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KAON Factory study : conventional facilities design report Uma Spantec Ltd., project manager 1990

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KAON FACTORY STUDY CONVENTIONAL FACILITIES DESIGN REPORT PROJECT MANAGER UMA SPANTEC LTD. DESIGN CONSULTANTS CHERNOFF THOMSON ARCHITECTS D.W.THOMSON CONSULTANTS LTD. HIPP ENGINEERING LTD PHILLIPS BARRATI KAISER ENGINEERING LTD. STEWART -EBA CONSULTING LTD. KAOM FACTORY STUDY CONVENTIONAL FACILITIES DESIGN REPORT PROJECT MANAGER UMA SPANTEC LTD. DESIGN CONSULTANTS CHERNOFF THOMSON ARCHITECTS D.W.THOMSON CONSULTANTS LTD. HIPP ENGINEERING LTD PHILLIPS SARRATI KAISER ENGINEERING LTD. STEWART -ESA CONSULTING LTD. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. CONVENTIONAL FACILITIES DESIGN SUMMARY 2. TUNNELS AND BELOW-GRADE STRUCTURES - DESIGN PACKAGE 1 3. WATER COOLING SYSTEMS, TUNNEL VENTILATION AND SITE UTILITIES - DESIGN PACKAGE 2 4. ELECTRICAL - DESIGN PACKAGE 3 5. EXPERIMENTAL, EXTRACTION AND NEUTRINO FACILITIES - DESIGN PACKAGE 4 6. FACILITIES PROGRAMMING, SUPPORT BUILDINGS AND SITE DEVELOPMENT - DESIGN PACKAGE 5 CONVENTIONAL FACILITIES DESIGN SUMMARY Chapter 1 Contents 1 CONVENTIONAL FACILITIES DESIGN SUMMARY 1.1 Introduction ........ . 1.1.1 Reference Volumes .. 1.2 Selection of Project Manager 1.3 The Site . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4 Geotechnical Investigations 1.5 Selection of Design Consultants 1.6 Computer Aided Drafting . . . 1. 7 Summary of Conventional Facilities. 1. 7.1 IA Transfer Line . . . . . . 1.7.2 Booster Complex ..... . 1.7.3 B.C. Transfer Line Tunnel. 1. 7.4 Main Ring. . . . . 1. 7.5 Extraction Hall . . 1.7.6 1.7.7 1.7.8 Experimental Hall Electrical Service . Mechanical Services 1.8 RecoIJ;?-mendations for Final Design Phase 1 1 1 1 2 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 6 7 8 8 9 10 1 CONVENTIONAL FACILITIES DESIGN SUMMARY 1.1 Introduction This volume contains the Design Reports of the five consulting teams that were retained to undertake the conceptual design of the conventional facilities. The adjective 'conventional' serves to describe those facilities necessary to house and service the accelerator and experimental areas and includes: • buildings • tunnels • electrical power to site • electrical power distribution • water cooling system • tunnel ventilation system • site services • site development The work ~f the consulting teams was done under the direction of the project management company, UMA Spantec Ltd. who take this opportunity to thank the consultants involved for their diligent work. 1.1.1 Reference Volumes • Geotechnical Data • Construction Schedule and Cost Estimate 1.2 Selection of Project Manager TRIUMF elected to retain an outside Project Manager for the project definition study to: 1 • manage the design consultant selection process • manage the work of the design consultants • prepare the project schedule • prepare the project estimate Advertisements requesting proposals were placed in various newspapers across Canada in late 1988 and following a selection process involving TRIUMF and B.C. Government personnel, the firm of UMA Spantec Ltd. of Burnaby B.C. was selected. This firm took up residence in TRIUMF office space starting in December, 1988 through to completion of the PDS in February 1990. The work of the project manager was expanded in mid 1989 to assist with the environ-mental assessment process then being conducted by Klohn Leonoff. 1.3 The Site The 1985 Proposal prepared by TRIUMF was based on the main accelerator rings encircling TRIUMF with a developed site area of 19.24 hectares. Early in the Project Definition Study the rings were changed from a circular configuration to a race-track to accommodate a more efficient slow extraction system. ' This change created problems accommodating the main ring service buildings. Other considerations such as the recent designation of the land to the east of TRIUMF as Pacific Spirit Park with its accompanying non-encroachment restriction, plus the need for more space to accommodate the experimental facilities caused alternative siting locations to be investigated. The only effective solution was the 'greenfield' option which placed the rings on UBC lands to the west of TRIUMF, resulting in a developed site area of 32.8 hectares including the existing TRIUMF site. This site was selected as the reference design for the project definition study. However agreement on the part of UBC to allow a change in the usage of the lands in question remains a subject for future negotiations. 2 1.4 Geotechnical Investigations The firm of Golder Associates Ltd. was retained in early 1988 to undertake a six bore hole programme, collect and study previous investigations in the area and prepare a geotechnical report. They also installed piezometers in each of the holes and undertook a monthly monitoring programme which ended in February 1990. In pursuit of a greater understanding of the ground water regime the firm of Klohn Leonoff was retained in mid 1989 to install two Westbay multi-point piezometer instruments in the middle of the Main ring. This involved drilling two 20-cm diameter holes, one 24-m deep and one 20-m deep. However due to problems in removing the steel casing, one bore hole (WB-1) had to be abandoned. The remaining Westbay instrument was monitored during the months of October 1989 and February 1990. The results of Golder's and Klohn Leonofrs work are bound into Volume 4B - Geotechni.cal Data. FUrther soil investigations will be required for detailed design and to delineate the water bearing zones for an efficient de-watering system design that will be required for all major excavations. 1.5 Selection of Design Consultants The conventional design work was divided into five packages as follows: • Tunnels and below grade structures. • Water cooling systems, tunnel ventilation and site utilities. • Electrical. • Experimental, extraction and neutrino facilities. • Facilities programming, support buildings and site development. Advertisements requesting proposals from architects and engineers were placed in fifteen Canadian newspapers in February 1989, resulting in receipt of 107 proposals and following 3 a short-listing and interviewing process involving personnel from the B.C. Government, TRIUMF and UMA Spantec the following firms were selected. • Package No.1 - Stewart EBA Consulting Ltd. with Sandwell Swan Wooster Inc. • Package No.2 - D.W. Thomson Consultants Ltd. with Keller and Gannon Consult-ingMechanical Engineers and Spectrum Engineering Corporation Ltd. • Package No. 3 - HIPP Engineering Ltd. • Package No. 4 - Phillips Barrat Kaiser Engineering Ltd. • Package No. 5 - Chernoff Thompson Architects with Cornerstone, Bush Bulman, Gaarder Lovick and Keen Engineering. The consultants, all Vancouver based with the exception of sub-consultants Keller and Gannon from San Francisco, and Spectrum Engineering from Ontario, started work in April 1989 and finished in November 1989, and the results of their work are contained in the following chapters. 1.6 Computer Aided Drafting It was decided that since TRIUMF utilizes Autocad Release 10 that all design drawings would be done in this medium with diskettes being turned over to TRIUMF at the end of the design for their records. 1. 7 Summary of Conventional Facilities The following summarizes the conventional facilities, working from the Cyclotron vault through to the Experimental Hall. 1.7.1 IA Transfer Line The IA transfer line is the beam line connecting the TRIUMF Cyclotron with the Booster. This beam line is located partially in the existing Cyclotron vault with the majority in a new tunnel structure approximately 150 m in length. 4 Work within the vault consists of new structural steel framing to support the beam line components and an overhead 7.5 ton monorail crane. The north wall of the vault, some 2.2 m in thickness, will be core drilled at two locations for passage of the beam pipe and for alignment sighting. Once through the vault wall the beam line enters a cast-in-place concrete tunnel built in an open cut excavation which ranges in depth from 8 m to 11 m. T~e tunnel for the first 100 m is fa concrete arch with inside dimensions of 3.8 m in width and 3.2 m in height. Beyond -this point the tunnel takes on a rectangular cross section 3.2 m in height with the width varying as required to allow the magnet carrier to traverse the tight turn leading to the Booster and to accommodate a beam dump. Located at the 100 metre point is a vertical access shaft sized to suit the 18 tonne magnet carrier. Handling of the shaft's pre-cast shielding beams, the magnet carrier and the beam line components will be by a mobile gantry crane. 1. 7.2 Booster Complex The Booster tunnel accommodates the A and B beam lines stacked with the A line over the B line. The tunnel structure is a cast-in-place concrete arch 5.9 m wide by 4.8 m high and approximately 214 m in circumference. Built within the centre of the ring, but set back 8 m to provide shielding, is the Booster building. This building has 3 stories below grade to accommodate equipment such as tunnel ventilation fans, magnet and rf power supplies. There are three stories above grade, the first accommodating the kicker cable drums, loading bay, offices, labs, and electrical switchgear. The second floor accommodates the computer room, offices and the KAON Factory control room. The third floor is predominantly offices with service space for the building mechanical system. The below grade portion of the Booster complex is of concrete construction built in an open cut excavation. The above grade portion consists of a structural steel frame with the outer walls being a combination of precast concrete panels and metal cladding. 1.7.3 B.C. Transfer Line Tunnel The B.C. Transfer Line is the beam line connecting the Booster with the Main Ring. The tunnel for this beam line is a rectangular cast-in-place concrete box section 3.8 m 5 wide, 3.2 m high, approximately 105 m long and accommodating an elevation change of 5.5 m from the Booster complex up to the main ring tunnel. The tunnel is built in an open cut excavation which ranges in depth from 10 to 12 m and is backfilled with a minimum cover of 8 m or to the original grade, whichever is the greater, to provide shielding. Access from the surface to the tunnel level is via a vertical access shaft similar to that located over the IA transfer line. 1. 7.4 Main Ring The Main Ring tunnel accommodates the C, D and E beam lines with C stacked over D on the inside of the race track and E separated horizontally by a minimum of 3.5 m and a maximum of 4.088 m. To allow reusable forms to be employed throughout the length of the main ring, the latter dimension was used in establishing a common width. The length of the Main Ring beam lines is 1076 m with approximately 900 m contained within the tunnel structure and the remainder within the Extraction Hall. Various combinations of open-cut and driven tunnel were considered for the Main Ring, IA and B.C. transfer lines and Booster tunnel. • Thnnel boring machine • Top heading and bench • Cut and cover excavation with - Concrete box - Cast-in-place concrete arch - Pre-cast concrete arch Corrugated plate culvert Cut and cover excavation with a cast-in-place concrete arch offered the best solution. It was considered the least expensive, offered the simplest form of construction, it could be built by many contractors and it allowed for changes in detail such as the provision of access tunnels for both personnel and services. The tunnel size selected is 7.1 m in width by 5.4 m high. The open-cut excavation ranges in depth from 9 m to 19 m and employs 60° side slopes with an ejector dewatering system 6 to handle ground water. It has been assumed that localized shot crete shoring will also be required. The tunnel will be backfilled with a mmunurn cover of 8 m or to the original grade, whichever is the greater, to provide shielding. Located around the Main Ring are six service buildings which house the tunnel ventilation and water cooling systems, magnet, kicker and rf power supplies, kicker cable drums and electrical switchgear. These buildings are set back from the Main Ring tunnel by 8 m for shielding reasons but are connected to the Main Ring by passageways which provide both personnel and service access. Each building consists of a four storey below grade cast-in-place concrete structure with a seven meter high structural steel metal clad surface building. The roof of the surface building extends to cover the adjoining capacitor farms. A fenced-in yard is also provided at each service building for the transformers. Also located around the ring are four buildings, primarily high roof steel structures pro-viding cover for capacitors. A concrete shaft is provided at each location for cable access to the tunnel. Large equipment access ~o the Main Ring tunnel is provided either through the Extraction Hall or via an access shaft not unlike those over the IA and BC tunnels. The main difference in this case is that rather than utilizing a mobile gantry crane, a 30 tonne bridge crane housed in a metal building is provided over the access shaft. 1.7.5 Extraction Hall The Extraction Hall accommodates the C, D and E beam lines, slow and fast extrac-tion lines and the switchyard wherein the extracted lines are divided into the primary experimental beam lines .. The various beam lines are housed in a 200 meter long cast-in-place concrete canyon, the floor of which is at the same elevation as that of the Main Ring tunnel floor. Access to the full length and width of the canyon is provided by 5 m of removable precast concrete beams. A 50 ton overhead crane is utilized for handling of the precast beams, the magnet carrier and beam line components. 7 A metal clad structural steel surface building 200 m long by 23 m wide is located above the canyon with an adjoining annex building housing electrical switchgear and water cooling systems. Beyond the Extraction Hall is a cast-in-place tunnel structure 70 m long housing the beam lines leading to the Experimental Hall. 1. 7.6 Experimental Hall The experimental areas are housed in a hall measuring 192 m long by 74 m wide with a height of 23 m from floor to underside of roof trusses and with a 40 m by 30-m extension housing the 6 GeV experimental facility. Both of these facilities provide open spaces free from structural framing elements with two 50 ton bridge cranes in the Main Hall and a 30 ton bridge crane in the 6 Ge V hall. All below grade structures are cast-in-place concrete with above grade portions being structural steel with metal cladding. Equipment access to the Experimental Hall floor is provided by four 5000 kilogram capacity elevators with platform sizes of 3 m by 4 m, a floor level truck access and an above floor loading dock located at the diagonally opposite end from which equipment can be lowered to the floor using one of the overhead cranes. Equipment and personnel galleries are provided around the entire perimeter of the facility outboard of the crane coverage area. 1. 7.7 Electrical Service The KA,ON Factory electrical load will be approximately 80 megawatts. The recommended method of electrical power supply is by means of a dedicated 60 kVA circuit from B.C. Hydro's Camosun Sub Station which is located approximately 2.5 m east of the KAON site. This will require double circuiting of the existing TRIUMF overhead 60 k V transmission line located on a right of way through Pacific Spirit Park. The receiving sub station located on the site will be an outdoor 60 kV installation with two 80/107 MVA transformers supplying primary standby transformation to the site dis-tribution system. The site electrical power distribution will be via an underground 25 k V system. Site electric load centres will have outdoor oil-filled transformers stepping the 25 k V distribution voltage down to utilization voltages of 4106 v and 480 v. 8 Subject to approval from UBC, maintenance standby power will be provided from the existing 60 kV circuit. Emergency standby power for critical and essential loads will be supplied from uninterrupted power supplies and diesel generation. 1. 7.8 Mechanical Services The mechanical services included in the conventional facilities consist of: • low conductivity water cooling systems (non-active, low-active and high-active sys-tems) • raw water cooling systems • tunnel and service building and booster complex ventilation, air conditioning and plumbing systems • electrical equipment ventilation and air conditioning systems • mechanical control systems • fire protection systems • low level liquid waste systems • site services (including sewers, storm drains, water lines and gas mains). The low conductivity water systems consist of three systems: • low active systems to cool all primary beam line components within shielded areas • non-active systems to cool power supplies and other similar equipment outside of the shielded areas • high active systems to cool targets, beam dumps and associated equipment. The raw water cooling system which provides cooling water to the LCW systems is designed to dissipate 100 megawatts of energy utilizing conventional forced air cooling towers. There are two raw water cooling systems, one ten megawatt system servicing the Booster complex and one 90 megawatt system servicing the Main Ring and initial and future experimental areas. The-latter system will be phased in as the KAON Factory develops. 9 The tunnel ventilation system is based on the assumption that 97% of the energy is re-moved through the cooling towers via the LCW system with the remaining 3% being removed via ventilation systems and on the assumption that the maximum allowable tun-nel temperature is 30°C. Cooling will be provided by mechanically cooled air conditioning systems located in the Booster complex and in each of the six Main Ring service buildings. Air capacity of these systems will be approximately 23,600 litres per second each. Air will be distributed along the length of the tunnel utilizing a plenum created at the top of the tunnel structure. All air associated with these systems will be recirculated while the beam is on. Provision has been made to achieve negative air pressure within the tunnel. A direct digital control system will be provided for the monitoring and control of the mechanical system components. Separate monitoring and control stations will be provided in each of the six service buildings, one in the Booster complex and one for the experimental areas. A separate, remote, monitoring only, station is to be provided in the Main KAON Factory control room in the Booster complex. A pre-action fire sprinkler system will be utilized in all tunnels and all major buildings. All floor drains, under-slab and perimeter drainage systems associated with the tunnels, Booster, service, extraction and experimental buildings will be directed to monitoring sumps prior to discharge to on-site-site storm or sanitary sewers. 1.8 Recommendations for Final Design Phase • The design work undertaken during the Project Definition Study is deemed to be conceptual in nature and therefore subject to refinement and further value engineer-ing during the next phase. To this end, the design consultants have identified in the following sections specific areas to be addressed during the final design. • Some of the facilities addressed in the following sections are not included in the capital cost estimate, i.e. new office building, 20 GeV and Neutrino Experimental Facilities, Technical Service Building and workshop expansion. These facilities, if built, will be phased in as funding allows. • The division of the design work into 5 packages proved to be practical during the Project Definition Study. Therefore UMA Spantec Ltd. recommends that, with minor changes in scope, this philosophy be followed for the final design. 10 TUNNELS AND BELOW-GRADE STRUCTURES - DESIGN PACKAGE 1 Chapter 2 Contents 2 TUNNELS AND BELOW GRADE STRUCTURES-DESIGN PACK-AGEl 1 2.1 Introduction ...... . ............ 1 2.1.1 General/Background........... 1 2.1.2 Scope and Objectives of the Assignment 1 2.1.3 Limitations on Geotechnical Interpretation 2 2.2 Review and Interpretation of Available Geotechnical and Topographical Data 2 2.2.1 General.............. 2 2.2.2 Experience at the TRIUMF Site 3 2.2.3 Summary of the Site Geology 3 2.2.4 Groundwater Conditions. . . . . 4 2.2.5 2.2.6 2.2.7 Geotechnical Properties and Design Parameters. Existing Topographical Data . . Potential Geotechnical Problems 2.3 Design Considerations ......... . 2.3.1 Introduction .......... . 2.3.2 Choice of Tunnel Construction Method 2.3.3 Main Ring Tunnel . . . . . . 2.3.4 BC Transfer Line Tunnel .. 2.3.5 Booster Tunnel and Building 2.3.6 IA Transfer Line Tunnel . . . 2.3.7 Work Within the Cyclotron Vault 2.3.8 Access Tunnels . . . . 2.3.9 Magnet Access Shafts . . . . . . . 2.3.10 Booster Building ......... . 2.3.11 Construction Materials - Below Grade Structures. 2.4 Tunnel Design. .. . . . . 2.4.1 Shielding ...... . 2.4.2 Vertical Alignment . . 2.4.3 Horizontal Alignment 2.4.4 Magnet Transporters . 2.4.5 Tunnel Lining Loads . 2.4.6 Earthquake Loads . . 2.4.7 Drainage and Waterproofing 2.4.8 Access and Emergency Exit . 2.5 Excavation/Tunnelling Methods and Temporary Ground Support . 2.5.1 Introduction/Local Experience 2.5.2 Dewatering.......... 2.5.3 Temporary Ground Support . 2.5.4 Excavation 2.5.5 Backfilling ......... . 1 5 6 6 7 7 7 9 9 9 10 10 11 11 12 13 13 13 14 14 14 14 15 15 16 16 16 17 17 18 18 2.6 Considerations for Detailed Design 2.6.1 Survey .......... . 2.6.2 Soil Investigation .... . 2.6.3 Booster Ring Access Shaft Possibility 2.6.4 Necessity of Early Detailing of Transition Sections 2.7 Specification Outline . . . . . 2.7.1 Division 2 - Sitework . 2.7.2 Division 3 - Concrete 2.7.3 Division 5 - Metals 2.8 Figures .. . 2.9 Appendix I ........ . 2.10 Drawing List ....... . 2.10.1 General/Introduction 2.10.2 Drawing List ..... 11 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 25 30 30 37 49 49 49 2 TUNNELS AND BELOW GRADE STRUCTURES-DESIGN PACKAGE 1 2.1 Introduction 2.1.1 General/Background Stewarl-EBA Consulting Ltd. (S-EBA) with Sandwell Swan Wooster Inc.(SSW) submitted a proposal for Design Package 1 which included the tunnel design to house the beam lines for the proposed KAON Factory extension to the existing TRIUMF installation at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. The proposal was written on March 1, 1989, in response to a request from UMA Spantec Ltd. on February 13, 1989. The appointment for the work was made in April, 1989. Sandwell Swan Wooster Inc. provided structural design services, Underhill Engineering Ltd., provided survey information, and B.H. Levelton and Associates were included to provide materials engineering consultant services if required. 2.1.2 Scope and Objectives of the Assignment The assignment was two fold: firstly, to select a method of construction of the Main ring based on two major options for construction, which were: • Partially driven tunnel, and the balance by cut and cover methods, • Co~pletely cut and cover methods, and, second~y, to do, a preliminary design based on the selected option including the Booster Complex and the connecting tunnels to the existing cyclotron. An interim report with cost estimates was submitted on July 5, 1989 comparing the options for the Main Ring Tunnel, Interim Report, Layout and Design Criteria of Main Ring Tunnel. The report included preliminary designs and cost estimates, and recommended the cut and cover method of construction. 1 2.1.3 Limitations on Geotechnical Interpretation The site was drilled and investigated by G.E. Crippen for the original TRIUMF project in 1967. It was drilled again by Golder Associates Ltd. with 6 mud flush rotary holes in 1989. The 1967 investigation was specific to the TRIUMF site and is applicable only to the start of the proposed new tunnel. Four holes of the 1989 program were located on the tunnel alignment now being considered. Two additional test holes included to accommodate multipoint piezometers were installed by Klohn Leonoff Ltd. late in the 1989 study to provide detailed groundwater information in the vicinity of the Main Ring Tunnel. Additional holes will be required for detailed design along the perimeter of the Main Ring, at the Booster Complex, and along the Transfer Lines to obtain soils information specific to these structures, particularly at the west arc of the Main Ring. These will also be required to delineate the water bearing zones for an efficient dewatering system design. Some of these holes may also facilitate permanent monitoring systems. 2.2 Review and Interpretation of Available Geotechnical and To-pographical Data 2.2.1 General Reference Material; • TRIUMF, Accelerator and Experimental Building, Report on Soils Investigation, dated July 1970, by G.E. Crippen and Associates Ltd. • Technical Feasibility and Preliminary Cost Report for the TRIUMF 90 Gev Acceler-a.tor Tunnel, dated September 1983, by Crippen Consultants. • KA ON Factory Engineering Design and Impact Study Support Services Package 1 -Geotechnical, dated April 1989, by Golder Associates Ltd. • Dewatering Systems, Highbury Street Tunnel, Robinson, Roberts and Brown, Octo-ber, 1962. 2 2.2.2 Experience at the TRIUMF Site The TRIUMF excavation required no shoring. The excavation was about 12 m deep with side slopes about 60° from the horizontal. The excavations were made in dense silty or sandy deposits. An ejector well dewatering system was used and water problems were minimal. Photographs taken during construction are attached as Figures 1 and 2, and show a single pipe ejector dewatering system with wells spaced at about 3 m centres within 2 m of the crest of the excavtion. The well casings were about 50 mm diameter plastic pipe which can typically provide a capacity of up to 0.75 l/sec/well. The reported steady state discharge of the system (G.E. Crippen, 1970) was only about 2.3 l/sec, and the ejectors then would be capable of providing a considerable vacuum in the wells. The well casings were probably installed in 150 mm to 200 mm drilled holes backfilled with sand with a seal at the surface. The vacuum appears to have been monitored at the collar of each well. Such a vacuum could playa large role in the condition of the steep cut slopes shown as remarkably stable in the construction photographs of TRIUMF. The original soil was replaced with clean sand backfill. Excavation for the adjacent Remote Handling Building was completed without dewatering from wells. The slopes are reported to have slumped at an excavation depth of about 5 m and shoring was used to complete the work. The Nordion Cyclotron has been under construction in 1989 adjacent to both TRIUMF and the Remote Handling Building. The excavation depth was slightly in excess of 5 m, no dewatering system was used and the excavation slopes were stable at slopes of about 60°. 2.2 .3 Summary of the Site Geology The sub-soil at the site is generally dense. Grain size ranges from silt to silty fine to medium sand containing stones and cobbles and occasional boulders, up to perhaps cubic metre size. Clay is mostly absent, but appears in the near surface weathered, materials. The surface deposits are generally of low permeability. Hydraulic conductivity is typically less than 5 x 10-6 m/sec, with seams of higher per-meability which passed modest flows of groundwater into the excavation of the existing facilities during construction. The stratigraphy of the site is believed to consist of post glacial beach deposits, overlying 3 a glaciomarine diamicton, overlying the Quadra sands. The upper deposits are considered to be B03e beach deposits consisting of dirty mixed-grain sediments made dense by wave action during placement. The glaciomarine diamictons are quasi-tills showing some strat-ification, possibly placed by ice rafting. The Quadra sands are lightly cemented, heavily overridden glacial sands. In the midst of these deposits at the location of the west arc of the Main Ring the most recent boreholes, Klohn Leonoff WB-2 and the Animal Sciences Water Wells, have encoun-tered a sensitive deposit. Although blow counts are high, the material looses strength with remoulding. This consists essentially of coarse silts and silty fine sand considered to be a Bose marine feature possibly filling a tidal embayment. The occurrence of these materials along the proposed tunnel alignment is shown on Drawing PAB 0002D. This section is based on a small number of borings and will require detailed investigation for final design. 2.2.4 Groundwater Conditions The original cyclotron vault excavation was dewatered by a single stage ejector well dewa-tering system (Figs. 1 and 2). It is assumed that the water table at the KAON site is at or near the surface. Perched groundwater tables are a feature of the local geology. They occur at a number of sites on the U.B.C. campus and caused considerable difficulty during construction of the Highbury Sewer Tunnel some 3.7 km to the west. Groundwater control using pumped wells was made difficult by the stratification encountered since the available drawdown in a thin water bearing stratum is limited to the thickness of that stratum. At the eastern end of the KAON Factory site, the near surface water table (above the Quadra Sands) in which the majority of construction will occur, is generally within one or two metres of the ground surface, and roughly parallel to the ground surface. The water table at the western end of the site is poorly defined, but is assumed also to be close to surface. Seasonal variation is expected to be about 2 m, which is not significant in terms of the excavation depth. Above the Quadra Sands, it appears the piezometric pressure distribution is nearly hydro-static, with a slight downwards gradient. However, during dewatering, some strata will drain more readily than others giving rise to perched water table conditions. Regionally, the piezometric water level at depth in the Quadra Sanda is well below the depth of proposed excavations. Near the top of the Quadra Sands, however, the water 4 table was encountered, but only with a strong downwards piezometric gradient, indicating recharge from above the Quadra Sands. During dewatering, this source of recharge would be largely cut off, so that in these areas, the water table in the Quadra Sands would be expected to drop below the depth of excavation, and hence not cause concern of uplift pressures on the base of the excavation. 2.2.5 Geotechnical Properties and Design Parameters Soil parameters have been given in the Crippen Consultants report of September 1983, and the Golder report of April 1989. These require judgement in their use. The values shown are typical of the results found and may be typical of the material encountered. They cannot be used in design without qualification: actual parameters may be either higher or lower than the values shown. Bulk unit weight Angle of shearing, resistance and apparent cohesion in terms stresses Coefficient of Passive = 23 KN/m3 (Crippen) = 30° (Crippen), 40°, very dense till (Golder) 35°, sandy seam material (Golder) = 35 kPa (No significant effective cohesion for sandy seam material) (Golder) Earth Resistance tan2 (45° + 12) Kp = 3.33 (Crippen) Coefficient of Active Earth Pressure Undrained shear strength ~. Hydraulic Conductivity Water table taken at ground surface Ka = 0.30 (Crippen) Qu = 130 kPa (stiff) (Crippen) k average = 1 X 10-6 to 1 X 10-5 mls (locally much higher). 5 2.2.6 Existing Topographical Data The mapping in use in this report has come from a number of sources but primarily from TRIUMF site plans and Burnett Resources overall air photo survey of the U.B.C. campus. This has been modified by work carried out this year by Underhill Engineering to establish a UTM grid for the KAON Factory Site. The UTM grid is shown on the base plans and coordinates have been established for 5 monuments and a number of building corners. All elevations are to Canadian Geodetic Datum. Burnett Resources are no longer in business and their base information has been lost. Serious consideration must be given to additional detailed survey work including new air photography to establish full control of the KAON Factory Site. 2.2.7 Potential Geotechnical Problems Stratigraphically controlled water bearing formations occurred at the Highbury sewer tun-nel and caused difficulties in dewatering with deep non-vacuum wells. Similar problems may arise on the KAON Factory Site. Perched groundwater is known to exist and ho-mogeneous conditions are unlikely. Abnormal boulder frequency could cause excavation problems and difficulties in soil support. The geologic interpretation of the material at Klohn Leonoff hole WB-2 indicated weak materials at the west arc of the Main Ring. This is confirmed by a short section of Golder's BH 89-4 but its presence is uncertain on the basis of BH 89-3. Detailed appraisal of this material may indicate a necessity for special excavation and foundation treatment for this portion of the Main Ring including increased foundation widths, piling, or excavation and replacement of the material. Where the foundation is directly supported by the Quadra sands additional permanent groundwater control measures may be required to prevent seepage of near surface ground-water past the tunnel to the deep groundwater system. 6 2.3 Design Considerations 2.3.1 Introduction The KAON Factory project involves the construction of subsurface structures to house a beam line from the existing TRIUMF cyclotron to an Extraction and Experiment Hall, making two circuits in a Booster Ring of about 209 m circumference and three circuits of the Main Ring of about 1080 m circumference. There is a transfer line tunnel joining the cyclotron and the Booster Ring about 162 m long and another joining the Booster and the Main Ring about 147 m long. Various Service and auxiliary buildings are to be constructed at elevations below grade congruent to the beam lines. These involve extensive open cut excavations. There are six service buildings and four cable shafts spaced around the perimeter of the Main Ring, one magnet access shaft on each transfer tunnel, one on the Main ring, and one within the Booster Building. There will be four survey shafts to allow accurate location of the tunnel: one at the centre point of each arc of the Main Ring, and one in the centre of each straight way. Site lines and survey shafts are also provided in the Booster complex. 2.3.2 Choice of Tunnel Construction Method Various combinations of open cut and driven tunnel were considered for the Main Ring and the Booster Complex. Comparative costs for the Main Ring were presented in the preliminary report of July 5, 1989. For the open cut tunnel three structural solutions were considered, a concrete box, corrugated metal pipe, and a cast-in- place concrete arch. The cut-and-cover tunnel solutions were all based on assumptions that the cut slopes could be st able at very steep slopes using experience from TRIUMF. Two slopes were considered: a 60° slope to conform to TRIUMF experience and an 80° slope using shotcrete shoring for stability. A concrete box section was considered but was found too expensive for general use at the spans required to house the beam line. A corrugated metal pipe was co~sidered on the basis of experience at Brookhaven. The design is believed to be economically feasible, but the pipe is structurally weak and cannot 7 support point loads, there is a possibility of electrolytic corrosion, and problems of supply from a single source supplier. For a conventional tunnel two tunnelling methods were considered, using a tunnel boring machine (TBM) giving a circular shape, and a top heading and bench method giving a modified horseshoe shape. The TBM method was rejected as impractical early in the study because of the following: • Enlargement of the Main Ring to accommodate separation of the E ring would require a TBM of about 9m diameter, which is too large for practical consideration of a short shallow tunnel. • Thrning difficulty due to small radius of the Main Ring. • Short length of the tunnel does not justify high capital costs of the TBM·. • Small number of contractors available for bidding. The top heading and bench tunnel was competitive with the cut-and- cover design in cost. It was not structurally suitable where the depth of excavation was small and the tunnel cover became insufficient for safe tunnelling. It allowed for variations in design less easily, where access tunnels and other additions to the tunnel would be necessary. The costs of the alternatives are roughly estimated as follows: Table 1: Cost of Main Ring Tunnel in Millions of Canadian Dollars 1989 Cut and Cover Concrete Box Cast-in-Place Concrete Arch Precast Concrete Arch Corrugated Metal Pipe Driven Tunnel Tunnel Boring Machine Top Heading and Bench * See Section 2.3.11 60° and dewatering 12.3 11.0 -* 10.8 not calculated 11.2 80° and shotcrete shoring 16.3 15.0 -* 14.8 The differences in cost between the cast-in-place concrete arch, the corrugated metal pipe, and the top heading and bench driven tunnel were not believed to be significant. The east-in-place concrete arch appeared to offer the best solution. It was considered the simplest 8 form of construction, it could be built by many contractors, and it allowed for many changes in detail such as the provision of access tunnels for both personnel and services. Nevertheless, in detailed design it will be necessary to consider the driven tunnel again particularly for applications where surface disturbance is to be avoided. 