries Subsidies. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 29: 18-32.  page 31 Sigler, M.F., Tollit, D.J., Vollenweider, J.J., Thedinga, J.F., Csepp, D.J., Womble, J.N., Wong, M.A., Rehberg, M.J. and Trites, A.W. (2009) Foraging response of a marine predator, the Steller sea lion, to seasonal changes in prey availability. Marine Ecology Progress Series 388: 243-261. Stergiou, K.I., Tsikliras, A.C. and Pauly, D. (2009) Farming up the Mediterranean food webs. Conservation Biology 23: 230-232. Svärd, C., Fahlman, A., Rosen, D.A.S., Joy, R. and Trites, A.W. (2009) Fasting aff ects the surface and diving         metabolic rates of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias juba- tus). Aquatic Biology 8: 71-82. Teh, L.C.L., Teh, L.S.L., Starkhouse, B. and Sumaila, U.R. (2009) An overview of socio-economic and ecological perspectives of Fij i’s inshore reef fi sheries. Marine Policy 33(5): 807-817. Tollit, D.J., Schulze, A.D., Trites, A.W., Olesiuk, P.F., Crock- ford, S.J., Gelag308 , T.S., Ream, R.R. and Miller, K.M. (2009) Development and application of DNA  techniques for validating and improving pinniped diet estimates. Ecological Applications 19: 889-905. Varkey, D.A., Ainsworth, C.H., Pitcher, T.J., Goram, J. and Sumaila, U.R. (2009) Illegal, Unreported and  Unregulated fi sheries catch in Raja Ampat Regency, Eastern Indonesia. Marine Policy 34: 228-236. Wabnitz, C., Andréfouët, S. and Muller-Karger, F.E. (2009) Measuring progress toward global marine  conservation targets. Frontiers in Ecology and the  Environment 8(3): 124-129. Whitlock, R., and McAllister, M.K. (2009) A Bayesian mark- recapture model for multiple-recapture data in a catch-and-release fi shery.  Canadian Journal of  Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 66: 1554-1568. Williams, R. and Noren, D.P. (2009) Swimming speed, respi- ration rate, and estimated cost of transport in adult killer whales. Marine Mammal Science 25: 327-350. Williams, R. and Thomas, L. (2009) Cost-eff ective abundance estimation of rare animals: Testing performance of small-boat surveys for killer whales in British  Columbia. Biological Conservation 142: 1542-1547. Williams, R., Bain, D.E., Smith, J.C. and Lusseau, D. (2009) Eff ects of vessels on behaviour pag308 erns of individual southern resident killer whales Orcinus orca.  Endangered Species Research 6: 199-209. Williams, R., Lusseau, D. and Hammond, P.S. (2009) The role of social aggregations and protected areas in killer whale conservation: The mixed blessing of critical habitat. Biological Conservation 142: 709-719. Wilson, R.W., Millero, F.J., Taylor, J.R., Walsh, P.J.,           Christensen, V., Jennings, S. and Grosell, M. (2009) Contribution of fi sh to the marine inorganic carbon cycle. Science 323: 359-362. Woodall, L.C., Koldewey, H.J., Santos, S.V. and Shaw, P.W. (2009) First occurrence of the lined seahorse  Hippocampus erectus in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Journal of Fish Biology 75: 1505–1512 Worm, B., Hilborn, R., Baum, J.K., Branch, T., Collie, J.S., Costello, C., Fogarty, M.J., Fulton, E.A., Hutchings, J.A., Jennings, S., Jensen, O.P., Lotze, H.K., Mace, P.M., McClanahan, T.R., Minto, C., Palumbi, S.R., Parma, A.M., Ricard, D., Rosenberg, A.A., Watson, R. and Zeller, D. (2009) Rebuilding global fi sheries. Science 325: 578-585. Yasué, M. and Dearden, P. (2009) The importance of  supratidal habitats for wintering shorebirds and the potential impacts of intensive shrimp aquaculture.         Environmental Management 43: 1108-1121. Ainsworth, C.H., Pitcher, T.J. and Rotinsulu, C. (2008)  Evidence of fi shery depletions and shig286 ing cognitive baselines in Eastern Indonesia. Biological Conservation 141(3): 848-859. Ainsworth, C.H., Pitcher, T.J., Heymans, J.J. and   Vasconcellos, M. (2008) Historical Reconstruction of the Marine Ecosystem of Northern British Columbia from Pre-European Contact to the Present. Ecological Modelling 216: 354-368. Ainsworth, C.H., Varkey, D.A. and Pitcher, T.J. (2008)  Ecosystem simulations supporting Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management in the Coral Triangle,  Indonesia. Ecological Modelling 214: 361-374. Alder, J., Campbell, B., Karpouzi, V.S., Kaschner, K. and Pauly, D. (2008) Forage fi sh: From ecosystems to markets. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 33: 153-166 [+ VIII pages of fi gures]. Allen, M.S., Walters, C.J. and Myers, R. (2008) Temporal trends in voluntary release of largemouth bass, with fi shery implications. North American Journal of  Fisheries Management 28: 418-427. Arbarch-Leloup, F., Desroy, N., Le Mao, P., Pauly, D. and Le Pape, O. (2008) Interactions between a natural food web, shellfi sh farming and exotic species: the case of the Bay of Mont Saint Michel (France). Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 76: 111-120. Bailey, M., Rotinsulu, C. and Sumaila, U.R. (2008) The  Migrant Anchovy Fishery in Kabui Bay, Raja Ampat, Indonesia: catch, profi tability, and income   distribution. Marine Policy 32: 483-488. Ban, N.C. and Alder, J. (2008) How wild is the ocean?  Assessing the intensity of anthropogenic marine  activities in British Columbia, Canada. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems 18(1): 55-85. Ban, N.C., Blight, L.K., Foster, S.J., Morgan, S.K. and O’Donnell, K. (2008) Pragmatism before prescription for managing global fi sheries. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 6: 521-521.page 32 Ban, N.C., Picard, C. and Vincent, A.C.J. (2008) Moving toward spatial solutions in marine conservation with indigenous communities. Ecology and Society 13(1): 32. Bhathal, B. and Pauly, D. (2008) ‘Fishing down marine food webs’ and spatial expansion of coastal fi sheries in India, 1950-2000. Fisheries Research 91: 26-34. Brennan, N.P., Walters, C., and Leber, K. (2008)                           Manipulation of stocking magnitude: addressing density-dependence in a juvenile cohort of  common snook (Centropopomus unidecimalis).   Reviews in Fisheries Science 16: 215-227. Cheung, W.W.L. and Pitcher, T.J. (2008) Evaluating the  Status of Exploited Taxa in the Northern South China Sea Using Intrinsic Vulnerability and  Spatially Explicit Catch-per-unit-eff ort Data.  Fisheries Research 92: 28–40. Cheung, W.W.L. and Sumaila, U.R. (2008) Trade-off s between Conservation and Socio-economic  Objectives in Managing a Tropical Marine   Ecosystem. Ecological Economics 66: 193-210. Cheung, W.W.L., Close, C.H., Lam, V., Watson, R. and Pauly, D. (2008) Application of    macroecological theory to predict eff ects of climate change on global fi sheries potential. Marine Ecology Progress Series 365: 187-193. Curtis, J. and Vincent, A.C.J (2008) Use of population  viability analysis to evaluate CITES trade-  management options for threatened marine fi shes. Conservation Biology 22(5): 1225–1232. Dalla Rosa, L., Secchi, E.R., Maia, Y.G., Zerbini, A.N. and Heide-Jørgensen, M.P. (2008) Movements of  satellite-monitored humpback whales on their feeding ground along the Antarctic Peninsula. Polar Biology 31: 771-781. Ebeling, J. and Yasue, M. (2008) Generating carbon fi nance through avoided deforestation and its potential to create climatic, conservation and human develop- ment benefi ts. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 36(1498): 1917-1924. Engel, M.H., Fagundes, N.J.R., Rosenbaum, H.C., Leslie, M.S., Og308 , P.H., Schmig308 , R., Secchi, E., Dalla Rosa, L. and Bonag308 o, S.L. (2008) Mitochondrial DNA diversity of the southwestern Atlantic humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) breeding area off  Brazil, and the potential connections to Antarctic feeding areas. Conservation Genetics 9: 1253-1262. Fahlman, A., Hastie, G.D., Rosen, D.A.S., Naito, Y. and Trites, A.W. (2008) Buoyancy does not aff ect diving metabolism during shallow dives in Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus. Aquatic Biology 3: 147-154. Fahlman, A., Svärd, C., Rosen, D.A.S., Jones, D.R. and Trites, A.W. (2008) Metabolic costs of foraging and the management of O2 stores in Steller sea lions. Journal of Experimental Biology 211: 3573-3580. Fahlman, A., Wilson, R., Svärd, C., Rosen, D.A.S. and Trites, A.W. 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(2008) A Survey of Alternative Livelihood  Options for Hong Kong’s Fishers. International Journal of Social Economics 35: 380-395. Teh, L.C.L., Teh, L.S.L. and Chung, F.C. (2008) A private  management approach to coral reef conservation in Sabah, Malaysia. Biodiversity and Conservation 17(13): 3061-3077. Trites, A.W. and Calkins, D.G. (2008) Diets of mature male and female Steller sea lions diff er and cannot be used as proxies for each other. Aquatic Mammals 34: 25-34. Walters, C., Hilborn, R. and Christensen, V. (2008) Surplus production dynamics in declining and recovering fi sh populations. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science 65: 2536-2551. Walters, C., Martell, S., Christensen, V. and Mahmoudi, B. (2008) An Ecosim model for exploring ecosystem  management options for the Gulf of Mexico:  implications of including multistanza life history models for policy predictions. Bulletin of Marine  Science 83: 251-271. Welch, D.W., Rechisky, E.L., Melnychuk, M.C., Porter, A.D., Walters, C.J., Clements, S., Clemens, B.J.,   McKinley, R.S. and Shreck, C. (2008) Survival of  migrating salmon smolts in large rivers with and without dam. Public Library of Science Biology 6(10): 2101-2108. Wells, R.J.D., Cowan, J.H. Jr., Pag308 erson, W.F. III and Walters, C.J. (2008) Eff ect of trawling on juvenile red snapper habitat selection and life history parameters.  Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 65: 2399-2411. Williams, R., Hall, A. and Winship, A. (2008) Potential limits to anthropogenic mortality of small cetaceans in coastal waters of British Columbia. Canadian Journal of  Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 65: 1867-1878. Wood, L.J., Fish, L., Laughren, J. and Pauly, D. (2008)  Assessing progress towards global marine protection targets: shortfalls in information and action. Oryx 42: 340-351. Yasué, M. and Dearden, P. 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NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-PIFSC-16.  Munro, G., Turris, B., Clark, C., Sumaila, U.R. and Bailey, M. (2009) Impacts of harvesting rights in Canadian Pacifi c fi sheries, statistical and economic analysis series,  Publication No. 1-3 iv, 61p. Og308 awa, Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Pitcher, T.J., Kalikoski, D., Pramod, G., and Short, K. (2009) Safe Conduct? Twelve Years Fishing under the UN Code. WWF. Gland, Switzerland. Wagey, G.A., Nurhakim, S., Nikij uluw, V.P.H., Badrudin and Pitcher, T.J. (2009) A Study Of Illegal, Unreported And Unregulated (IUU) Fishing In The Arafura Sea,  Indonesia. Research Centre for Capture Fisheries,  Ministry of Marine Aff airs and Fisheries, Jakarta,  Indonesia, 54p. Agnew, D., Pearce, J., Peatman, T., Pitcher, T.J. and Pramod, G. (2008) The Global Extent of Illegal Fishing.  MRAG, London, U.K., and Fisheries Ecosystems Restoration Research, Fisheries Centre, UBC, Vancouver, Canada, 32p. Booth, S., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (2008) Baseline study of marine catches from Arctic Alaska: 1950-2006. Lenfest Ocean Program, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, 15p. Christensen, V., Walters, C.J., Ahrens, R., Alder, J., Buszowski, J., Christensen, L.B., Cheung, W.W.L., Dunne, J., Froese, R., Karpouzi, V., Kaschner, K., Kearney, K., Lai, S., Lam, V., Palomares, M.L.D., Peters-Mason, A., Piroddi, C., Sarmiento, J.L., Steenbeek, J., Sumaila, R., Watson, R., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (2008) Models of the world’s large marine ecosystems. GEF/LME global project promoting ecosystem-based approaches to fi sheries conservation and large marine ecosystems, UNESCO/Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commissions Technical Series No. 80 iv+43p. Dalsgaard, A.J., Christensen, V., Nicolajsen, H., Koed, A., Støg308 rup, J., Groos, J., Bregnballe, T., Sørensen, H.L., Christensen, J.T. and Nielsen, R. (2008) Økosystemmodel for Ringkobing Fjord. Skarvbestandens påvirkning af fi skebestandene. DTU Aqua-rapport nr 178-08, Copenhagen, 71p. 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Lauderdale, Florida, 7-11 July 2008. FISHERIES CENTRE RESEARCH REPORTS Gascuel, D., Guéneg308 e, S., Diallo, I., and Sidibé, A. (2009) Impact de la Pêche sur L’écosystème Marin de Guinée -  modélisation EwE 1985/2005 (Fishing Impact on the  Marine Guinean ecosystem: a 1985/2005 model using EwE). Fisheries Centre Research Reports 17(4), 60p. Gascuel, D., Tremblay-Boyer, L. and Pauly, D. (2009) A trophic level based sog286 ware for assessing the impacts of fi shing on aquatic ecosystems. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 17(1), 82p.Berman, M., Gregr, E.J., Ishimura, G., Coag308 a, R., Flinn, R., Sumaila, U.R. and Trites, A.W. (2008) Economic valuation of critical habitat closures. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(8), 102. Morisseg308 e, L., Melgo, J.L., Kaschner, K., and Gerber, L. (2009) Modelling the Trophic Role of Marine Mammals in Tropical Areas: Data requirements, uncertainty, and validation. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 17(2), 120p.Cheung, W., Lam, V. and Pauly, D. 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(2008) Ecological and Economic  Analyses of Marine Ecosystems in the Bird’s Head  Seascape, Papua, Indonesia: II. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(1), 186p. Berman, M., Gregr, E.J., Ishimura, G., Coag308 a, R., Flinn, R., Sumaila, U.R. and Trites, A.W. (2008) Economic valuation of critical habitat closures. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(8), 102.page 36 CHAPTERS IN BOOKS AND TECHNICAL REPORTS Cisneros-Montemayor, A.M., Christensen, V., Arreguin-Sanchez, F. and Sumaila, U.R. (2009) Fisheries in Baja California Sur: a trophic based analysis of management scenarios, p. 29-30. In: Palomares, M.L.D., Morisseg308 e, L., Cisneros- Montemayor, A.M., Varkey, D., Coll, M. and Piroddi, C. (eds) Ecopath 25 Years Conference Proceedings: Extended Abstracts. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 17(3). Close, D.A., Currens, K.P., Jackson, A.D., Wildbill, A.J., Hanson, J.T., Bronson, J.P. and Aronsuu, K.  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(2008) Modelling present and climate-shig286 ed distribution of marine fi shes and invertebrates. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(3), 72p. Gregr, E. J. and Coag308 a, R. (2008) Environmental data for the eastern North Pacifi c and Bering Sea. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(6), 79p. Le Ouesne, W.J.F., Arreguín-Sánchez, F., Albanez-Lucero, M., Cheng, H., Escalona, V.H.C., Daskalov, G., Ding, H., Rodriguez, E.G., Heymans, J.J., Jiang, H., Lercari, D., Lopez-Ferreira, C., Lopez-Rocha, J.A., Mackinson, S., Pinnegar, J.K., Polunin, N.V.C., Wu, J., Xu, H., Zetina- Rejon, M.J. (2008) Analysing Ecosystem Eff ects of Selected Marine Protected Areas With Ecospace Spatial Ecosystem Models. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(2), 67p. Palomares, M. and Pauly, D. (2008) Von Bertalanff y growth parameters of non-fi sh marine organisms. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(10), 137p. Pramod, G., Pitcher, T., Pearce, J. and Agnew, D. (2008) Sources of information supporting estimates of unreported fi shery catches (IUU) for 59 countries and the high seas fi sheries. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(4), 242p. Rejon, M.J. (2008) Analysing Ecosystem Eff ects of Selected Marine Protected Areas With Ecospace Spatial Ecosystem Models. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(2), 67p.page 37 Bailey, M. and Sumaila, U.R. (2008) Towards ecosystem-based management in the Bird’s Head functional seascape of Papua, Indonesia: The economic sub-project, p. 125-141. In: Bailey, M. and Pitcher, T.J. (eds) Ecological and economic analyses of marine ecosystems in the Bird’s Head Seascape, Papua, Indonesia: II. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(1). Ban, N.C. (2008) Siting marine reserves: stakeholder-based vs. science-driven approaches, p. 1267-1276. In: Nielsen, J.L., Dodson, J.J., Friedland, K., Hamon, T.R.,  Musick, J. and Verspoor, E. (eds) Reconciling fi sheries with conservation: proceedings of the Fourth World  Fisheries Congress. American Fisheries Society,  Symposium 49, Bethesda, Maryland. Cheung, W.W.L., Lam, V. and Pauly, D. (2008) Dynamic  bioclimate envelope model to predict climate-induced changes in distributions of marine fi shes and  invertebrates, p. 5-50. In: Cheung, W.W.L., Lam, V. and Pauly, D. (eds) Modeling present and climate-shig286 ed distributions of marine fi shes and invertebrates. Fisheries Centre Research Reports, Vol. 16(3). Christensen, V. (2008) Ecopath with Ecosim: Linking  fi sheries and ecology, p. 55-70. In: Jørgensen, S.E. (ed) Handbook of Ecological Modelling, Network and  Informatics. WIT Press, Southamptom, UK. Chuenpagdee, R. and Pauly, D. (2008) Small is beautiful? A databse approach for global assessment of small- scale fi sheries: preliminary results and hypotheses, p. 575-584. In: Nielsen, J., Dodson, J.J., Friedlander, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and Vespoor, E. (eds) Reconciling fi sheries with conservation: Proceedings of the 4th World Fisheries Congress, Vancouver, 3-6 May 2004. American Fisheries Society Symposium 49, Bethesda. Colin, C.W., Munro, G. and Sumaila, U.R. (2008) Subsidies, decommissioning schemes, and their implication for eff ective fi sheries management, p. 713-726. In: Nielsen, J., Dodson, J.J., Friedlander, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and Vespoor, E. (eds) Reconciling fi sheries with conservation: Proceedings of the 4th World Fisheries Congress, Vancouver, 3-6 May 2004. American Fisheries Society Symposium 49, Bethesda. Cullis-Suzuki, S. and Pauly, D. (2008) Preliminary estimates of national and global costs of marine protected areas, p. 85-90. In: Alder, J. and Pauly, D. (eds) A comparative assessment of biodiversity, fi sheries and aquaculture in 53 countries’ exclusive economic zones. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(7). Engelman, R., Pauly, D., Zeller, D., Prinn, R.G., Pinnegar, J.K. and Polunin, N.V.C. (2008) Climate, people, fi sheries and aquatic ecosystems, p. 1-15. In: Polunin, N.V.C. (ed) Aquatic Ecosystems: Trends and global prospects. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Flower, K., Rodrigues, A., Balmford, A. and Watson, R. (2008) Marine fi sheries in Balmford, p. 82-94. In:  Rodrigues, A.S.L., Walpole, M., ten Brink, P., Keg308 unen, M., Braat, L. and de Groot, R. (eds) The Economics of Biodiversity and Ecosystems: Scoping the Science. European Commission, Cambridge. Haggan, N. and Klah-Kist-Ke-Is, Chief S.L. (2008) Reconciling aboriginal fi sheries with conservation: Themes, concepts and examples, p. 495-497. In: Nielsen, J., Dodson, J.J., Friedland, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and Verspoor, E. (eds) Reconciling Fisheries with Conservation. Proceedings of the Fourth World Fisheries Congress, American Fisheries Society, Bethesda. Jones, T., Hastings, M., Boston, B., Pauly, D. and Jones, D.R. (2008) Growth of leatherback sea turtle (Dermochel- ys coriacea) in captivity, with inferences on growth in the wild, p. 82-97. In: Palomares, M.L.D. and Pauly, D. (eds) Von Bertalanff y Growth   Parameters of Non-Fish Marine Organisms. Fisheries Centre