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Conference Agenda ~ NEXUS Spring Institute 2007 2009

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 Spring Institute April 26-27, 2007  “Rethinking Health Practices in a Social World – Focus on Gender & Health Behaviours”  Location:  St. John’s College <insert map link>   2111 Lower Mall   UBC-Point Grey Campus  The fourth annual NEXUS Spring Institute is a two-day conference for sharing research and ideas.  For a full description of the Spring Institute program, see below. Abstracts for all presentations are available for download from the Nexus Website.  Thursday, April 26th  8:30 AM - 9:00 AM Registration for Workshop 1  9:00 AM - 12 PM  Workshop 1: Sex & Gender Analysis in Research   Presented by Lorraine Greaves and Joy Johnson   Sponsored by the Women’s Health Research Network  12:00 PM - 1:30 PM  Publication Launch: Better Science with Sex & Gender: A Primer (Lunch    will be provided)  1:30 PM - 2:00 PM Registration for Workshop 2  2:00 PM - 4:00 PM Workshop 2: Getting published: Tips for preparing manuscripts for peer    review    Presented by Joan Bottorff and John Oliffe    Hosted by NEXUS  Friday, April 27th  8:00 AM - 8:30 AM Registration  8:30 AM - 8:45 AM Welcome  8:45 AM - 9:45 AM Keynote Presentation  Donna Stewart, Professor, Departments of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and  Gynecology, Anesthesia, Surgery, Medicine and the Department of  Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto  9:45 AM - 10:30 AM Coffee Break & Poster Session  10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Gendering Addictions  “Smoke, In My Eyes” – Pierre Bourdieu and the social context of young women’s tobacco use  Rebecca J. Haines, Postdoctoral Fellow, IMPART & NEXUS, UBC  Examining the measurement invariance of the Dimensions of Tobacco Dependence Scale across gender.  Chris G. Richardson, Postdoctoral Fellow, NEXUS, UBC  British Columbia’s Youth in Custody: Gender Differences in Sexual and Substance Use Risk Behaviours     Monica Durigon, Masters student, Department of Health Care and     Epidemiology, UBC  12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  Lunch – Themed tables for informal discussion ƒ Mental Health & Gender ƒ Quantifying Gender ƒ Sex & Gender in Youth Research ƒ Knowledge Translation & Gender ƒ Addictions & Gender ƒ Research in Culturally Diverse Groups  1:00 PM - 2:30 PM  Gendered Research  Voiced and enacted genders: Dialogical and dramaturgical approaches to genders  Sharalyn Jordan, PhD student, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, UBC  The Invisible Woman: Strategies for Overcoming the Methodological Challenges of Research with Unregulated Health Care Workers  Zena Sharman, PhD student, Interdisciplinary Studies, UBC  Exploring the influence of masculinities underpinning the help- seeking decision-making of white and South Asian men  Paul Galdas, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, UBC  2:30 PM - 3:00 PM  Coffee Break  3:00 PM - 4:00 PM Keynote Presentation  Ross Gray, Associate Professor, Department of Public Health  Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto  4:00 PM - 4:15 PM  Closing Remarks    Name: Monica Durigon¹, Dr Jane Buxton¹, Dr Diane Rothon², Valencia Remple¹, Dr Mel Krajden¹ ¹British Columbia Centre for Disease Control ²Ministry of Children and Family Development  Title: British Columbia’s Youth in Custody: Gender Differences in Sexual and Substance Use Risk Behaviours  Objectives:  To characterize the profile of British Columbia’s youth in custody  To describe and estimate prevalence of reported sexual and substance use risk taking behavior among male and female youth in custody  To determine if there are differences in sexual and substance use risk taking behavior between male and female youth in custody  To explore the mechanisms through which gender may impact on self report of sexually transmitted infections and injection drug use outcomes  Methods: From January to August 2006, youth aged 14-19 years residing in, or entering into BC’s three youth custody centers were invited to participate. An interviewer-administered questionnaire, collecting demographic and risk factor information, was completed on 417 youth. Descriptive statistics will characterize British Columbia’s youth in custody; while prevalence estimates will calculate risk behaviors. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals will measure effect size of gender on sexual and substance use risk taking behaviour. Logistic regression will model the association between select risk behaviors, gender, age and ethnicity, on self report of sexually transmitted infections and injection drug use outcomes.  