2.3.3 ,Main Ring Tunnel The Main Ring tunnel was sized to accommodate the C,D, and E rings. The C and D rings were to be stacked and the separation of the E ring was to be increased at the Extraction Hall to allow local shielding. A cross section of the tunnel including magnets, services, and the magnet transporter is shown in Figure 3. The horizontal clearance was chosen to suit the maximum separation of the C and D beam lines with respect to the E beam line of 4088 mm. This dimension controlled the tunnel width and was held for the entire tunnel to allow reusable forms to be employed throughout the Main Ring. The Main Ring tunnel and all other tunnels include unistrut fittings at 1.2 m centres to support cable trays and piping. 2.3.4 Be Transfer Line Tunnel The BC Transfer Line is the beam line from the Booster B Ring to the Main Ring C Ring. It changes grade to allow the Transfer Line to enter the Main Ring above the C beam line. A box section is required at the Booster Ring and Main Ring and is used for the entire transfer line. A typical section is shown on Drawing PAB 0004D. 2.3.5 Booster Tunnel and Building The Booster Tunnel was sized to accommodate the A and B beam lines stacked with the A line over the B line. A cross section of the tunnel including magnets, services, and the magnet transporter is shown on Figure 4. The beam lines are not circular in plan but are constructed of segments forming a polygon. The location of the beam line varies with respect to the centre line of a tunnel which is 9 circular in plan. The horizontal clearance was chosen to accommodate this variation in beam line location. The excavation for the tunnel was extended to remove all but a shielding zone within the Booster Ring. The building consists of three subgrade floors. The walls form an octagon in plan to allow straight forms to be used. 2.3.6 IA Transfer Line Tunnel The IA Transfer Line is the beam line connecting the TRIUMF cyclotron with the A ring at the Booster. This tunnel is sized to carry a single beam line in a section similar to that used at the Booster and the Main Ring. The beam line will be diverted through short radius turns in this tunnel, and there will also be provision for a beam dump. The magnet carrier cannot traverse the tight curves without an increase in tunnel width, considerably above that required for the straight sections. For this reason a half arch section will be used for straight sections of any length, while a box section will be used at curves and for the beam dump, the width of the section being varied as required by the circumstances. Typical sections are shown on Drawing P AB 0004D. 2.3.7 Work Within the Cyclotron Vault A magnet support frame will be constructed from the bottom floor elevation of the existing cyclotron vault, along the northern portion of the existing east wall. The present steel floor at EI 52.54 will be cut back to permit installation of the new steel framing, which will be detailed with bolted connections to permit manhandling of relatively small individual components into place. A 7.5 tonne capacity monorail will be installed above the magnet line to permit the han-dling of magnets from the existing cyclotron bridge crane into position on the new support steel position on the new support steel. The north wall of the present vault, some 2.2 m in thickness, will be core drilled at two locations for passage of the beam line and for alignment sighting. A general arrangement of this work is shown on Drawing No. PAC 0002D. 10 2.3.8 Access Tunnels Access to all tunnels for personnel and services is provided by an underpass which preserves shielding of the beam line. At each access point the tunnel becomes a box section or hall. A stairway or ladder provides access to the tunnel from the underpass. Air water and electrical power enter the tunnel at these locations and tunnel drainage is intercepted and led from the tunnel. Access and emergency exit tunnels are provided to the Main Ring tunnel from the Service Buildings and to the Booster tunnel, and bOth the IA and BC Transfer Line tunnels from the Booster Building. The locations of these access tunnels are controlled by three criteria: • Convenient access for operating personnel • A maximum travel distance of 100 m. to a place of refuge in the ev~nt of fire • Emergency egress at the ends of any dead end tunnels Many of these tunnels will serve a double purpose, and will be used for the transmission of mechancial or electrical services in addition to the personnel access uses. At the cyclotron end of the IA Tunnel a transverse exit tunnel will lead eastwards along the north wall of the cyclotron vault and connects to the present spiral stair in the cyclotron building, thus providing 'an exit from this otherwise dead end tunnel. The IA and BC tunnels will not connect directly to the Booster tunnel except for passage of the beam line. Access to the Booster Building is gained through the Service tunnels. There will be access from the Booster tunnel to the Booster Building by way of two labyrinth passages Access to or exit from the Main Ring tunnel will be gained by tunnels from the basement level of the six service buildings beneath the floor of the main ~ing tunnel and hence up through stairs into the ring tunnel between the beam lines. These stairwell openings will require to be temporarily' covered during passage of the magnet transporter, and then reopened for use. 2.3.9 Magnet Access Shafts Magnet Access shafts from the ground surface to the tunnels are provided near the Main Ring Service Building 1, the BC Transfer Line tunnel, and at the IA Transfer Line tunnel. 11 A shaft is provided within the Booster Building to provide access to the Booster Ring. Access shafts are shown on Drawing PAC 0003D. The access shafts will be sized to permit clearance for the appropriate magnet carrier, thus permitting the carrier, and the magnets, to be introduced into the tunnel from ground level. , Lifting of the components is proposed to be by means of a mobile gantry type crane, fitted with industrial standard controls as shown in Figs. 5 and 6. The advantage of such a unit is that it may be used over any of the access shafts. When not in use the gantry will be stored in the Booster Building. Fixed overhead cranes are to be provided in the Booster Building and at Service Building 1. 2.3.10 Booster Building This section of the report deals only with the below-grade portion of the booster building, the above g"rade structures being described in Chapter 6. The building is proposed to be octagonal in plan, this being considered the best compromise between maximum floor area within a circular tunnel and construct ability at a reasonable cost. There will be three floor levels below grade, the lowest being some 13.2 metres below the ground level floor. The lowest floor will be linked to the booster tunnel ring by means of two curved magnet access galleries, which will be designed to permit the passage of the magnet carrier from a position beneath a vertical access shaft in the booster building to the booster tunnel ring. Shielding of these galleries will be accomplished by a labyrinth in one gallery and a sliding shield door in the other. The structural framing will be based upon a column grid at 10 m centres in each direction, oriented to suit the equipment layout proposed by TRIUMF. This equipment will impose very high loads on the intermediate below-grade floors, of the order of 1550 kg per square m (15.3 kPa), and in order to keep the overall structural floor depth to a minimum, a two-way slab with drop panels at the column heads will be employed for each of the suspended floors. However, the large hatchway required for passage of the magnets down to the lower floor will require beam framing at its perimeter. Foundation conditions are good and no special foundation provisions are expected to be required. Each floor will be linked by stairwell and elevator. The elevator will be of 5 tonne capacity 12 designed to move machine components as well as personnel. 2.3.11 Construction Materials - Below Grade Structures Although a number of construction materials have been considered, all below grade con-struction in tunnels, access shafts, booster building and exits will be in cast-in-place con-crete, largely due to the flexibility of construction which this material allows. Precast units were considered for the upper curved sections of the tunnel arches, but were rejected on the grounds of difficulty in handling large components in deep excavations and the problems envisaged in waterproofing the joints. In the tunnels the cast-in-place concrete can be placed over movable formwork, which will permit reasonably rapid construction and economic reuse of formwork. For the booster building the requirements of shielding, the substantial floor loads, and the considerable soil pressures against the exterior of the below grade structure makes cast-in-place concrete the only logical choice. A waterproofing membrane will be installed over the outside of the tunnel sections and on the exterior face of the booster building basement walls. Further protection against water ingress will be provided at joints in the concrete by means of labyrinth type waterstops placed in the joints. 2.4 Tunnel Design Criteria affecting the tunnel design were as follows: 2.4.1 Shielding The beam line is to be protected by shielding of 8 m of earth, 5 m of concrete or an equivalent density of other materials. 13 2.4.2 Vertical Alignment The elevation of the beam is to remain truly horizontal to the extent possible. The initial elevation is controlled by the TRIUMF cyclotron. The final elevation is controlled by the beam line elevation in the Experimental Hall. The slope of the Be Transfer Line is not known exactly. This has no influence on the cost estimate. The elevations are shown on Drawing PAB 0003D. 2.4.3 Horizontal Alignment The horizontal location of the beam was given by TRIUMF. The exact length of the Main Ring and Booster Rings has been fixed as has the geometry of the IA Transfer Line. The geometry of the Be Transfer Line has not. It follows that the coordinates of the IA Transfer Line and Booster are calculated but the coordinates of the Main Ring are derived from the scaled distance between the Booster and Main Rings. The uncertainty about the Be Tunnel has no influence on the cost estimates. The location of the beam lines is shown on Drawing No. PAB 0003D. 2.4.4 Magnet Transporters Two transporters are considered; a 30 tonne machine for the Main Ring and an 18 tonne machine for the Booster and Transfer Lines. The dimensions of these transporters are assumed to be as follows: Main Ring: 2000 wide x 7300 long x 4800 high (30 tonne) Booster: 1300 wide x 6100 long x 3500 hIgh (18 tonne) 2.4.5 Tunnel Lining Loads The depth of the tunnels from the existing ground surface to the footing base and to the crown are shown on Table 2. Lining loads include the total weight of the overburden plus full hydrostatic head, plus an allowance for earthquake loads. Traffic loads will be considered but are expected to be neglibible. The loads do not include an allowance for future construction over or adjacent to the tunnels. 14 Table 2: Depth Below Original Grade (m) Depth Below Finished Grade *footing base crown *footing base crown max min max min max min max min IA 11 8 7 4 11 8 7 4 Booster 16 13 10 7 16 16 10 8 BC 12 10 8 6 12 12 8 8 Main Ring 19 9 12 2 19 15 12 8 * NOTE: the additional depth locally to base of service access tunnels is 3 m. 2.4.6 Earthquake Loads Earthquake ground motion excitations are in accordance with the provisions in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC), 1985. The KAON Factory site is in Zone 4 of the Building code which suggests design paramet.ers of acceleration = 0.2 g (ZA) and velocity = 0.20 mls (ZV) for an earthquake with a probability of exceedence of 10% in 50 years. Detailed design of the tunnel sections should include an assessment of their interaction with the surrounding soil. The assessment is to include examinations of global distortions as well as local asymmetric loads by considering the characteristics of the design earthquake, the appropriate soil parameters, the water table elevation, the methods of excavation and backfill, the structural characteristics of the tunnel and other contributing effects. Under the design earthquake, the integrity of the tunnel structure should not be compro-mised. Ho~ver, post earthquake misalignment of the magnet lines is to be anticipated. Appendix 1 contains a preliminary evaluation of the KAON Factory tunnel response to , earthquakes, by Mr. W.E. Hodge. 2.4.7 Drainage and Waterproofing The tunnels are to be covered with plastic sheeting to provide a continuous sealed wa-terproof membrane. The tunnels are to be drained by parallel peripheral drains outside the tunnel footing. These are to be large diameter perforated asphalt coated galvanized corrugated steel pipe. They will be placed at constant elevation beside the tunnels with 15 no gradient and will drain in two directions to the access tunnels where provision will be made for cleaning the drains should this be necessary. 2.4.8 Access and Emergency Exit Access. shafts are to accommodate the magnet transporter dimensions given for the Main Ring and Booster. The Booster transporter is to be used in the IA and BC 'Transfer Line tunnels. Emerg~ncy exits are to provide 1100 mm width, to be within 100 m of any location, and to be protected by rated fire doors. 2.5 Excavation/Tunnelling Methods and Temporary Ground Sup-port 2.5.1 Introduction/Local Experience There is cC;nsiderable local experience in soft ground tunnelling. The Highbury Sewer Tunnel (19QO) is closest to the KAON Factory site (3.7 km east), and was driven in wa-ter bearing sandy soils and dense silt with water bearing gravel or sand layers. Partial dewatering was accomplished by pumped wells, but some of the tunnel had to be driven in compressed air, due to its depth below ground surface (up to 88 m), and the resultant high pressure water confined between layers of relatively impermeable till and clay. The KAON FACTORY formations are somewhat similar except that the water bearing soils are shallower (10 to 15 m), and therefore more accessable to economical dewatering meth-ods. Also the KAON Factory site is located in relatively high terrain making it easier to accomplish drawdown. The CN Rail Thornton Tunnel (Vancouver-Burnaby 1966-68) was driven in stiff till at the south end for 600 m. No difficulty was encountered (steel sets and lagging were used for initial support) except when surface water was allowed to penetrate and soften the till (7 m of ground cover) near the south portal. A more recent project was the Coquitlam Lake Intake Tunnel upgrading (GVRD 1987), some of which was driven in dense silty sands. The shotcrete shoring method has been used extensively in the Vancouver area, mostly for deep vertical walled foundation excavations up to 18 m deep. Examples of use are the West End Community Centre at Denman and Haro Streets which was 10 m deep in sand and gravel in a matrix of clay and till (1973), and the Oceanic Plaza (1000 block W. Hastings Street, 1975), which was up to 16 m total depth with up to 9m in silt, gravel and till. All of the excavations were kept dewatered during excavation, mostly by open pumping from 16 ditches and sumps in the excavation. 2.5.2 Dewatering The tunnel route will be dewatered before excavation by lowering the water level to below excavation grade with an ejector well system designed to operate with suction pressures in the wells. A multi stage well point system is not practical with the steep excavation slopes, yet a vacuum system is essential to ensure dewatering of any relatively thin water bearing strata. Since the near surface water table is essentially perched on the underlying Quadra Sands, deep dewatering to control uplift pressures beneath the excavation should not be required. Operating costs for an ejector dewatering system can be high, therefore, dewatering and excavation sequences should be carefully integrated. This can be done by dewatering slightly ahead of the advancing excavations, and shutting down the dewatering system in areas where the tunnel is completed and backfilled, with its drainage system operational. If seepage from the cut slopes is encountered during excavation, excavation in that area should be suspended until additional ejector wells are installed and the seepage has sub-sided. A small capacity single stage well point system should be available for dewatering localized deeper excavations for access tunnels. The vacuum aspect of the dewatering system has significant implications on temporary ground support, as discussed subsequently. 2.5.3 Temporary Ground Support A 60° side slope for the open cut was selected, as this was considered the maximum slope that could stand without systematic shoring after dewatering, and this was the slope used in construction of TRIUMF. Slope stability of a 60° wall excavation was reviewed by wedge analysis of five conditions; i.e., a basic "dry" wedge, one with full hydrostatic water pressure, one with modified water pressure, with and without a tension crack, and a wedge with a dry slope with a wet tension crack. Each condition was analyzed with five wedge slope angles and three angles of shear resistance. Results confirmed that complete drainage and control of piezometric pressure would be re-17 qui red to stabilize the non-homogeneous strata excavated at a 60° slope. AT the TRIUMF site it appears that the reversal of groundwater flow and the related seepage forces played an important role in providing stability on steep excavation slopes. The system proposed for the KAON FACTORY will be expected to act similarly and should be considered an integral part of the temporary ground support. It will be necessary for the Engineer to retain more control than usual in the dewatering contract. The surface of the excavation will have to be protected with plastic sheathing during periods of precipitation. Local areas of wall surface may require shot crete shoring if rav-elling occurs and particularly in the sensitive materials in the west arc of the Main Ring. Shotcrete equipment need not be mobilized, but it should be readily available. 2.5.4 Excavation The excavation should be taken down in lifts working generally from the south to the north and west, that is from the area of shallow to the deeper excavation. The condition of the slopes should be watched carefully during the deepening of the excavation for signs of instability. Water pressures or flows will require to be controlled and shot crete or other shoring may be necessary. Whilst there will be advantages in opening the cut section by section the choice of sequence should be left to the contractor both in consideration of machine efficiency and the problems he may face in stockpiling materials. 2.5.5 Backfilling Provided the spoil from the excavation is stockpiled and sealed against soaking by rain-water, it is anticipated that this material will provide most of the backfill of the cut and cover trench. It is anticipated that a more uniform material such as dredged sand will be used immediately adjacent to the tunnel. The spoil will require careful handling, water content control, and compaction in layers. It must be brought up equally on each side of the arch structures and compaction close to the tunnel structure should be light so as not to distort the arch. 18 2.6 Considerations for Detailed Design 2.6.1 Survey Detailed topographic surveying will be required using the UTM grid and establishing related site grids. The work should include new large scale aerial photography. 2.6.2 Soil Investigation A soils investigation to provide a consistent geologic understanding of the site and the groundwater distribution on the site is required. This should include site specific informa-tion at the location of particular structures related to compressibility and the strength of the soil. It should examine the anomalous material found at the western arc of the Main Ring. 2.6.3 Booster Ring Access Shaft Possibility The possibility of using a vertical Booster Ring access shaft should be considered to avoid the difficult geometric patterns of the Booster B3 level. 2.6.4 Necessity of Early Detailing of Transition Sections Transition section detailing affects the individual tunnel designs and requires early consid-eration. The IA Tunnel to the Booster Ring, the Booster Ring to the BC Tunnel, the BC Tunnel to the Main Ring, including the provision of access for personnel, electrical, and mechanical facilities should be undertaken at an early stage of the work. 2.7 Specification Outline 2.7.1 Division 2 - Sitework Section 02140 - Dewatering 19 PART 1 - GENERAL .1 Description • The work consists of the supply of all specialist dewatering services, labour, plant materials and equipment, and performance of all works, design, construc-tion, operation, and maintenance of an ejector well system, to dewater the site .area and a vacuum well point system for local dewatering within the site. • The piezometric surface is to be maintained at a minimum depth of 1.0 m below the final base of the excavation. During excavation the piezometric level shall be at least 2.0 m below the advancing excavation level. A vacuum of 60 kPa shall be maintained in the filter sand anulus surrounding operating ejector wells. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Materials • Clean, uniform filter sand (gradation to be determined on site), and bentonite or cement grout well seal . . 2 Equipment • Ejector well pumping plant, complete with minimum supply line pump capac-ity of 40 BHP (Brake Horse Power), or more as required by the Contractors excavation and construction sequence. Pumping plant to have duplicate power source and pump on standby for immediate backup operation. • Water supply and return header pipes, complete with surface connections for ejector wells. • Solid and slotted, minimum 50 mm diameter ejector well casing, complete with well cap, riser pipe, ejector body, and vacuum monitoring gauge for each ejector well. • Portable, single stage vacuum well point pumping plant, complete with pump rated at a minimum 5 BHP (Brake Horse Power), header pipes, well points and all related equipment. 20 PART 3 - EXECUTION .1 Installation • Install the dewatering system sufficiently in advance of excavation to achieve _ the dewatering requirements noted in PART 1 - GENERAL. • Ejector well casing shall be installed in a mimimum 150 mm diameter hole and backfilled with filter sand and a well seal as shown on the drawings. • Vacuum well point systems shall be installed as required . . 2 Water Collection and Treatment • Collect water from the system into a series of conduits and discharge as required. No open flow channels or other methods that might cause soil erosion to occur will be permitted. • Design the system so that discharge water is clear. Pumping of silt and sand ' .. will not be permitted. Section 02220 - Excavating, Backfilling and Compacting for Structures PART 1 - GENERAL .1 Description The work consists of excavating, stockpiling, and using common material as engi-neered backfill. The material will be removed, loaded and hauled to designated stockpile or waste areas or placed directly in the work. It will be compacted both in stdckpiles and the work and sealed against the entry of rainwater when necessary. Processing other than the removal of oversize boulders by pit selection will not be required. Water content will be controlled. Backfill will be required to a minimum depth of 8 m over the tunnel structures except at the IA Transfer Line Tunnel where 4 m will be required, or to the original grade level, whichever is the greatest. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Backfill Materials • Use backfill materials which have been freed of snow, ice, shale, clay, friable materials, organic matter and all other deleterious materials. 21 • Type 1 fill: clean, well graded, hard durable sand and gravel, to the following gradation: u.s. STD Sieve Size % Passing sq mesh (mm) by Weight 2 in. 50 100 1.5 in 40 70-100 No. 4 5 25-55 No. 10 2 10-40 No. 40 0.4 0-15 No. 100 0.15 0-5 • Type 2 fill: clean, well graded sand, to the following gradation: u.S. STD Sieve Size % Passing sq mesh (mm) by Weight 3/8 in. 9 100 No. 10 2 75-100 No. 40 0.4 25-100 No. 100 0.15 10-50 No. 200 0.07 0-15 • Type 3 fill: uncontaminated material excavated on site with a natural moisture content within 2% of optimum moisture content, as determined by ASTM D968 Method D . . 2 Equipment • Excavation Excavate with a backhoe, or by hand, at .the perimeters of the excavation. Otherwise, any equipment may be used. • Compaction Compaction of material within 1 m of concrete structures shall be by vibrating plate compacters. Compaction of backfill to within one metre of a concrete structure may be carried out by a ride-on, self propelled, vibrating drum roller capable of compacting the material to the required dry density. General compaction shall be done with a crawler tractor of a mass not less than 180 kN (D8 or equivalent). PART 3 - EXECUTION .1 Excavation 22 • Ensure adequate dewatering ahead of excavation as per Section 02140. • Excavate in lifts, not exceeding 1.5 m in vertical height stabilizing each lift before starting excavation of succeeding lifts, as per Section 03362. • Excavate drainage trenches concurrently with excavation to the final general excavation level. • Place spoil in designated waste disposal, stockpile, or fill areas . • 2 Backfill and Compaction • Place type 1 fill in bottom of the excavation under the structure footings around the drainage pipes, and under the slab. • Place type 2 fill within 1 m of concrete structures or as directed by the Engineer. • Place type 3 fill as common backfill within the tunnel excavation, or as site fill, or as berming over the beam line. • Type 1 and 2 fill are to be placed in 200 mm loose lifts. Type 3 fill is to be placed in 300 mm loose lifts. • All fill is to be compacted by the controlled use of hauling and spreading equip-ment. Types 1 and 2 fill shall be compacted with vibratory equipment as follows. Type 1 shall be heavily compacted using not less than 6 passes of a vibrating roller (Dynapac CA 25 or equivalent). Type 2 shall be lightly compacted using six complete passes of a vibrating plate compactor, or a walk-behind vibrating roller. During backfilling of tunnel strucutres, material shall be maintained at an equal elevation on each side of the excavation within a tolerance of ± 1 m. Section 02343 - Monitoring for Ground Movement PART 1- GENERAL .1 Description The work consists of supplying and installing borehole inclinometers adjacent to the deep part of the Main tunnel excavation and the Booster excavation. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Instrumentation Equipment • Borehole in place inclinometers with multi-sensor displacement measuring ca-pability, as manufactured by the Slope Indicator Co., or approved equivalent. 23 PART 3 - EXECUTION .1 Installation • Drill 6 pairs of holes spaced along and on opposite sides of the deep parts of the Main ring excavation, to a depth of about 15 m, and 3 holes along the side of the Booster Ring excavation to a depth of about 10 m. Holes to be 76 mm diameter. • Install the inclinometers with all accessory equipment, complete with suitable protection from vandalism and accidental damage. SECTION 02413 - Tunnel Drainage and Waterproofing PART 1 - GENERAL .1 Description • The work consists of installing an impermeable membrane liner around the overt of the tunnel, and a horizontal drain system at the invert of the tunnel. The horizontal drain system will be installed during tunnel construction, and each section of tunnel connected up and complete before backfilling commences in that section. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Materials • Impermeable Liner: low density Polyethylene (L.D.P.E.) 2 mm (80 mil) thick. • 300 mm (12 in.) diameter longitudinal drains, perforated asphalt coated galva-nized esp; steel thickness 2 mm, to eSA 6163.2 • 150 mm (6 in.) diameter drains, perforated asphalt coated galvanized esp; steel thickness 1.3 mm. • Drain gravel shall consist of clean, free draining aggregates,sized to type 1 fill, section 02220. • Prefabricated drains, "NUDRAIN" as manufactured by NILEX or approved equivalent, 250 mm wide Type A Strip, 40 mm thick. PART 3 - EXECUTION 24 .1 Impermeable liner to be installed under the supervision of a representative of the man-ufacturer . . 2 Drain pipes to be lengths recommended by the supplier, conforming to straight lengths of tunnel structure . • 3 Sumps to be installed in the inverts of the access tunnels . . 4 Prefabricated drains to be installed against the walls of the excavations for the Main and Booster Rings, spaced at 2 m horizontally, centre to centre. Hand compaction of backfill material adjacent to the drains shall be done. 2.7.2 Division 3 - Concrete SECTION 03361 - Shotcrete PART 1 - GENERAL .1 Description The work consists of the application of shot crete to the walls of excavated surfaces, where required . • 2 Definitions • Shotcrete. Portland cement concrete applied from a nozzle by compressed air, and containing admixtures as necessary to provide quick set, high early strength and satisfactory adhesion, using the dry-mix process. Steel fibres and micro-silica shall be added to the shot crete. y.. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Materials • Cement: Type 10 conforming to CSA CAN3-A23.1 • Aggregate: Conform to CSA CAN3-A23.1, ACI 506.2, and ACI 506R-85. • Water: Conform to CSA CAN3-A23.1 • Admixtures: Conform to CSA CAN3-A26.6 • Steel fibres: "Dramix ZL" 30/0.50 or equivalent, conforming to ASTM A820. Proportion not less than 60 kg/ m3 of shot crete, dry mix. 25 • Micro-silica: Pre-bagged dry. Proportion not -less than 10% dry micro-silica to dry cement weight. Ensure compatibility with all materials . • 2 Dry-Mix Composition Conform to Gradation No.2 in ACI 506.2 for gradation limits for combined aggre-gate. Cement content to be not less than 385 kg/m3 of dry mix. PART 3 - EXECUTION .1 General • Conform to ACI 506.2 and ACI 506R-85 for proportioning and mixing, placing equipment, field quality control and testing. • Conform to ASTM Cl018 for flexure toughness and first crack strength testing. • Conform to ASTM ClOg for compressive strength using 50 mm cube specimens. SECTION 03362 - Shotcrete Shoring PART 1 - GENERAL .1 Description • The work consists of the temporary shoring of open cut excavation surfaces in soil, where required. • Shotcrete shoring is the application of shotcrete and the installation of patterned grouted bolts or soil tendons in stages as the excavation proceeds, as specified and as shown on the drawings. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Materials • Soil Tendons: Deformed rebar conforming to CSA G30.l2 M grade 400 or thread bar equivalent. • Soil Tendon Plates: 200 x 200 x 12 sheet steel, conforming to ASTM 4570 structural grade hot rolled carbon sheet steel and strip. 26 • Soil Tendon Grout: 2: 1 sand - ciment fondu mix, or as otherwise specified. • Shot crete: Steel fibre reinforced, with micro- silica as per Section 03361. PART 3 - EXECUTION .1 Installation of Soil Tendons • Install tendons in holes ensuring full encasement of the tendons in grout. • Pull test tendons using a calibrated hollow centred hydraulic ram and pump, with gauge . . 2 Installation of Shotcrete • Install shotcrete in accordance with the drawings and Section 03361. SECTION 03100 - Concrete Formwork PART 1 - GENERAL .1 Description The work consists of the construction, erection, and stripping of formwork as required to place the cast-in- place concrete to the outlines defined. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Formwork Materials • Face formwork to be in contact with the concrete shall be resin faced plywood or steel. • Formwork framing (studs, walers, etc.) shall be construction grade Douglas fir. • Shoring shall be construction grade Douglas fir, or heavy duty metal scaffolding systems. • Formwork ties shall be proprietary manufacture, fitted with water barriers. • Waterstops shall be labyrinth type, neoprene, 150 mm wide. PART 3 - EXECUTION 27 .1 Design All formwork shall be designed by a professional engineer registered in British Columbia. Shop drawings shall bear the engineers seal . • 2 Construction Formwork shall be sturdily constructed in accordance with good standard practise, and shall be adequately supported and braced to withstand the pressure of wet concrete and construction loadings without undue distortion. The provisions of the W.C.B. shall be followed. SECTION 03200 - Concrete Reinforcement PART 1 - GENERAL .1 Description The work consists of the supply, fabrication, and placement of reinforcing steel to cast-in-place concrete, all as specified and detailed. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Reinforcing Steel • All reinforcing steel shall be new billet steel deformed bars conforming to Cana-dian Standard CSA G.30.12, with a minimum yield strength of 400 MPa. • All welded steel wire fabric reinforcement shall conform to Canadian Standard CSA G.30.5 and G.30.15. PART 3 - EXECUTION .1 Shop Drawings Detailed shop drawings and bar schedules shall be prepared, showing the position and nUmbering of all bars . . 2 Placement All reinforcing steel shall be securely tied into place to hold reinforcement in its correct position and to prevent displacement during concrete pouring. 28 SECTION 03300 - Cast-in-}>lace Concrete PART 1 - GENERAL .1 Description The work consists of the supply, placement, and finishing of all cast-in-place concrete for the tunnels, shafts and booster building below grade structure. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Concrete All concrete materials shall conform to Canadian Standard CSA Can3-A23.1. Ag-gregate size, compressive strength, slump, and other factors shall be as outlined in the detailed specifications. Concrete additives shall be as permitted by the detailed specifications and shall be in conformance with the relevant CSA and ASTM Specifications. The use of additives other than those listed will not be permitted unless with the express permission of the Owner's engineer. PART 3 - EXECUTION .1 Concrete Placement The placement, vibration and compaction of concrete is of vital importance, and the highest quality of work is demanded. Methods of concrete placement shall be generally as outlined in Canadian Standards CSA A23.1 and A23.3, with particular attention being paid to vibration, compaction, void removal, and exclusion of honeycombing . • 2 Concrete Finishing Exposed finished concrete surfaces shall be given a finish commensurate with the purpose for which it is intended. Finished floors shall be true and level to within 3mm in 3m, with falls to drain where specified . . 3 Concrete Testing All concrete shall be tested in accordance with the provisions of Canadian Standard CSA A23.2. 29 2.7.3 Division 5 - Metals SECTION 05100 - Structural Metal Framing PART 1 - GENERAL .1 Description The work consists of the supply, fabrication and erection of structual metal framing to support magnets within the existing cyclotron vault. PART 2 - PRODUCTS .1 Structural Components • Steel shapes, plate and bar shall conform to Canadian Standard CSA G.40.21, Grade 300W (Grade 350W for hollow structural sections). • Welding shall conform to the provisions of Canadian Standard CSA W59. • Bolts shall conform to American Standard ASTM A325. PART 3 - EXECUTION .1 Fabrication and Erection • The fabricator shall prepare shop detail drawings for approval. • All fabrication shall conform to Canadian Standard CSA Can 3 SI6.I. . • Erection shall conform to CSA Can 3 S16.1 and shall also conform to W.C.B. Standards and provisions. 2.8 Figures 30 Fig. 1: Excavation for TRIUMF 31 Fig. 2: Excavation for TRIUMF. Cyclotron Vault Under Construction 32 w w "%j ~. ()Q . w AIR SUPPLY PLENUM CONTINUOUS IN TUNNEL SPRINKLER PIPE CABLE TRAYS----HOSES TO MAGNETS I I At .. COOUNG WATER PIPES ,--, 1 MAGNET 1 I_ - CARRIER -I 1 1 1 1 1 SHEET METAL PANEL WllH 25mm lHERMAL INSULATION SUPPLY REGISTER FlRE MAIN COMPRESSED AIR SPRINKLER PIPE FRESH AIR SUPPLY DUCT CABLE TRAYS COOUNG WATER PIPES 4 •• I .. . :' .' '~. ': .. : .~ . ' '~. . : .. : .~ .' '~. ': ..  .: 1 I .. ...... .. .. . " .. .. ,.. .. t: .. .. .. ,. .. .. ... MAIN RING ruNNEL EQUIPMENT SPACE REQUIREMENTS w ~ "%j 1-'-()Q ~ SPRINKLER PIPE CABLE TRAYS ~ COOLING WATER PIPES .. .. . -- - 11-------, '--I AIR SUPPLY PLENUM CONTINUOUS IN TUNNEL SHEET METAL PANEL WITH 25mm THERMAL INSULATION COMPRESSED AIR SPRINKLER PIPE A+ 1 I I--~ L __ ~ .. .. . . . . .. 1 MAGNET 1 1_ CARRIER .. I .. . 4 _I ' BOOSTER ruNNEL EQUIPMENT SPACE REQUIREMENTS FRESH AIR SUPPLY DUCT .. .. ., . - . .. . ... ., 35 w Z c( a: <J. > a: t-z c( CJ W ~ -m 0 :E it) • w a: :::') CJ -II. . -,::, .. ~ 0-. U('l) .- CO a: 0) ..... ~~ 0 .. ~c: U)Q) Q)E "a. .... -~~ ocr Uw 2.9 Appendix I 37 w.E. HODGE P. Eng. Geotechnical Engineer Stewart-EBA Consulting Ltd. 810, 355 Burrard Street Vancouver, B.C. V6C 2G8 Attention: D.J. Bazett, P. Eng. Dear Sirs: Re: Ttiumf . Kaori Factbty Resporiseto Eatthquake September 4; 1989 This letter contains the results of a "SHAKE" analysis undertaken to assess the likely behavior of the proposed Kaon track at the Triumf site in the UBC Endowment Lands during an earthquake. GEOLOGY The physical characteristics of the overburden, from ground level to the top of the Tertiary sandstone, was based on information obtained during conversations with D.J. Bazett and G.E. Rawlings, and from documents produced by these gentlemen. Apparently, as yet, detailed geological knowledge of the lower strata is not available. SOIL COLUMN The SHAKE analysis assumes the ground surface and the underlying strata to be horizontal. Based on the information provided, the overburden was modeled as a single stratigraphic unit consisting of dense to very dense non-cohesive soil, resting directly on sandstone at a depth of 550 feet below ground level. The water table was placed at 180 feet below ground level. The SHAKE analysis is not particularly sensitive to refinements of geotechnical soil classification, and consequently, within the context of this preliminary stage of project investigation, the assumption of the simplified soil profile made here is considered to be both adequate and appropriate. SOIL PARAMETERS The analysis requires the Shear Modulus, the Damping Ratio, and the Unit Weight of the overburden to be given at various depths within the soil column. These values were generated using the relationships proposed by Hardin and Drnevich together with selected values for Void Ratio (0.35) and effective Friction Angle (40 degrees). The Shear Wave Velocity of the sandstone was taken at 8000 feet per second. _. --~------.