Research Report 16(10). Karpouzi, V.S. and Pauly, D. (2008) A framework for evaluat- ing national seabird conservation eff orts, p. 62-70. In: Alder, J. and Pauly, D. (eds) A comparative  assessment of biodiversity, fi sheries and aquaculture in 53 countries’ exclusive economic zones. Fisheries  Centre Research Reports 16(7). Karpouzi, V.S. and Pauly, D. (2008) Life-history pag308 ern in marine birds p. 27-31. In: Palomares, M.L.D. and Pauly, D. (eds) Von Bertalanff y growth parameters of non-fi sh marine organisms. Fisheries Centre Research Report 16(10). Lam, V., Cheung, W.W.L., Close, C. and Pauly, D. (2008)  Modeling seasonal distributions of pelagic marine fi shes and squids p. 51-62. In: Cheung, W.W.L., Lam, V. and Pauly, D. (eds) Modeling present and climate-shig286 ed distributions of marine fi shes and inverte- brates. Fisheries Centre Research Reports, Vol. 16(3). Marsden, A.D. and Sumaila, U.R. (2008) Canada’s interna- tional marine fi sh trade since 1950: Volume, value, and implications for conservation. pp. 261-264 In: Nielsen, J., Dodson, J.J., Friedlander, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and Vespoor, E., (eds). Reconciling fi sheries with conservation: Proceedings of the 4th World Fisheries Congress, Vancouver, 3-6 May 2004.  Ameri- can Fisheries Society Symposium 49, Bethesda. McAllister, M.K., Pikitch, E.K., Babcock, E.A. (2008) Why are Bayesian Methods Useful for Stock Assessment of Sharks? p. 351-368. In: Pikitch, E.K. and Camhi, M.  (eds) Sharks of the Open Ocean. Blackwell Publishing, New York. Mondoux, S., Pitcher, T.J. and Pauly, D. (2008) Ranking  maritime countries by the sustainability of their  fi sheries, p. 13-29. In: Alder, J. and Pauly, D. (eds) A comparative assessment of biodiversity, fi sheries and  aquaculture in 53 countries’ exclusive economic zones.  Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(7). page 38 Morato, T. and Pitcher, T.J. (2008) Reconciling Fisheries with Conservation on Seamounts, p. 1623-1634. In: Nielsen, J.L., Dodson, J.J., Friedland, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and Verspoor, E. (eds) Reconciling fi sheries with  conservation: proceedings of the Fourth World Fisheries Congress. American Fisheries Society, Symposium 49, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Palomares, M.L.D., Sorsogon, P.M.E., Hunter, A. and Pauly, D. (2008) Growth of marine mammals, p. 2-26. In:  Palomares, M.L.D. and Pauly, D. (eds) Von   Bertalanff y growth parameters of non-fi sh marine organisms. Fisheries Centre Research Report 16(10). Pauly, D. (2008) Die Auswirkungen der Fischerei auf die Biodiversität, p. 8-13. In: Fisch ohne Schutz.   Hamburger Gespräche für Naturschutz 2007. Michael Og308 o Stig286 ung, Hamburg. Pauly, D. (2008) Reconciling fi sheries with conservation: The challenge of managing ecosystems - Grand Conference Keynote, p. 1-4. In: Nielsen, J., Dodson, J.J., Friedlander, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and          Vespoor, E. (eds) Reconciling fi sheries with   conservation: Proceedings of the 4th World Fisheries Congress, Vancouver, 3-6 May 2004. American  Fisheries Society Symposium 49, Bethesda. Pauly, D. 2008. Beauty for Fishes, p. 21-25. In:  S. Comer and D. Klochko (eds.) Ichthyo: The Architecture of Fish. X-Rays from the Smithsonian Institution. Chronicle Books, San Francisco. Pauly, D. and Watson, R. (2008) Adjusting for context in evaluating national fi sheries statistics reporting systems, p. 57-61. In: Alder, J. and Pauly, D. (eds) A comparative assessment of biodiversity, fi sheries and aquaculture in 53 countries’ exclusive economic zones. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(7). Pauly, D., Alder, J., Booth, S., Cheung, W.W.L., Christensen, V., Close, C.,  Sumaila, U.R.,  Swartz, W., Tavakolie, A., Watson, R., Wood, L. and Zeller, D. (2008) Fisheries in large marine ecosystems: descriptions and diagnoses, p. 23-40. In: Sherman, K. and Hempel, G. (eds) The UNEP large marine ecosystem report: a perspective on changing conditions in LMEs of the world’s regional seas. UNEP Regional Seas Reports and Studies No. 182.  Pauly, D., Cheung, W.W.L., Close, C., Hodgson, S., Lam, V. and Watson, R. (2008) Asymmetry in latitudinal, longitudinal and bathymetric distribution   of marine fi shes and invertebrates, p. 63-72. In: Cheung, W.W.L., Lam, V. and Pauly, D. (eds)  Modeling present and climate-shig286 ed distributions of  marine fi shes and invertebrates. Fisheries Centre  Research Reports, Vol. 16(3). Pitcher, T.J. (2008) “You may rest assured that the British Government is entirely opposed to sharks”. Series Editor’s Foreword, p. ixxx-xxxi. In: Camhi, M.D., Pikitch, E.K., and Babcock E.A. (eds) Sharks of the Open Ocean. Fish and Aquatic Resources Series 13, Blackwell, Oxford, UK. Pitcher, T.J. (2008) Lessons from History: session leader’s summary from the 4th World Fisheries Congress, p. 5887-599. In: Nielson J. (ed.) Reconciling Fisheries with Conservation: Proceedings of the 4th World Fisheries  Congress. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, USA. Pitcher, T.J. and Ainsworth, C. (2008) Back to the Future: A Candidate Ecosystem-Based Solution to the Fisher- ies Problem, p. 365-383. In: Nielsen, J.L., Dodson, J.J., Friedland, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and Verspoor, E. (eds) Reconciling fi sheries with conservation: proceedings of the Fourth World Fisheries Congress. American Fisheries Society, Symposium 49, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Power-Antweiler, M.D. and Pitcher, T.J. (2008) Reconciling Fisheries and Allocation Using a Justice-Based    Approach: Troll Fisheries Score Best, p. 63-78. In: Nielsen, J.L., Dodson, J.J., Friedland, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and Verspoor, E. (eds) Reconciling fi sheries with conservation: proceedings of the Fourth World Fisheries Congress. American Fisheries Society, Symposium 49, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Sumaila, U.R. (2008) Current state of global fi sheries: The role of economic valuation, p. 87-93. In: Lasry, J.M. and  Fessler, D. (eds) Finance and sustainable development:  Opposition or partnership. Economica, Paris. Sumaila, U.R. (2008) Geg308 ing values and valuation right: A must for reconciling fi sheries with conservation, p. 707-712. In: Nielsen, J., Dodson, J.J., Friedlander, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and Vespoor, E. (eds) Reconciling  fi sheries with conservation: Proceedings of the 4th World Fisheries Congress, Vancouver, 3-6 May 2004. American Fisheries Society Symposium 49, Bethesda.  Sumaila, U.R., Ishimura, G., Liu, Y. and  Marsden, D. (2008) Sessions summary: Reconciling fi sheries with conservation and the valuation of fi shes, p. 705-706. In: Nielsen, J., Dodson, J., Friedland, K., Hamon, T., Musick, J. and Verspoor, E. (eds) Reconciling fi sheries with conservation. Proceedings of the World Fisheries Congress, Vancouver, 2004. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda. Swartz, W., Kaschner, K. and Pauly, D. (2008) The marine  mammal protection index: ranking countries’  conservation performance, p. 71-84. In: Alder, J. and Pauly, D. (eds) A comparative assessment of biodiversity, fi sheries and aquaculture in 53 countries’ exclusive economic zones. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(7). Varkey, D.A., Ainsworth, C.H., and Pitcher, T.J. (2008)  Ecosystem-Based Management: The Infl uence Of A Project In Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia, p. 165–175. In: Bailey, M. and Pitcher, T.J. (eds) Ecological and Economic Analyses of Marine Ecosystems in the Birds Head Seascape, Papua, Indonesia: II.  Fisheries Centre Research Reports 16(1).page 39 MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS Ahrens, R. (2009) Middle (SG-2) and Lower (SG-1) Fraser River Sturgeon Monitoring Plan Guide. Prepared for British Columbia Conservation Federation. Surrey B.C. Campbell, B., Cisneros-Montemayor, A.M., Espinosa, M., Hastey, J.P., Klain., S., Lam, V., Stoeven, M.T. and Swartz, W. (2009) To nationalize a fi shery? Fishbytes March/April 2009. Cheung, W.W.L., Booth, S., Zeller, D. and Pauly, D. (2009) Impact of climate change on U.S. marine fi sheries, with emphasis on the Southeast and Central Atlantic States. Sea Around Us Project, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 10 p. Cisneros-Montemayor, A.M. (2009) 2009 NAAFE   Conference, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. Fishbytes May/June 2009. Cisneros-Montemayor, A.M. and Ishimura, G. (2009) Billfi sh confl icts in recreational and commercial fi sheries in Mexico. Sea Around Us Newsleg308 er 51: 6. Cisneros-Montemayor, A.M. and Sumaila, U.R. (2009) A global valuation of ecosystem-based marine  recreation. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2009-09. The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Cullis-Suzuki, S. and Pauly, D. (2009) Evaluating global regional fi sheries management organizations: methodology and scoring. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2009-12, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Dyck, A.J. (2009) Re-visiting international fi sheries   subsidies. Sea Around Us Newsleg308 er 51: 5-6. Kumar, R. and Varkey, D. (2009) Ecosystem food web  constellation diagram using SAS/GRAPH®  sog286 ware. In: Pacifi c NorthWest SAS User Group (PNWSUG)-2009, Oregon, Portland. 1-7p. Martell, S. (2009) Assessment and management advice for Pacific hake in U.S. and Canadian waters in 2009.  Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat Research  Document 2009/021:iv+54p. Pauly, D and Sciama, Y. (2009) L’océan mondial ne contiendra bientôt plus de poissons. Les Dossiers de La Recherche (36): 36-40. Pauly, D. (2009) A brief history of collapse. In: Six experts discuss the global fi sheries crisis. SEED Magazine Blog, hg308 p://seedmagazine.com/content/article/ fi nding_ fi sh. Pauly, D. (2009) Aquacalypse Now: the End of Fish. The New Republic. October 7: 24-27.  [Reprinted in shortened version in The Week: The Best of Australian and  International Media, Oct. 23, p. 40-41] Pauly, D. (2009) Fish as Food: a love aff air, issues included. The Huffi  ngton Post. November 12, hg308 p://www.huffi  ng- tonpost.com/dr-daniel-pauly/fi sh-as-food-a-love- aff ai_b_354399.html (see also hg308 p://www.huffi  ngton- post.com/dr-daniel-pauly/ ) Pauly, D. (2009) Sushinomics. Foreign Policy, March/April: 36- 37. Pauly, D. and Jacquet, J. (2009) Something's fi shy about this eco-stamp of approval:  scooping up wild fi sh to feed to farm animals just doesn't make sense. The Tyee. hg308 p://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2009/09/14/wastedfi shfood Stanley, R.D., McAllister, M.K., Starr, P. and Olsen, N.  (2009) Stock assessment for bocaccio (Sebastes paucispinis) in British Columbia waters.  Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat Research Document  2009/055. Sumaila, U.R. (2009) Chapter 2 Introduction.  In:  Rocheg308 e, J. (ed) Océanis 35(1-2): 67-70. Sumaila, U.R., Khan, A., Dyck, A., Watson, R., Munro, G., Tyedmers, P. and Pauly, D. (2009) A Bog308 om-up  re-estimation of global fi sheries subsidies. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2009-11, The University of  British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Tremblay-Boyer, L., Gascuel, D. and Pauly, D. (2009)  Estimation et cartographie de l'impact de la pêche sur les biomasses marines à l'échelle mondiale, de 1950 à 2004. [Abstract] 9ième forum Halieumétrie. "Les indicateurs en halieutique : pertinence, précision et robustesse", Brest, Juin 2009. Amegashie, J.A. and Sumaila, U.R. (2008) A note on   endogenous time preference and the commons: the case of the fi shery. Fisheries Centre Working Paper  #2008-04, The University of British Columbia,  Vancouver, B.C., Canada.  Villanueva, M.C., Christensen, V. and Failler, P. (2008)  Linking ecology, sociology and economics to  determine the cost of aquatic environments. In: Proceedings of the 5th World Fisheries Congress.  Yokohama, Japan. Vincent, A.C.J. (2008) Keynote: Reconciling fi sheries with conservation on coral reefs: the world as an onion, p. 1435-1468. In: Nielsen, J.L., Dodson, J.J.,   Friedland, K., Hamon, T.R., Musick, J. and  Ver- spoor, E. (eds) Reconciling fi sheries with conservation: proceedings of the Fourth World Fisheries Congress. American Fisheries Society, Symposium 49,  Bethesda, Maryland. Wabnitz, C. and Pauly, D. (2008) Length-weight   relationships and additional growth parameters for sea turtles, p. 98-101. In: Palomares, M.L.D. and Pauly, D. (eds) Von Bertalanff y growth parameters of non-fi sh marine organisms. Fisheries Centre  Research Report 16(10). page 40 Bailey, M., and Sumaila, U.R. (2008) Power in diversity:  Bringing people together and pug308 ing ideas out. Sea Around Us Newsleg308 er 49: 3-4.  Gascuel, D., Guéneg308 e, S. and Pauly, D. (2008) The trophic- level based ecosystem modelling approach:  theoretical overview and practical uses. Annual  Science Conference – International Council for the  Exploration of the Sea 2008 / F:18, 16 p. Kaschner, K., Ready, J.S., Agbayani, E., Rius, J., Kesner-Reyes, K., Eastwood, P.D., South, A.B., Kullander, S.O., Rees, T., Close, C.H., Watson, R., Pauly, D. and Fro- ese, R. (eds) (2008) AquaMaps Environmental Dataset: Half-  Degree Cells Authority File (HCAF). [see  www.aquamaps.org]. Martell, S.J.D. (2008) Assessment and management advice for Pacifi c hake in U.S. and Canadian waters in 2008. Northwest Fisheries Science Center National Marine  Fisheries Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric  Administration. 2725 Montlake Blvd., East Seag308 le, WA 98112, USA. Pauly, D. (2008) Acceptance speech and lecture, 4th Ramon Margalef Prize in Ecology, September 6, 2008. [The Catalan and Spanish translations are available at these URL: hg308 p://www.gencat.net/premiramonmar- galef/pdf/2008_discurs_pauly_cat.pdf hg308 p://www. gencat.net/premiramonmargalef/pdf/2008_discurs_ pauly_cas.pdf ] Pauly, D. (2008) Coral reef fi sheries: three thematic   challenges. Abstract of Plenary Lecture, p. xi, Book of Abstracts, 11th International Coral Reef Symposium, 7-11 July, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Pauly, D. (2008) Foreword to: Sharks of the Open Ocean, edited by Camhi, M.D., Pikitch, E.K. and Babcock, E.A. Blackwell Publishing, p. xxxii-xxxiii. Pauly, D. (2008) Interview with Margaret Boyes. Fisherman Life March: 16-18. Pauly, D. (2008) Japan’s fi sheries and the whales – not. Sea Around Us Newsleg308 er 49: 1-3. Pauly, D. (2008) The end of the line? [Review of M.   