UBC Community, Partners, and Alumni Publications

How do various fugitive literature searching methods impact the comprehensiveness of literature uncovered… Helmer, Diane; Savoie, Isabelle; Green, Carolyn Oct 31, 1999

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52387-Helmer_D_et_al_Fugitive_lit.pdf [ 40.41kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52387-1.0045259.json
JSON-LD: 52387-1.0045259-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52387-1.0045259-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52387-1.0045259-rdf.json
Turtle: 52387-1.0045259-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52387-1.0045259-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52387-1.0045259-source.json
Full Text
52387-1.0045259-fulltext.txt
Citation
52387-1.0045259.ris

Full Text

Centre for Health Servicesand Policy ResearchHOW DO VARIOUS FUGITIVELITERATURE SEARCHING METHODSIMPACT THE COMPREHENSIVENESSOF LITERATURE UNCOVERED FOR SYSTEMATICREVIEW?BCOHTA 99:10C          OCTOBER  1999British Columbia Office of Health Technology AssessmentPresentation at the 4th International Conference on Grey LiteratureWashington DC, October 4-5 1999U N I V E R S I T Y  O F  B R I T I S H  C O L U M B I AHOW DO VARIOUS FUGITIVE LITERATURESEARCHING METHODS IMPACT THECOMPREHENSIVENESS OF LITERATUREUNCOVERED FOR SYSTEMATIC REVIEW?Diane Helmer BFA MLISInformation SpecialistBC Office of Health Technology AssessmentIsabelle Savoie MD MHAMedical ConsultantBC Office of Health Technology AssessmentCarolyn Green MScResearch CoordinatorBC Office of Health Technology AssessmentPresentation at the 4th International Conference on Grey LiteratureWashington DC, October 4-5 1999BC Office of Health Technology AssessmentCentre for Health Services and Policy ResearchUniversity of British Columbia429 - 2194 Health Services MallVancouver BC, CanadaV6T 1Z3tel: (604) 822-4810fax: (604) 822-5690bcohta@chspr.ubc.cawww.chspr.ubc.caBC Office of Health Technology AssessmentGrey Literature ’99: The comprehensiveness of fugitive literature search methods1BIOGRAPHICAL NOTEDiane Helmer is an information specialist for the BC Office of Health Technology Assessment(BCOHTA), Centre for Health Services and Policy Research at the University of BritishColumbia, Vancouver, Canada.  BCOHTA promotes and encourages the use of health technologyassessment research, appropriate to issues of  policy, planning, and utilization at governmental,operational, and clinical levels.  Diane is responsible for managing document delivery, Inter-Library Loans, and conducting fugitive literature searches. She holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts,specializing in education from Concordia University, and a Master’s of Library and InformationStudies from the University of British Columbia.BC Office of Health Technology AssessmentGrey Literature ’99: The comprehensiveness of fugitive literature search methods2INTRODUCTIONThe systematic review is a vital tool for health care providers, researchers, and policy makers,allowing efficient and effective review of research evidence on which appropriate policy ortreatment decisions can be based.  The systematic review uses explicit methods to evaluate andsynthesize information in  manageable form so that the current state of knowledge on theeffectiveness of an intervention can be understood (Chalmer, 1995).For researchers conducting systematic reviews and aiming to reduce publication bias, the natureof fugitive literature presents a number of problems, not the least of which is to define its limits.Although considerably debated, the most authoritative definition of fugitive literature remainsbroad (GL’97, 1997).  Moreover, with the advent of advanced information technologies and theInternet, new forms of fugitive literature are being introduced and becoming more widely used(Caroll et al, 1997).  This, together with the fact that practically every organization and writer hasaccess to desktop publishing software, has meant that overall, fugitive literature is increasing atan exponential rate.  According to one estimate, its rate of growth is three to four times that ofconventional literature (Farace, 1997).Some countries, particularly the US and the UK, have developed their fugitive literatureresources and made them easier to access.  