-. --2203 MacDonald House 1600 Beach Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. V6G.lY7 _ . _ _ i~04) 68~-1448 - 2 -EARTHQUAKE The intensity of the earthquake shaking was modeled on the ground motion which was recorded in the parking lot of the Washington Highways Test Lab in Olympia during the April 13, 1949 Puget Sound earthquake. This ground level seismometer measured a maximum acceleratoin of 0.28g. The work done for this report was based on generated excitations which would produce 0.28g at ground surface at the Triumf site. In this analysis the required level of shaking was produced in two different ways: (a) "Puget" The accelerations recorded at Olympia were applied directly at ground surface in the Triumf (numerical) model and allowed to propagate downward, past the levels of the proposed structures. This approach is reasonable because the Olympia site is underlain by 400 feet of alluvial soil, which is somewhat compatible with the Triumf site geology. (b) "Caltech" The "Hard Rock" acceleration history recorded at the Caltech Seismological Lab in Pasadena California during the February 9, 1971 . San Fernando earthquake were applied to the Triumf soil column at the sandstone level and allowed to propagate upward. The input acceleration levels were adjusted to produce a maximum surface acceleration in the model of O.28g. RESPONSE SPECTRA The Velocity and Acceleration Response Spectra for both excitations were computed for a depth of 30 feet below ground level. These spectra are shown in Figures 1 to 4. STRUCTURAL DISTORTIONS In order to assess the likely distortions to which the buried structure would be subjected during an earthquake of this magnitude, the horizontal movements of the ground were computed in the Time Domain by double integration of the acceleration history at two selected levels. The results are shown in Figures 5 to 8 for depths of 30 feet and 70 feet, for both the Puget and the Caltech excitations. By assuming that the structure will move in a manner which is totally compliant with the ground, it is possible to use these plots to estimate the distortions to which a buried structure would be subjected during a similar seismic event. A shear wave carrying the earthquake motions would travel through the ground at the Triumf site at about 500 to 1000 feet per second. In this case it is conservative to choose the slower speed, and thereby, a wave could be assumed to take about 2 or 3 seconds to traverse the length of the large track. Inspection of the data in the horizontal displacement plots W.E. HODGE P. Eng. Geotechnical Engineer 39 - 3 -indicates that for such a time interval the maximum distortions a structure would undergo would be as follows: Depth below ground surface 30 feet 70 feet Puget Sound EQ 1 in 1580 1 in 1650 San Fernando EQ 1 in 3200 1 in 3040 It therefore appears appropriate to provide the structural designers with the task of designing a structure which can tolerate a horizontal distortion of, say, 1 in 1500 in both the horizontal axes, combined with a complementary vertical component. It is not possible to compute the vertical component using the technique described above, however, Dr. Nathan M. Newmark who was a leading authority in this field, recommended that "The design spectrum for vertical response be considered equal to 2/3 that for the horizontal response for all frequencies in the amplified velocity or displacement ranges ..... CLOSING REMARK The analysis reported here may be considered appropriate for a Preliminary level of structural design. After a better understanding of the geology has been gained and when site specific geotechnical data is obtained, a more confident estimate could be made of the probable response of the Triumf site to an earthquake. Yours truly, W.E. Hodge, P.Eng. SEBA.l w.E. HODGE P. Eng. Geotechnical Engineer 40 f e e t p e r ;: s Triumf Kaon Factory Velocity Response 'Spectrum, 30 ft. depth 2~· --------------------------------------------------------~ 1.5 1 ~ 0 5 ..... -.. -... -........ -"-.--.-_.-_.-.. -_.---".--.--.-".-".--.. "_ ... -... -.... --.-".--.--.--.--.--.. --.---.-.-.--.--.. ----.--.. -... _ .. -.... --.--.---.. --._.--._-._--.. --.--._ ..... -.-_." .. --._ . . o n d Otc o 1 2 3 4 Period In seconds -t- Puget EQ FIGURE 1 Triumf Kaon Factory Velocity Response Spectrum, 30 ft. depth 1.4 f e 1.2 e t 1 P 0.8 e r ~ 0.6 N S -.----.--.-.. --.------.--.. --.--.--.--.----.--.-... --.-----.-.--.--n-----·---·---·----·---·-....... I -to . .-=t ·~·i e 0.4 c 0 n 0.2 d 0 0 1 2 3 4 Period In seconds -+- Caltech EQ FIGURE 2 ~ w Triumf Kaon Factory Acceleration Spectrum, 30 ft. depth 0.6~i --------------------------------------------------~ 0.5 -1+---------_._-------_. __ ._-_._------_._--_. __ ._------------.------.--.--.--------.--.--------gO. 4 ~-----I -..." +-.---.-------.----.- .------.--.-----.--.----.---.---.---.-----00---.--------.-------.--.--.---00.-.----.--r a v 0. 3 ~--F ----t---.--.------I -.---.-.--.-.----.--.----.--.---.--.--.-.-------------.----.-----.-.----------.---.----t y 0.2 0. 1 - .... ------.--.-----.---.--.---.-----.-.--.. --.--.--.--.--.--.-----.--.----.-.--.. --.. -----.------.---. O'~------------~------------~------------~----------~ o 1 2 3 4 Period In Seconds -e- Puget EQ FIGURE 3 0.7 0.6 0.5 g r 0.4 a v ~ I 0.3 ~ t y 0.2 0.1 0 0 Triumf Kaon Factory Acceleration Spectrum, '30 ft. depth ~------.--.-----.--.------.. -' ... ----.----.. --.----.--.-_. __ ._. __ ._---_._-1 2 3 4 Perl ad In seconds ~Caltech EQ FIGURE 4 ~ V1 m I I I I m a t e r Triumf Kaon Factory Horizontal Displacements, 30 ft. depth 150 r' ----------------------------------------~ 100 5 0 ~~.----.~ ... -I---... - ... - ... - ...... --- .- ... - ... --.-........ -.--.--.--.-... - ... --........ .... -----.. - .. --....... - - ....... - ......... - ... - .... -----... _-_ ... _ .. _ ... _ ... _ ... - .. __ .. _ ......... _ ...... _ .. 01 -- ~~ L __ ~H ,'-\ ~ -. s -50 -100~' ----------~----------~----------~--------~ o 10 20 30 40 Tlma In seconds -- Puget EQ FIGURE 5 ~ 0'\ m I Triumf Kaon Factory Horizontal Displacements, 30 ft. depth 601~--------------------------------------~ 4 0 - -----.--.----------- .--.. --.--.-----------------.-----.----.--.--.--.---.----.--------.--I 2 0 --.- -.--.------.--.--......... --........ - -----------.--.--.------------.- -.- --.--.-.--.-- ----------------------.--.-----I I m e t O I ~ By T ,. • f -,.. '\ • , ~. ~ .. ~ --• y \.. '" • .ty4:~'"  e -20-'-r s -40 -60~' ----------~----------~----------~~--------~ o 10 20 30 40 Time In seconds -Caltech EQ FIGURE 6 t--a w ~ a: .r::, :J .., C!J 0. LL CD ~ • ~= a "'0 (1) .9" o __ "'rn (fJ u.'" "0 a c::: c c::CD 0 w () CD ..... OE a (J) CD (\J CJ) ",CD C ::l ~~ 0... CD I E -.... 0. ..-s·! ::sO .-... - a I-S ,...-c::: fa .-... 0 J: a a a a a a a to a to to a ,...- ,...- I ,...-E----ECD ..... CD~(J) 47 ~ co m I I I I m Triumf Kaon Factory Hori~ntal DisplacellJents, 70 ft. depth 40~i ----------~--------------------------------------~ 2 0 --------.------.---... -.. --.~-.--.--.--.--.--.----.--.--.. ------.----.---.- -.---------------------------.-----.---.---... - .----~ .... .~v~ ~ .. ~~ 0 1 !WItH ~ ~ .... T ~ ~ ~ ...... 1 -- -e 20 t -e r s -40 -60~1 ----------~------------~----------~----------~ o 10 20 30 40 Time In seconds - Caltech EQ FIGURE 8 2.10 Drawing List 2.10.1 General/Introduction The following drawings accompany this chapter of the report. These drawings represent the conceptual layouts for the scope-of-work included in Design Package 1. 2.10.2 Drawing List PAB-0001 D PAB-0002 D PAB-0003 D PAB-0004 D PAB-0005 D PAC-0001 D PAC-0002 D PAC-0003 D PAC-0004 D PAC-0005 D Tunnel System-General Arrangement Tunnel System-Geologicial Sections Tunnel System-Horizontal & Vertical Alignments Tunnel System-Sections Tunnel System-Typical Construction Method Tunnel System-Booster Complex, Plans of Levers B3 and B2 Booster Building-Sections, Cyclotron Vault Plan and Section Tunnel System-Magnet Shafts Tunnel System-Service Accesses Connection, B-C Transfer Tunnel, Main Ring Tunnel. 49 '\', , i " . . '. I. WATER COOLING SYSTEMS, TUNNEL VENTILATION AND SITE UTILITIES - DESIGN PACKAGE 2 Chapter 3 Contents 3 WATER COOLING SYSTEMS, TUNNEL VENTILATION AND SITE UTILITIES -DESIGN PACKAGE 2 1 3.1 Introduction...... . ..... . ..... 1 3.1.1 General/Background .... . ... 1 3.1.2 Scope/Objectives of this Assignment 2 3.2 Design Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.2.1 General/Introduction . . . . .... 2 3.2.2 Low Conductivity Water Cooling Systems 4 3.2.3 Raw Water Cooling Systems . . ..... 6 3.2.4 Tunnel Ventilation Systems . . . . . . . . 11 3.2.5 Electrical Equipment Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems . 13 3.2.6 Mechanical Control Systems. . . 14 3.2.7 Fire Protection Systems . . . . . 14 3.2.8 Low Level Liquid Waste Systems 14 3.2.9 Site Services ..... 15 3.3 Design Brief ..... .. . . 17 3.3.1 General/Introduction 17 3.3.2 Description of the KAON Factory Accelerator Design 17 3.3.3 Low Conductivity Water Cooling Systems 19 3.3.4 Raw Cooling Water Systems ........ . ..... 22 3.3.5 Tunnel Ventilation Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.3.6 Electrical Equipment Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems . 25 3.3.7 Mechanical Control Systems. . . 26 3.3.8 Fire Protection Systems . . . . . 27 3.3.9 Low Level Liquid Waste Systems 28 3.3.10 Site Services .. . ... ..... 29 3.3.11 Items Recommended for Further Study or Consideration during the Final Design of the Conventional Facilities 33 3.4 Outline Specification and Equipment Schedules 34 3.4.1 General/Introduction .. ....... 34 3.4.2 Division 2 - Site Work (Site Services) 34 3.4.3 Division 3 through 14 '. . . . 36 3.4.4 Division 15 - Mechanical .. 37 3.4.5 Major Equipment Schedules . 42 3.5 Drawing List .... . . . . . 55 3.5.1 General/Introduction 55 3.5.2 Drawing List . . . . . 55 3 WATER COOLING SYSTEMS, TUNNEL VENTILATION AND SITE UTILITIES -DESIGN PACKAGE 2 3.1 Introduction 3.1.1. General/Background a. The D.W. Thomson Consultants Ltd. engineering team was retained in May, 1989 by TRIUMF /KAON to undertake the engineering study and design for the scope-of-work items identified under Design Package 2, as part of the design of the Conven-tional Facilities for the KAON FACTORY. h. The . study period was from May, 1989 through to November 30, 1989. During this period the D.W. Thomson Consultants Ltd. team worked in close cooperation with the project managers , UMA Spantec; with TRIUMF-KAON project personnel; and with other project personnel involved in the design of the Conventional Facilities, including those involved in Design Package 1, Design Package 3, Design Package 4 and Design Package 5, to establish design criteria and to develop conceptual designs for the systems included under Design Package 2. c. The D.W. Thomson Consultants Ltd. team comprised Keller & Gannon, Consult-ing Mechanical Engineers, from San Francisco, California; and Spectrum Engineer-ing Corporation Limited, consulting nuclear engineers, from Peterborough, Ontario. Project management and team leadership was provided by D.W. Thomson Consul-tants Ltd. Keller & Gannon assumed the primary responsibility for the low con-ductivity cooling water systems. Both D.W. Thomson Consultants Ltd. and Keller & Gannon developed together the design criteria for all systems. Spectrum Engi-neering Corporation Limited provided advisory and critique services throughout the design study process, and particularly, during the final documentation phase. The conceptual designs for the raw water cooling systems, the LCW (Low Conductiv-ity Water) systems, and the tunnel ventilation and air-conditioning systems were developed together by D.W. Thomson Consultants Ltd. and Keller & Gannon. d . The methodology employed to establish the design criteria, upon which conceptual sys-. tem:designs could be developed, included the scheduling of workshops with TRIUMF-' . KAON personnel and with personnel from other design teams. This approach re-... sulted in the preparation of a "Design Criteria Document" which was circulated, revised, and circulated again after each major workshop, and as the design criteria was established. Section 3.2 of this Chapter of the study consists of the "design criteria document" mentioned herein. Section 3.2 is entitled "Design Criteria". 1 e. The established design criteria formed the engineering design basis for the development of the recommended conceptual designs for the various cooling and distribution sys-tems. The recommended engineering concepts for the various systems and system components are outlined and described in Section 3.3, "Design Brief". f. The D.W. Thomson Consultants Ltd. team wishes to acknowledge and thank the project managers, UMA Spantec; the TRIUMF /KAON project personnel; and the other project personnel involved in the other design packages for their assistance and sup-port in the development of the design of the Design Package 2 systems. 3.1.2 Scope/Objectives of this Assignment a. The KAON Factory Project Definition Study includes the Machine/Accelerator design and the design of the Conventional Facilities (including tunnels, structures, mechan-ical systems, electrical systems, site services, buildings, site development, etc.) This section of the study design report, referred to as Design Package 2, consists of the following scope-of-work items, included in the design of the Conventional Facilities: • Low Conductivity Water Cooling Systems (Non Active, Low Active and High Active Systems) • Raw Water Cooling Systems • Tunnel and Service Building and Booster Complex, Ventilation, Air-Conditioning and Plumbing Systems. • Electrical Equipment Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems • Mechanical Control Systems • Fire Protection Systems • Low Level Liquid Waste Systems • Site Services (including sewers, storm drains, waterlines and gas mains) 3.2 Design Criteria 3.2.1 General/Introduction a. This section of the study outlines the design criteria which was used in the design of the mechanical services associated with the KAON FACTORY machine. Specifically the mechanical services include the following scope-of-work items: • Low Conductivity Water Systems 2 • Raw Water Cooling Systems • Tunnel Ventilation (Air-Conditioning) Systems • Electrical Equipment Ventilation (Air-Conditioning) Systems • Mechanical Control Systems • Fire Protection Systems • Low Level Liquid Waste Systems • Site Services h. The following Codes, Regulations and Standards will apply to the design of the various building systems: • Vancouver Building Bylaw 6134 • National Building Code. • Canadian Gas-Association National Standard of Canada CAN/CGA-B149.1-M 86. • CSA Standard C22.1-1986, Canadian Electrical Code. • CSA Standard B51-M1986, Boiler, Pressure Vessel and Pressure Piping Code. • N.F.P.A. 13 Sprinkler Systems Installation 1987. • N.F.P.A. 14 Standpipe and Hose Systems 1986. • NRCC 23175 National Fire Code of Canada 1985. • B.C. Power Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Safety Act and Regulations 1982. • B.C. Building Code (1985) Parts 1 to 9 inclusive. • B.C. Building Code Section 3.7, Building Requirements for Persons with Dis-abilities. • B.C. Amendments to 1986 Canadian Electrical Code. • B.C. Electrical Safety Branch Bulletins. • B.C. Code Amendments, Gas Safety Act and Regulations • B.C. Industrial Health and Safety Regulations, Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia. • B.C. Plumbing Code 1985. • B.C. Mechanical Fire Protection Guide - Dampers and Closures in Air Handling Systems, 1980. • SMACNA Duct Liner Application Standard Dec. 1975, 2nd printing July 1981 • SMACNA Fire, Smoke and Radiation Damper Installation Guide, Third Edition 1986 (as amended by B.C. Mechanical Fire Protection Guide, 1980). 3 • SMACNA High Pressure Duct Construction Standard 3rd Edition - Nov. 1975, 2nd printing Jan. 1977, Rev. A. , • SMACN A Low Pressure Duct Construction Standards 5th Edition Dec. 1976 • SMACNA Low Velocity and Duct Construction Standards, Fourth Edition 1969. 3.2.2 Low Conductivity Water Cooling Systems a. LCW systems for the new KAON Factory will include: • Low Active Systems to cool all primary beam line components within the shielded areas. • Non-Active Systems to cool power supplies and other similar equipment outside the shielded areas. • High Active Systems to cool targets, beam dumps and associated equipment. • The exact arrangements and capacities for the various systems have been estab-lished through study of alternatives. High active systems will be cooled using low active systems. h. LCW, cooling systems within the Experimental Hall are to be designed with an expan-sion capability of at least 50%. c. Pressure drop allowance across beam line equipment and power supplies is 410 kPa. d. LCW supply temperature should be 25°C (19°C minimum). The temperature rise through magnets is approximately 40°C. The temperature rise through power sup-plies is approximately 10°C. Heat from the LCW systems will be rejected through the use of plate and frame heat exchangers to a raw water system. Heat exchangers will be designed for low pressure drop on the LCW side in order to minimize pressure drop within the LCW systems. In order to protect the deionization equipment from high temperature, the deionization beds will be placed after the heat exchangers. e. The resistivity to be maintained within the LCW systems is 10-15 megohms/em. Resis-tivity meters will be installed at deionizer bed outlets in the makeup and recircula-tion pipelines. An additional resistivity meter will be placed in the main circulating pipeline downstream from its junction with the polishing return pipe. f. The flow through equipment should be maintained within +/-10% tolerance. Flow rates will be established manually, using needle valves on the individual equipment components. The use of constant flow devices (e.g. Griswold), in lieu of manual valves, is recommended to be reviewed at the final design stage. g. The piping system materials will be 304L stainless steel, Schedule 10, with welded joints. Copper piping with brazed joints may be considered for smaller pipe sizes. 4 Piping systems must incorporate proper air venting through the use of both manual and automatic air vents. Drains will be installed at all low points in the systems, consisting of drain valves with hose connections. Piping systems will be closed sys-tems. Expansion and contraction of the piping systems will be controlled through the use of expansion loops. Pipe and fittings will be rated for a working pressure of 1025 kPa. Piping systems will be pressure tested at 1500 kPa for a period of eight hours. h. Stainless steel ball valves will be utilized for pipe sizes 50 mm and less. Isolation valves for pipes greater than 50 mm will be stainless steel butterfly valves. i. P umps will be base-mounted centrifugal type, all type-316 stainless steel construction, installed on concrete housekeeping pads. Flexible connections will be installed on the suction and discharge pipe connections of the pump. Suction strainers will be provided for use in system start-up. Pumping systems should be reliable, as achieved through specification of high quality equipment and materials. Pumps will incorpo-rate mechanical seals. Variable frequency drives (VFD's) on the pump motors will be used for smooth pump start-up and system flexibility, where applicable. j. In order to achieve some scrubbing effects within the LCW pipe lines, the systems will be designed for velocities of nominally 2-3 m/second. k . Pipe systems will utilize a colour-coded identification system, including arrows show-ing ' direction of flow. Potentially radioactive (high active) systems will be further identified. 1. Instrumentation of the piping systems will include: LCW supply and return thermome-ters and temperature sensors; LCW supply and return pressure gauges, and pressure sensors. Temperature and pressure sensors will be connected to a remote monitoring station. Flow meters (annubar Pitot type) will be installed in , the piping mains of each system. All gauges shall be provided with gauge valves. m. Redundant LCW pumps and heat exchangers are not considered to be necessary. e. Resin trap filters will be rated at 1.0 micron nominal and will be located downstream of each deionization bank. o. UV sterilizers and absolute rated filters are not required in the polishing or main loops. p. LCW system make-up capacities will be sufficient to fill any system within a period of two (2) hours. q. It is noted that the Experimental Beam Lines (in the Experimental Hall) can tolerate extra cooling loads if some experiments along the line are not operating. Conse-quently; the water supply temperature to machine components and water cooled electrical equipment will vary from 30°C to 19°C as beam lines and electrical equip-ment are turned on and off. Also, it is understood that the number of beam lines in operation at anyone time will vary from one to all. 5 r. Pressure in low active systems will be such that heat exchanger leakage will be from low active to high active during operating and shutdown conditions. s. Low and high active drainage points will be piped to an active drainage sump (low level liquid waste). t. Low and high active polishing stations will have accessible sample stations to sample water before and after ion exchange. u. High active system polishing loops will perform the following functions - filtration, deionization and degassing. Gases removed will be vented to atmosphere through the main building ventilation exhaust. Component redundancy is not required. 3.2.3 Raw Water Cooling Systems a. Eight cooling load centres have been identified as follows: LOAD A one at the booster ring complex (10 megawatts) LOADS B and C two along the north side of the main ring (10 megawatts each) (Stations 1 and 2) LOADS D and G one at each end of the ring (east and west) (10 megawatts each) (Stations 3 and 6) LOADS E and F two along the south side of the main ring adjacent to the extraction area of the Experimental Hall (10 megawatts each) (Stations 4 and 5) LO AD H one at the Experimental Hall (30 megawatts + 50% expansion = 45 megawatts) h. The expected electrical load for the KAON FACTORY accelerator machine is approx-imately 90 megawatts. The raw cooling water systems are designed to dissipate 100 megawatts of energy. The raw water cooling piping distribution system for the Ex-perimental Hall and Extraction Hall facilities is designed for future expansion and includes for the additional 15 megawatts of energy (future load). Also, space has been provided for an additional cooling tower and associated pumps and equipment, to accommodate the future 15 megawatt load. Of the total energy amount, approx-imately 3% is dissipated to the atmosphere by natural convection and air side "free cooling" ventilation systems. The remaining 97% of the energy is removed through the cooling towers via LCW water systems and mechanically cooled (chilled water) air handling systems. c. Each service building and the booster complex has a load, outlined above, of approxi-mately 10 megawatts. 6 The following table outlines the distribution of the 10 megawatts of electrical energy and the dissipation of the resulting 9.7 megawatts of heat. (IE'" DI$"III'IO' CIa" rOt "PlcaL S["IC[ IIILDlla (IOO$'EI CGRPLEI SIIILal) ELECTIICAL LOADS 10 HI TRAMSFORHERS (OUTSIDE) Sill TCHGEAR r- -I ..-- lOS of m- (GRADE LEVEl) m POIIER SUPPLIES FOR HAGNET SYSTEII (LEVEl 8-2) 80t HAGNETS (TUNNEl) 20' RF System Auxilliaries (LEVEl 8-1) 80' RF System Power Supplies (LEVEl B-1) j 90' RF System Hachine Components (TUNNEl) m Electronics (0 I STR 18UlED) m Hechanical Systems Pumps/Hotors/Fans (DISTRIBUTED) m Building Electrical (DISTRIBUTED) HEAT 01551'.'101 a --- 0.2 HI to air (outside) l' ~ 0.1 HII to building ventilation system (40'C) < 5' ~ 0.058 H' to building ventilation system (20'C) 20' 95' ~ 1.106 1111 to non -active LCW system 5' ~ 0.233 HI to tunnel ventilation system (30'C) 95' --- 4.423 HI to low active LCI system 20'--0.116 HII to building ventilation (20'C) 80' --- 0.466 HI to low active LCII system (in tunnel) 10' --- 0,233 HII to building venti lat ion system (lO'C) st -- 0.105 HII to tunnel ventiht ion system (lO'C) 61' ~ 1.404 HII (Anodes) to low active LCII systems 28' ~ 0.581 HII (FERR/CAV/DAHPING) to low active LCW systems 100'--.-0.20 HW to building ventihtion system (20'C) 100' ~ 0.485 HI to building ventilation systems 100'~ 0.243 HII to building ventilation system (20'e) 7 For each of the service buildings and the booster complex, the cooling loads are sum-marized as follows: Water Systems • non-active LeW - 1.106 MW . • low-active LeW - 6.88 MW Air Systems • building cooling • tunnel cooling 1.378 - 0.338 MW MW 9.7 MW . In the Experimental Hall a total of 30 megawatts is planned for initially with expan-sion capability to 45 megawatts. All of the electrical energy is expected to be dissipated through the raw water system via LeW water systems in the Experimental Hall. The following table is a summary of the anticipated connected Experimental loads and the corresponding connected design loads, for each of the identified beam lines and/ or machine components. 8 Low Active Systems Expected Load Design Load North Beam Line 5,100 KW 5,000 KW Neutrino Line 7,600 KW 7,500 KW Proton Beam Line 5,700 KW 6,000 KW (includes 5,000 KW High Active) South Beam Line 10,400 KW 11,000 KW (includes 5,000 KW High Active) 20 Ge V Beam Line 42000 KW 5,000 KW Totals 32,800 KW 34,500 KW Non Active Systems Extraction Hall Power Supplies 22000 KW 2,000 KW Sub Totals 2,000 KW 2,0~)o KW North Beam Line Power Supplies 2,000 KW 2,000 KW Neutrino Line Power Supplies 500KW 500KW Proton Line Power Supplies 1,000 KW 1,000 KW South Beam Line Power Supplies 2,500 KW 2,500 KW Sub Totals 6,000 KW 6,000 KW Experiment Components in 6 GeV Hall 2,000 KW 2,000 KW Experiment Components in Exp. Hall 5,800 KW 7,000 KW Experiment Components in Neutrino Hall 1,000 KW -1,000 KW Sub Totals 8,800 KW 10,000 KW Totals 16,800 KW 18,000 KW It should be emphasized that not all of the connected loads are operational at one time. d. The raw water cooling systems are to be designed on the basis of free cooling (evapo-rative) and no refrigeration or chillers will be employed. The following evaporation rates correspond to the extracted heat loads, as follows: Energy Loads 90 megawatts (307 million BTU's) 100 megawatts (341 million BTU's) 115 megawatts (392 million BTU's) Peak Evaporation Rates 135,000 KgJhr (298,000 Ibs.Jhr) (approximately 600 GPM) 150,000 KgJhr (331,000 Ibs.Jhr) (approximately 660 GPM) 173,000 Kg/hr (380,000 lbs./hr) (approximately 750 GPM) Note that the peak evaporation rates listed above correspond to energy loads equiv-alent to 97 percent of the energy loads listed. 9 The necessary bleed-off rate to keep the level of dissolved solids low will be about 380 f-/min. (100 GPM). During cool outside conditions the evaporation rate will be reduced by approximately 380 .elmin (100 GPM). e. Specific temperature design data is summarized as follows: Ambient Raw Water Low or Non- High Active Wet-Bulb Temperature Active Systems Systems 18°C 22°C 23.5°C 25°C 20°C 24°C 25.5°C 27°C 23°C 27°C 28.5°C 30°C It is to be noted that the maximum expected temperatures correspond to the 23°C ambient wet bulb figure. The temperatures associated with the 20°C ambient wet bulb temperature will be exceeded approximately 12 hours per year. Similarly, the temperatures associated with the 18°C ambient wet bulb temperature will be ex-ceeded approximately 130 hours per year. f. It is required that the raw cooling water systems be divided into 2 or 3 separate systems, as follows: • BOOSTER COMPLEX SYSTEM The booster complex system is to be a separate one comprising cooling towers, pumps, heat exchangers, etc. It is expected that the booster ring complex will be placed into operation prior to the main rings and Experimental Hall facilities. • MAIN RING CENTRAL SYSTEM The main ring central raw cooling water system is to provide raw cooling water to each of the six mechanical service buildings located around the perimeter of the main ring. • EXPERIMENTAL HALL SYSTEM A raw cooling water system is to provide raw cooling water to various heat exchangers and loads in the Extraction Hall, Experimental Hall, and in the 20 Ge V Hall. While this system is considered to be a separate system, expandable by 50% to meet future demands, it will be incorporated into the main ring central raw water cooling system. g. All raw water cooling systems will use conventional forced-air cooling towers for reject-ing the heat to the air. h. Cooling towers, heat exchangers, and pumps provided to serve the Experimental Hall should not be located such that they prohibit extension of the beam lines in the future. i. High active LCW systems are expected to be contained within shielding within the Experimental Hall to cool targets and beam dumps. Design temperature criteria for 10 these systems might possibly be relaxed. Revision of any design temperature criteria must be reviewed and approved by TRIUMF personnel providing magnet design. j. Under some ambient conditions, steam will rise from the cooling towers. The visual impact from roadways or structures that are located off the TRIUMF facility site is to be minimized in the siting of the cooling towers. Analysis should be undertaken concerning possible chemical treatment required at the cooling towers, in order to address environmental concerns associated with impact of these chemical treatment systems on the surrounding area. k. An analysis is recommended to be undertaken (during the final design stage) to find alternate methods of controlling total dissolved solids in the raw water other than high bleed-off rates. 1. Noise generated by mechanical equipment, such as the cooling towers, is a concern and should be a consideration in selection of the equipment. Special baffling may be required. m. Redundant cooling tower modules and associated pumps are not necessary. n. Pumping and piping arrangements are to be developed to ensure maximum flexibility of the central raw cooling water stations (number of pumps, cooling tower cells, etc.). m. Because the raw water system is an open system, raw water cooling system pressure will be such that any heat exchanger leakage will be to raw water from low active water during operating and shutdown conditions. 3.2.4 Tunnel Ventilation Systems TUNNEL VENTILATION - BEAM ON a. Based on the information contained in the previous section, approximately 60 megawatts of energy is input to the main ring and 3.4% of this (2.03 megawatts) is rejected to the tunnel air. h. The maximum allowable tunnel temperature is 30°C and this should be held stable once the beam is on although a laC/hour rate of change is acceptable. It is preferable to maintain a onstant day/night temperature. When it is seasonally possible the set point should be lowered although 25°C is likely the lowest desirable set point. c. The 30°C set point was strongly recommended as higher temperatures negatively affect equipment and electrical conductors, even though such a low maximum temperature will require mechanical (refrigerated) cooling during the summer. 11 d. The use of fan/coil units (located in tunnels) for handling the tunnel cooling load, was investigated and was rejected because of maintenance and potential radioactive handling problems. e. Ventilati~n shafts from the tunnel to the surface will be configured to avoid line-of-sight or reflection routes for radiation. f. Tunnel radiation levels are expected to be low. The exhaust air requires HEPA filtering but not a filtration system of the sophistication required for hot cells or other high level, or possible high level applications. HEPA filters filtering exhaust air will have provision for contamination control during replacement such that the spreading of contamination is minimized. g. Provision of air seal barriers at various locations is acceptable, as follows: • between the cyclotron vault and booster tunnel • between the booster tunnel and driver tunnel • between the main ring access tunnels and the respective service buildings, and • between the extraction tunnel and the Experimental Hall It should be noted that all piping, duct or electrical penetrations through these air seals will be required to be properly sealed. h. In order to achieve negative pressure within the tunnel, exhaust fans will draw air from the tunnel. This air will be HEPA-filtered prior to discharge at grade. If the tunnel is sealed relatively well, total exhaust quantities will be in the range of 470 f/sec to 940 f/sec (1,000 to 2,000 cfm) at each service building. This corresponds to an air change rate of ~ to ~ air changes per hour. It is recognized that sealing of all openings and penetrations into the tunnel is a major design issue that must be considered by all engineering disciplines. i. Cooling will be provided by mechanically cooled air conditioning systems located at each of the load centers around the tunnel. Air capacity of these systems will be approximately 23,600 f/sec (50,000 cfm) each. Air will be distributed along the length of the tunnel, utilizing a plenum created at the top of the tunnel structure. All air associated with these systems will be recirculated. Relatively efficient filtration will be provided for these systems. Provision will be made to "bag" filter media such that contamination control is maintained and personnel exposure minimized. j. In the event of smoke purge, the recirculation system fans will be reversed such that smoke is drawn into the plenum near the point of origin along the tunnel. The exhaust air will then be directed up shafts for discharge at grade. This exhaust air must be discharged through HEPA filters. An automatic filter bypass will be provided to ensure exhaust flow is maintained in the event HEP A filters become plugged. Filters will be provided on the air intake for the smoke purge make-up. 12 k. In order to maintain a reasonable temperature in the tunnels during equipment shut-down, small make-up units with electric heating coils will be provided. These units will run in conjunction with the exhaust fans providing negative pressure control. Make-up units will be provided with particulate filters to prevent the introduction of dust. 1. REP A filters performing a radioactive containment function will have in situ efficiency performance test and redundancy features. The redundancy feature is provided by installing a fan/filter arrangement at each one of the six service buildings. m. It is recommended that CSA CAN3-N288.3.2 High Efficiency Air Cleaning Assemblies for Normal Operation of Nuclear Facilities be considered in the design of the air systems. TUNNEL VENTILATION - BEAM OFF a. During "beam off" the tunnel conditions will be designed to satisfy worker comfort with respect to temperature, humidity and ventilation rates. h. Tunnel purging will likely be required for radioactive/ozone elimination prior to per-sonnel access. The main tunnel system, using outside air passed through the intake (95% efficiency) filters and discharging air through the smoke purge REPA filters, will be used for this purpose. EXPERIMENTAL HALL VENTILATION - TARGETS a. The first level of radiation containment around the targets will be a shielded vacuum chamber (not part of Package 2). External to this will be a space enclosed by con-ventional shielding blocks. This space will be exhausted and HEPA filtered (part of Package 2) following the same criteria as detailed above for tunnel ventilation. 3.2.5 Electrical Equipment Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems a. Air handling systems will be provided to remove heat given off the surface of electrical equipment located in each of the main ring service buildings and booster complex. h. Two separate temperature classifications for electrical equipment associated with the service buildings have been identified: 13 • The first classification includes equipment located inside the building requiring forced ventilation using outside air only. The nominal maximum temperature identified for this equipment is 40°C. The equipment in this classification in-cludes switchgear (located at grade level and level Bl) and mechanical equip-ment motors (located at grade level, level B1 and level B3). • The second classification includes electrical equipment requiring a maximum air temperature of 20°C. This equipment is distributed between grade level, level B1 and level B2. "Free cooling" using outside air will be used whenever the outside air temperature is sufficiently low (approximately 10°C ). Mechanical cooling utilizing a chiller will be used at other times. Air in this system will be filtered with 85% efficient filters. In order to avoid cooling all spaces to 20°C, the two classifications of equipment should be physically separated by walls. 