Conclusion: The identification of sexual and substance use risk behaviors for British Columbia’s vulnerable youth in custody, can be utilized to develop and inform current public health efforts. Coupled with knowledge gained in relation to gender differences, the information derived from this study can serve to create relevant and gender sensitive harm reduction strategies to address the distinct health needs of this population. Name: Paul Galdas  Title: Exploring the influence of masculinities underpinning the help-seeking decision-making of white and South Asian men  Abstract: The benefit of prompt treatment for MI is widely recognised. However, there is a growing body of literature to suggest that ‘masculinity’ may lead men to be reluctant to seek medical help. The influence of masculinity on white and South Asian men’s help-seeking behaviour for chest pain is not fully understood.  The research aimed to address this gap in the literature by exploring how masculinities influence white and South Asian men’s decision to seek or delay- seeking medical help for acute chest pain. A modified grounded theory methodology employing in-depth interviews was used to investigate the help-seeking experiences of 37 white and 19 South Asian men who had been admitted to two hospitals in the UK with acute chest pain.  The main findings highlight white and South Asian men’s differing representations of masculinity in the context of help seeking. South Asian men’s accounts revealed culturally distinct representations of masculinity, signified by a willingness to seek help and express being in pain. By contrast, the accounts provided by white men strengthen the empirical basis for theorising about the detrimental influence of ‘hegemonic masculinity’ on delaying men’s help seeking.  The study findings suggest that strategies that aim to reduce help-seeking delay need to be developed to specifically target men of differing ethnicity. The findings can be used to incorporate cultural and gender sensitivity into the delivery of nursing care, and the design of cardiac health promotion and behaviour modification strategies that aim to reduce help-seeking delays among men who experience cardiac chest pain. Name: Ross Gray, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto Title: Why Men’s Health is Probably Worth the Bother  Abstract: Until recently, there has been little interest in men’s health as a topic of investigation or as a practical problem. But the evidence keeps adding up to show that, overall, men have more health problems than women, behave in less healthy ways, and seek less help from health-related services. So there is a problem! Patriarchy does not seem to be working well for men on this score. In this presentation, I will attempt to demonstrate and evoke the types of dilemmas men have with health and illness. I will consider how masculinity shapes and limits men’s responses to their bodies and their health. And reflect on how and why the health care system has been so slow to take up the particular issues of men’s health. All of this considering and reflecting is fine and dandy, but what should we be doing to better engage men about health issues? And given all the resistance to change on all sides, is it worth the effort? Name: Rebecca J. Haines, Postdoctoral Fellow, IMPART/NEXUS  Title: “Smoke, In My Eyes” – Pierre Bourdieu and the social context of young women’s tobacco use  Abstract: This paper provides an overview of a qualitative research project conducted with female smokers aged 16 to 19 in Toronto, Canada. To contribute to the growing knowledge-base on the social context of youth smoking, this project sought to address the problem of female adolescent tobacco use through a substantiate focus on the roles of gender and youth cultures in shaping smoking practices. Drawing from the work of social theorist Pierre Bourdieu, this project was also a preliminary attempt to critically theorize young women’s smoking as a practice informed by the nature and structure of their social location or habitus. Through the application of key theoretical concepts including, collective lifestyles, cultural capital and symbolic violence, Bourdieu’s theoretical perspective is put forth as an innovative model for thinking sociologically about the reasons for young women’s tobacco use. In addition to in-depth, one-to-one interviews (n=25), this project employed a participant-driven photographic methodology that allowed young women to construct and interpret images about the place of smoking in their everyday lives. While many of the basic coping and social functions that smoking fulfills for young women closely parallel those of adult smokers, a Bourdieusian reading of the data suggests that tobacco use can function as a form of “survival strategy” employed in the face of age and gender-based adversity. Not only did this project have the benefit of leading participants to reflect on the reasons why they smoke, but it also provided new insights to assist in the development of tobacco prevention and intervention efforts that are truly youth or "girl-centered." Name: Sharalyn Jordan, Ph.D. student in Counselling Pscyhology, Department of Educational and Counselling Pscyhology and Special Education  Title: Voiced and enacted genders: Dialogical and dramaturgical approaches to genders  Abstract: Moving beyond static, binary notions of gender to conceptualize genders as mutable, and multiple, creates theoretical and methodological challenges.  