This is not the case in many other parts of the world.Where no centralized agency exists to assist in its distribution, the acquisition of grey literatureremains problematic (Alberani et al, 1990).Although the accessibility of various kinds of fugitive literature and document delivery has beenfacilitated by the development of the Internet and resource-sharing initiatives between libraries,increased access to information through these means has only partly kept pace with the mass ofinformation.To establish standards for searching the literature a number of guidelines have been produced(Mulrow et al, 1997)(Goodman C, 1993).Search protocols based on these guidelines will generally require researchers to:· search the electronic literature databases;· search the grey literature;· hand-search key journals;· scan reference lists;· identify conference proceedings;· consult other researchers in the topic area.The assumption has been that this series of steps will reduce publication bias and improve theultimate credibility and precision of the systematic review (NHS Centre for Reviews andDissemination, 1996)(Stern et al, 1997).  To date however, very little evidence appears to havebeen gathered to show the effectiveness of some of these steps.In the light of these difficulties, this study was designed to determine if and to what extentvarious fugitive literature searching methods affect the comprehensiveness of literatureuncovered for systematic reviews.BC Office of Health Technology AssessmentGrey Literature ’99: The comprehensiveness of fugitive literature search methods3METHODSThe British Columbia Office of Health Technology Assessment (BCOHTA) at the University ofBritish Columbia undertakes health technology assessment research, whose primary purpose is toexamine scientific evidence on the effectiveness of current and developing health technologies.BCOHTA bases its appraisals on comprehensive evaluations of the scientific evidence, andconsequently, the literature searches for each project can be intense.In 1993, BCOHTA adopted the use of databases to manage the bibliographies associated witheach project.  Since 1993, the Office has used DB/TextWorks by Inmagic Software Inc. toproduce bibliographies.In undertaking systematic review, a BCOHTA search is normally divided into two parts: theelectronic literature (or Level 1 search) and the fugitive searches.  [1]The electronic literature search comprises detailed search strategies in databases such asMedline, Embase, HealthStar, Biosis, PsychLit or Current Contents.  The selection of thedatabases is directly dependent on the topic of the systematic review.  When the electronicliterature search is complete, BCOHTA researchers select articles that meet the pre-definedinclusion and exclusion criteria, and this material is retrieved.The second part of BCOHTA’s search strategy is the fugitive search.  In the fugitive search:· subject specific and specialized databases are identified and searched;· the Internet is searched by using meta-indexes such as OMNI. [2]  Search terms similar tothose in the electronic search strategies are applied to these m ta-indexes.  A select numberof search engines are used to locate organizations and researchers;· relevant non-indexed and indexed journals are identified.  These journals are then hand-searched to ensure comprehensiveness;· The search for fugitive literature also makes use of directories to indicate organizationsundertaking topic-specific research.  From this point, relevant organizations and researcherscan be identified and contacted.For the purpose of this study, two systematic review projects were used as sources of data.  Theprojects chosen were topics for which it was feasible both to apply a prospective methodologyand to undertake a substantive fugitive search.The systematic reviews aimed to gather as many randomized controlled trials as possible on theirrespective topics.  A prospective analysis was applied to the literature items retrieved by bothelectronic searches and fugitive searches.The fugitive search strategies for each project are detailed in Tables 1 & 2.  For the electronicsearch, a strategy designed to be consistent across both projects was applied to Medline, Embaseand Current Contents.Items meeting the inclusion criteria for each project were retrieved and entered in a BCOHTAproject-specific database using DB/Text.  Each item was coded to describe how it was found .Items previously uncovered through the electronic literature search were downloaded directlyBC Office of Health Technology AssessmentGrey Literature ’99: The comprehensiveness of fugitive literature search methods4from their respective database into DB/Text.  The unique identifiers assigned by Medline andsimilar databases allowed such records to be differentiated from the fugitive records.A second code was assigned to describe the type of item uncovered.  The item types were codedindependently by one librarian and by one researcher.  The coding results were then comparedand any differences between the researcher’s and librarian’s coding were resolved by discussion.PRELIMINARY RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONIn total, 1034 items were retrieved.  