3.2.6 Mechanical Control Systems a. A direct digital control system will be provided for the monitoring and control of me-chanical system components for the Design Package 2 systems. b. Separate monitoring and control stations are to be provided in each of the six service buildings; one in the booster complex; and one for the extraction (Experimental Hall areas). A separate, remote, monitoring only, station is to be provided in the main KAON FACTORY control room in the booster complex. c. Appropriate sensing devices are to be installed for monitoring and controlling various systems and system components. 3.2.7 Fire Protection Systems a. A pre-action fire sprinkler system will be utilized to protect the tunnel and personnel. b. Hose stations will be provided near tunnel access points 3.2.8 Low Level Liquid Waste Systems a. Storm drainage sumps are required to intercept ground water from around the tunnels, service buildings, booster complex and extraction/Experimental Hall areas, and to discharge the ground water to the on-site storm drainage system. 14 h. Sanitary floor drainage systems are required to intercept floor drainage (spills) from the KAON MACHINE components, or associated systems components, so that the waste can be monitored for radioactivity, and diluted, if necessary, prior to discharging to on-site sanitary sewers. c. Sump surfaces will be finished to facilitate decontamination. Sumps will be vented to the active filtered exhaust such that it is under negative pressure with respect to the building. d. Provision will he made to mix sanitary sump contents to ensure uniformity of samples. Sampling means will be provided. e. Provision will be made to empty the sanitary sump either through a metered discharge to site domestic effluent sewers to maximize dilution or into drums for subsequent processing/ disposal. f. All controls will be local but level alarms will be fed to the central control room. g. There will be a redundant pump in each storm sump and in each sanitary sump. 3.2.9 Site Services a. The various codes, regulations, design guides, etc. are recommended as design criteria for each of the respective site utility services. These items are listed separately for each site utility service. h. Sanitary Sewage Systems Governing Codes and Regulations 1. The British Columbia Building Code 2. The Province of British Columbia Plumbing Code Other Design Documents ·3. The University of British Columbia Requirements 4. The City of Vancouver Requirements 5. The Greater Vancouver Sewage and Drainage District Requirements 6. Water and Pollution Control Federation Guidelines c. Storm Drainage Systems Governing Codes and Regulations 1. The British Columbia Building Code 15 2. The Province of British Columbia Plumbing Code Other Design Documents 3. The University of British Columbia Requirements 4. The City of Vancouver Requirements 5 . . The Greater Vancouver Sewage and Drainage District Requirements 6. Water and Pollution Control Federation Guidelines 7. Provincial Ministry of Environment Requirements 8. Federal Ministry of Environment Requirements d. Water Distribution Systems Governing Codes and Regulations . 1. The British Columbia Building Code 2. The Province of British Columbia Plumbing Code Other Design Documents 3. The University of British Columbia Requirements 4. The City of Vancouver Requirements 5. The Greater Vancouver Water District Requirements 6. America Water Works Association Guidelines 7. National Fire Protection Association Design Guidelines e. Natural Gas Systems Governing Codes and Regulations 1. The British Columbia Building Code 2. The Province of British Columbia Plumbing Code 3. National Standard of Canada,CAN/CGA-B149.1 Natural Gas Installation Code Other Design Documents 4. British Columbia Gas Requirements 5. The University of British Columbia Requirements 16 3.3 Design Brief 3.3.1 'General/Introduction a. This section of Chapter 3 consists of a description of each of the scope-of-work systems or items included under Design Package 2 for the design of the Conventional Facilities associated with the KAON FACTORY ACCELERATOR machine. h. While Section 3.2 outlined the design criteria, which was established during the study period, this section outlines and describes the concepts for the design of each of the systems or items based upon the previously established criteria. c. The KAON FACTORY accelerator machine, and the associated building and tunnel facilities, consumes approximately 90 megawatts of electrical power while the ma-chine is operating. This energy cannot be dissipated easily but must be extracted continuously through water systems and air systems while the machine is operating. d. Low Conductivity Water (LCW) systems are used to extract heat from many of the components of the KAON FACTORY accelerator machine such as magnets, power supplies for magnets, RF System Auxiliaries, RF System machine components, beam . dumps, targets and other experiment components. These systems are classified as non-active systems where they are serving components that are not subjected to possible radioactivity; low active systems where they are serving components that are subjected to low levels of radioactivity; and high active systems where they are serving components that are subjected to high concentrations of radioactivity. e. The heat extracted by LCW systems from the machine components or by air systems within tunnel and building systems is rejected to a raw cooling water system con-sisting of centrally located cooling towers and a raw cooling water supply and return distribution system. f. Some of the air systems require air-conditioning (refrigeration) to maintain satisfactory operating temperature conditions as well as to extract the heat. The heat from the required chillers is also rejected to the central raw cooling water system. i 3.3.2 Uescription of the KAON Factory Accelerator Design a. The developed KAON FACTORY accelerator machine consists of five accelerator and storage rings; the existing cyclotron facility; an extraction hall area where the ex-tracted beam is divided into four primary beam lines; an Experimental Hall where the four extracted beam lines are directed; and a Neutrino facility and a 20 GeV Hall. 17 h. The injection beam emanating from the existing cyclotron facility leaves the North face of the existing TRIUMF building and is directed along the IA Tunnel towards the B<><?Bter Complex. The Booster Complex comprises a subterranean circular tunnel and building complex. The IA Tunnel connects to the Booster Tunnel. The Booster Thnnel contains two beam rings, the A ring (accelerator ring) and the B ring (booster ring). The injector line feeds into the A ring and the A ring connects to the Bring through an AB transfer line. c. The B line feeds into the BC transfer line which transfers the accelerated beam to the C ring (collector ring) in the main ring tunnel. d. The main ring tunnel contains three beam rings; the C or Collector ring, the D or Driver ring and the E or Extender ring. e. The Extraction Hall canyon is located along the straight section of the C, D and E rings on the South side of the main ring tunnel. Four primary extraction lines are taken from the beam lines as follows: • The North Primary Beam Line (ESA): This beam line is extracted from the E line and is directed through the connecting tunnel between the Extraction Hall and the Experimental Hall to targets and experiments located in the Experi-mental Hall. • The Neutrino Beam Line (DF): This beam line is extracted from the D ring and is directed through the connecting tunnel between the Extraction Hall and the Experimental Hall and through the Experimental Hall to a separate Neutrino Building. • The Polarized Proton Beam Line (ESP): This beam line is extracted from the South Primary Beam Line, which is extracted from the E ring and is directed through the connecting tunnel between the Extraction Hall and the Experimen-tal Hall, to the Experimental Hall. • The South Primary Beam Line (ESB): This beam line is extracted from the E ring and is directed through the connecting tunnel between the Extraction Hall and the Experimental Hall to targets T1 and T2 and to experiments and to a beam dump. The 6 Ge V line and 20 Ge V line are extracted from this Primary Beamline. f. The following KAON FACTORY accelerator machine components require cooling fa-cilities; machine magnets (in tunnels and extraction and experimental areas); power supplies for magnets (in service buildings, in the extraction hall, in the Experimen-tal Hall and in the booster complex); RF System power supplies (in buildings); RF System Auxiliaries (in buildings); RF System Machine Components (in tunnels); and switchgear (in buildings). Refer to Section 3.2 Design Criteria for the Energy Distribution in typical service buildings and in the Booster Complex. 18 3.3.3 Low Conductivity Water Cooling Systems a. Low Conductivity Water (LCW) Cooling systems are employed to extract heat directly from various KAON FACTORY ACCELERATOR machine components, including the following items: • machine magnets (located in the tunnels, extraction-canyon and Experimental Hall areas); • power supplies for magnets (located in the service buildings, in the Booster Complex, in the extraction canyon and in the Experimental Hall); • RF System machine components (located in the tunnels); • RF Auxiliaries (located in the tunnels); • Electrical supply cables or bus bars; • Targets and associated components; • Beam Dumps; • Experiment components. h. These LCW systems are categorized as follows: • Non-Active LCW Systems: These systems are used to cool all water-cooled power supplies for magnets and water-cooled bus ducts; to extract heat from low-active heat exchangers where required; and to cool certain experiment com-ponents or heat exchangers for experimental purposes. • Low-Active LCW Systems: These systems are used to cool the machine magnets located in the tunnels, in the extraction hall and in the Experimental Hall; the RF system machine components located in the tunnels; and the RF System Auxiliaries. Low-active systems also are used to extract heat from high active systems. Low active systems are located in areas with restricted access when the KAON FACTORY Beam is on. • High-Active LCW Systems: These systems are used to cool high active KAON FACTORY machine components, such as Targets and associated components and beam dumps. High Active Systems are contained/installed in rooms which are buried in the concrete shielding in the Experimental Hall. All High Active LCW Systems are located in the Experimental Hall with the exception of the one system located in the shielding at the Neutrino Hall. c. All LCW systems are closed loop recirculating cooling systems. They are designed to extract heat directly from the KAON FACTORY machine components. Low Active systems are used to extract heat from High Active Systems, through plate type heat exchangers. The Raw Cooling Water System is used to extract the heat from Non-Active and Low Active LCW Systems, through plate type heat exchangers. 19 d. The overall concept for the number and location of LeW systems developed from an understanding of the distribution of the KAON FACTORY machine component elec-tricalloads and an understanding of how the heat generated from these loads would be dissipated (either to LCW water systems or to building or tunnel air handling systems). Also, the categorization of an LCW system, depending upon the compo-nents being cooled, determined to a large extent the location of the respective LCW system. e. The res,ulting number of LCW systems, the categorization thereof, and the components they, 'serve, are outlined in brief, in the following clauses. f. Typical Service Building There are two LCW systems in each of the six service buildings. One is a Non-Active LCWr·system and it provides cooling for the magnet power supplies located on Level B-2 and to various electrical supply buses. This Non-Active LCW system is located on Level B-l. The other LCW system is a Low Active System, located on Level B-3. ' This system provides cooling for the tunnel magnets, RF System Auxiliaries, RF System Machine Components, and associated water-cooled electrical buses. Heat is extracted from both of the above LCW systems through plate type heat exchangers. These heat exchangers reject the heat removed to the raw water cooling syste1Jl. Note that there are six service buildings around the perimeter of the main ring. The Low Active LCW System in each service building serves only the machine components in the adjacent section or segment of tunnel. None of the Low Active LCW systems are interconnected in the tunnel, however, hose-end drain valves are to be supplied to allow sections to be connected together with temporary hoses during filling and draining operations, or to facilitate filling a system quickly. Through use of these connection hoses any system can be filled within the two hour time period requested. Selection of the proposed LCW pipe distribution system is based on a cost comparison of several options considered during development of the study. Distribution systems considered for the main ring included variations of a single central LCW plant, two larger LCW plants on either side of the main ring, as well as, the six LCW systems withih the service buildings as presently proposed. g. Booster Complex As for the typical service building, the Booster Complex houses two LCW systems, one non-active, the other, low active. The Non-Active LCW system is located on the Mezzanine Level and the Low Active LCW system is located on Level B-1 (the tunnel level). The Low Active LCW system supplies machine components in the IA tunnel and in the BC tunnel, as well as the machine components in the Booster Tunnel. Note also 20 that the LCW piping distribution system in the Booster tunnel is split and therefore segmented so that a continuous loop is not developed. h. Typical Capacitor Building There is one non-active LCW system located in the capacitor building. This system is located at the grade level and provides cooling to the electrical power supplies. i. Extraction Hall/Experimental Hall There are several Non-Active and Low Active LCW systems required to serve the KAON FACTORY machine components in the Extraction Hall and in the Experi-mental Hall. There are three Non-Active LCW systems located in an on grade mechanical room. These systems provide cooling to power supplies for machine components and to water-cooled electrical distribution buses. The supply and return piping distribution is located along the power supply gallery on the south west face of the Extraction Hall. During the development of the Low Active LCW systems for the Extraction Hall and Experimental Hall areas, it was decided that all KAON FACTORY machine components along the four primary extracted beam lines would be served by Low Active LCW systems located in an equipment room at tunnel level adjacent to the Extraction Hall. The concept, therefore, is that there will be four Low Active LCW systems, one for each of the four primary beam lines. Each Low Active LCW sys-tem will serve machine components along the respective beam line, including heat exchangers for the High Active LCW systems. The LCW supply lines will be located wi thin the concrete shielding in the Experimental Hall, at the top of the beam line. In the Extraction Hall canyon (which is really an extension/expansion of the main ring tunnel) the C, D and E ring machine components will be cooled with a Low ActIve LCW system from Service Building No.5, as for the other service buildings. In the Experimental Hall there are three Non-Active LCW systems. Two systems s';lpply distribution loops that provide LCW water for cooling machine component p~wer supplies. The other Non-Active LCW system supplies a second distribution loop that will supply experiment components and/or heat exchangers for extract-ing,.,heat from machine or experiment components. These systems are located in a separate building equipment room adjacent the Experimental Hall and 6 Ge V Annex. Th~re are two High Active LCW systems required for components along the four prin;:tary beam lines. One High Active system is located within the shielding between the . North Primary Beam Line and the Neutrino Beam Line. This system serves components along the North Primary Beam Line, the Neutrino Beam Line and the Polarized Proton Beam Line. The other High Active System serves components along the South Primary Beam Line. There is a separate Low Active LCW system provided to cool machine components located in the tunnel between the 6 Ge V Hall and the 20 Ge V Hall. This system 21 is located at tunnel level in a small service building located along the tunnel. A non-active LCW system is also provided to serve power supplies in the 20 Ge V Hall. Heat is rejected from both of the systems directly to the raw water cooling system. There is one High Active LCW system required to cool the horn at the Neutrino Hall. This system will be buried in the shielding outside the Neutrino Hall. A Low Active LCW system will be provided to extract the heat from the high active system heat exchanger. In turn, the heat from the Low Active LCW system will be removed through a Non-Active LCW heat exchanger. This heat exchanger will be cooled with Non-Active LCW water from one of the Experimental Hall looped systems. j. All LCW closed loop water systems include a dionization polishing station to contin-uously maintain low levels of conductivity. Each LCW water system is supplied with deionized water from a deionization water make-up station. In some instances a single make-up station is used to supply more than one LCW water system. It is intended that system volumes will be made-up manually, not automatically, and that loss of water in a system will be automatically sensed with level sensors located in the expansion tanks and that an alarm will be indicated in the central control system. k. Refer to the drawings accompanying this report for conceptual flow diagrams of the Non-Active LCW systems, Low Active LCW systems and High Active LCW systems. 1. Also, refer to 3.2, Design Criteria, for details of design parameters and anticipated operating conditions. 3.3.4 Raw Cooling Water Systems a. As outlined in Section 3.2 Design Criteria, there are eight identified energy load centres as follow; one at the Booster Complex; six around the main ring tunnel complex; and the extraction/Experimental Hall areas. h. During the study period four alternate raw water cooling systems were considered for extracting heat from the low active, non active and high active LCW systems and from air ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The four alternates were: 22 Alternate I Alternate II . Alternate III Alternate IV Individual Cooling Towers This Alternate consisted of a cooling tower facility for each of the eight load centres. Central Cooling Towers This Alternate consisted of a central cooling tower facility and a raw water supply and return distribution system. Cooling Ponds/Raceway This Alternate consisted of a water raceway and spray pond facility coupled with some conventional cooling towers. Fraser River Water This Alternate consisted of using Fraser River water to extract heat through heat exchangers. c. Alternate II, Central Cooling Towers, was recommended as the most cost effective solu-tion. However, it became evident that the Booster Complex could be constructed and placed in operation at least one year in advance of the main ring system. Therefore, it was decided to consider a compromise design in that a smaller separate cooling tower installation would be provided for the Booster Complex cooling requirements, and associated nearby building facilities . The main central cooling tower facility would provide raw cooling water for the balance of the cooling loads. d. The concept for the central raw cooling water system is as follows. The main cooling towers will be located on the South side of the Extraction Hall adjacent to the service road along the treed green area along Marine Drive. The towers will be installed on top of a reinforced concrete sump/reservoir structure located above grade. The top of the cooling towers will project approximately three (3) metres above the top of the Extraction Hall. The towers will be of the forced ventilation type. Adjacent to the cooling towers to the East will be a pump house which will house the main raw cooling water distribution supply pumps. The pumps will draw from the cooling tower sumps/reservoirs and discharge to a header system that supplies raw cooling water to the six service building systems, and to a header serving the extraction hall LCW systems, the Experimental Hall LCW systems, and the 20 Ge V tunnel LCW systems. Parallel return lines discharge to the cooling towers. e. The central cooling tower facility is designed to dissipate/handle the equivalent of 90 megawatts of energy. Space has been provided for adding an additional cooling tower cell with a capacity of 15 megawatts. f. The cooling tower facility for the booster complex is designed to dissipate/handle the equivalent of 10 megawatts of energy. 23 3.3.5 Tunnel Ventilation Systems a. Tunnel Ventilation systems are required to remove excess heat (energy) supplied to the KAON FACTORY ACCELERATOR machine components, that is not removed directly by the LCW cooling systems but is rejected to the air in the tunnels. These systems are considered to contain low levels of radioactive particles. h. Section 3.2 Design Criteria outlines the basic criteria upon which the recommended tunnel ventilation systems are designed. c. Essentially there are seven major tunnel ventilation systems as follows: • Booster Complex: This system provides tunnel ventilation for the IA transfer tunnel, the booster ring tunnel, and the BC transfer tunnel. This system is located at the tunnel level of the Booster Building. • Service Buildings 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6: Each of these five tunnel ventilation systems serves a segment of the main ring tunnel. Each of these tunnel ventilation systems is located at the tunnel level of the respective service building. • Service Building 5: This system provides tunnel ventilation for the extraction canyon section of the main ring, a small section of the main ring tunnel, and the primary extraction line tunnel between the extraction canyon and the Ex-perimental Hall. d. Each tunnel ventilation system is designed to maintain a set operating temperature con-dition of 30°C when the beam (KAON machine) is on. Calculations were performed to establish the estimated heat loss through the tunnel walls into the surrounding grade. Results of the calculations indicate the initial rate of heat transfer to be approximately 76 watts/m2 (24 BTU /Hr.Ft2 ) (of tunnel wall), however as steady state conditions approach this figure drops to an estimated 12.6-18.9 wattsfm2 (4-6 BTUfHr.Ft2 ). A heat loss figure of 15.7 watts/m2 (5 BTU/Hr.Ft2 ) of tunnel wall is recommended for design purposes. Therefore, to achieve this operating condition during the summer months, mechanical cooling is required. A chiller plant, located on the grade level floors of the respective booster complex and service buildings, provides chilled water to cooling coils in the return air duct of the tunnel ventilation system to provide the required cooling. A second cooling coil, supplied directly from the raw water cooling system, is provided so that the chiller will not be required to be used when the outdoor temperature conditions are low enough to satisfy the tunnel operating conditions. Note that the recommended steady state heat loss corresponds to approximately ten percent of the load dissipated to the air. e. The tunnel ventilation systems are designed as total recirculating systems with no fresh air supply, while the KAON machine is operating. 24 f. The distribution system comprises a supply air ducting system serving the appropriate section of tunnel so that the cool air is distributed evenly along the tunnel sections. The tunnel itself is used as the return air plenum. g. It is imperative that the tunnels be well sealed to avoid the intrusion of air from the various other building ventilation and/or air-conditioning systems in the service buildings and in the booster complex. Refer to Section 3.2, Design Criteria, for addition design criteria. h. In addition to the main tunnel ventilation systems described herein above, it is required that the tunnels be maintained at a slightly negative pressure so that when the beam (KAON machine) is on any air leakage will be into the tunnel and not out of the tunnel. To accomplish this, small exhaust fans are provided in each service building and in the booster complex. These exhaust fans discharge through HEP A filters located below grade. i. The arrangement and design of the main tunnel recirculating ventilation systems is such that they will be used for smoke purging in the event of a tunnel fire and for regular purging of the tunnel after the KAON machine is turned off and prior to personnel entering the tunnel. Under smoke removal conditions, the main recirculating fan rotation is reversed, so that the tunnel air (with smoke) is drawn into the tunnel air distribution ducts continuously along the tunnel. It is then discharged vertically through smoke control dampers and through HEPA filters to outside. At the same time, dampers will open on a fresh air intake system to allow fresh air to be ducted into the tunnel return air duct shaft and from there into the tunnel. Another set of control dampers, located in the tunnel return air shaft (plenum) between the fresh air duct and the ventilation recirculating fan, will close. An automatic filter bypass will be provided to ensure that exhaust flow is maintained should the HEPA filters become plugged. Filters will also be provided on the fresh air intake system. j. The characteristics of the proposed axial vane circulating fan is such that its rated capacity running in reverse is approximately 60 percent of its normal operating rated capacity. This will provide significantly more than required flow rates during a smoke removal mode of operation. k. During extended maintenance periods when the KAON machine is off, a separate small ventilation system is provided at each of the service buildings and at the booster complex. Electric heating coils are provided to heat-up the required fresh air in each of these systems. 3.3.6 Electrical Equipment Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems a. Separate ventilation and air-conditioning systems are provided to extract heat dissi-pated to the air, in the six service buildings and the booster complex from compo-25 nents such as Power Supplies to magnets, RF System Auxiliaries, RF System Power Supplies, computer/electronic areas, and building mechanical/electrical systems. h. Since the operating temperature requirements are different for the various equipment components above, three separate systems are provided, as follows: Two for rooms with operating temperature requirements of 20°C and one for rooms with operating temperature requirements of 40°C. The three systems identified represent three thermal zones. Further zone control is not provided. c. Both 20°C systems require mechanical cooling. The required chilled water requirements will be provided from the same chiller system provided to supply chilled water to the tunnel ventilation system. There will be one chiller system located in each of the six service buildings, the booster complex, and the Extraction Hall. d. The air-handling system for the 40°C temperature operating condition will not have any mechanical cooling. e. "Free Cooling" using outdoor air will be used whenever the outdoor air temperature is sufficiently low. 3.3.7 Mechanical Control Systems a. Direct Digital Control (DDC) systems will be provided to monitor and alarm and to control the various Design Package 2 systems. The systems will consist of computer monitoring and control operating stations as follows: one in the booster complex, one in each of the six (6) service buildings and one for the Extraction/Experimental Hall area. A separate monitoring and alarm station only will be provided in the main KAON FACTORY control room located in the booster complex. h. All of the monitoring and control operating stations will be linked together so that anyone control station will be able to monitor activities/functions at other stations. The 'control' capabilities of each station may be restricted to functions/activities associated with local equipment only. The final scope of monitoring, alarm and control functions will be determined at a final design stage. c. The station located in the main KAON FACTORY control room will contain monitoring and alarm functions only and no control capabilities. d. The following types of functions will be monitored, alarmed or controlled: • Low Conductivity Water Systems System pressure, flow rates, resistivity, temperature, low level in expansion tanks indicating a leak in the system, pump operating conditions . • Low Level Liquid Waste Storm Drainage and Floor Drainage Systems Low liquid level alarm in primary collection sump, pump operating conditions. 26 • Tunnel Ventilation Systems Fan operating conditions, temperature, air pressure, humidity, air flow rates. • Raw Water Cooling Systems Water temperatures, system pressures, outdoor temperatures, humidity, pump operating conditions, flow rates. e. The monitoring and control functions will be accomplished using various types of elec-tronic measuring devices and sensors as follows: • low level liquid controllers/switches • liquid temperature sensors • liquid pressure sensors • resistivity meters • air temperature sensors • aIr pressure sensors • humidity/moisture sensors • air flow measuring meters • sprinkler flow switches • other system flow switches • sprinkler heat detectors 3.3.8 Fire Protection Systems a. Each of the six service buildings and the booster complex will be fully sprinklered buildings. Each building fire protection system will consist of a combined standpipe and sprinkler system including risers which will serve both fire hose cabinets on each floor and floor sprinkler systems. The floor sprinkler systems will be alarmed using sprinkler flow switches tied to the main fire alarm systems. The combined standpipe and sprinkler systems are wet systems. h. Pre-action fire sprinkler systems are recommended in the tunnels for life-safety pur-poses, when personnel are present. Essentially, these systems are extensions to the building combined wet standpipe and sprinkler systems. The operation of the tunnel sprinkler systems is as follows: the sprinkler system can be either dry (drained) or wet but it is controlled by a solenoid valve that opens at a predetermined temperature. This pre-determined temperature is lower than the temperature at which the fusible link on the sprinkler head melts. When a heat detector opens the solenoid valve, al-lowing the sprinkler system to be pressurized, a trouble alarm is sounded/indicated. This pre-signal will allow the KAON machine to be shut-down in advance of a sprin-kler head being activated allowing water to discharge over the machine and/or elec-trical components. 27 c. Separate fire standpipe hose valves will be provided at regular intervals along the tunnel. Hose stations will be provided adjacent each main tunnel access point. 3.3.9 Low Level Liquid Waste Systems a. Four distinct drainage or liquid waste systems are required for the conventional facil-ities associated with the KAON FACTORY ACCELERATOR machine. These are identified as follows: • Subsurface or ground water drainage systems; • Active sanitary floor drainage systems; and • Non-active floor drainage systems The scope of work of this Chapter includes: 1) The provision of the collection sumps and discharge facilities for all subsurface groundwater drainage associated with the machine tunnels; 2) The provision of the subsurface collection systems and the active floor drainage systems to the collection sumps for the service buildings and the booster complex; and 3) The provision of non-active floor drainage systems including sumps and discharge facilities for the non-active areas in the booster complex and the main ring service buildings. The active and non-active floor drainage systems in the Extraction Hall and Experimental Hall areas are included under Chapter 5 (Design Package 4), as are the subsurface drainage systems. b. Subsurface Drainage: All tunnel structures and associated building structures and all other building structures will be provided with perimeter subsurface collection and drainage systems. These systems will consist of perforated drainage pipes bedded in proper drainage gravel and then wrapped with filter cloth to prevent the entry of silts and fines into the system. These subsurface drainage systems will discharge to conveniently located collection and monitoring sumps. Duplex sump pumps will be provided to pump the collected subsurface drainage into gravity storm drains. c. Active Sanitary Drainage Systems: Floor drainage systems will be provided in the following structures: , . • IA Tunnel • ~:Sooster Tunnel • Booster Complex Tunnel Floor Level • BC Tunnel • Main Ring Tunnel • Service Building Sub-Tunnel and Tunnel Floor Levels 28 • Extraction Hall/Experimental Hall areas This Chapter includes the floor drainage systems in the Booster Complex and Ser-vice Buildings and associated sumps, dilution facilities and duplex pump discharge facilities. The active floor drainage systems in the IA Tunnel, the Booster Tunnel, the BC Tunnel, the Main Ring Tunnel and the Extraction Hall area are not included in this design section, however the systems will be connected to the collection sumps provided under this design section. d . Active Sanitary Floor Drainage Systems: Floor drainage systems will be provided in the Experimental Hall areas where specifically required, complete with collection sumps, pumps and dilution facilities. These systems are included under Design Package 4, Scope-of-Work items. e. Non-Active Sanitary Floor Drainage Systems: Non-active floor drainage systems will be provided on upper levels of the booster complex and service buildings. These systems will collect floor drainage in areas where non-active cooling water systems and/or raw cooling water systems are installed, and also general grade level mechanical service spaces. f . The recommended design for each of the sanitary low level liquid waste collection sumps and discharge facilities comprises a dry collection chamber with sufficient capacity to hold a major system spill; a transfer and dilution facility located in the dry collection chamber; and a wet pit containing duplex sewage/sump pumps. The dry collection chamber will contain a liquid level controller that will indicate water in the pit. This condition will be alarmed through the DDC automated control system. The transfer and dilution facility will consist of a hydraulic ejector assembly with flow measuring and control devices on both the suction piping (located in the dry collection chamber) and the water supply piping, so that the collected waste water can be effectively diluted when transferring it from the dry collection sump into the wet pump pit. An approved reduced pressure back flow prevention device will be required on the water supply system. 