Kurlansky’s The Last Fish Tale]. Nature 453: 1180-1181. Pauly, D. (2008) To William Cheung, on the completion of his postdoc with the Sea Around Us Project (2007-2008). Sea Around Us Newsleg308 er 50: 4. Pauly, D. (2008) Worrying about whales instead of managing fi sheries: a personal account of a meeting in Senegal. Sea Around Us Newsleg308 er 47: 1-4. Pauly, D. (2008/2009) On Marine Ecosystems, Fisheries Management and Semantics. Marine Ecosystems and Management Dec. ‘08/Feb. ‘09. Vol. 2(2): 5. Perry, I., Ommer, R., Pitcher, T.J. and Sumaila, R. (2008)  Coping with global change in marine social-ecological systems. Fishbytes 14(5): 1-2. Taylor, N., McAllister, M.K., Block, B. and Lawson, G. (2008) A Multi Stock Age Structured Tag Integrated Model (MAST) for the Assessment of Atlantic Bluefi n Tuna. ICCAT Collective Volume of Scientifi c Papers SCRS/2008/097. Van der Meer, L. A note on salmon farming in Chile. Fishbytes May/June 2008.page 41page 42 Fisheries Centre Visitors Listed below are some of the visitors to the UBC Fisheries Centre in 2008-2009. These and many other Canadian and international visitors came to present seminars, ag308 end workshops and collaborate with FC researchers.  Ayaa K. Armah University of Ghana, West Africa Host: Rashid Sumaila Mahamudu Bawumia Former deputy governor of the Ghana Central Bank, West Africa Host: Rashid Sumaila Amado Blanco Project Seahorse Foundation for Marine Conservation, Philippines Host: Amanda Vincent Christopher Brown Ecology Centre, University of Queensland and CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric  Research, Australia Host: Villy Christensen Marta Coll Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, Spain Host: Villy Christensen Ben Collen Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, UK Host: Amanda Vincent Marion Cuif Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Rennes Agrocampus, France Host: Murdoch McAllister Tyler Eddy University of Wellington, New Zealand Hosts: Tony Pitcher and Villy Christensen Marie-Pierre Etienne AgroParisTech College, France Host: Murdoch McAllister Lou Frog308 é Rennes University, France Host: Daniel Pauly Didier Gascuel Departement Halieutique Agrocampus Rennes - Ensar, France Host: Daniel Pauly Carlos Gaspar Nature, Economy and Environmental Policy, Argentina Host: Rashid Sumaila Neil A. Gribble Northern Fisheries Centre, Australia Host: Villy Christensen Mark Hepburn CSIRO, Australia Host: Villy Christensen Cheng Heqin State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal, University of Zongshan North Host: FC Nick Hill Imperial College of London, UK Host: Amanda Vincent Les Kaufman Boston University, USA Host: Amanda Vincent Paul G. Kinas Laboratorio de Estatistica, Departamento de Matemática, Fund. Univ. Federal do Rio Grande, Brazil Host: FC Hiroyuki Kurota National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries Shimizu, Japan Host: Murdoch McAllister Brian Langseth Michigan State University, US Host: Villy Christensen Anahita Marzin Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Rennes Agrocampus, France   Host: Murdoch McAllister Angelie Nellas Project Seahorse Foundation for Marine Conservation, Philippines Host: Amanda Vincent Henrik Osterblom Stockholm University, Sweden Hosts: Villy Christensen and Rashid Sumaila   Lenin Oviedo El Valle, Caracas, Venezuela    Host: Villy Christensen Persson, Lo Lund University, Sweden Host: Daniel Pauly Ruth Pincinato Universidade de São Paulo Host: Rashid Sumaila Massimiliano Rosso University of Genoa, Savona, Italy Host: Andrew Trites Reza Shokri University of Newcastle, Australia Host: Amanda Vincent Stephen Smikle Department of Fisheries and Commerce, Jamaica, and University of West Indies Host: Villy Christensen Gabriela Rodrigues Vera Laboratório de Ecologia trófi ca de Peixes, Universidade de São Paulo, Intituto Oceanográfi co, Brazil    Host: Tony Pitcher and Villy Christensen Maria Villanueva UNICAEN, France Host: Villy Christensenpage 43 The 2008-2009 Fisheries Centre Report was produced by Grace Ong, Carmel Ohman, and Daniel Pauly with input from the Fisheries Centre units and members. Funding for this Report and other Fisheries Centre publications is generously provided by a grant from the Province of British Columbia Ministry of Environment. Some of our major funders are (in thousands of dollars): North Pacifi c Marine Science Foundation (28,168), The Pew Charitable Trusts (19,602), Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (3,075), Province of BC Ministries of Fisheries, Environmental and Advanced Education (1,763) John G. Shedd Aquarium (1,434), Chocolaterie Guylian N.V., Belgium (1,031), U.S. Department of Commerce (628) and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council (481). Funding External research funding of the Fisheries Centre (1993-2009) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 Year R es ea rc h Fu nd in g (in  m ill io n do lla rs )page 44page 4

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