Of these, 302 (29.2%) were identified through the fugitivesearch.  Given the difficulties encountered in acquiring the fugitive literature, this may stillrepresent an underestimation of the effectiveness of fugitive searches.  For example, not allresearchers have responded to the inquiry for trials and other relevant information.Most of the fugitive literature uncovered takes the form of traditional reviews.  The indexing andprecision of randomized trials in the specialized databases may explain this finding.  In addition,fugitive items are less likely to offer abstracts.  Therefore, it is often harder to determine if theitems meet the inclusion and exclusion criteria before ordering the item.  The search ofspecialized databases was the most effective method of identification, followed by the review ofreference lists.As stated above, these results are preliminary.  Some letters are being followed up, and someitems requested through inter-library loan have not yet been received.  A response is awaitedfrom the Inter-Library Loans department to confirm whether these items are available.CONCLUSIONSThe preliminary results show that the fugitive search can be an effective tool for uncoveringmaterial for the systematic review.  The quality of the fugitive literature items uncovered as wellas the likelihood of this literature affecting the results of the systematic review is yet to bedetermined.BC Office of Health Technology AssessmentGrey Literature ’99: The comprehensiveness of fugitive literature search methods5REFERENCESAlberani V, de Castro Pietrangeli P, Rossi Mazza AM (1990) “The use of grey literature inhealth sciences: a preliminary survey”, Bull tin of the Medical Librarians Association, Vol 78No 4, p.358Caroll BC, Cotter GA (1997)  “A new generation of grey literature: the impact of advancedinformation technologies”, Publishing Research Quarterly, Vo  13 No 2, pp. 5-14Chalmer I, Altman DG, editors (1995)  “Systematic reviews”  BMJ Publishing Group, London,pp.1-2Farace DJ (1997)  “Rise of the phoenix: a review of new forms and exploitations of greyliterature” Publishing Research Quarterly, Vo  13 No 2, pp. 69-76GL’97 Luxembourg Convention (1997) “Perspectives on the Design and Transfer of Scientificand Technical Information”  Third International Conference on Grey Literature. Luxembourg,13-14 November 1997Goodman C (1993)  “Literature searching and evidence interpretation for assessing health carepractices” Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care, Stockholm, pp. 16-32Mulrow CD, Oxman AD, editors (1997) “Cochrane Collaboration handbook”  In: The CochraneLibrary [database on disk and CDROM]. Oxford, Update Software, Issue 4NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (1996)  “Undertaking systematic review of researchon effectiveness : CRD guidelines for those carrying out or commissioning reviews.  CRDReport No. 4.  The Centre, York, pp. 2-3Stern J, Simes RJ (1997)  “Publication bias: evidence of delayed publication in a cohort study ofclinical research projects” British Medical Journal, No 315, pp. 640-5ENDNOTES[1]  New Zealand Health Technology Assessment (1999).  “NZHTA search protocol”  Availablefrom: <http:// nzhta.chmeds.ac.nz/nzhtainfo/protocol.htm>[2]  <http://www.omni.ac.uk>BC Office of Health Technology AssessmentGrey Literature ’99: The comprehensiveness of fugitive literature search methods6TABLE 1.  Fugitive Search – Lipid Lowering DrugsCommercial databases Web library catalogs(using Library of Congress or National Library ofMedicine (MeSH) subject headings)Internet peer-reviewed sites Internet search engines1. Cochrane Library2. HSTAT (technology assessment guidelines)3. HSRProj (NLM)4. Dissertation Abstracts5. Article1st (OCLC)6. Papers1st (OCLC) – conferences and paper abstracts7. TRIP database (evidence-based medicine)8. NTIS Database9. CRISP (Computer Retrieval of Information on ScientificProjects)10. HTA Database11. LILACS1. UBC Library Catalog2. BC Ministry of Health Library Catalog3. Canadian Institute of Scientific and TechnicalInformation (CISTI) catalog4. Belinda Database (Buckinghamshire Health AuthorityLibrary)5. HealthPromis (UK web catalog of health promotion)6. National Health Information Center – HealthInformation Resource Database7. CHID Online (Combined Health Information Database)8. WorldCat9. GAO Web Catalog10. COPAC (Union catalogs in the UK)11. NLM Locator Plus1. UK Academic Web Directory2. UK Social Science Information Gateway3. OMNI (Organising Medical Networked Information)4. Medical Matrix5. Health Communications Network6. Global Health7. Health Index8. Medweb Public Health9. Medscape1. Northern Lights2. Altavista3. ExciteIn-house databases Directories Organizations contacted Journals hand-searched1. In-House Catalog2. Analytics Database1. ECRI.  