3.3.10 Site Services a . This section of the report outlines the design concepts for the following site services; sanitary sewers, storm drainage sewers and ditches, watermains and natural gas pipelines. b. Sanitary Sewer System A main 300 mm diameter gravity sanitary sewer enters and services the south campus at the southerly corner of the campus immediately east of the existing Waste Disposal Facility. At a point adjacent to and north of the Waste Disposal Facility this trunk 29 sanitary sewer splits into two primary sub-trunk sanitary sewers. One is aligned in a northerly direction along the services right-of-way on the east side of the existing TRIUMF buildings on the east side of Wesbrook Crescent. The other runs in a north-westerly direction parallel to and east of Marine Drive. The existing northerly aligned sewer services the existing TRIUMF, Paprican and British Columbia Research facilities. As it proceeds farther to the north it jogs west to Wesbrook Crescent and continues north along Wesbrook Crescent to serve as one of the primary trunk sanitary sewer services for the south-eastern portions of the University of British Columbia campus. The existing north-westerly sewer facility continues parallel to Marine Drive and ser-vices the existing Animal Science facilities, the Thunderbird Stadium and, essentially, the western portion of the University of British Columbia campus. The existing main 300 mm sanitary sewer connects off site into a 380 mm Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District trunk sewer facility. This trunk sewer eventually discharges to the Highbury tunnel, and subsequently, to the lona Sewage 'freatment Plant. The concept for providing a new sanitary sewer system to serve the proposed new KAON Factory facilities is to extend a new 300 mm sewer parallel to Marine Drive along the new service access road located between the Extraction/Experimental Hall facilities and the treed green-belt area along Marine Drive. This new sewer will essentially replace the existing 300 mm sewer which will have to be removed when the KAON Factory is constructed. The existing 12 inch sewer emanating from the south east UBC campus, which presently runs along Marine Drive, will be connected to the new 300 mm sewer. A network of new branch sewer lines will be provided to collect sanitary sewage and drainage from the Booster Complex, the new Administration Building, the Entrance Pavilion, the six service buildings, the Extraction and Experimental Hall buildings, the Neutrino Hall, the 20 GeV Hall, and other bujldings or appurtenances requiring sanitary drainage connections. These branch sewers will connect to the main 300 mm trunk sewer along the main access road as described above. Also, the existing sewers serving the Animal Sciences will be redirected to connect to one of the new branch sewers. Refer to the accompanying site services drawings which show the recommended con-ceptual site sewer system. Existing sewers will be abandoned and/or removed where they interfere with the construction of the KAON Factory facilities. c. Storm Drainage System A 1200 mm diameter gravity storm sewer enters the southerly corner of the south campus immediately east of the existing Waste Disposal Facility and services a ma-jor portion of the south campus. This trunk storm sewer discharges to an open 30 ditch that parallels the west side of Marine Drive and discharges to the Fraser River through various culvert crossings along Marine Drive. This trunk sewer continues in a northerly direction along the services right-of-way on the east side of the existing TRIUMF buildings on the east side of Wesbrook Crescent. Various tributary storm drains and open ditches from the north-west feed into this primary trunk facility. Similar to the sanitary sewer routing, a major open drainage ditch system parallels Marine Drive and services the westerly portions of the south campus. The portion of this drainage facility in the immediate vicinity of the Waste Disposal Facility is a closed piped system. The concept for providing a new storm drainage collection system to serve the pro-posed KAON FACTORY facilities is to extend a new main storm drainage network, parallel to the proposed new main 300 mm sanitary sewer along the service access road, and proposed new branch sewers. The new network will connect to the existing 1200 mm drain at a point adjacent to the existing Waste Disposal Facility (on the North East corner). The new storm drainage collection system will service the following buildings and/or appurtenances: • The Booster Complex, • The Administration/Office Buildings, • The Entrance Pavilion, • The Six Service Buildings, • The Extraction and Experimental Hall Buildings, • The Neutrino Building, • The 20 Ge V Service Building, • The 20 Ge V Hall, • Catch basins in parking areas, roadways and service entrance ways and, • Electrical Manholes Existing storm drains will be abandoned and/or removed where they interfere with the construction of the KAON FACTORY facilities. Refer to the appropriate site services drawing which accompanies this report. The drawing shows the recommended conceptual site storm drainage system. d. Water System The existing water supply system, feeding the south campus area (and TRIUMF in particular) emanates from the UBC campus system. Two main connections are noted: one is located along Wesbrook Mall and the other is along the South Campus Road from the north-west. The Wesbrook watermain is 300 mm in diameter where it crosses 16th Avenue and subsequently becomes a 250 mm pipe in the area of 31 the British Columbia Research facilities. The South Campus Road watermain is a 250 mm diameter main where it supplies the south campus area. These two supply mains subsequently interconnect with each other in the south campus area through a looped network. The concept for providing new water lines to serve the proposed KAON FACTORY facilities includes the provision of a new 200 mm looped water line which will connect to the existing 250 mm water lines at points along Wesbrook Crescent and to the 250 mm water line along the South Campus Road. The proposed new 200 mm looped water system will supply branch service connections to the following buildings and/or facilities: • Booster Complex • Entrance Pavilion • Each of Six Service Buildings • Extraction Hall Building • Experimental Hall Building • 20 Ge V Hall Building • Neutrino Hall Building • Cooling Towers • Irrigation Systems • Site Fire Hydrants Note: The building water service connections will be sized appropriately to satisfy the demand requirements of the fire protection standpipe and sprinkler systems, the domestic water requirements and the LCW and raw water systems filling require-ments. e. Natural Gas System The existing natural gas distribution system consists of two "firm" gas lines along the Wesbrook Crescent. Both these lines are 70 kPa pressure lines. One is 150 mm in diameter, the other is 100 mm in diameter. Both the 150 mm and the 100 mm lines supply branch lines feeding the existing TRIUMF facilities. An existing 75 mm line extends along Wesbrook Crescent and supplies gas to the existing Waste Disposal Facility. The concept for extending the existing gas service includes providing a new service from one or both of the existing gas supply lines, that will supply gas to the Ad-ministration/Office complex, to the Experimental Hall, Extraction Hall, Neutrino Hall and 20 Ge V Hall. The recommended new gas supply service is located along the Wesbrook Crescent Road: this line will serve branch lines to the above-noted building facilities. Refer to the appropriate site services drainage showing the proposed gas service concept layout. 32 f. Radioactive Isotope Service A radioactive isotope supply line is located along Wesbrook Crescent. It emanates from the existing TRIUMF facility and runs along Wesbrook Crescent to the UBC Acute Care hospital complex located on Wesbrook Mall, north of 16th A venue. It would appear at this time that this line will have to be relocated. This should be reviewed at the detailed design stage. 3.3.11 Items Recommended for Further Study or Consideration during the Final Design of the Conventional Facilities a. Cost Benefit analysis and life cycle costing of alternative methods of recovering heat from the LCW cooling systems. h. Alternate ways of providing dilution facilities for low-level liquid waste systems. c. Alternate ways of controlling the build-up of total dissolved solids in the raw cooling water system, other than bleeding off water. d. Alternate cooling tower designs to minimize noise. e. Review the need for high efficiency filters on the air intake system for regular purging of the tunnels. f. Review possible on-site regeneration of deionization mixed bed resin materials. g. Review of the design temperature criteria for cooling of electrical components. h. Review the need for main temperature control valves on each LCW circuit. i. Review the need for additional thermal zone controls for the air systems in the typical service buildings and in the Booster Complex. j. Review'the need for flow control devices in lieu of manual valves in the LCW systems. k. Optimize the design and selection of LCW heat exchangers/cooling towers/raw wa-ter distribution piping to match the final design of the KAON FACTORY machine components. 1. Review the need for sprinklers in the tunnels. m. Review the use of gravity storage tanks in LCW systems in lieu of the pressure vessels noted. n. Review the support structures for the cooling towers. 33 3.4 Outline Specification and Equipment Schedules 3.4.1 General/Introduction a. The following outline specification is considered to be a 'generic' one, intended to pro-vide a description/outline of the recommended types of equipment and system com-ponents to be used in the installation of the Design Package 2 systems. h. It is expected that these types of equipment and system components for the Design Package 2 systems will be reviewed, modified and/or changed where required to suit the final design. c. Following the Outline Specification are Major Equipment Schedules. These schedules identify major items of equipment in the Design Package 2 systems and correlate the following information: • equipment designation • location of equipment • system or area that equipment service • description/capacity of equipment d. Refer to the conceptual design drawings and schematic diagrams which accompany this report for equipment locations in the Design Package 2 systems. 3.4.2 Division 2 - Site Work (Site Services) SECTION 02411 - Foundation Drains PART 1: GENERAL .1 SCOPE: To include supply and installation of perimeter foundation drainage system. PART 2: PRODUCTS .1 FOUNDATION DRAINAGE PIPING: perforated polyvinyl chloride 150 mm diameter pipe with PVC or cast iron fittings . • 2 FILTER CLOTH: polyester filter cloth around all foundation drainage piping . . 3 DRAIN GRAVEL: 14 mm to 17 mm diameter granular material. 34 SECTION 02601 - Manholes and Catchbasins PART 1: GENERAL .1 SCOPE: To include supply and installation of all manholes and catchbasins. PART 2: PRODUCTS .1 MANHOLES: circular precast concrete to ASTM C478, with eccentric top cone or flat slab top, ladder rungs, rubber ring joints and heavy duty frames and covers suitable for H20 loading . • 2 CATCHBASINS: precast concrete, 600 mm diameter x 1220 mm deep with 300 mm deep sump and trapping hood to ASTM C139 and C478. SECTION 02700 - Piped Utilities PART 1: GENERAL .1 SCOPE: applicable to all plumbing site work sections, establishing general provisions, standards and codes, testing procedures and acceptance criteria, shop drawing proce-dures, restoration requirements, construction drainage procedures, blasting, shoring and bracing, trench preparation, reinforcing steel and poured in place concrete. SECTION 02701 - Storm Sewers PART 2: PRODUCTS .1 DRAINAGE PIPING AND FITTINGS: non-reinforced concrete pipe to CSA A257.1 and ASTM C14M or reinforced concrete pipe to CSA A257.2 and ASTM C76M with mortar or rubber ring joints to CSA A257.2 and ASTM C443M, polyvinyl chloride pipe to CSA 181.2 or 182.1 with fittings to ASTM D3034 of minimum SDR 35 . . 2 BEDDING: natural sand or crushed rock screenings with the following grading - 100% passing 9.5 mm sieve, 50 to 100% passing 4.75 mm sieve, 30 to 90% passing 2 mm sieve, 10 to 50% passing 425 micrometer sieve and 0 to 10% passing 75 micrometer sIeve. 35 SECTION 02702 - Sanitary Sewers PART 2: PRODUCTS .1 WASTE PIPING AND FITTINGS: cast iron class 4000 to CSA B70, polyvinyl chloride pipe to CSA 181.2 or 182.1 with fittings to ASTM D3034 of minimum SDR 35 . . 2 BEDDING: In accordance with Section 02701. SECTION 02713 - Watermains PART 2: PRODUCTS .1 WATER PIPING AND FITTINGS: ductile iron class 50 to CSA B131 and AWWA C151, polyvinyl chloride pipe to CSA 137.3 or AWWA C900 with fittings to suit . . 2 VALVES: ULC listed for application on fire services . . 3 VALVE BOXES: Nelson type with cap on section of cast or ductile iron pipe down to valve with hub of pipe over valve . .4 AIR AND VACUUM RELIEF VALVES: combination automatic float and lever type . . 5 FIRE HYDRANTS: compression dry-barrel type with 2 hose nozzles and a pumper nozzle, ULC listed, conforming to AWWA C502 . . 6 BEDDING: In accordance with Section 02701. SECTION 02715 - Natural Gas PART 2: PRODUCTS .1 NATURAL GAS PIPING: polyethylene pipe to CSA B137.4 .2 VALVES:' high pressure Rockwell plug valves for polyethylene gas piping service . . 3 BEDDING: In accordance with Section 02701. 3.4.3 Division 3 through 14 Not used 36 3.4.4 Division 15 - Mechanical SECTION 15010 - Mechanical General Requirements PART 1: GENERAL .1 SCOPE: applicable to all sections, establishing general provisions, standards and codes. SECTION 15050 - Basic Mechanical Materials PART 1: GENERAL .1 SCOPE: pipe, fittings, valves, specialties, supports, anchors, and mechanical equipment identification applicable to all sections. PART 2:, PRODUCTS .1 PIPE AND FITTING MATERIALS a. DOMESTIC AND INDUSTRIAL COLD WATER: type '1' hard drawn copper, hard soldered or brazed connections, 860 KPa solder type fittings. h. COMPRESSED AIR: Type 'L' hard drawn copper, hard soldered or brazed connections, 860 KPa solder type fittings. c. FIRE SPRINKLER PIPING: black steel pipe and fittings, schedule 40 with threaded or grooved connections. d. COOLING TOWER WATER AND CHILLED WATER PIPE AND FITTINGS: black steel piping, schedule 40, threaded, welded or flanged connections. Iron or steel fittings, 860 KPa. e. LCW PIPE AND FITTINGS: 304 L stainless steel, schedule 10, 1034 KPa fittings, welded connections. f. SANITARY WASTE AND STORM DRAIN PIPING: cast iron service weight piping with coupling connections for below grade. Indoors above grade, cast iron service weight piping with hubless joints or DWV copper tubing. g. VENT PIPING: For sizes 50 mm and smaller or DWV copper tubing; 65 mm and larger; cast iron with hubless joints or DWV copper tubing. 37 .2 VALVES a. LCW SYSTEMS • Butterfly Valves: 304 stainless steel for sizes 65 mm through 300 mm, 1034 KPa working pressure. • Ball Valves: 304 stainless steel for sizes 12 mm through 50 mID, 1034 KPa working Pressure. • SPECIALTIES: to include temperature indicators, differential pressure gauges, pressure gauges, expansion joints, air vents and drain connections as required. • MECHANICAL IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM: tag and mark for identification all valves, pipes and equipment. h. MECHANICAL INSULATION • CHILLED WATER PIPING: provide 50 mm thick premolded high-density fi-breglass with an all service (vapour barrier) jacket; finish with canvas jacket in exposed areas. • LCW PIPING: provide 52 mm · thick premolded density fibreglass on return lines for personnel protection; finish with canvas jacket in exposed areas. • DUCTWORK: Provide 38 mm interior acoustic fibreglass insulation on all sup-ply and return ductwork routed through unconditioned spaces. c. MOUNTING ACCESSORIES • HANGERS AND SUPPORTS: To include pipe clamps, riser clamps, straps, steel hangers and supports as required. Shields to be provided where pipe is insulated. • SEISMIC BRACING: An approved seismic bracing system will be provided for all piping, ductwork and equipment. • SLEEVES: Pipes and ductwork passing through concrete walls floors or roofs shall be provided with sleeves fitted into place at the time of construction. • SEALING: All pipes and ductwork passing through sleeves shall be caulked and sealed. SECTION 15300 - Fire Protection PART 1: GENERAL 38 .1 SCOPE: Provide design and installation of an ordinary hazard group 2, wet pipe sprin-kler system throughout the service buildings and tunnel facilities. SECTION 15400 - Plumbing PART 1: GENERAL .1 SCOPE: To include materials and installation of domestic water, industrial water, com-pressed air and associated waste systems. PART 2: PRODUCTS .1 PIPE AND FITTING MATERIALS: In accordance with Section 15050 . • 2 EQUIPMENT • AIR COMPRESSOR: Base mounted, oil-free, high pressure, liquid ring air com-pressor assembly complete with pump, motor, dessicant type air dryer, receiver tank, filtration, water separators, etc. as required . • SUMP PUMPS: Duplex submersible sump pumps for storm drainage systems. Duplex submersible sewage pumps for sanitary drainage systems. Contents of low level liquid water sumps will be transfered to sanitary sumps using simplex ejectors or transfer pumps . • 3 FIXTURES a. HOSE BIBBS: Locate to suit operation and maintenance requirements. h. COUNTER SINK: Stainless steel c. SERVICE SINK: wall hung, trap standard type. d. EMERGENCY EYEWASH/SHOWER: Stainless steel construction e. FLOOR DRAINS: Heavy duty cast iron. f. SUMP MONITORING: Low level liquid controller to indicate water in the dry pit. SECTION 15401 - Low Conductivity Water (LCW) Systems PART 1: GENERAL 39 .1 SCOPE: To include materials, installation, and testing of non-active, low-active and high-active LCW systems. PART 2: PRODUCTS .1 PIPE, FITTINGS AND VALVES: In accordance with Section 15050 . . 2 PIPE SPECIALTIES: To include temperature indicators, differential pressure gauges, t pressure gages, expansion joints, air vents and drains suitable for use with LCW . • 3 EQUIPMENT a. CIRCULATING PUMPS: Centrifugal type, horizontal, end suction, constructed of 316 stainless steel. b. VARIABLE FREQUENCY DRIVES (VFD's): To be provided on main LCW circulat-ing pumps, where deemed to be specifically applicable. c. HEAT EXCHANGER: Plate type heat exchanger constructed of type 304 stainless steel, maximum working pressure of 1034 KPa, maximum working temperature of 93°C. d. EXPANSION TANK: Bladder type expansion with all wetted parts constructed of 304 stainless steel. Suitable for 860 KPa operating pressure, ASME stamped. Atmo-sphere type expansion tanks will be considered in the design phase. e. AIR SEPARATOR: Centrifugal type with flanged inlet and outlet connections. Con-structed of 304 stainless steel. Suitable for 860 KPa operating pressure, ASME stamped. f. DEIONIZER TANKS: Constructed offibreglass, 304 L stainless steel or PVDF / Polypropy-lene lined carbon steel. Filled with cation-anion mixed resin. Suitable for 1034 KPa working pressure. g. LCW SYSTEM ACCESSORIES: To include water filters, resistivity elements and in-dicators as required. SECTION 15500 - Process Cooling and Ventilation System PART 1: GENERAL .1 SCOPE: To include cooling towers, pumps, chillers, air handling equipment and asso-ciated piping for equipment cooling within tunnels and support facilities. 40 PART 2: PRODUCTS .1 PIPE, FITTINGS, AND VALVES: In accordance with Section 15050 . • 2 EQUIPMENT a. COOLING TOWER: Wood structure, prefill, forced draft, draw through type c/w chemical treatment accessories. h. CHILLER: Water cooled, centrifugal type. c. PUMPS: • CHILLED WATER: Base mounted centrifugal type, horizontal, end suction or vertical in-line type as appropriate, mechanical seals. • COOLING TOWER WATER: Base mounted centrifugal type, horizontal split case, double suction design with mechanical seals. d AIR HANDLING EQUIPMENT • Service Buildings: Factory fabricated cabinet type air handling units for systems under 16,000 LIS. Larger systems will use field fabricated (built-up) air handling units. Each air handling system shall contain a mixing box, chilled water cooling coil, and filter section to house pre-filters and 95 percent efficient cartridge or bag filters. • Tunnel: Field fabricated (built-up) air handling unit, utilizing a vane-axial fan. The fan shall be reversible for smoke removal application. The system shall include a chilled water cooling coil, water side economizer (free cooling) coil and filter section to house pre-filters and 95% efficient cartridge or bag filters. Smoke discharge air will be filtered using HEP A filtration prior to release. • Return fans: In-line centrifugal or vane-axial type to suit application. • Ductwork: All supply, return and exhaust system ductwork shall be galvanized steel constructed in conformance with SMACNA standards. • Power Ventilators: Roof or wall mounted centrifugal exhauster, V-Belt drive, motors with vibration isolation. • Diffusers, Registers and Grilles: To suit application. • Special Filtration: All air exhausted from shielding tunnels will be filtered using HEPA filtration prior to discharge at grade. 41 SECTION 15550 - Controls and Instrumentation PART 1: GENERAL .1 SCOPE: To establish requirements for provision and installation of all temperature, pressure, and flow control systems, as well as associated alarm systems. SECTION 15990 - Testing and Balancing PART 1: GENERAL .1 SCOPE: To establish requirements for testing and balancing all air and water systems associated with the project. 3.4.5 Major Equipment Schedules 42 'l'RIUHF/KAOR FAC'l'ORY DESIGN PACKAGE I 2 MAJOR EQUIPHERT SCHEDULE AREA: SERVICE BUILDIRG ItO. 1 lID! IIC1lUG11lS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY HE 1-1 LEVEL B-1 Lew, NON-ACTIVE 1109 KW, 25.2 L/S HE 1-2 LEVEL B-3 Lew, LOW-ACTIVE 6888 KW, 41.0 L/S (Lew), 83.3 L/S (RW) CIRCOLl'fIIG PUlPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CP 1-1 . LEVEL B-1 Lew NON-ACTIVE 27.7 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 29.8 KW CP 1-2 LEVEL B-3 Lew LOW-ACTIVE 45.0 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 44.8 KW CP 1-3 GRADE LEVEL CHILLED WATER 60.6 L/S, 180 kPa TDH, 14.9 KW AIR BDDLIIG EgUIPIIEI! EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY AHU 1-1 GRADE LEVELS B-1, B-2 37,700 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 56 KW AHU 1-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) GRADE, LEVELS 25,900 L/S, 1000 Pa SP 44.8 KW B-2, B-4 AHU 1-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) GRADE, LEVELS 10,400 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 11.2 KW B-1, B-3 (VENTILATION) AHU 1-4 LEVEL B-3 TUNNEL 23,600 L/S, 1250 Pa SP, 44.8 KW VANE AXIAL FAN RF 1-1 GRADE AHU 1-1 37,700 L/S 375 Pa SP, 29.8 KW SWSI CENTRIFUGAL FAN RF 1-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 1-2 25,900 L/S 375 Pa SP, 22.4 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE RF 1-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 1-3 10,400 L/S 375 Pa SF, 11.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE EF 1-1 GRADE FILTERED TUNNEL 940 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW EXHAUST IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE SF 1-1 LEVEL B-3 TUNNEL FRESH AIR 940 L/S. 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE SF 1-2 GRADE LEVEL STAIR PRESSURIZATION 2830 L/S, 750 Pa SP, 5.6 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE CHILLER EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CH 1-1 GRADE LEVEL CHILLED WATER 1407 KW, 60.1 L/S CHILLED WATER 40.4 L/S RAW WATER EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY AC 1-1 GRADE LEVEL OIL FREE 22 L/S FREE AIR, COMPRESSED AIR 690 kPa, 19 KW 43 ~UMF/KAON FACTORY DESIGR PACKAGE I 2 MAJOR EQUIPMENT SCHEDULE IRD: SlRYICI BOILDIIG 10. 2 BlAt IICIIDGDs EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) HE 2-1 LEVEL B-1 HE 2-2;" LEVEL B-3 CIRaJLAtIIG PUlPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CP 2-1 LEVEL B-1 CP 2-2 LEVEL B-3 CP 2-3 GRADE LEVEL AIR BAlDLIIG EQOIPIIEIft' EQUIP. NO. , LOCATION (LEVEL) AHU 2-1 GRADE AHU 2-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) .. AHU 2-3 -" GRADE -(MEZZANINE) AHU 2-4 LEVEL B-3 RF 2-1 GRADE RF 2-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) RF 2-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) EF 2-1 GRADE SF 2-1 LEVEL B-3 SF 2-2 GRADE LEVEL CHILLER EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CH 2-1 GRADE LEVEL AIR COMPRESSOR EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AC 2-1 GRADE LEVEL SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY Lew, NON-ACTIVE 1109 KW, 25.2 L/S (LCW),19.8 L/S (RW) LCW, LOW-ACTIVE 6888 KW, 41.0 L/S (LCW), 83.3 L/S (RW) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY Lew NON-ACTIVE 27.7 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 29.8 KW Lew LOW-ACTIVE 45.1 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 56 KW CHILLED WATER 60.6 L/S, 180 kPa TDH, 14.9 KW SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY LEVELS B-1, B-2 37,700 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 56 KW GRADE, LEVELS 25,900 L/S, 1000 Pa SP 44.8 KW B-2, B-4 GRADE, LEVELS 10,400 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 11.2 KW B-1, B-3 (VENTILATION) TUNNEL 23,600 L/S, 1250 Pa SP, 44.8 KW VANE AXIAL FAN AHU 2-1 37,700 L/S 375 Pa SP, 29.8 KW SWSI CENTRIFUGAL FAN AHU 2-2 25,900 L/S 375 Pa SP, 22.4 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE AHU 2-3 10,400 L/S 375 Pa SF, 11.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE FILTERED TUNNEL 940 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW EXHAUST IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE TUNNEL FRESH AIR 940 L/S. 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE STAIR PRESSURIZATION 2830 L/S, 750 Pa SP, 5.6 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CHILLED WATER 1407 KW, 60.1 L/S CHILLED WATER 40.4 L/S RAW WATER SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY OIL FREE 22 L/S FREE AIR, COMPRESSED AIR 690 kPa, 19 KW 44 TRIUMP/KAON PAC'l'ORY DESIGN PACKAGE I 2 MAJOR EQUIPMENT SCHEDULE ARD: SlRVICI BUILDIIG 10. 3 lID! DCIIUGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) HE 3-1 LEVEL B-1 HE 3-2 LEVEL B-3 CIRCOLA'fIIG POIIPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CP 3-1 LEVEL B-1 CP 3-2 LEVEL B-3 CP 3-3 GRADE LEVEL AIR BUDLIIG EQUIPDI'I' EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AHU 3-1 GRADE AHU 3-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 3-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 3-4 LEVEL B-3 RF 3-1 GRADE RF 3-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) RF 3-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) EF 3-1 GRADE SF 3-1 LEVEL B-3 SF 3-2 . GRADE LEVEL CHILLER EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CH 3-1 . GRADE LEVEL AIR COMPRESSOR EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AC 3-1 GRADE LEVEL SERVICE Lew, NON-ACTIVE Lew, LOW-ACTIVE SERVICE LOW NON-ACTIVE LOW LOW-ACTIVE CHILLED WATER SERVICE LEVELS B-1, B-2 GRADE, LEVELS B-2, B-4 GRADE, LEVELS B-1, B-3 (VENTILATION) TUNNEL AHU 3-1 AHU 3-2 AHU 3-3 FILTERED TUNNEL EXHAUST TUNNEL FRESH AIR STAIR PRESSURIZATION SERVICE CHILLED WATER SERVICE OIL FREE COMPRESSED AIR 45 DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 1109 KW, 25.2 L/S (LOW), 19.8 L/S (RW) 6888 KW, 41.0 L/S (Lew), 83.3 L/S (RW) DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 27.7 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 29.8 KW 45.1 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 56 KW 60.6 L/S, 180 kPa TDH, 14.9 KW DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 37,700 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 56 KW 25,900 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 44.8 KW 10,400 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 11.2 KW 23,600 L/S, 1250 Pa SP, 44.8 KW VANE AXIAL FAN 37,700 L/S 375 Pa SP, 29.8 KW SWSI CENTRIFUGAL FAN 25,900 L/S 375 Pa SP, 22.4 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 10,400 L/S 375 Pa SF, 11.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 940 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 940 L/S. 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 2830 L/S, 750 Pa SP, 5.6 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 1407 KW, 60.1 L/S CHILLED WATER 40.4 L/S RAW WATER DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 22 L/S FREE AIR, 690 kPa, 19 KW 'l"RIUMF InoB FAC'l'ORY DESIGB PACKAGE I 2 MAJOR EQUIPMDT SCHEDULE lID: SlRVICI IIJILDIIG 10. 4 mt IICIIIIGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) HE 4-1 LEVEL B-1 HE 4-2 LEVEL B-3 CIiCOLl!IIG PmIPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CP 4-1 LEVEL B-1 CP 4-2 LEVEL B-3 CP 4-3 GRADE LEVEL AIR BUDLIIG EQOIPIIII! EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AHU 4-1 GRADE AHU 4-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 4-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 4-4 LEVEL B-3 RF 4-1 GRADE RF 4-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) RF 4-3 GRADE (HEZZANINE) EF 4-1 GRADE SF 4-1 LEVEL B-3 SF 4-2 GRADE LEVEL CHILLER EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CH 4-1 GRADE LEVEL AIR allPRESSOR EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AC 4-1 GRADE LEVEL SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY Lew, NON-ACTIVE 1109 KW, 25.2 L/S (Lew), 19.8 L/S (RW) Lew, LOW-ACTIVE 6888 KW, 41.0 L/S (Lew), 83.3 L/S (RW) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY Lew NON-ACTIVE 27.7 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 29.8 KW LCW LOW-ACTIVE 45.1 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 56 KW CHILLED WATER 60.6 L/S, 180 kPa TDH, 14.9 KW SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY LEVELS B-1, B-2 37,700 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 56 KW GRADE, LEVELS 25,900 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 44.8 KW B-2, B-4 GRADE, LEVELS 10,400 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 11.2 KW B-1, B-3 (VENTILATION) TUNNEL 23,600 L/S, 1250 Pa SP, 44.8 KW VANE AXIAL FAN AHU 4-1 37,700 L/S 375 Pa SP, 29.8 KW SWSI CENTRIFUGAL FAN AHU 4-2 25,900 L/S 375 Pa SP, 22.4 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE AHU 4-3 10,400 L/S 375 Pa SF, 11.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE FILTERED TUNNEL 940 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW EXHAUST IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE TUNNEL FRESH AIR 940 L/S. 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KH IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE STAIR PRESSURIZATI~ 2830 L/S, 750 Pa SP, 5.6 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CHILLED WATER 1407 KW, 60.1 L/S CHILLED WATER 40.4 L/S RAW WATER SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY OIL FREE 22 L/S FREE AIR, COMPRESSED AIR 690 kPa, 19 KW 46 TRIUMP/ItAON PACTORY DESIGN PACKAGE I 2 MAJOR EQUIPMENT SCHEDULE AIlD: SERVICE BOILDIIG 10. 5 BEl! IICIIUGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) HE 5-1 LEVEL B-1 HE 5-2 LEVEL B-3 CIRCOL!!IIG PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CP 5-1 LEVEL B-1 CP 5-2 LEVEL B-3 CP 5-3 GRADE LEVEL AIR BDDLIIG EQUIPIIEI'f EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AHU 5-1 GRADE AHU 5-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 5-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 5-4 LEVEL B-3 RF 5-1 GRADE RF 5-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) RF 5-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) EF 5-1 GRADE SF 5-1 LEVEL B-3 SF 5-2 GRADE LEVEL CHILLER EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CH 5-1 GRADE LEVEL AIR cmtPRESSOR EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AC 5-1 GRADE LEVEL SERVICE Lew, NON-ACTIVE Lew, LOW-ACTIVE SERVICE Lew NON-ACTIVE Lew LOW-ACTIVE CHILLED WATER SERVICE LEVELS B-1, B-2 GRADE, LEVELS B-2, B-4 GRADE, LEVELS B-1, B-3 (VENTILATION) TUNNEL AHU 5-1 AHU 5-2 AHU 5-3 FILTERED TUNNEL EXHAUST TUNNEL FRESH AIR STAIR PRESSURIZATION SERVICE CHILLED WATER SERVICE OIL FREE COMPRESSED 'AIR 47 DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 1109 KW, 25.2 L/S 6888 KW, 41.0 L/S (Lew), 83.3 L/S (RW) DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 27.7 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 29.8 KW 45.1 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 44.8 KW 71 L/S, 180 kPa TDH, 14.9 KW DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 37,700 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 56 KW 25,900 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 44.8 KW 10,400 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 11.2 KW 37,750 L/S, 1250 Pa SP, 44.8 KW VANE AXIAL FAN 37,700 L/S 375 Pa SP, 29.8 KW SWSI CENTRIFUGAL FAN 25,900 L/S 375 Pa SP, 22.4 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 10,400 L/S 375 Pa SF, 11.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 940 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 940 L/S. 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 2830 L/S, 750 Pa SP, 5.6 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 1670 Kli, 71 L/S CHILLED WATER 48 L/S RAW WATER DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 22 L/S FREE AIR, 690 kPa, 19 KW "l'RlUMP lOON PACTORY DESIGN PACOGE • 2 MAJOR EQUIPMENT SCHEDULE AREA: SERVICE BUILDIIG 10. 6 lID! EICIIDGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) HE 6-1 LEVEL B-1 HE 6-2 LEVEL B-3 CIRCOLl!11G PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CP 6-1 LEVEL B-1 CP 6-2 LEVEL B-3 CP 6-3 GRADE LEVEL AIR BAlDLIIG EQUIPIIEI! EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AHU 6-1 GRADE AHU 6-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 6-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 6-4 LEVEL B-3 RF 6-1 GRADE RF 6-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) RF 6-3 GRADE (MEZZANINE) EF 6-1 GRADE SF 6-1 LEVEL B-3 SF 6-2 GRADE LEVEL CHILLER EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CH 6-1 GRADE LEVEL AIR allPRESSOR EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AC 6-1 GRADE LEVEL SERVICE Lew, NON-ACTIVE Lew, LOW-ACTIVE SERVICE Lew NON-ACTIVE LCW LOW-ACTIVE CHILLED WATER SERVICE LEVELS B-1, B-2 GRADE, LEVELS B-2, B-4 GRADE, LEVELS B-1 , B-3 (VENTILATION) TUNNEL AHU 6-1 AHU 6-2 AHU 6-3 FILTERED TUNNEL EXHAUST TUNNEL FRESH AIR STAIR PRESSURIZATION SERVICE CHILLED WATER SERVICE OIL FREE COMPRESSED AIR 48 DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 1109 KW, 25.2 L/S (Lew) 19.8 L/S (RW) 6888 KW, 41.0 L/S (Lew), 83.3 L/S (RW) DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 27.7 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 29.8 KW 45.1 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 56 KW 60.6 L/S, 180 kPa TDH, 14.9 KW DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 37,700 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 56 KW 25,900 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 44.8 KW 10,400 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 11.2 KW 23,600 L/S, 1250 Pa SP, 44.8 Kw VANE AXIAL FAN 37,700 L/S 375 Pa SP, 29.8 KW SWSI CENTRIFUGAL FAN 25,900 L/S 375 Pa SP, 22.4 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 10,400 L/S 375 Pa SF, 11.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 940 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 940 L/S. 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE 2830 L/S, 750 Pa SP, 5.6 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 1407 KW, 60.1 L/S CHILLED WATER 40.4 L/S RAW WATER DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY 22 L/S FREE AIR, 690 kPa, 19 KW TRIUHP InON PACTORY DESIGN PACKAGE I 2 MAJOR EQUIPMENT SCHEDULE AREA: BOOS'fER aJIPLEI IlIA! ElCIIDGERS EQUIP ; NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) HE 7-1 LEVEL B-1 HE 7-2 LEVEL B-3 CIRCOLA'I'IIG PUMPS EQUIP . NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CP 7-1 GRADE (MEZZANINE) .. CP 7-2 LEVEL B-3 CP 7-3 GRADE LEVEL AIR HDDLII,9 EQlJIPMKI'!' ~ EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AHU 7-1 GRADE AHU 7-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) AHU 7-3 GRADE AHU 7-4 LEVEL B-3 RF 7-1 GRADE RF 7-2 GRADE (MEZZANINE) RF 7-3 GRADE EF 7-1 LEVEL B-3 SF 7-l, LEVEL B-3 SF 7-2 GRADE LEVEL CHILLER EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) CH 7-1 GRADE LEVEL AIR COMPRESSOR EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) AC 7-1 GRADE LEVEL (MEZZANINE) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY Lew, NON-ACTIVE 1109 KW, 25.2 L/S (Lew), 19.8 L/S (RW) Lew, LOW-ACTIVE 6888 KW, 41.0 L/S (LCW), 83.3 L/S (RW) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY Lew NON-ACTIVE 27.7 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 29.8 KW LCW LOW-ACTIVE 45.1 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 56 KW CHILLED WATER 60.6 L/S, 180 kPa TDH, 14.9 KW SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY LEVEL B-1 37,700 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 56 KW GRADE, LEVEL B-2, B-3 25,900 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 44.8 KW GRADE, LEVEL B-1 8,000 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 11.2 KW (VENTILATION) TUNNEL 23,600 L/S, 1250 Pa SP, 44.8 KW VANE AXIAL FAN AHU 7-1 37,700 L/S, 375 Pa SP, 29.8 KW PLUG FAN AHU 7-2 25,900 L/S, 375 Pa SP, 22.4 KW PLUG FAN AHU 7-3 8,000 L/S, 375 Pa SP, 11.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE FILTERED TUNNEL 940 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW EXHAUST IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE TUNNEL FRESH AIR 940 L/S, 500 Pa SP, 2.2 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE STAIR PRESSURIZATION 2830 L/S, 750 Pa SP, 5.6 KW IN-LINE CENTRIFUGAL TYPE SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CHILLED WATER 1407 KW, 60.6 L/S CHILLED WATER 40.4 L/S RAW WATER SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY OIL FREE 22 L/S FREE AIR, COMPRESSED AIR 690 kPa, 19 KW 49 nIOIP /DOI fACTORY DISIGI PACO~ I 1. JIlJ(Il IQUIPIIII'I' SCBmJLI ~EAT EXCHANGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY HE 8-1 EXTRACTION HALL NORTH BEAM LINE, 5000 kW, 43.8 L/s (Lew) Lew, LOW-ACTIVE 71. 7 L/s (RW) HE 8-2 EXTRACTION HALL NEUTRINO BEAM LINE 7500 kW, 65.7 L/s (Lew) Lew, LOW-ACTIVE 107.6 L/s (RW) HE 8-3 EXPERIMENTAL HALL NEUTRINO BEAM LINE 5000 kW, 39.9 L/s (Lew) (HA) Lew, HIGH-ACTIVE 39.9 L/s (Lew) (LA) HE 8-4 EXTRACTION HALL PROTON BEAM LINE 6000 kW, 52.6 L/s (Lew) Lew, LOW-ACTIVE 86.1 L/s (RW) HE 8-5 EXTRACTION HALL BEAM DUMP LINE & 11000 kW, 96.5 L/s (Lew) TARGETS Tl & T2 ~ 157.8 L/s (RW) Lew, LOW-ACTIVE HE 8-6 EXPERIMENTAL HALL BEAM DUMP LINE & 5000 kW, 39.9 L/s (Lew) (HA) TARGETS Tl & T2 39.9 L/s (Lew) (LA) Lew, HIGH-ACTIVE HE 8-7 EXTRACTION HALL POWER SUPPLIES 2000 kW, 52.6 L/s (Lew) Lew, NON-ACTIVE 35.9 L/s (RW) CIRCULATING PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CP 8-1 EXTRACTION HALL NORTH BEAM LINE 43.8 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 44.8 kW Lew, LOW-ACTIVE CP 8-2 EXTRACTION HALL NEUTRINO BEAM LINE 65.7 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 75 kW Lew, LOW-ACTIVE CP 8-3 EXPERIMENTAL HALL NEUTRINO BEAM LINE 39.9 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 56 kW LCW, HIGH-ACTIVE CP 8-4 EXTRACTION HALL PROTON BEAM LINE 52.6 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 75 kW LCW, LOW-ACTIVE CP 8-5 EXTRACTION HALL BEAM DUMP LINE & 96.5 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 112 kW TARGETS Tl & T2 Lew, LOW-ACTIVE CP 8-6 EXPERIMENTAL HALL BEAM DUMP LINE 39.9 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 56 kW TARGETS Tl & T2 , LCW, HIGH-ACTIVE CP 8-7 EXTRACTION HALL POWER SUPPLIES 52.6 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 74.6 kW LCW, NON-ACTIVE CP 8-8 EXPERIMENTAL HALL NORTH BEAM LINE 3.9 L/s, 180 kPa TDH, 1.5 kW Lew, HIGH-ACTIVE POLISHING STATION CP 8-9 EXTRACTION HALL NEUTRINO BEAM LINE 4.0 L/s, 180 kPa TDH, 1.5 kW LCW, LOW-ACTIVE POLISHING STATION CP 8-10 A/C EQUIP. ROOM CHILLED WATER 15.1L/S, 180 kPa TDH, 7.46 kW AREA: EI!RlCTIOI BALL (mH'D.) AIR HANDLING EQUIPMENT EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY AHU 8-1 A/C EQUIP. ROOM COOLING OF ELECTRICAL 23,600 L/S, 1000 Pa SP, 44.8 kW EQUIPMENT ~HILLER EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CH 8-1 A/C EQUIP. ROOM CHILLED WATER 350 kW, 15.1 L/S CHILLED WATER 10.0 L/S RAW WATER !BEAT ElCBAlGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION (LEVEL) SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY HE 9-1 MECHANICAL EXPERIMENT COOLING 10,000 kW, 263 L/s (LCW) ROOM LOOP 179.4 L/s (RW) Lew, NON-ACTIVE HE 9-2 MECHANICAL POWER SUPPLIES 6000 kW, 157.8 L/s (LCW) ROOM Lew, NON-ACTIVE 107.6 L/s (RW) CIRCULATING PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CP 9-1 MECHANICAL EXPERIMENTAL COOLING 263 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 281 kW ROOM LOOP LCW, NON-ACTIVE CP 9-2 MECHANICAL POWER SUPPLIES 94.7 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 112.5 kW ROOM Lew, NON-ACTIVE 51 ftIUlP/DOI PlC.'D! BISIG! PICDGII 2 DJ(Il IQUIPIIII! SCBIOOLE ARB: CAPACI'fOR BOILDIIG 10. 