I propose a weave of dialogical self theory (Hermans, 1996, 2001; Wertsch, 1991) and Goffman’s (1959) dramaturgical self as a promising approach to conceptualizing and investigating the role of genders. Both theories posit that selves are brought into being through communication practices in our interactions. Thus, gendered selves are brought into being through the processes of voicing and enactment. Voicing, from dialogical self theory, focuses on the multiple, sometimes competing, I-positions we create through speech in our interactions, and the creative struggle with pre-given social categories we are all engaged in. Goffman’s work contributes a view of self-enactment that attends to social group dynamics and spatiality (Goffman, 1966, 2005).  His work also provides greater attention to non-verbal aspects of interactions including gestures and props (1959, 1979, 1982). Both voicing and enactment attend to relational-emotional and social- symbolic contributors to self. Together, these approaches provide direction for interpreting interview and focus group interactions in investigations where the relationship of genders with behavior or with other social self-positions (race/ethnicities, sexualities, classes) are of interest.        Name: Chris G. Richardson, Joy L. Johnson, Pamela A. Ratner  Title: Examining the measurement invariance of the Dimensions of Tobacco Dependence Scale across gender.  Abstract: Research indicates that gender may influence the experience and development of tobacco dependence in adolescent smokers. Quantitative measures of tobacco dependence may need to be tailored to accommodate gender specific differences in measurement structure and item functioning before researchers can use these scales to examine the influence of gender on the development of tobacco dependence. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of gender on responses to the Dimensions of Tobacco Dependence Scale (DTDS) - a multidimensional measure of tobacco dependence for adolescents. Responses from 1425 current smokers (55% female; mean age 16 years) were examined. Tests of scale level measurement invariance using multigroup confirmatory factor analyses indicated that gender did not influence the measurement structure of the DTDS. Tests of item level differential item functioning indicated that gender did not influence item functioning. These findings provide evidence of the measurement invariance of the DTDS across gender and support the use of the DTDS as a tool to examine the influence of gender on the emergence of tobacco dependence.    Name: Zena Sharman, PhD student, Interdisciplinary Studies  Title: The Invisible Woman: Strategies for Overcoming the Methodological Challenges of Research with Unregulated Health Care Workers  Abstract: This presentation utilizes the example of my in-progress doctoral research (a mixed methods investigation of the working lives of home support workers (HSWs) in rural/northern BC) as a means to illustrate the methodological challenges of conducting research with low-status women workers in health care. These challenges include: (1) access to participants, as HSWs are ‘invisible’ in that they work behind closed doors in private homes, (2) access to data, because unregulated workers like HSWs are ‘invisible’ in provincial and national data on health care workers, and (3) access to the phenomenon, because HSWs primarily do carework, a kind of feminized labour rendered ‘invisible’ by gendered assumptions about women’s skills and abilities. Carework is thus difficult to see and may be taken for granted by researchers or participants. I also discuss the broader challenge of devising an anti-oppressive feminist research design that accounts for the researcher and participants’ social locations (i.e., how individuals and groups are differentially affected by the social relations of inequality, such as gender, race and class). While my presentation is specific to a particular population of workers, it will be of interest to researchers interested in incorporating a more nuanced approach to gender in their research designs. Name: Donna Stewart, MD, FRCPC, University Professor and Chair of Women’s Health, University Health Network, University of Toronto  Title: Gender Inequities in the Global Village  Abstract: As the world grows ever smaller we continue to see inequities between men and women in childhood survival, nutrition, education, poverty, violence, human rights, and sexual rights. This presentation will describe some global disparities between the sexes and how both sex and gender affect physical and mental health and wellbeing. The steps in developing, obtaining approval, and advocating for an International Consensus Statement on Women’s Mental Health will be described. Finally, a brief overview of a CIHR funded international study will be described which builds local capacity and monitors women’s health in low, middle and upper income countries. 

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