HealthCare Standards2. UHC Technology Assessment Monitor1. US National Institutes of Health2. University of Ottawa Heat Institute3. Montreal Heart Institute4. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute5. Health Heart Program St Paul’s Hospital, University ofBritish Columbia6. World Health Organization7. International Task Force on Coronary Heart Disease8. International Society of Atherosclerosis9. Institute of Clinical Evaluation Sciences10. American Heart Association11. National Cholesterol Education Program12. College of Pharmacy and Faculty of Medicine, DalhousieUniversity13. American College of Cardiology14. Ontario Ministry of Health15. Conseil d’Evaluation des Technologies du Sante16. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare17. University Hospital Consortium18. Health Services Utilization Research Commission19. Trent Institute for Health Services Research20. Canadian Coordinating Office of Health TechnologyAssessment21. International Society for Pharmacoeconomics andOutcomes Research22. Therapeutics Initiative, UBC23. National Pharmacy Cardiovascular Council 1. Canadian Journal of Cardiology2. American Journal of Cardiology3. Circulation4. Bandolier5. Evidence-Based Medicine6. Cardiovascular Review Reports7. JAMA8. ACP Journal ClubBC Office of Health Technology AssessmentGrey Literature ’99: The comprehensiveness of fugitive literature search methods7TABLE 2.  Fugitive Search – Acupuncture in Addiction TreatmentCommercial databases Web library catalogs(using Library of Congress or National Library ofMedicine (MeSH) subject headings)Internet peer-reviewed sites Internet search engines1. Cochrane Library2. HSTAT (technology assessment guidelines)3. HSRProj (NLM)4. Dissertation Abstracts5. Article1st (OCLC)6. Papers1st (OCLC) – conferences and paper abstracts7. TRIP database (evidence-based medicine)8. Ebsco Academic Search9. Ebsco Canadian MAS10. Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Science Database(ETOH)11. ACUBASE (France)12. CRISP (Computer Retrieval of Information on ScientificProjects)1. UBC Library Catalog2. BC Ministry of Health Library Catalog3. Canadian Institute of Scientific and TechnicalInformation (CISTI) catalog4. Belinda Database (Buckinghamshire Health AuthorityLibrary)5. HealthPromis (UK web catalog of health promotion)6. National Health Information Center – HealthInformation Resource Database7. CHID Online (Combined Health Information Database)8. WorldCat9. GAO Web Catalog10. COPAC11. NLM Locator Plus1. UK Academic Web Directory2. UK Social Science Information Gateway3. OMNI (Organising Medical Networked Information)4. Medical Matrix5. Health Communications Network6. Global Health7. Health Index8. Medweb Public Health9. Medscape1. Northern Lights2. Altavista3. ExciteIn-house databases Directories Organizations contacted Journals hand-searched1. In-House Catalog2. Analytics Database1. ECRI.  HealthCare Standards2. UHC Technology Assesssment Monitor1. US National Institutes of Health.  Office of AlternativeMedicine  (Also known as the National Center forComplementary Medicine)2. Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine3. Center for Addiction and Alternative Medicine Research4. The University of Texas Center for Alternative MedicineResearch5. Tzu Chi Institute for Complementary and Alternativemedicine (BC)6. National Acupuncture Detoxification Association7. Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Center for Complementary& Alternative Medicine -- Rosenthal Center Directory ofDatabases8. Research Council for Complementary Medicine9. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health10. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism11. Centre for Addiction Studies (UK)12. NIDA Organization13. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse14. Foundation for Traditional Chinese Medicine (UK)15. Hooper Detox Centre16. National Academy of Acupuncture17. BC Women’s Hospital18. Vancouver Richmond Health Board (Detox Committee)19. The Acupuncture Association of BC20. Evergreen Treatment Services21. Ministry for Children and Family (BC)22. Hennepin County Medical Center23. Merle West Center for Medical Research24. Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center25. Yosan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine1. Alternative Medicine Journal (peer-reviewed)2. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine(peer-reviewed)3. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment4. JAMA5. American Journal of Acupuncture6. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine7. Lancet8. BMJ

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52387.1-0045259/manifest

Comment

Related Items