1 ~EAT EXCHANGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY HE 10-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. Lew, NON-ACTIVE 475 KW, 11.4 L/S (Lew) NO. 1 8.52 L/s (RW) ~IRCULATING PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CP 10-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. Lew, NON-ACTIVE 12.5 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 18.7 KW NO. 1 PACKAGED WATER-COOLED AIR-CONDITIONING UNIT EQUIP NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY PAC 10-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. COOLING OF 25 KW COOLING, 1890 L/S NO. 1 ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 250 Pa, 0.82 L/S (Lew) 10 KW ELECT. AREA: CAPACITOR BOILDIIG 10. 2 HEAT EXCHANGERS EQUIP. NO. ' LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY HE 11-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. Lew, NON-ACTIVE 475 KW, 11.4 L/S (Lew) NO. 2 8.52 L/s (RW) CIRCULATING PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CP 11-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. Lew, NON-ACTIVE 12.5 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 18.7 KW NO. 2 PACKAGED WATER-COOLED AIR-CONDITIONING UNIT EQUIP NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY PAC 11-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. COOLING OF 25 KW COOLING, 1890 L/S NO.2 ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 250 Pa, 0.82 L/S (Lew) 10 KW ELECT. 52 ftl1JllP/1D PACmlf DlSIG! PlCDGE I 2 DJ(Il !QOIPIIIft SCIIBOOLE ARD: CAPACID BUILDIIG 10. 3 ~EAT EXCHANGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY HE 12-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. Lew, NON-ACTIVE 475 KW, 11.4 L/S (Lew) NO. 3 8.52 L/s (RW) CIRCULATING PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CP 12-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. Lew, NON-ACTIVE 12.5 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 18.7 KW NO. 3 ~ACKAGED WATER-COOLED AIR-CONDITIONING UNIT EQUIP NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY PAC 12-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. COOLING OF 25 KW COOLING, 1890 L/S NO. 3 ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 250 Pa, 0.82 L/S (Lew) 10 KW ELECT. AREA: CAPACITOR BUILDIIG 10. 4 ~EAT EXCHANGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY HE 13-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. LCW, NON-ACTIVE 475 KW, 11.4 L/S (LCW) NO. 4 8.52 L/s (RW) CIRCULATING PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CP 13-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. Lew, NON-ACTIVE 12.5 L/S, 750 kPa TDH, 18.7 KW NO. 4 PACKAGED WATER-COOLED AIR-CONDITIONING UNIT EQUIP NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY PAC 13-1 CAPACITOR BLDG. COOLING OF 25 KW COOLING, 1890 L/S NO. 4 ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 250 Pa, 0.82 L/S (LCW) 10 KW ELECT. ')1 !RIOJIP/DOI FACTORY DESIGI PAClAG! I 2 IIlJOR EQOIPIIDT SCIIEIlJLE AREA: 20 G!V 'l'DDEL SERVICE BOILDIIG ~EAT EXCHANGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY HE 14-1 20 GEV TUNNEL Lew, NON-ACTIVE 2500 kW, 65.8 L/s, (Lew) SERVICE BUILDING 45 L/s (RW) HE 14-2 20 GEV TUNNEL Lew, LOW-ACTIVE 5000 kW, 43.9 L/s (Lew) (LA) SERVICE BUILDING 71.8 L/s (Lew) (NA) CIRCULATING PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CP 14-1 20 GEV TUNNEL Lew, NON-ACTIVE 65.8 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 111.9 kw SERVICE BUILDING CP 14-2 20 GEV TUNNEL Lew, LOW-ACTIVE 43.9 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 56 kw SERVICE BUILDING AREA: 20 GEV BALL PACKAGED WATER-COOLED AIR CONDITIONING UNIT PAC 14-1 20 GEV HALL COOLING OF ELECTRICAL 25 KW COOLING, 1890 L/S, 250 Pa, EQUIPMENT 0.82 L/S (Lew), 10 kW ELECT. AREA: IEO'fRllO BALL HEAT EXCHANGERS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY HE 15-1 NEUTRINO HALL LCW, LOW-ACTIVE 3500 kW, 27 L/s, (Lew) (LA) 30.8 L/s, (Lew) (NA) CIRCULATING PUMPS EQUIP. NO. LOCATION SERVICE DESCRIPTION/CAPACITY CP 15-1 NEUTRINO HALL Lew, LOW-ACTIVE 29.7 L/s, 750 kPa TDH, 30 kW PACKAGED WATER-COOLED AIR-CONDITIONING UNIT PAC 15-1 NEUTRINO HALL COOLING OF ELECTRICAL 25 kw COOLING, 1890 L/S, 250 Pa, EQUIPMENT 0.82 L/S (LCW), 10 kw ELECT. 3.5 Drawing List 3.5.1 General/Introduction The following drawings accompany this Chapter of the report. These drawings represent the conceptual layouts for the scope-of-work systems included in Design Package 2. 3.5.2 Drawing List DRAWING NO. PAF-OOOI D PAF-0002 D PAF-0003 D PAF-0004 D PAF-0005 D PAF-0006 D PAF-0007 D PAF-0008 D PAF-0009 D PAF-0010 D PAF-OOll D PAF-0012 D PAF-0013 D PAF-0014 D PAF-0015 D PAF-0016 D PAF-0017 D PAF-0018 D DRAWING DESCRIPTION Site Services - Sanitary Sewers Site Services - Storm Drains Site Services - Water Distribution Site Services - Gas Distribution Site Services - Raw Cooling Water Distribution Booster Complex - Cooling Water Systems - Flow Schematic Main Ring Cooling Water Systems - Flow Schematic Capacitor Building Cooling Water Systems - Flow Schematic Extraction Hall/Experimental Hall Cooling Water Systems - Flow Schematic Experimental Hall Cooling Water Systems - Flow Schematic Cooling Load Distribution Schematic for - Typical Service Building And Booster Complex Ventilation Schematics and Details Booster Building Levels B-1, B-2 and B-3 Booster Building Ground and Mezzanine Levels Service Building Floor Plans Tunnel Sections . Extraction Hall Plans - Cooling System Experimental Hall Plans - Cooling System 55 ELECTRICAL - DESIGN PACKAGE 3 Chapter 4 Contents 4 ELECTRICAL - DESIGN PACKAGE 3 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Executive Summary .. . . . . . . . . . . 4.3 Design Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.'3.1 Utility Power Supply and Transmission 4.3.2 Transmission Receiving Substation 4.3.3 25 kV Distribution System 4.3.4 4160 V Distribution System 4.3.5 480 V Distribution System 4.3.6 Power Factor Correction . . . 4.3.7 Voltage Flicker and Harmonics 4.3.8 Transmission Standby System. 4.3.9 Building Services Emergency Standby System. 4.3.10 Tunnel Services ...... . 4.3.11 Grounding ......... . 4.3.12 Site Communication System 4.3.13 Seismic Design ....... . 4.3.14 Relocation of Existing Services 4.4 Supplemental Report, Accelerator Power Cabling 4.4.1 Introduction 4.4.2 Summary ... 4.4.3 Design Brief. . 4.4.4 Spread Sheets 4.5 Data Sheets ..... . 4.5.1 60 kV Circuit Breakers 4.5.2 4.5.3 4.5.4 4.5.5 4.5.6 4.5.7 4.5.8 4.5.9 4.5.10 4.5.11 Power Transformers Power Capacitors . Power Reactors . . . Power Resistors . . . Distribution Transformers 25 kV Switchgear ..... 5-kV Distribution Equipment 480-V Distribution Switchgear 480-V Distribution Motor Control Centre Type Power and Control Cables . 4.5.12 Batteries and Chargers ... . 4.5.13 Emergency Generators .... . 4.5.14 Uninterruptible Power Supply. 4.6 Drawing List 4.7 Summary Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 2 3 3 10 11 14 15 17 19 20 20 22 24 25 26 27 27 27 28 29 32 33 33 34 36 37 38 39 40 40 41 42 43 44 44 48 50 51 4 ELECTRICAL - DESIGN PACKAGE 3 4.1 Introduction TRIUMF KAON retained Hipp Engineering Ltd. in May 1989 to provide conceptual and preliminary electrical engineering, designated Design Package 3 - Electrical, for the KAON Factory Engineering and Design and Impact Study. The scope of this report comprises the conceptual and preliminary engineering considerations listed below. • Transmission service for an 80 megawatt load from the nearby B.C. Hydro Substation to a new substation on the KAON site. • 25 kV power distribution system from the new substation to each of the new build-mgs. • Transformation and main secondary switchgear at each of the access points to the accelerator tunnels and building service points. • Distribution from secondary switchgear to main power supplies and equipment. • Convenience power and lighting in various tunnel complexes. • Fire alarm and communication/security in the tunnel systems. • Emergency power generation. • Grounding systems. During the period from May to the end of October of 1989, Hipp Engineering Ltd. has worked with UMA Spantec Ltd., TRIUMF KAON personnel, associated project consul-tants, the UBC Department of Physical Plant, B.C. Hydro, and equipment . suppliers to develop design criteria, establish conceptual designs and assist in project coordination. This work has culminated in preliminary engin~ering design, capital cost, and operating cost estimates. A total of 40 D size drawings have been produced, including site and duct layout drawings, transmission line drawings, one line diagrams, equipment arrangement drawings, tunnel drawings and grounding drawings. These conceptual and preliminary drawings have been developed to the level of detail necessary for clear project definition and accurate cost estimating. 1 All design is in compliance with the Canadian Electrical Code CSA (Canadian Standards Association) Standard C22.1 -1986 and relevant IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Elec-tronic Engineers) standards. All materials and equipment included in the electric system will bear a CSA approval label. Insurance underwriters' requirements, such as Factory Mutual and Underwriters' Laboratories of Canada, will be addressed with the insurer and KAON in the implementation phase of this project. Safety to operating personnel, the public and limitation of property damage are prime design criteria of the system presented in this report. This objective is realized through system configuration, switchgear arc- proof specifications, limitation of ground fault cur-rent, control of step and touch voltages during fault conditions, emergency lighting and other communication and protection systems. The design criteria for the electric system presented in this report also include high relia-bility, simplicity, maintainability, standby and emergency capacity. It is expected that the reviewers of this report will include persons not associated with the electrical engineering discipline. Accordingly, the authors have attempted to use text that develops and explains the design objects in every-day terms. We express our thanks and appreciation to our project colleagues who have assisted in the preparation of this report. In particular, we offer special thanks to Dr. R. Billinge of CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) in Geneva, Switzerland, and Dr. R Lundy, formerly of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois who have reviewed our work and have contributed to the report. The extended scope of work assigned to Hipp Engineering, MAGNET POWER CABLING SYSTEM is included in this report as Section 4.4, Supplemental Report, Accelerator Power Cabling. This facet of the work encompasses design and cost estimating of the accelera-tor magnet power circuits for the booster and main rings throughout tunnel and service building areas to connect power supplies, magnets, capacitors banks, RF system dc power supplies, 'iUld RF system ac system ac bias supplies. 4.2 Executive .Summary a. The KA'ON Factory electrical load will be approximately 80 MW. h. The KAON Factory electrical power will be supplied by B.C. Hydro from their Camosun Substation, located 2.5 km east of the KAON Factory. c. The recommended method of electrical power supply to the KAON Factory is by means of a dedicated 60 kV circuit from Camosun Substation. B.C. Hydro will install 230 2 kV to 60 kV transformation at the CamoslUl Substation to power this circuit. d. The recommended method of electrical transmission from CamoslUl Substation to the KAON Factory is by double-circuiting the existing 60 kV transmission line 60L57 routed on a right-of-way through Pacific Spirit Park from CamoslUl Substation to the UBC property line in the area of the Pulp and Paper Research Institute of Canada (PAPRICAN) Building. The transmission line will continue southward to the KAON Factory transmission receiving substation. The total transmission line length is 2.5 km. e. The KAON Factory transmission receiving substation will be an outdoor 60 kV installa-tion with two 80/107 MVA transformers supplying prime and standby transformation to the site distribution system. f. The KAON Factory electrical system will not have any deleterious effect on the B.C. Hydro or UBC transmission systems. g. The site electrical power distribution will be an underground 25 kV system. h. Site electric load centers will have outdoor oil- filled transformers stepping the 25 kV distribution voltage down to utilization voltages of 4160 volts and 480 volts. i. Subject to approval from UBC, maintenance standby power will be provided from 60 kV circuit 60L57. j. Emergency standby power for critical and essential loads will be supplied from uninter-ruptible power supplies and diesel generation. k. All tunnel service systems will be resistant to radiation damage. l. The B.C. Hydro electrical energy billing is estimated to be $1,300,000 per month based on present rates, 80 MVA demand, and a 70% load factor (excluding the proposed Goods and Services Tax). B.C. Hydro's transmission billing rate is expected to increase 3% per year. 4.3 Design Brief 4.3.1 Utility Power Supply and Transmission Reference Drawings: PAJ-OOOI D PAJ-0004 D PAJ-0005 D PAJ-0006 D 3 The criteria for power supply and transmission line construction are capacity, reliability, flexibility, cost, aesthetics, environmental compatibility, short and long term coordination with UBC, and absence of electrical disturbance to the UBC electrical system and other B.C. Hydro customers. B.C. Hydro proposes to serve the KAON Factory from their Camosun Substation located near the north end of Camosun Street, 2.5 km east of the KAON Factory. This substation is supplied by two 230 kV circuits, one of which B.C. Hydro proposes to reinforce in order to serve the 80 MW KAON Factory load. The UBC Main and South Campus (TRIUMF) Substations are supplied by two 60 k V circuits, 60L56 and 60L57, both originating from the B.C. Hydro Sperling Substation located at Arbutus Street and King Edward Avenue. These circuits proceed approximately 3.3 km westward by underground cable to a location adjacent to the Camosun Substation, where they surface and proceed to UBC via overhead transmission lines. The overhead segment of circuit 60L56 to the UBC Main substation is via 16th Avenue. The overhead segment of circuit 60L57 to the South Campus Substation is via a right-of-way through the Pacific Spirit Park. This circuit continues overhead to the UBC Main substation. Preliminary information on the characteristics of the KAON Factory load included a 10 hz power pulse of 13 MW magnitude. This characteristic led to the initial concept of service from B.C. Hydro at the 230 kV voltage level in order to satisfy B.C. Hydro's requirement for allowable voltage flicker. The B.C. Hydro 230 kV system is a much stronger system than the 60 kV system and is able to tolerate larger pulsating loads and remain within B.C. Hydro's voltage flicker specifications. As study of the characteristics of the magnet pulsating loads progressed, it became ev-ident that the load power pulsations will be less than 2 MW rather than 13 MW. This development resulted in supply at 60 k V becoming a technically viable option. Hence, the options of service at 230 kV and 60 kV have been studied. In combination with the 230 kV and 60 kV options, the alternatives of overhead and underground transmission have been considered, resulting in four options for transmission service to the KAON Factory. The transmission service point selected for this project is at the KAON Factory transmis-sion receiving substation incoming terminal structure. This is the point of division between utility ownership and KAON ownership. The entrance protection and revenue metering point are next in line within the KAON transmission receiving substation. B.C. Hydro will be responsible for maintenance of all facilities ahead of the service point and KAON will be responsible for all maintenance from the service point through the substation and lower voltage circuits. B.C. Hydro's cost to service the KAON Factory consists of two elements, the system 4 reinforcement cost, which is paid for by B.C. Hydro, and system extension cost, which is paid for by the customer. B.C. Hydro's definition of system reinforcement is upgrading of existing B.C. Hydro facilities or the installation of new facilities that are common to more than one customer. The upgrading of the 230 kV supply to Camosun Substation is a system reinforcement cost and will be paid for by B.C. Hydro. Their definition of system extension is the extension of the system dedicated to the service of a single customer. In the case of 60 kV service, B.C. Hydro proposes to install 230 kV to 60 kV transformation at Camosun Substation under the category of system extension. In the case of 230 k V service, B.C. Hydro would install a 230 kV circuit position at the Camosun Substation bus under the category of system extension. All transmission from Camosun Substation, whether underground, overhead, 60 kV or 230 kV, comes under the category of system extension and will be a direct expense to the KAON project. The present policy of B.C. Hydro provides for customer construction of the transmission extension. It will be to KAON's advantage to construct the extension to B.C. Hydro's stan-dards and return the line to B.C. Hydro for their perpetual ownership and maintenance. This procedure will absolve KAON of the responsibility to own, operate and maintain the transmission line. The following table lists the power supply and transmission (system extension) costs that are chargeable to the KAON project to provide transmission service to the KAON service point for the four options of transmission service. OPTION 1A 1B 2A 2B VOLTAGE TYPE 230 kV OIH 230 kV UIG 60 kV OIH 60 kV UIG COST $ 3,171,000 $ 14,362,000 * $ 4,311,500 $ 15,318,000 * * includes a second circuit for standby. At the time that the University Endowment Lands were converted to Pacific Spirit Park, the Minister responsible for Crown Lands granted a blanket right-of- way to the Crown, within the Pacific Spirit Park, for the purpose of installing utilities. The aesthetic, en-vironmental, reliability and capacity characteristics, of these options are described under each of the following headings. a. Option lA - 230 k V Overhead Transmission. This method would require widening the existing right-of-way clearing through Pa-cific Spirit Park to 37 m wide to provide for the erection of 30 m high steel towers. The steel towers would be the single column type, painted green, and bolted to a concrete foundation, similar to the 36 m steel towers of the 230 kV circuit that par-5 allels Highway 99 north of the George Massey Tunnel. Although the height of this transmission line will exceed the surrounding forest, it would not generally be visible from vantage points beyond the right-of- way area. Objection based on aesthetics and additional cleared right-of-way is anticipated. Although corona discharge from overhead 230 kV lines, and the resulting interference at communication frequencies, is controlled by the selection of large diameter conductors, corona discharge can be an environmental issue. The reliability of overhead transmission is high and is enhanced by installation of a lightning shield wire above the conductors, installation of lightning arresters, proper right-of-way clearing, and removal of danger trees. The incidence of insulator, con-ductor or structure failure is relatively low. Vandalism within the 2.3 km transmis-sion line route is not expected to be a significant factor. The open construction of an overhead transmission line provides maximum access leading to minimum repair time. The capacity of the overhead 230 kV transmission line is the highest of all options and could equal the Camosun Substation capacity. h. Option 1B, 230 kV Underground Transmission This method will involve installation of two direct buried circuits on the B.C. Hydro right-of-way through the Pacific Spirit Park corridor. Each circuit will consist of three single conductor copper cables enclosed in a fluidized thermal back- fill ma-terial and surrounded with concrete cribbing on the sides and top. The fluidized thermal back- fill material consists of concrete mixed with fly ash and 10 mm minus aggregate. This material is mixed to be very fluid, filling all voids without vibration or tamping, and develops about 1000 psi strength. Cable ducts are a more expensive alternative and result in greater thermal derating of the cable. The total width of each circuit cribbing will be approximately one m and the two circuits will be spaced approximately five m apart. Cable manholes will be installed every 300 m for access, splicing and cross bonding of the cable sheaths. Disturbance to the existing right-of-way vegetation and excavation will be required to accommodate a seven m wide installation and cable access manholes. The underground circuits will require ap-proxiinately 3 m clearance from the existing 60 kV overhead transmission line 60L57 and will have to accommodate the transmission line as it switches from the south side o~ the cleared right-of-way to the north side of the cleared right-of-way. The locatien alternatives are in the area of the existing pathway or outside of the existing right-of-way cleared area. The cables will be an oil-filled, paper insulated type and will require oil reservoirs which will be monitored with pressure switches. In general, extra high voltage cables are not as reliable as overhead conductors of the same voltage level. The advent of solid insulated cables up to voltage levels of 360 kV are an alternative to the traditional oil-filled cables. Although this new technology eliminates the complexities of cable oil reservoir systems it has not reduced costs, and more important, is not approved by B.C. Hydro. Cable faults can result from in-6 sulation failures, termination failures, lightning strikes and surges, and unauthorized excavation. A spare circuit approach is the only practical method of limiting lost operating time to an acceptable level in the event of a cable failure. An alternate scheme of installing a fourth cable in close proximity to the three energized cables has been studied all,d rejected. Special consideration would be required to deal with induced sheath voltages in the spare cable and the access required for final repair or replacement will be impeded by the adjacent energized conductors. The cable size will be in the order of 1250 kcmil and final selection will be based on the thermal characteristics of the ground material, fault current duties of the conductor and cable sheath, standardization with B.C. Hydro's sizing, and minimal insulation stress. The circuit capacity will be in the order of 200 MVA. c. Option 2A, 60 kV Overhead Transmission. This option will involve upgrading of the existing 60L57 transmission line to carry two circuits. The present pole spacing of 61 m and average pole length of 16.7 m are suitable for the additional circuit. The cross arms on the existing in-line trans-mission poles (tangent poles) will be replaced by six post-type insulators, mounted horizontally and attached directly to the transmission poles. The six insulators will be installed in opposite pairs (three to each side of the pole) and will be spaced 1.83 m apart vertically. Corner and angle poles will be replaced by two poles, each termi-nating three conductors with dead-end insulators. The existing transmission poles have approximately 10 years of remaining life, and therefore will be replaced with full length pressure treated poles when the second circuit is added. The projected life span of full length pressure treated poles is 30 to 40 years. The KAON 60 kV transmission circuit will be 1351 kcmil aluminum bare conductors (Columbine) which are rated for 1175 amperes at a 40°C temperature rise on a 40°C ambient temperature and a 0.6 m per second cross wind. The capacity of the 60 kY transmission line will be 130 MVA. The 1351 kcmil aluminum conductor has b~en selected since it can be supported by cantilevered post type insulators on 61 m spans under the worst ice conditions (as listed in B.C. Hydro Standards for the Lower Fraser Valley area), its ample capacity, and because it is a standard size used byB.C. Hydro. This latter point is important for emergency repairs. The upgraded 60 kV transmission line can be in the same alignment (lead) as the existing 60L57 cir.cuit and will not require any additional right-of-way clearing or removal of trees. The aesthetic impact is minimal and the environmental impact is much less than installing underground cables and structures. Corona discharge disturbance on the new 60 k V line will be less than that of the existing line due to the larger diameter conductor. Reliability of the 60 kV overhead transmission lines is high provided that, sound transmission line design is used, right-of-way maintenance is practiced and danger trees are identified and removed or topped. Maintenance of the right-of-way required 7 for the double circuit line will not differ from present requirements for the existing overhead transmission Line 60L57. The environmental impact of the second circuit to Pacific Spirit Park will be negligible. The double-circuiting of the 60L57 will require cooperation and coordination with UBC. The preferable and economic method to complete this work is during an outage of transmission line 60L57. This will require that the UBC Main and South Campus Substations be served from circuit 60L56, which has marginal capacity to serve this load. The options for obtaining an outage on circuit 60L57 are to increase the conductor size of one segment of 60L56, or to take the 60L57 outage during summer months when the UBC load is at a minimum. B.C. Hydro has confirmed that circuits 60L56 and 60L57 can be paralleled. Temporary jumpering of circuits 60L56 and 60L57 will be required at the UBC Main Substation to provide service to the South Campus Substation. Upgrading of circuits 60L56 and 60L57 conductor size is a planning requirement of UBC in order to maintain backup transmission capability. This work should be coordinated between KAON and UBC to achieve maximum mutual benefit and minimum cost. UBC will be reliant upon one 60 kV circuit during the above work, regardless of whether the alterations are required for upgrade of the existing 60 kV supply circuits for the UBC system or for the addition of the KAON 60 kV circuit. The estimated outage time to double circuit 60L57 in its existing lead is four weeks. An alternative method to construct the KAON 60 kV transmission line is to build a new transmission line spaced 4 m from circuit 60L57. This spacing will permit new transmission poles to be set and the opposite side conductors strung while circuit 60L57 is in service. The existing transmission line will be removed after it is replaced by the new line. This will permit construction of the KAON circuit and the increase of circuit 60L57 conductor size with minimal disruption to UBC. The required outage time to string the second circuit and remove the old transmission line will be approximately two weeks. Further reductions in outage time achieved by use of hotline techniques are not recommended due to safety and cost factors. d. Option 2B, 60 kV Underground Transmission The aesthetic and environmental impact of this method will be similar to Option 1B, 230 kV 'Transmission. Construction techniques and right-of- way requirements will also be similar to the underground 230 k V transmission. The reliability of 60 kV underground cables will be less than that of the overhead system and is addressed with the double circuit approach as in the case of 230 kV underground transmission. B.C. Hydro has installed solidly insulated cables at the 138 kY class and most likely will consider the use of solidly insulated 60 kV cables as an alternative to oil-filled cables. The cable size will be in the order of 1250 kcmil and final selection will be based on the thermal characteristics of the ground material, fault current duties of the conductor and cable sheath, and standardization with B.C. Hydro's sizing. The circuit capacity 8 will be in the order of 100 MVA. Our recommendation is Option 2A, 60 k V Overhead Transmission Service. This method provides minimal aesthetic and environmental impact, high reliability, a future added load capacity of 50 MVA, minimal repair time and relatively low cost. Underground transmission service at 60 kV or 230 kV incurs a premium cost in the order of $10,000,000 to the KAON Factory project and involves major civil works in Pacific Spirit Park. Service to KAON at 60 kV has the advantage that it is compatible with the existing transmission voltage at UBC. The KAON and UBC transmission systems will be able to provide each other with back-up capability. The immediate benefit that will be realized from use of 60 kV for the KAON Substation is the provision of 60 kV maintenance standby service and, if required, initial construction power service from circuit 60L57. This connection can provide 10 MVA of power for KAON during scheduled outages that may be required to service the 230 k V to 60 k V transformer at Camosun Substation or the KAON 60 kV transmission line. Conversely, the 60 kV transmission to KAON can provide additional transmission back-up capability for the UBC transmission system. The transmission voltage selected for KAON will influence the long range planning for transmission to the UBC Campus and the transmission system within the Campus. Service to KAON at 60 kV would facilitate the future integration of the KAON and UBC transmission systems. Subject to B.C. Hydro's system development, the UBC Campus loads could be served from a single substation (Camosun) and thereby pro-vide continuous back-up to all campus loads. The arrangement of service to KAON and the campus loads from different substations (Camosun and Sperling) precludes closed transition switching, thereby necessitating an outage when transferring from one source to the other. Service to KAON at 60 kV could also facilitate the establishment of single account service for the UBC Campus. Study of the various campus loads, their diversity factors, the B.C. Hydro Electric Service Agreement, and discussions with B.C. Hydro would be required to determine if savings could be realized from single account service for all campus loads. Service at 230 k V would require the installation of a 60 k V to 25 k V transformer and associated switchgear at the KAON substation to provide maintenance standby from circuit 60L57. 9 4.3.2 Transmission Receiving Substation Reference Drawings: PAJ -0001 D PAJ-0006 D PAJ-0030 D PAJ-0039 D The transmission receiving substation will transform electrical energy from the 64 k V transmission voltage to the site 24.94 kV distribution voltage. It should be noted that the voltages of 64 k V and 24.94 k V are referred to by the nominal rating figures of 60 k V and 25 kV throughout this report. The transmission receiving substation will have two 80/107 MVA transformers, each complete with a ± 10% on-load tapchanger. The 80/107 MVA designation denotes an 80 MVA base rating without fan cooling (ONAN) and a 107 MVA rating with fan cooling (ONAF). The transformers will have a 10% impedance on the 80 MVA base rating. This value of impedance will limit the let-through fault current to acceptable values. The transformer and switchgear configuration will provide for redundant transformer capability to facilitate continuity of electrical service during routine maintenance or during transformer failure conditions. The transmission receiving substation will be a low profile design and will have dimensions of 34 m wide by 50 m long and will be located with its short dimension adjacent to the UBC property line in the area of the existing TRIUMF parking lot . A similar area north and contiguous to the substation should be designated for expansion. Conventional substation chain link type fencing will enclose the substation and can be concealed by landscape berms and shrubbery. The substation buses will be exposed IPS aluminum bus supported on post type insulators. The substation will include the following equipment. • Entrance terminal tower and disconnect switch for incoming overhead 60 kV trans-mission line. • Entrance terminal tower and disconnect switch for maintenance standby incoming overhead 60 kV transmission line 60L57. • Incorriing transmission line protection consisting of 60 k V circuit breakers complete with current transformers. • B.C. Hydro revenue metering current and potential transformers. • Two 80/107 MVA base rated 64 kV to 24.94 kV transformers complete with associ-ated 60 kV disconnect switches and circuit breakers. • Associated 60 k V IPS bus and support structures. • Two station service transformers. 10 • Two 25 kV neutral current limiting resistors. • Control building complete with metering, protection and control devices, B.C. Hydro revenue metering equipment, and station battery and charger. • 60 k V surge arresters • Grounding grid and bonding system. • Lightning masts and overhead shield wire. • Lighting fixtures The transformers on-load tap changers will have a voltage correction range of ± 10% and will compensate for swings in the 60 k V transmission service voltage. This range corre-sponds to the voltage variation specified in the B.C. Hydro transmission service agreement. The incoming 80/107 MVA transformers will be a low noise type of similar specification used by utilities in urban residential areas. Additional noise control can be achieved by construction of landscaped earth berms. ~ll 60 kV equipment will be selected to withstand B.C. Hydro's ultimate fault current level of 2500 MVA. The initial fault level will be 1676 MVA at the KAON 60 kV service entrance. The substation ground grid will not be connected to other site substations. All substation grounding and bonding systems will be designed to maintain safe levels of station rise, ~tep and touch voltages during worst- case fault conditions. Isolation devices will be used to limit transfer voltages within control circuits that extend beyond the boundaries of the substation. Additional detail on the grounding system is presented in Section 4.3.11 of this report. The 80/107 MVA transformer 25 kV terminals will be connected to the main 25 kV switch-board located in. the Office Building by underground cables. 4.3.3 25 kV Distribution System Reference Drawings: PAJ-0001 D PAJ-0002 D PAJ-0003 D PAJ-0006 D PAJ-OOlO D through PAJ-0029 D PAJ -0031 D through PAJ -0035 D 11 The selection of 25 kV for the site distribution voltage is based on technical and economical considerations. Lower voltages, such as 12.5 kV require twice as much ampacity and therefore require double installed cable ampacity and more complex duct bank design. Voltages higher than 25 kV, such as 35 kV, limit switchgear selection. 25 kV distribution cable and- 25 kV switchgear are standard and well proven components in many power distribution systems. The site distribution will be a 25 kV single radial system. This system is one in which each load centre is supplied by a single circuit originating from a common source. In this application, the single source will be the main 25 kV switchboard located within the Office Building. Primary dual radial, or primary ring systems, have not been considered. This decision is based on switchgear and cable costs and space requirements and added operating complexity. Selection of a 25 kV single radial system is also supported by its operating simplicity and safety features, and its proven high reliability. A comprehensive switchgear and circuit labeling system will be developed in consultation with KAON during the implementation phase. The labeling system criteria will be clarity and simplicity, for the purpose of safe operation through concise switching orders required for maintenance work. All switchgear cells, transformers, other major equipment and cables will bear a designation label. The power circuit elements of the 25 k V distribution system will consist of two underground 2500 ampere feeders from the transmission receiving substation to the Office Building, the main 25 k V switchboard located in the basement of the Office Building, 600 ampere 25 kV underground feeder circuits routed from the main 25 kV switchboard to the site load centers, 25 kV switchboards located at the site load centres, and 25 kV circuits run from the site load centers to the 4160 V and 480 V distribution transformers. The electrical one-line and site layout drawings demonstrate the circuit configuration and physical locations. The 25 kV distribution system will be resistance grounded by inserting a resistor in the neutral to ground circuit of the 80/107 MVA transformer 14.4/25 kV star connected wind-ings. The resistor will limit the ground fault current to 400 amperes. This design provides inherent protection to the 80/107 MVA transformers from damage resulting from 25 kV system phase-to-ground faults. This technique is very effective since experience indicates that most of the 25 k V system short circuit currents will be phase-to-ground faults rather than phase-to-phase faults. The reduction of ground fault current also reduces ground grid voltage rise, step voltages, touch voltages, and transfer voltages associated with ground fault conditions. The duration of a ground fault is limited to less than 100 milliseconds by the protective relay system. The 25 k V underground distribution conductors used for incoming and outgoing feeders from the main 25 k V switchboard will be single conductor, 750 and 500 kcmil copper respectively, x-link polyethylene insulated, copper tape shielded, rated 28 kV, with 133% 12 insulation level, overall PVC jacketed, unannored type power cable, each installed in a 100 mm diameter PVC duct. Cable ampacity ratings will be based on IEEE Standard S135 in accordance with the provisions of the Canadian Electrical Code. Cables installed inside buildings will be protected against mechanical damage by means of covered cable trays and non-magnetic conduits. All 25 kV cables will have sheath currents eliminated by isolation of one end of the sheath. In the case of the main 2500 ampere feeders connecting the 80/107 MVA transformers to the main 25 kV switchboard, each 2500 ampere feeder will consist of twelve, 750 kcmil cables located in two duct banks, providing a total of four conductors per phase. The twelve single phase cables are split into two duct banks, each with a three high by three wide configuration, and separated by 3.0 m to provide for adequate heat dissipation and to avoid excessive ampacity deration. Details and cross sections are provided on the drawings. The 25 kV 600 ampere feeders, with a 23 MVA capacity, from the main switchboard to the site load centres will consist of one single 500 kcmil conductor per phase and will be run in a three high by three wide duct bank configuration. In the case of the experimental hall, two 600 ampere 25 k V feeder circuits, each consisting of one 500 kcmil conductor per phase will be run in a three high by three wide duct bank. Adjacent duct banks will have a minimum separation of 1.8 m to provide for heat dissipation and to avoid ampa~ity deration. The 25 k V circuits utilizing parallel single conductor cables (more than one cable per phase) will be arranged in the standard configurations that eliminate current imbalance between parallel conductors. Manholes will be installed to facilitate pulling of cables without exceeding the manufacturer's maximum specified tension. Each of the above power circuit duct banks will include a spare duct and cable. This feature will minimize lost operating time associated with a cable failure. All spare cable ends will be terminated with stress cones and will be ready for quick replacement of the failed cable. Duct banks will also include ducts for 480 V standby circuits, communication, control, monitoring and alarm circuits. The main 25 kV switchboard will be located in a 22.5 m by 10.5 m room located at the basement level of the Office Building. This switchboard will consist of 15 cells housing two 3000 ampere buses (Bus 1 and Bus 2), each supplied from one 80/107 MVA transformer, two incoming 3000 ampere circuit breakers, one 3000 ampere tie circuit breaker, one bus transition cell, ten 1200 ampere feeder breakers, one spare 1200 ampere circuit breaker, and associated protection and control equipment. Each incoming and feeder cell will have a digital metering system equal to the Power Measurement Ltd. 3700 ACM meter, providing 13 all phase voltages and currents, all product values, power factor values, maximum and minimum values, and complete with a RS232C port to facilitate energy management at a remote point. The main switchboard room will be located over a cable room of 2.5 m height. This cable room will provide for cable duct entrance and bottom cable access to the switchgear. The main switchboard rrom arrangement and switchboard configuration will provide for expansion of the 25 k V system. All circuit. breakers within the main switchboard will have a fault current interrupting rating of 1000 MVA and will be either the vacuum or SF6 type. The switchboard is to be of arc-proof design with maximum operator fault protection features. A 125 V DC station service power supply will be located within the main 25 kV switchboard room. Each 25 kV feeder originating from the main switchboard will terminate at a 25 kV sub-switchboard consisting of an incoming section, a line-up of circuit breakers and protective relaying equipment. Each 25 kV sub- switchboard will be fitted with the same standard of control and instrumentation devices used on the main 25 kV switchboard. A 125 V DC station seryice will be installed at each 25 kV sub-switchboard. Each circuit breaker will feed a pow~r distribution transformer and will have protective equipment. The individual transformer feeder circuits will be three conductor No. 4/0, copper conductor, 28 kV teck cable (armour jacketed, PVC covered) run in duct and cable tray. This cable size has been selected based on short circuit withstand capability rather than current-carrying capacity. 4.3.4 4160 V Distribution System Referenc~ Drawings: PAJ-0006 D PAJ-OOlO D PAJ-0012 D PAJ-00l4 D PAJ-0016 D PAJ-00l8 D PAJ-0020 D PAJ-0022 D PAJ-0023 D PAJ-0024 D PAJ-0026 D PAJ-0028 D The 4160 voltage has been selected for the medium voltage power distribution system. This voltage is suitable for the main ring magnet power supplies and will realize savings from the use of lower ampacity cable and switchgear compared to lower voltage systems. Approximately 50 MW of power will be distributed at this voltage level. 14 All 25 kV to 4160 V transformers will be of a standard design consisting of: 5.0/5.6 MVA, 55/65C rise, 24.94 kV - 4160 V with provision for future fan cooling, (6.65/7.454 MVA with fans), 6% impedance, oil-filled, outdoor type, copper conductor, complete with full capacity taps, ± 2.5% and ± 5%, CSA 88 design. This standard design will permit the use of a universal 25 kV - 4160 V spare transformer. The 4160 V switchboard will consist of contactors and circuit breakers, will have 1200 ampere buses and will be rated for 150 MVA fault current duty. The magnet power supply circuits will be switched from 400 ampere and 800 ampere 4160 V contactors capable of remote control. Sub-feeders to the Experimental Hall transformers will be fed from 4160 V circuit breakers. The 4160 V system will be low resistance grounded through a 400 ampere resistor to limit station voltage rise and to protect the distribution system. 4.3.5 480 V Distribution System Reference Drawings: PAJ-0006 D PAJ-OOll D PAJ-0013 D PAJ-0015 D PAJ-0017 D PAJ-0019 D PAJ-0021 D PAJ-0023 D PAJ-0025 D PAJ-0027 D PAJ-0029 D The 480 voltage has been selected for the low voltage power distribution system to stan-dardize with the TRIUMF low voltage system. This voltage will be used to distribute power to the RF power supplies and for building services. Approximately 25 MW of power will be distributed at this voltage level. Two types of 25 k V to 480 V transformers will be used, one type for building services and power electronic equipment, the other type will supply the RF power supplies. The building supply 25 k V to 480 V transformers will be of a standard design consisting of: 2.0/2.24 MVA, 55/65C rise, 24.94 kV - 480 V, with fan cooling, (2.67/3.0 MVA with fans), 6.5% impedance, oil-filled, outdoor type, copper conductor, complete with full capacity taps, ± 2.5% and ± 5%, CSA 88 design. 15 This standard design will permit the use of a universal 25 kV - 480 V spare transformer for building services. The 480 V transformers for building services will be provided with fans initially to facilitate the PDC standby scheme described in Section 4.3.9 below. The RF power supply 25 kV - 480 V transformers will have the same capacity ratings as listed above for the building service transformers, except instead of the 133 per cent fan rating, they will have provision for future addition of fans. In addition to this specification, they will have extra bracing of the windings to withstand the mechanical stress of short circuiting on their secondary windings caused by the frequent "crow- barring" requirements of the RF power supplies. These transformers will also contain electrostatic shielding between the primary and secondary windings to limit propagation of RF noise. These transformers will cost up to 35% more than the standard transformer and a separate spare transformer will be supplied. The 480 V switchboards will consist of power distribution centers (PDC's) to distribute 480 V power. All PDC's will have 4000 ampere buses and all PDC power circuit breakers will be rated to interrupt 50 kA of fault current. The building services PDC's will have a 4000 ampere main circuit breaker and other features described in Section 4.3.9 below. The small magnet power supplies and other power electronics equipment will be powered from fused load break switches located in a motor control centre (MCC) type of switchboards. This equipment will facilitate the entry of the incoming 1000 ampere PDC circuit and will provide for convenient entry of branch feeder cables. The RF power supplies are fed from PDC type 480 V switchboards via fully rated (1600 ampere frame) circuit breakers with 400 ampere rated instantaneous trips to facilitate repeated removal of power from the "crowbarred" RF power supply. The 480 V system will be high resistance grounded through a two ampere resistor to limit ground fault current, thereby protecting operating personnel and property. The high resistance system will alarm a ground fault condition while maintaining continuity of service. This feature permits delaying removal of the fault to a time more convenient to the operation schedule. The 480 V distribution system has been designed to service the magnet power supplies as presently defined and can be modified by the addition or removal of 480 V power distribution transformers and PDC's during the detailed design phase of the project. 16 4.3.6 Power Factor Correction Reference Drawings: PAJ -0006 D PAJ-0008 D PAJ-OOlO D PAJ-0012 D PAJ-00l4 D PAJ-00l6 D PAJ-0018 D PAJ-0020 D PAJ-0022 D PAJ-0024 D PAJ-0026 D PAJ-0028 D B.C. Hydro utility billing will consist of an energy charge and a kVA demand charge. The demand charge for 80 MVA at $ 3.918 per kVA per month will cost $ 313,440 (before 6% BC Social Services tax). At a 70% load factor this amount represents 25% of the utility billing. The magnet rectifier loads power factor is estimated to be 0.7 lagging. Operation of the KAON power system without power factor correction at 80 MW will result in a demand of 114 MVA. The additional billing demand created by 0.7 power factor operation is 34.3 MVA and will result in an additional after tax demand billing of $142,391 per month, or $1,708,695 per year. Operation at 0.7 power factor also increases the ampere loadings on the B.C. Hydro power supply, the 60 kV transmission line, the KAON 60 kV substation transformers and through-out the 25 k V system. The power system design therefore .provides for the installation of 81 MVAC of power factor correction capacitors in ten banks distributed throughout the 25 kv system. This amount of capacitance will be sufficient to improve the power factor to unity. The configuration of more than one capacitor bank connected to a common bus is known as the back-to-back capacitor switching configuration. This arrangement results in large inrush currents when a capacitor bank is switched on adjacent to an energized capacitor bank. Peak inrush currents, exceeding the system available short circuit current, can result and are only limited by the bus and cable impedance between the capacitor banks. Therefore, current limiting reactors will be installed between the capacitor banks and their 25 kV feeder circuit breakers. There is a second reason to consider installation of reactors ahead of the capacitor banks. 17 Detuning reactors may be required to protect the system from power system harmonic res-onance. Application of static power factor correction requires investigation of the resulting power system natural frequency to determine if it coincides with an excitation source. Typ-ical sources of excitation are the harmonic currents produced from rectification. Six point rectification will produce the 5th, 7th, 11th, 13th, 17th, 19th, etc, harmonics. Twelve point rectifiers eliminate the 5th and 7th harmonics and start with the 11th, and continue to the 13th and higher order harmonics. T he amplitude of the harmonic current generated by rectifiers decreases as the harmonic order increases. The KAON power system will have a different natural frequency for each configuration of the power system when the 25 kV capacitors are connected directly to the 25 kV bus. With 25 kV Buses 1 and 2 connected together and supplied by one 80/107 MVA transformer the power system natural frequency will be 155 hz. When each 25 kV bus is supplied by its respective 80/107 MVA transformer the natural frequency of each bus will be 219 hz. When 25 kV Buses 1 and 2 are paralleled together and supplied by both of the 80/107 MVA transformers the natural frequency of the power system is 191 hz. The natural frequencies resulting from connection to the higher impedance standby circuit 60L57 is not of interest since the magnet rectifiers will not be operating and only one capacitor bank will need to be connected. The value of the reactor selected will be determined after detailed power system studies, consisting of system modeling and simulation are completed. The above power system natural frequencies fall in the range of 155 to 219 hz, or above and below the 3rd harmonic (180 hz). T his is a desirable result, being much preferable to system natural frequencies in the area of the 5th harmonic. At this time, the harmonic output spectrum of magnet power supplies, with 10 and 50 hz switching, is not known and the possibility of some 6.67, 10, 20, 33.3, 50, 100, and 180 hz, and their harmonics cannot be discounted. Consequently, detuning reactors should be provided for, and the reactor and capacitor design should have the flexibility to permit selection of various system natural frequencies. Detuning reactors have higher impedance than reactors selected for limiting switching in-rush current and their installation will automatically solve the back-to-back inrush current problems. Insertion of the series reactor in the capacitor circuit produces a voltage rise at the capacitor terminals, and therefore the capacitor voltage rating should be selected to operate at a higher voltage than the 25 k V system bus voltage. The estimated cost of installing 81 MVA of power factor correction (correction to unity) as described above is estimated at $2,000,000. The power factor billing saving of $ 1,798,695 per year will recover the cost of power factor correction equipment in approximately 14 months. Correction of the power factor to values lower than unity, for example, 98 per cent, have been studied. Depending upon how a reduced power factor correction system is 18 implemented, the capital recovery time for the incremental correction from 98% to unity is in the range of 10 months to 4 years. This range of pay back periods is a function of the distribution of the capacitor banks and the associated switchgear and reactor costs. For the purpose of this study, correction to unity power factor has been used. 4.3.7 Voltage Flicker and Harmonics The KAON load has been studied to identify deleterious effects to the B.C. Hydro system, the UBC transmission system, and to the KAON power distribution system. The categories of possible disturbance are voltage flicker and injection of harmonic current into the B.C. Hydro power supply system. a. Voltage Flicker. B.C. Hydro requires that 10 hz voltage flicker observed in their 60 kV system be less than .25%. The 2 MVA, 10 hz, pulsating load will produce .12% maximum voltage flicker at the KAON 60 kV service point. This value is not visible or of any consequence. It is also important to note that KAON will be the only customer connected to the 230 k V - 60 k V transformer at Camosun Substation and the first point of common supply between KAON and the B.C. Hydro system is the 230 kV bus at Camosun substation. The resulting maximum voltage flicker at this point is .04%. The UBC 60 kV transmission system will not be subject to any voltage flicker since UBC is not served from Camosun Substation. In addition to external voltage flicker requirements, the KAON Factory will require high quality power for its instrumentation equipment. The maximum voltage flicker on the KAON 25 kV bus is estimated to be .18%. h. Harmonics The magnet rectifier loads will generate harmonic currents that will be injected into the power supply system as described in Section 4.6 above. We strongly recommend that all rectifiers be 12 pulse design to eliminate the generation of 5th and 7th harmonic current. The lowest order harmonic will be the 11th and its maximum magnitude will be approximately 9% of the fundamental current. This value should be .acceptable to B.C. Hydro. A 9% harmonic will combine in quadrature with the fundamental power frequency to produce a .4% total harmonic content. In the event that the 11th or 13th harmonics do create problems, filters will be installed to shunt this current at its source of generation. Filtering of the 11th and higher order harmonics is much less expensive than dealing with 5th and 7th order harmonics. 19 4.3.8 Transmission Standby System Reference Drawings: PAJ-0006 D PAJ-0030 D The 60 kV circuit 60L57 which serves the South Campus Substation passes by the proposed location of the KAON 60 kV substation. Subject to approval by UBC, this circuit will be tapped with one span of line that will terminate on a 60 kV entrance tower within the KAON substation. The capacity of this service will be in the order of 10 MVA, and will be used to maintain building power during periods of interruptions of the prime 60 k V service. Standby service from 60L57 will be on a scheduled basis to facilitate service to B.C. Hydro equipment at Camosun Substation or service to the KAON 60 kV transmission line. It is expected that the new KAON 60 kV circuit will not be able to be paralleled with the 60L57. Switching of the KAON substation 60 kV entrance circuit breakers will be open transition, i.e., it will be necesssary to open the prime power supply 60 kV entrance circuit breaker prior to closing the 60L57 standby entrance circuit breaker. This switching procedure will cause a momentary outage at KAON. The two entrance circuit breakers will be key-interlocked with each other to prevent parallel operation. Metering will be installed on the 60 k V standby service entrance and could be totalled with the prime circuit metering system. 4.3.9 Building Services Emergency Standby System Reference Drawings: PAJ-0037 D PAJ-OOll D PAJ-0015 D PAJ-0017 D PAJ-0019 D PAJ-0021 D PAJ-0023 D PAJ-0025 D The site loads are classified with respect to supply continuity requirements into the fol-lowing categories: • Critical loads (Priority 1) that cannot tolerate any power supply interruption and 20 are served from uninterruptible power supplies (UPS's). • Essential building loads (Priority 2) that can tolerate power supply interruptions up to 10 seconds and have back-up service provided by a system of diesel generation and automatic transfer switches. • Normal building loads (Priority 3) that can tolerate power supply interruptions up to 2 hours and have a manual standby power switching system. • Machine load (no priority) consisting of accelerator power equipment. These levels of service continuity are provided by the following systems. a. UPS (Critical Loads) UPS services have two categories, safety systems, and computer type data and control systems. The first UPS safety service category includes communication systems, fire detection systems, escape lighting, security systems, the tunnel evacuation alarm system, radiation monitoring systems and critical stored heat equipment cooling. The second UPS service category includes, data processing systems, machine control computers, and administration and management data processors. In addition to providing continuity of service, the UPS will provide voltage regulation, transient suppression and filtering. Twenty units of 20 k VA each will be installed, consisting of two units to serve each of the main ring buildings, the booster building, the extraction building and four units in the experimental hall. The UPS units will be powered from the emergency power bus which is provided with standby diesel generation. This arrangement will permit the use of batteries rated 20 minute or less in the UPS systems. In the event of a UPS failure, the UPS will automatically switch to the bypass mode without interruption of service to the critical load. In the bypass mode, the load will be supplied directly from a power conditioning and shielded isolation transformer connected directly to the 480 V system. Each UPS output voltage will be 120/208 V. Each UPS will have a manually operated maintenance bypass feature to permit maintenance of the unit without interruption of service. h. Standby Diesel Generator System (Essential Building Loads) Standby diesel generators and transfer switches will be used to provide standby service to the building essential loads, such as selected lighting, heating, ventilation, sump pumps and elevators. In addition, the standby generation system will power the UPS's, providing continuous service beyond their 20 minute battery rating. Two 480 V standby diesel generators will serve essential and critical loads throughout the KAON site. A generation capacity of 2000 kW, consisting of two 1000 kW units, has been selected subject to revision once a final listing of the critical loads is developed. The two units will have capability to be synchronized to a 480 V essential power bus. The essential power bus will distribute to the site through eleven circuit breakers 21 and circuits. Each essential power circuit will terminate at an automatic transfer switch. The transfer switch will automatically transfer the essential load from the prime power supply to standby generation after a delay of approximately 10 seconds from loss of the prime power. The 10 second delay will be required for preparation of the diesel generators for loading. The standby diesel generators will be located in the area of the Helium Storage Building. The diesel generators will be self-contained radiator cooled type. c. 480 V PDC Interconnection System. (Normal Building Loads) This system, illustrated on Drawing PAJ-0037-D, is a variation of a secondary selec-tive system for the building service loads only. In the event that a 480 V distribution transformer fails, the building load can be powered from the adjacent 480 V build-ing services PDC by means of manually switching key-interlocked circuit breakers. Approximately 1200 kVA will be available through this transfer scheme and will be within the capability of the adjacent transformer's fan cooled rating to supply. The manual switching should take less than one hour. 4.3.10 Tunnel Services Reference Drawing: PAJ-0036 D. Lighting and control conductors will be copper con-ductor, cross-linked polyethylene insulated and run in rigid galvanized steel conduit. The CERN publication CERN 79-04 lists X-link polyethylene insulation material suitable for use up to accumulated radiation dosages of 106 Gray (Gy). Communication and instru-ment conductors will be shielded cable, installed in rigid galvanized steel conduit. Other devices and materials selected for tunnel application will be resistant to radiation damage over an accumulated dosage of 106 Gy. Use of fiber optic cables will be avoided in areas subject to radiation. a. Tunnel Lighting Tunnel illumination will be above 300 lux in the arc segments and 400 lux in the straight segments, provided by high output fluorescent or high- intensity discharge lamps. Lighting fixtures and ballasts will be selected to withstand radiation and the elevated temperatures of the "bake out" procedure. Light switch-on control will be provided at all access points and total area lighting will be controlled from the control room. The general illumination is switched off for the periods when tunnels are secured locked. The lighting system in the tunnel will be overhauled prior to activation of the spaces, and once overhauled it is expected to have a life span acceptable for tunnel mounted devices. All tunnel lighting circuits will be supplied from the emergency power bus. Selected lights will be supplied from the UPS system to provide minimal illumination during the delay that is required for the standby 22 generator to come on line. No self-contained battery pack type of emergency lights will be located in the tunnel due to heat and radiation considerations. h. Power Distribution 120 V and 480 V power will be distributed throughout the tunnel. Duplex 120 V ac convenience outlets with two circuits at 5 m intervals, will provide suitable power sources for portable lighting and/or test equipment. The receptacles will be mounted on the tunnel wall one metre above the floor or mounted on pedestals a~ the edge of the walkway. The 480 v, 30 ampere receptacles for the vacuum equipment and other power equipment will be distributed at 25 m intervals along the tunnel beam lines. A standard 100 A welding receptacle with interlocked disconnect switch will be installed at each tunnel access point. c. Communications The telephone and paging functions will be integrated into the overall site communi-cation system. A minimum of three telephone lines (extensions from the main PBX) will be run in an interrupted ring around the main accelerator ring with provision for reconnecting any telephone outlet to any of the three circuits. Cable will be six pair lead-sheathed installed in conduit. Handsets that will have access to the paging function will be programmed at the central control unit. Standard telephone outlets for removable jack equipped handsets will be located at 25 m intervals along the tunnels. An audio paging system controlled from the central control room and tied into the telephone system will extend throughout the tunnel system. A tone generating sys-tem in the central control room will provide alarms/alert signals as required. Com-munication cable will be lead sheathed installed in conduit. d. Evacuation and Warning Alarm Systems A tunnel alarm system consisting of alarm horn and rotating beacon light stations at 50 m intervals along the tunnels will be provided. The evacuation alarm system will be manually or automatically activated from the central control room. e. Fire Alarm System Thnnel fire alarms will be integrated into the project-wide Class B fire alarm system and will input 16 zones of alarms covering the site builings and tunnel service build-ings with their sections of the tunnels. Temperature rate-of-rise detectors and smoke detectors will be located on the tunnel ceiling at 25 m intervals. Smoke detectors will also be provided in the return air ducts for the various tunnel sections. Smoke detectors will be air aspiration type, rather than the ionization type, to prevent nui-sance tripping resulting from radiation leaks. Break glass stations will be provided at all tunnel access points. f. Security System 23 All access doors will be fitted with an open/closed indication device and a locking device. The door position indication mechanism will be the Central Magnetic type CAT. 1078 sensor or equivalent. The locking mechanism will be either electric latch-ing or electronic type (Gibraltar Lock) with access by electronic key or card, and possibly combined with turn-stiles. The security system will include a coloured video system for surveillance of locked-out areas, with cameras at each tunnel access point, normally retracted behind a radiation shield. 4.3.11 Grounding Reference Drawings: PAJ-OOl D PAJ-038 D PAJ-039 D a. Transmission Receiving Substation Grounding Due to the high short-circuit fault levels at Camosun Substation the transmission receiving substation ground mat will have no direct connection (bonding) to the site power distribution ground system. Only the conductivity of the earth will couple the two ground systems. All control circuits conaecting the substation and the main 25 k V switchboard located in the Office Building will be connected through isolation transformers. The 25 k V power cables will have their shields connected at the main 25 kV switchboard only. This isolation will reduce the voltage rise of the distribution ground system during 60 kV fault conditions. The duration of 60 kV faults will be limited to less than 100 milliseconds by the 60 kV protective relay system. The substation grounding will be of conventional design, including a ground grid, a perimeter ground loop, ground electrodes, ground mats, fence grounding, structure grounding, equipment grounding and surface crushed rock. The ground grid and ground electrode design will be based on soil conductivity data. Measurement of the installed ground system will be made to confirm that station rise, step and touch voltages are within IEEE Standard 80-1986. h. Power Distribution System Grounding The 25 kV system will be low resistance grounded. The neutral point of each 80/107 MVA transformer star connected 14.4/24.94 kV secondary winding will be connected to its respective 25 kV switchboard ground bus through a 400 ampere (36 ohm) re-sistor. Each 400 ampere resistor will be located close to its 80/107 MVA transformer and will be insulated from the substation ground system. The connection from the grounded side of the ground resistor to the main 25 kV switchboard ground bus will be made by an insulated ground conductor. As described in Section 4.3.3 above, 24 resistance grounding reduces the ground fault current, thereby providing protection to the 80/107 MVA transformers and reduces ground grid potential rise. Each building will have a ground system consisting of a 4/0 copper perimeter ground loop and ground rods, and will be bonded directly to the main 25 k V switchboard bus in the Office Building by a radial system of insulated 4/0 grounding conductors. All electrical equipment in each building, including 25 kV switchboards, 4.16 kV switch-boards, 480 V switchboards, electrical equipment frames, etc, will be bonded to the building ground system. Each building substation will have a conventional grounding system including a ground grid, a perimeter ground loop, ground electrodes, fence grounding, structure grounding, equipment grounding and surface crushed rock. The ground grid and ground electrode design will be based on soil conductivity data. Mea-surement of the installed ground system will be made to confirm that station rise, step and touch voltage are within IEEE standard 80-1986. c. Tunnel Grounding The tunnel ground system (and other metal components such as reinforcing bars) requires special consideration to prevent the formation of a continuous loop around the beam path. Such a loop, parallel with the beam path, would result in induced currents affecting the beam. Accordingly, the tunnel ground system will consist of eight segments, each connected to its respective building ground system. The gaps in the tunnel ground system will coincide with the tunnel expansion zones. d. Data System Grounding Each building will have a ground electrode system for the data ground bus. This ground bus will be insulated throughout the building and will be connected to the building ground system at one point only. This design will provide for the flexibility of earth coupling of the two ground systems and insertion of impedance between the two systems. e. Ground Circuit High Frequency Chokes Although the ground system is expected to effectively attenuate high frequency wave forms, chokes may be required to be installed in ground circuits at RF area bound-aries. These high frequency blocking RF.:... chokes would limit the antenna effect of ground system conductors carrying transient reflections of high speed switching of power semiconductors. 4.3.12 Site Communication System Site voice communications, such as telephone system, intercom system, and P / A system will be combined into one site-wide system, that provides all the above functions via central unit programmed to enable selected groups of stations access to the paging and intercom 25 functions for preselected areas as dictated by operating philosophy. The central unit and the site stations will be supplied as a complete system by any of the local telephone equipment distributors. The site cabling, included in the budget of this report, consists of a radial system of 20-pair No. 20 twisted/shielded communication cables placed in the site distribution underground ducts, and following the site grounding pattern. The site-wide Fire Alarm system is distributed in a similar pattern. The interconnection of the site zones to the central logic and display panel will be accomplished by two 4-pair No. 16 plenum-type cables designed for fire protective signaling functions. The site distribution underground duct system will also carry the site security system, interconnected by 20 conductor No. 14, 600 V rated cable, and the coaxial cable for closed circuit colour video surveilance system. The B/W systems have poor definition of flames and electrical arcing. The site distribution underground ducts have spaces allocated for accelerator-data com-munications transported via data-highway fiber-optic trunk lines . . '4.3.13 Seismic Design The seismic design criteria are: Zonal Acceleration (Za) of 4, Zonal velocity (Zu) of 4, and a Zonal Velocity Ratio (V) of 0.20. The transmission receiving substation incoming tower and foundation will be designed for extra dynamic forces resulting from the sudden displacement of the tower foundation during seismic activity. Extended anchor bolts with a chair type of base will be used to permit elongation of the bolts to absorb seismic energy. The incoming conductor will be sagged to allow for lateral movement of the tower. All rigid bus connections will have slip type connectors or sufficient cable slack to permit differential movement of bus support structures and equipment bushings during seismic activity. All cable duct banks will be reinforced longitudinally and in the cross direction to act as a catenary between supports and thereby resisting shearing of duct banks. The clearance of 1.8 m between parallel duct banks specified in Section 4.3.3 will permit free movement during seismic activity. All duct bank reinforcement will be fiberglass reinforcement bars, such as PSI FIBREBAR. This selection will prevent rebar heating cased by magnetic induction from single phase cables. All cable manhole walls will be designed for extra earth pressure resulting from seismic activity. 26 All transformers will be dowelled to their concrete pads. 4.3.14 Relocation of Existing Services An allowance of $1,000,000 has been provided to relocate existing underground power circuits, overhead power lines, and communication systems belonging to UBC. Relocation of the utilities will have to provide for continuity of service to the PAPRICAN Building, TRIUMF, and the Chemical Disposal facility. This aspect of the implementation will require close liaison and thorough planning with the UBC Department of Physical Plant. 4.4 Supplemental Report, Accelerator Power Cabling 4.4.1 Introduction This chapter presents the preliminary design and estimate of cost for the KAON Factory magnet power wiring and is supplementary to Hipp Engineering Ltd.'s assignment, DE-SIGN PACKAGE 3 - ELECTRICAL. The domain of this chapter consists of all accelerator magnet power circuits for the booster and main rings throughout the tunnel and service building areas to connect power supplies, magnets, capacitor banks, RF system dc power supplies, and RF system ac bias supplies. RF coaxial and control cables are not within the domain of this chapter. The circuits studied in this chapter are classified by the voltage and current ratings of: a. 1,000 ampere, 1 kV, dc. h. 1,000 ampere, 8 k V, ac. c. 1,000 ampere, 15 kV, ac. d. 3,600 ampere, 8 k V, ac. e. 4,500 ampere, 15 kV, ac. The recommended system presented in this chapter is based on the technical and economic evaluation of alternatives developed from fundamental design principles. The conductor system properties that have been studied include routing, support systems, conductor configuration, voltage drop, heat loss, radiation resistance and costs. 27 All cable sizing has been selected in accordance with the Canadian Electrical Code and Canadian Standards Association (CSA) standards C22.1 - 1986 for the purpose of this study. Potential savings in the order of four per cent of the total estimated cost are possible by using IEEE ratings for the 8 kV and 15 kV circuits. 4.4.2 Summary The Kaon Factory magnet circuit power wiring in the Booster and Main Ring Tunnel will consist of five types of cable configurations and two types of water cooled conductors. All conductors are copper. a. 1000 ampere, 1kV, dc The recommended circuit cable configuration is one single conductor 1000 kcmil cable ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) 90 deg insulation, unarmored and installed with one cable diameter spacing using epoxy spacer blocks in a three high configuration in a 600 mm cable tray. h. 1000 ampere, 8 kV, ac It is recommended that these cicuits comprise single conductor 1000 kcmil power ca-ble, 900 EPR insulation, 8 k V - 133% insulation level, copper tape shield, unarmored, black AFUMEX jacketed. c. 1000 ampere, 15 kV, ac These circuits are proposed to consist of a single conductor 1000 kcmil power cable, 900 EPR insulation, 8 kV - 133% insulation level, copper tape shield, unarmored, black AFUMEX jacketed. d. 3,600 ampere, 8 kV, ac Two types of conductor are proposed: • Six parallel 500 kcmil cables installed with one cable diameter spacing, using epoxy spacer blocks, in a two-high configuration in a 600 mm cable tray . .• A 75-mm diameter schedule 160 copper pipe supported by indoor porcelain insulators. e. 4500 ampere, 15 kV, ac Two types of conductor are proposed: • Six parallel 500 kcmil cables installed with one cable diameter spacing, using epoxy spacer blocks, in a two-high configuration in a 600 mm cable tray. • A water cooled conductor, 75-mm diameter schedule 160 copper pipe supported by indoor porcelain insulators. 28 4.4.3 Design Brief Reference Drawings: PAJ 0041 D PAJ 0042 D PAJ 0043 D PAJ 0044 D All magnet circuits are the single loop type. The 1000 ampere circuits at 1 kV, 8 kV and 15 kV have a conductor configuration of one 1000 kcmil single phase cables spaced one diameter apart on spacer blocks within 600 mm cable tray. The large ampacity circuits are 3600 ampere, 8 kV in the booster area and 4500 ampere, 15 kV in the main tunnel area. Within the booster and main ring tunnels the large ampacity circuit conductors consist of bare copper pipe mounted on porcelain insulators. The 3600 ampere circuit has a conductor configuration of one 75 mm diameter, schedule 80 copper pipe and the 4500 ampere circuit has a conductor configuration of one 75 mm diameter, schedule 160 copper pipe. The pipe conductors are water cooled by means of insulated connections to a low conductivity water supply. Use of pipe conductor within the tunnel facilitates the multiple series connections to the magnets by the use of jumper connection pads installed on the pipe conductor. The series loop connection of the large ampacity circuits to the power supplies in the service buildings and the surface located capacitor banks is provided by multiple single conductor cables. The 3600 ampere, 8 kV circuit is configured from six parallel 500 kcmil conductors and the 4500 ampere circuit is configured from six parallel 750 kcmil conductors. Two cable configurations are used for the large amperage circuits - cable tray and spacer block design, and a cable duct design. The cable tray design is used throughout the tunnels and service building areas. The cable duct design is used in zones of limited access in the areas between the four access shafts and the main ring tunnel, and at ave locations at the booster accelerator. The cable duct design consists of bundling six parallel conductors around a 46 mm diameter water cooled pipe. The complete assembly is mounted within a 300 mm duct. Transition from the cable tray configuration to the cable duct configuration is made without cable splices. :-Four options of cable configuration were studied for the 1000 ampere circuits. There is a total of 53.1 km of 1000 ampere circuits in the magnet wiring and therefore this portion of the installation will have a dominant effect on overall magnet circuit costs . • 1000 ampere circuits using one 1000 kcmil cable spaced one cable diameter from adjacent cables installed on 600 mm cable tray using epoxy spacer blocks, allowing three layers of cable. The estimated cost for this option is $5,387,480 including material and labour costs. This cable configuration has a resistive loss of 1,523 kW 29 costing $297,680 per year. • 1000 ampere circuits using two parallel 350 kcmil cables spaced one cable diameter from adjacent cables, installed on 600 mm cable tray using epoxy spacer blocks, al-lowing three layers of cable. The estimated cost for this option is $6,100,550 including material and labour costs. This cable configuration has a resistive loss of 1,976 kW costing $386,130 per year. • 1000 ampere circuit using three parallel 4/0 AWG cables spaced one cable diameter from adjacent cables, installed on 600 mm cable tray using epoxy spacer blocks, al-lowing three layers of cable. the estimated cost for this option is $7,267,060 including material and labour costs. This cable configuration has a resistive loss of 2,130 kW costing $416,270 per year. • 1000 ampere circuit using five parallel 350 kcmil cables without spacing on 600 mm cable tray and without epoxy spacer blocks. The estimate of cost for this option is $9,031,260 including material and labour costs. This cable configuration has a resistive loss of 1,075 kW costing $210,060 per year. The configuration of one 1000 kcmil conductor spaced one cable diameter is recommended after evaluation of capital and operation costs and simplicity of design. Although the con-figuration of using five 350 kcmil conductors produces an annual energy saving of $87,620 per year compared to the one 1000 kcmil configuration, the additional capital cost of this option is $3,723,140. The pay-back period to recover this expenditure would be 42.5 years. Four groups of spread sheets are used to present design and cost data. All items marked with an * in the spread sheets are data input items, and all other items are calculated values. A parallel set of summary tables for each of the four cable configurations is provided. Cost of conductor losses is based on full load capacity of the conductors, 70% load factor, and $0.32/kwh for one year operation. 1. Summary Data (Figs 1-8) • The recommended configuration (Figs. 1,2) This group of tables summarizes the total cost of the magnet conductor system in the tunnels and between the tunnels, service buildings and access shafts. The circuit categories are listed by voltage and current ratings, including both types (cable and pipe) of large amperage circuits. Fig. 1 lists the circuit characteristic of cable size, number of parallel cables, cable length, cable loss, cost of cable loss, unit cable cost, 30 total cable cost, cable tray length, and total installed cost. This table includes a line for 600 mm tray required for the RF IDC Bias cables with a total cost of $295,960. Fig. 2 is the same format as Fig. 1, except it groups the circuits by the categories of A, B, C, D and E rings . • Other Options Considered (Figs. 3-8) This group of spread sheets presents a cost evaluation of options comprising multiple conductor, bundled into spaced or random-laid configurations such as are frequently used in industry for high current cable duct assemblies. Three options were examined: two spaced 350 kcmil conductors, (Figs. 3,4) three spaced 4/0 AWG conductors, (Figs. 5,6) an and five random-laid 350 kcmil conductors (Figs. 7,8). 2. Technical Data (Figs. 9-13) These tables present the physical characteristics of circuits serving the arious magnet types within each of the five accelerator rings A to E. The characteristics of the recommended conductor in each case are included. 3 . . Cost Data (Figs. 14- 20) The third group of tables presents the cost of circuits serving the various manget types within each of the five accelerator rings (Figs. 14-18). Figure 19, Table 1 shows cable termination unit cost, cable diameter, unit material and installation costs, cable weight, cable tray and spacer costs, and three spacing options for each recommended type of cable studied. Figure 19, Table 2 develops tray and spacer costs for 1000 kcmil, 1 kV cables in the proposed spaced configuration. Figure 19, Table 3 develops tray costs for 1000 kcmil, 1 kV cables in the rejected non-spaced configuration for comp[artison with the recommended configuration shown in Table 2 . .. Fig. 20 develops costs of miscellaneous materials used in assemblies of duct banks and pipe buses 4. Power Supplies, Distribution The quantities of materials for the cable duct and pipe bus assemblies were estimated from proposed layouts of power supplies along the accelerator rings as known at the time of this report. Figures show power supplies per site Service Buildings, and show cross sections of power duct banks entering the Main Accelerator ring tunnels by listing all individual cable trays from each Service Building. These cable tray schedules will assist other accelerator designers in assessment of available space and lo-cation for their portion of the accelerator cabling. Figures 21-27 show the power supply characteristics in order of their geographical location. 31 Figures 28-33 show the cable tray characteristics also in order of their location on site. 4.4.4 Spread Sheets Summary Data Fig. 1 Recommended Option, Conductor Type Fig. 2 Recommended Option, Conductor Location Fig. 3 Option 2 x 350 kcmil Conductor Type Fig. 4. Option 2 x 350 kcmil Conductor Location Fig. 5. Option 3 x 410 AWG Conductor Type Fig. 6 Option 3 x 410 AWG Conductor Location Fig. 7 Option 5 x 350 kcmil Conductor Type Fig. 8 Option 5 x 350 kcmil Conductor Location Technical Data Fig. 9 A Ring Fig. 10 BRing Fig. 11 C Ring Fig. 12 DRing Fig. 13 E Ring Cost Data Fig. 14 A Ring Fig. 15 BRing Fig. 16 C Ring Fig. 17 DRing Fig. 18 E Ring Fig. 19 Table 1, Cable Data Fig. 19 Table 2, Cable Trays (Proposed Configuration) Fig. 19 Table 2, Cable Trays (Random Lay - not recommended) Fig. 20 Table 1, Insulators and Hardware Fig. 20 Table 2, Other Cable Trays Power Supplies, Distribution Fig. 21 Power Supplies, Distribution Fig. 22 Power Supplies, Service Buildings, No. 1 Fig. 23 Power Supplies, Service Buildings, No.2 Fig. 24 Power Supplies, Service Buildings, No. 3 Fig. 25 Power Supplies, Service Buildings, No. 4 Fig. 26 Power Supplies, Service· Buildings, No. 5 Fig. 27 Power Supplies, Service Buildings, No.6 32 Power Distribuition Fig. 28 Power Distribution, Service Buildings, No.1 Fig. 29 Power Distribution, Service Buildings, No.2 Fig. 30 Power Distribution, Service Buildings, No.3 Fig. 31 Power Distribution, Service Buildings, No.4 Fig. 32 Power Distribution, Service Buildings, No.5 Fig. 33 Power Distribution, Service Buildings, No. 6 4.5 Data Sheets 4.5.1 60 kV Circuit Breakers a. Standards CSA, CEMA, ANSI, and NEMA Standards and Specifications, including ANSI 37, and CSA CAN3-C308-M85. b. Type Outdoor, three-phase, minimum oil. c. Ratings (minimum) No. poles Rated Voltage Rated Current Rated Frequency Rated Interrupting Time Rated Symmetrical Breaking Current at 72.5 kV Operating Duty without derating B.I.L d. Auxiliary Supplies 3 72.5 kV 2000 amperes 60 Hz 5 cycles (maximum) 25 kA (first-pole-to-clear factor 1.3) C-O-15 seconds-C-350 kV ??-125 V, DC, for closing, tripping and alarm circuits 208 V f 60 Hz, 3-phase for charging motor 120 V, 60 Hz, I-phase for heating element e. Capacitive Current 33 The circuit breaker is to be capable of interrupting 650 amperes of capacitive current at 72.5 kV, where the capacitor bank is located on the 25 kV secondary bus of the main substation power transformer. The circuit breaker interruption of the capacitive current combined with the transformers magnetizing current, without any other plant load, shall be restrike free. The substation transformer will be a 80/107 MVA unit with a 10% impedance. f. Current Transformer The circuit breaker shall be supplied complete with one current transformer with the following characteristics: Ratio: 1000/2000:5 ( tapped) Voltage Class: C400/C200 Thermal rating: 100 times for 1 second Maximum secondary resistance: .2 Ohm (2000 ampere tap) The current transformer shall conform to ANSI/IEEE Standard C57.l3-l978, Re-quirements For Instrument Transformers. 4.5.2 Power Transformers a. Standards The transformer shall be manufactured and tested to conform to the latest revisions and latest amendments of the applicable CSA,. EEMAC, and ANSI/IEEE. b. Type Outdoor, three-phase, two winding, mineral oil immersed. c. Ratings • Voltage ratings, phase-to-phase, at no load: Primary 64 kV Secondary 24.94 k V .. Power capacity ratings at 55°C temperature rise are: 80/107 MVA ONAN/O~AF • Power capacity ratings at 65°C temperature rise are: 89.6/120 MVA ONAN/ONAF d. Windings • The 64 kV windings shall be delta connected and fully immlated. 34 • The 24.94 kV windings shall be wye connected with neutral brought out, and fully insulated. • All winding conductor be shall copper. • The angular displacement between the primary and secondary winding shall be 30°, with the low voltage neutral phasor lagging. e. Impedance (At Transformer Base MVA) f. Minimum Basic Impulse Insulation Levels (BIL) • 64 k V windings: 350 k V • 24.94 kV windings: 125 kV • 24.94 kV neutral: 125 kV g. Full Load Temperature Rise • 10% • 55°C over ambient temperature of 30°C when operating at rated load. • The transformer is to be capable of continuous operation at 65°C temperature rise, at 112% of rated MVA, with normal life expectancy. h. Cooling Equipment • Standard radiator design. i. On-Load Tap Changer .• Plus and minus 10% in 25 steps c/w automatic control j. Station Service • 120/208, 300 kVA k. Accessories • per standard CSA88 1. Bushing Current Transformers • Primary Bushing Current Transformers. CT1 Ratio: 1000 Voltage Class: C400 Thermal Rating: 100 times for 1 second • Secondary Bushing Current Transformers. 35 CT2 Ratio: 3000/2000:5 Voltage Class: C400 Thermal Rating: 20 times for 1 Second CT3 Ratio: 3000/2000:5 Voltage Class C400 Thermal Rating 20 times for 1 Second m. Surger Arrester • Three only station class D. Noise Level • 57 DB o. Capacitor Bank Inrush • The transformer shall be designed to withstand switching of 8100 kVAr capacitor bank on its 24.94 kVr secondary. 4.5.3 Power Capacitors a. The capacitors and their accessories to be supplied under this Specification shall be capable of withstanding a maximum available short circuit level of 750 MVA. h. The capacitors shall be installed in an outdoor substation and must be capable of operating with an ambient temperature variation of -18°C to 35°C. c. Standards The capacitors shall conform to the following standards: • ANSI C55-1 (IEEE Std. 18 - 1989) • ANSI C37.99 - 1980 • NEMA CPl - 19.76 Ratings, physical construction or tests described herein shall be based on these stan-dards where not otherwise defined. d. Capacitor Ratings and Details 140 capacitors each rated at 400 kVAr, 8320 V, 60 Hz, single phase, 95kV BIL, connected to form a 3- phase ungrounded wye banks as follows: 36 8 x 8100 kVAr 1 x 12200 kVAr 1 x 4000 kVAr The capacitor bank shall be capable of continuous operations as follows without exceeding rated temperature rise: • at 135% of rated reactive power including fundamental frequency and harmonic voltages. • at 110% of rated terminal voltages, including harmonics but not transients. • at 180% of rated RMS current including fundamental and harmonics. The capacitors shall be two-bushing units for outdoor installation using a non-toxic dielectric which is a Class III combustible fluid (N.F.P.A.). The capacitor shall contain internal resistors to discharge the capacitors when de-energized, so that the residual voltage is reduced to 50 volts or less within 5 minutes. e. Physical Construction and Accessories • Provide the capacitor bank mounted on an open structural steel "Stack rack", which shall be complete with stack insulators, base insulators, hardware, con-nectors and terminals, etc. Hot dip galvanize all steel structures and hardware. The elevating structure shall be provided by the Owner. • Provide each capacitor with an HRC fuse rated with interrupting capacity, 10,000 watt-seconds. After the link has blown, there shall be a visual indi-cating of fuse operations. Size the fuses to protect the capacitors against case rupture. 4.5.4 Power Reactors a. Application The reactors shall be capable of withstan~ing a maximum short circuit level of 1000 MVA. The reactors shall be installed in an outdoor substation, Vancouver, British Columbia and must be capable of operating with an ambient temperature variation of -18D C to +35DC . h. Standards The reactors shall conform to applicable ANSI Standards C57 series. Ratings, phys-ical construction or tests described herein shall be based on these standards where not otherwise defined. All equipment shall be CSA approved and comply with the Canadian Electrical Code. 37 c. Reactor Rating 28 k V, 380 k VA, 300 amperes, 4.15 ohms, 60 Hz, 135 k V BIL, single-phase out-door, air-core reactors. Reactors shall be rated for 135% continuous current without exceeding rated temperature rise. d. Tests The following routine tests shall be made on the reactors: • impedance • resistance • applied potential • heat run on first unit unless duplicate tested design exists. e. Physical Construction Reactors shall have epoxy impregnated, weatherproof coils suitable for outdoor mount-ing without further protection. Reactors shall be fitted with blade-type copper termi-nals suitable for 4-hole pad connectors to NEMA dimensions. The line side terminal shall be displaced 1800 about the vertical centre line from the load side terminal. Both line and load terminals shall be located at the top of the reactor. Reactors shall have insulator supports capable of withstanding the full voltage to ground un-der the impulse test on a line terminal. 4.5.5 Power Resistors a. Specifications Application - Neutral Grounding h. Type - Air cooled with stainless steel resistor elements, mounted in an outdoor venti-lated metal enclosure on top of transformer. c. System voltage - As tabulated below. d. Resistor • Voltage - As tabulated below • Current - As tabulated below • Resistance - As tabulated below e. Neutral conductor current transformer • Mounted inside resistor enclosure • Voltage class - as tabulated below 38 • Ratio - as tabulated below • Accuracy class - C20 f. Data Table SYSTEM RESISTOR C.T. VOLTAGE VOLTAGE CURRENT RESISTANCE KV CLASS RATIO 25 kV 14.4 kV 400A,10s 36.0 ohms 25 100/5A 4.16 kV 2.40kV 400A,10s 6.0 ohms 5 100/5A 480 V. 277 V 2A cont. 138.5 ohms 0.6 As req'd 4.5.6 Distribution Transformers a. Transformer Specifications • Type - Oil filled, outdoor, sealed type, with skid base. • Capacity - per CSA C88 5 MVA, 24.94 - 4.16 kV 2 MVA, 24.94 - 0.48 kV • HV winding - 24.94 KV, 3ph, 3w, 60Hz, delta. • LV winding - 4160 V or 480 V as tabulated above, 3 ph, 4 w, 60 Hz, star. N eu tral low resistance (400 A) grounded for 4160 V, high resistance (2A) for 480 V. • Min. % IZ - 6.0 for 5 MVA transformers, 6.5 for 2 MVA transformers. • Winding material - Copper. • Type of cooling - ONAN/Future ONAF, except building services transformers JVhich will be ONAF initially. • Full load temp, rise - 55°C over 40°C ambient, 112% full load at 65°C rise. • Taps - ±2.5%, ±5%, off-load type . • " HV terminals - In cable box for 3C4/0 Teck type cable. • LV terminals - In cable box with non-ferrous cable gland to be copper plate. • Neutral bushing - On top of transformer tank. • Detachable radiators c/w valves. • Pressure relief device with contact. • Pressure/vacuum gauge. • Sudden gas pressure relay with 2 contacts. • Oil temp. indicator with 2 contacts. • Weatherproof terminal box for control wiring. • Finish - 5 MVA transformers:standard transformer green, epoxyenamel. 2 MVA transformers:Fieldstone tan, Sherwin Williams 47982 Code N, F2N G59 39 4.5.7 25 kV Switchgear a Specifications • Type - Metal clad, indoor, drawout type. • Interrupting medium - Vacuum or air - magnets. • kV Class - 25 kV. • MVA Class - 1000 MVA. • Rated Continuous Current - 1200A and 3000A. • Power System - 25 k V, 3 phase, 3 wire, neutral low (400A) resistance grounded. • Metering and protection (incoming breakers) - Digital instrument package with optional RS 232 output. - Device 51 phase overcurrent protection, device 51 N. - Associated CTs, fused PTs, auxiliary relays and test switches. • Metering and protection (feeder breaker). - Digital instrument package with optional RS 232 output. - Device 50/51 phase overcurrent protection, device 50 N - Associated CTs, auxiliary relays and test switches. • Main bus 1200 A. • Incoming feeder cables. - Three 1 - conductor XLPE insulated non-amoured power cables for 1200 A. - Twelve 1 - conductor XLPE insulated non-amoured power cables for 3000 A breakers. • Outgoing feeder cables. - 3 - 1C500 MCM XLPE insulated non-amoured power cables or 3C4/0 XLPE insulated Teck type. • Finish - ASA 49 light grey enamel. 4.5.8 5-kV Distribution Equipment a Specifications • Type - Indoor, Modular, Extendable, with individual drawout type motor starters and fixed feeder units. • Enclosure - EEMAC 1, Free standing. 40 • Number of starters per vertical section - 3 for 400A contactors, 1 for SOOA contactors. • Main buses - 1200A tin plated copper. • Ground bus - 1/2 in. X 2 in. copper running full length of MCC. • Wiring - EEMAC Class lB. • Incoming Section - Ammeter, AM switch, voltmeter, VM switch, associated fused PT's and CT's, Westinghouse CO-6 relay device 50G in FTll case or equal. - Suitable for 6 - 1c500MCM 5 kV incoming Teck cables, top or bottom entry, c/w non-ferrous plate. • Starter Units - 400A or SOOA 3P mechanically interlocked isolating switch. - Three current - limiting fuses rated 350 MVA interrupting capacity located or line side. - 400A or SOOA 3P fixed or drawout vacuum- break contactor with auxiliary contacts. - Individual fused control transformer 4160 - 120V. - Ammeter and C.T. - 3 - pole overload relay. - Test switch. - On/green and off/red light and stop pushbuttons on door. • Lamicoid nameplates. • Outgoing cables - 3c 5kV Teck type of various sizes out top and/or bottom. • Glanding plates and channel sills required. • Finish - ASA 49 light grey baked enamel. 4.5.9 480-V Distribution Switchgear a. Specifications • Type - Indoor, metal enclosed, drawout type power circuit breakers, electrically operated. • Voltage Class - 600V • Interrupting Rating - 50 kA RMS sym. • Breaker ratings (cont.) - Main breaker 4000A - Feeder Breakers 1600A 41 • Adjustable long time, short time, instantaneous, and ground static trip unit c/w ground sensor for each breaker as shown on drawings. • Power System - 480V, 3pH, 3W, neutral high (2A) resistance grounded. • Metering (incoming section) - Voltmeter, VM switch, ammeter, AM switch, ground alarm/trip unit, c/w associated CT's and fused PT's. • Metering (feeder breakers) - Ammeter, AM switch, and associated CT's. • Main bus - 4000A, tin plated copper • Bus bar bracing - 50 kA RMS sym. • Padlockable in open or closed position. • Key interlock between main breaker and standby power feeder breaker. • Incomer -Flexible copper connections from adjacent associated transformer to switchgear incoming section, 4000A capacity. • Feeder cables - 3C 1k V XLPE Teck type, various sizes. • Finish shall be ASA 49 grey baked enamel. 4.5.10 480-V Distribution Motor Control Centre Type a. Specifications • Type - Indoor, modular, double sided type, extendable, with individual fixed feeder units and drawout starters. • Enclosure - EEMAC 1, Free standing, vertical sections maximum 20 in. W X 20 in. D x 90 in. H overall. • Short circuit withstand capacity - 50 kA RMS sym. • Main buses - 1000A tin plated copper. • Ground bus - 1/4 in. x 1 in n copper running full length of MCC. • Wiring - EEMAC Class lB. • Incoming Section Suitable for 6 - 1c500 MCM 1kV incoming Teck cables, top or bottom entry, c/w non-ferrous plate. • Starter Units Front connected contactor and fused isolator switch assembly c/w Form II, Class C HRC fuses, 3 - phase overload heater with hand reset button in door, individual 480 - 120 V control transformer. • Feeder Units Fused disconnect type, with Form I Class J HRC fuses. 42 • Lamicoid Nameplates. • Outgoing Cables - 3c 1kV Teck type of various sizes out top and/or bottom. • Glanding plates and channel sills required. • Finish - ASA 49 light grey baked enamel. 4.5 .11 Power and Control Cables a Specifications b. Sizes • Power Cable - 28 KV Power cable construction, single or 3 - conductor stranded copper conductor with conductor shielding, 90C XLPE insulation rated 28 kV, copper tape shield, 133% insulation level, 1 - conductor non-armoured, 3 - conductor aluminum interlocked armour (Teck type), PVC outer jacket colour red, acid-flame retar-dant. • Power Cable - 5 KV Standard Teck construction, single or 3 - conductor stranded copper conductors, 90C XLPE insulation rated 5kV, non-shielded, aluminum interlocked armour, PVC outer jacket colour orange, acid-flame retardant. • Power Cable - 480 V Power Feeders Standard Teck construction, single or 3 - conductor stranded copper conductors, 90C XLPE insulation rated 1000V, aluminum interlocked armour, PVC outer jacket colour black, acid- flame retardant. • Control Cable Standard Teck construction, multi-conductor No. 14 AWG, 90C XLPE insulation rated 600 V, aluminum interlocked armour, PVC outer jacket colour black, acid-flame retardant. • 28-k V Power Cables SIZE 3cl 3c4/0 3C250MCM 1c500 MCM lc750 MCM • 5-kV Power Cables SIZE 3c2 1c500 MCM 43 • 1 k V Power Cables SIZE 3C2 3c4/0 3c350 MCM 3c500 MCM lc350 MCM lc750 MCM • 600 V Control Cables SIZE 10cl4 20c14 4.5.12 Batteries and Chargers a. Specifications • Batteries - Construction - Sealed type all cell, lead- acid or nickel-iron or equivalerit, in clear containers with leak-proof seal and electrolyte level lines marked on each container. - Nominal Voltage - 125V - Minimum Rating - 50 ampere-hours at 8 hr rate. - Battery Stand -Two row two tier earthquake proof stand of acid resistant construction. Alternatively, battery and charger may be mounted in a single floor mounting cabinet. • Charger - Modes of Operation - Constant voltage float charge with current limit - Automatic "High-Low" float charge with current limit - Booster or equalizing charge • Metering, Protection and Alarms - Metering - VM and AM on AC and DC sides. - Protection and alarms - to include DC ground fault, undervolt age , over-voltage,overcurrent. 4.5.13 Emergency Generators a. Rating 44 Two 1000 kW, 0.8 power factor, stand-by power units rated 277/480 volts 3 phase/4 wire 60 Hz high resistance grounded. h. Performance • General - The stand-by power systems shall provide fully automatic operation such that upon power failure the generator shall supply all required load within 10 seconds. On resumption of normal power and after time delay on transfer switch, the load shall be retransferred to utility power, and after rundown time delay, the generator set shall automatically shut down and return to starting condition ready for another operating cycle. The generators shall be fitted with droop resistors for parallel operation. - Each system shall have provisions for manual start-up and switching. - Each system shall act as a complete, integrated and self protected stand-by power unit; and shall be well suited for the specified environmental conditions. • Voltage Regulation Between no-load and 100%-load shall be within ± 1.5 • Random voltage variation For constant loads between 0% and 100% - shall not exceed ± 1% of its mean value. • Frequency Regulation Under varying loads between 0% and 100% - shall be adjustable from isochronous up to 5% maximum droop, as required. • Random Frequency Variation Under constant loads - shall not exceed ± 0.25% of its mean value. • Electromagnetic Interference - Attenuatio~ Shall meet requirements of IEEE standards. • Total Harmonic Distortion Of the a.c. waveform shall be less than 2.5% - no-load and 4% - full load. • Telephone Influence Factor (TIF) Shall be less than 50 per NEMA MG1-22.43. • Alternator Temperature Rise At rated load shall be less than 105°C (NEMA CLASS F) based on continuous load. 45 • Waveform Deviation Factor Shall be less than 0.04 line-to-line. • Starting System Rating Storage batteries shall have sufficient capacity to provide a total of 60 second cranking time at O°C , consisting of six 10- second cranking attempts, with a battery end voltage of not less than 80% of rated voltage. • Battery Charger Shall be capable of automatically recharging a completely discharged battery to 80% of capacity within 2 hours and to full capacity in not more than 6 hours. c. Design Criteria • Engine - Fuel - Diesel - Vibration Isolator Mounts - Structural Steel Mounting Base - Radiator Cooling System Complete with - Temperature Control - Oil Pan Heater - 120 volt - Engine Coolant Heater - 120 volt - Fuel pump appropriate for underground installation of fuel tank • Governor - Electronic Type - Fine speed control, using vernier adjustment • Fuel Tank - 3000 gallon underground complete with vent, filler cap and standard fittings. - Day tank with float level control and electric fuel pump suitable for wall mount-mg. • Alternator - Revolving field with Static Exciter (Brushless) - Rotor - Dynamically Balanced 46 - Windings - Vacuum Impregnated with solid Epoxy Resin - Winding Insulation - Class F - Cooling - Direct Drive Fan • Voltage Regulator - Solid State - Voltage Adjusting Rheostat, ± 5% • Engine Control Panel - NEMA 1 Mounted on engine frame c/w the following items: - Selector Switches: AUTO/OFF/MAN/TEST - Push Buttons: MAN. START MAN. STOP RESET - Failure illuminated annunciators: OVER CRANK SHUTDOWN LOW OIL PRESSURE ALARM LOW OIL PRESSURE SHUTDOWN HIGH WATER TEMPERATURE ALARM HIGH WATER TEMPERATURE SHUTDOWN OVERSPEED SHUTDOWN - Trouble Horn - Trouble circuit relay activated by any alarm or shutdown c/w auxiliary contact. - Controls for inlet motorized dampers. - Fire control contacts: close to stop engine. - Cranking limiter to open the starting circuit after about 30 seconds if engine fails to start. - Time clock automatic exercise circuit. • Alternator Control Panel - EEMAC 1 Enclosure Electrically operated air magnetic circuit breakers for two generators - rated 3 Pole 1000 Amps. - Undervoltage detection to initiate starting. - Synchronizing system 47 - Metering: Voltmeter Voltmeter phase selector switch Ammeter Ammeter phase selector switch Frequency meter ± 0.3 Hz accuracy Running time meter - Voltage adjustment - Ground bus 4.5.14 Uninterruptible Power Supply a. Standards and Codes Provide equipment manufacturered in accordance with, and satisfying the require-ments of the latest editions of the applicable standards of: CSA, IEEE, EEMAC, NWCB, at the Electrical Energy Inspection Act of the Province of British Columbia. h. Scope Provide an uninterruptible power supply as specified herein complete with enclosure, charger, battery, inverter, transfer switch and all the controls. c. Characteristics • Input power available: Three phase 480-volt, 60 Hz, +5% - 15%, 60-amp. • Output required: Voltage: 120/208 three phase Maximum voltage error ±4 % Maximum continuous current: 60-amp Frequency: 60 Hz Maximum frequency error:O.05% Maximum harmonic distribution at 1/'2 load: 5% • Power storage capacity: 20 minute minimum Audible Noise: 60 dB at 1m maximum d. Description of Operation During normal operation the output power is supplied by the battery via a 120-V, 60 Hz inverter. The charger maintains the battery voltage within the operating limits. The inverter output voltage is maintained in phase with the utility voltage. 48 Utility power outage shorter than one minute does not cause the output voltage to vary more than specified in 3.0 [b.] above. ? An inverter overload or internal failure will initiate an automatic transfer to the utility supply line. The abnormal conditions will activate alarm. e. Transfer Switch Provide an automatic transfer switch with a manual override. At the time of the transfer the input and the output voltages must be in phase and the transfer time must not exceed 5 ms. Automatic transfer is to be initiated by one or more of the following: - inverter failure, - inverter overload, - battery low voltage. At the end of the fault condition the transfer switch will return to normal operating position automatically. f. Controls Provide devices that allow manual control of internal circuitry as follows: - to separate the charger from the circuit, - to separate the battery from the circuit, - to separate the inverter from the circuit, - to bypass the circuit, - to silence the alarm. Provide devices that inform of the status of the following: - incoming line, - dc power circuit, - outgoing line, - function or position of devices, - alarm conditions. Identify all the control devices by a permanent lettering describing the function. g. Alarm The alarm circuit is' to be fed from the incoming supply line and will be activated by: - battery low voltage, or - transfer switch in bypass position, The alarm will be self-resetting. Provide a remote audio alarm station with a continuous or slow-pulsating soft tone not exceeding 60 dB at 1 m distance. 49 On the face of the power supply, provide a red indicating light and a silencer push-button. The pushbutton will silence the remote audio alarm and the local audio alarm. h. Enclosure Supply EEMAC 1 free-standing, front access only, steel enclosure, finish with ANSI 61 grey enamel on the outside and on the inside. Provide hinged and lockable doors. i Battery Provide a minimum maintenance, corrosion free storage battery with a 10 year min-imum life. 4.6 Drawing List REPORT DRAWINGS PAJ-OOOl D Site Plan PAJ-0002 D Underground Duct Sections PAJ-0003 D Power Distribution Manhole Details PAJ-0004 D Incoming Transmission Line PAJ-0005 D Existing Transmission Line Details PAJ-0006 D One Line Diagram (Recommended - OPT. 2A, 2B) PAJ-0007 D One Line Diagram (Alternate - OPT. lA, lB) PAJ-0008 D One Line Diagram (Alternate - OPT. lC) PAJ-0009 D One Line Diagram (Alternate - OPT. 2C, 2D) PAJ-001O D Booster Building One Line Diagram PAJ-OOll D Booster Building One Line Diagram PAJ-0012 D Main Ring Building lOne Line Diagram PAJ-0013 D Main Ring Building lOne Line Diagram PAJ-0014 D Main Ring Building 2 One Line Diagram PAJ-0015 D Main Ring Building 2 One Line Diagram PAJ-0016 D Main Ring Building 3 One Line Diagram PAJ-0017 D Main Ring Building 3 One Line Diagram PAJ-0018 D Main Ring Building 4 One Line Diagram PAJ-0019 D Main Ring Building 4 One Line Diagram PAJ-0020 D Main Ring Building 5 One Line Diagram PAJ-002l D Main Ring Building 5 One Line Diagram PAJ-0022 D Main Ring Building 6 One Line Diagram PAJ-0023 D Main Ring Building 6 One Line Diagram PAJ-0024 D Extraction Building One Line Diagram PAJ-0025 D Extraction Building One Line Diagram PAJ-0026 D Experimental Hall One Line Diagram PAJ-0027 D Experimental Hall One Line Diagram PAJ-0028 D Experimental Hall One Line Diagram 50 PAJ-0029 D Experimental Hall One Line Diagram PAJ-0030 D Primary Substation Outdoor PAJ-0031 D Primary Switchgear Indoor PAJ-0032 D Booster Building Electrical Equipment Layout PAJ-0033 D Main Ring Building 1, 2,4,5 Electrical Equipment Layout PAJ-0034 D Main Ring Building 3, 6 Electrical Equipment Layout PAJ-0035 D Experimental Hall Electrical Equipment Layout PAJ-0036 D Tunnel Services PAJ-0037 D Emergency Power Systems One Line Diagram PAJ-0038 D Site Electrical Grounding PAJ-0039 D Substation Grounding PAJ-0040 D Legend SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT DRAWINGS PAJ-0041 D Main Ring Accelerator Services PAJ-0042 D Booster Accelerator Services PAJ-0043 D D Ring Dipole Magnet Wiring Schematic PAJ-0044 D 4500 A, 15 KV Water Cooled Bus Detail 4.7 Summary Data Figures 1-33 follow: 51 KAON FACTORY STUDY Ol-Dee-89 PROJECT 2729 SUMMARY DATA, RECOMMENDED OPTION lOOOkemil ============================================= SUMMARY PER CONDUCTOR TYPE 0.032 c/kWh LOSS COST BASED ON: 195.37 /kWYr :==================================================================================~=============: :===================: : CONDUCTOR UNIT: TRAY HARDWARE:: TOTAL :: POWER LOSS: : RATING SIZE PARALLEL LENGTH COST COST: LENGTH COST :: COST :: LOSS COST: : [kID] [k$/km] [k$] : [10] [k$]:: [k$] :: [kW] [k$/Y]: :=================================================================1=================== :=========::===================1 AIR COOLED • • I I (CABLES) 1000A 1kV 1000-1KV 1000A 8kV 1000-8KV 1000A 15kV 1000-15KV 3600A 8kV 500-8KV 4500A 15kV 750-15KV 1 1 1 6 6 30.05 2.41 13.45 1. 20 6.00 49.82 1497.21 4400 1073.11 2570.32 57.21 137.64 240 53.10 190.74 60.21 809.54 2040 431.75 1241.29 43.37 52.04 100 23.95 75.99 57.30 343.80 500 109.52 453.32 I 713.91 139.48 51. 95 283.45 18.74 97.46 10.15 55.38 3.66 19.04 SUBTOTAL FOR CABLE BANKS 53.10 2840.22: 7280 _ 1691.45: 4531.67 1165.51 227.71: I I I I ___________________________________________ ________ ______________ -- ---- -------______ 1 ________ _ WATER COOLED (PIPE) I 3600A 8kV 3" seh.80 0.44 134.00 58.96 24.315 : 83.28 I I I : 4500A 15kV 3"sch.160 1.94 186.00 360.84 115.74 : 476.58 I I I I :~--------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------- :---------: SUBTOTAL FOR PIPE BUSES 419.80 : 140.06 : 559.86 I : •• 1 I I I 1-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------I I :SUBTOTAL FOR RF DC BIAS CABLES I I I I I I : 295.96 : 60.27 11.78 297.87 58.20 358.15 69.97 :====================================================================================================================== I II II I II II : GRANO TOTAL :: 5387.48 :: 1523.66 II II II II I I 297.68 : ===============================================================================================:====================== Figure 1 52 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON fACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 SUMMARY PER CONDUCTOR LOCATION :===============:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========: :=========1:=========:=========: : :CONDUCTOR:PARALLEL : : CONDUCTOR: TRAYS : TRAY :HARDWARE:: TOTAL : POWER : LOSS : : LOCATION : SIZE : CABLES: LENGTH : COST : IN : LENGTH : COST :: COST : LOSS : COST : : : [AWG) : PER CCT: [km) : [k$) : TUNNEL : [m) : [k$) :: [k$) : [kW) : [k$/Y) : 1 _______________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _______ --1---------1---------1---------1 1--------- 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 , , , , , , ---------------1--------- ---------1--------- --------- --------- ---------1-------- -1 --------- 1--------- ---------"A"-RING:: : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1000 AI 1 kV :1000-lKV 1: 2.40 124.80 1 240: 58.53 "B"-RING 1000 AI 8 kV 3600 AI 8 kV 3600 A PIPE 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 :1000-8KV 1 2.41 137.64 1 240: : 500-8KV 1 6 1. 20 52.04 100 : :3" sch.80: 0.44 58.96 1 53.10 23.95 24.32 183.33 190.74 75.99 83.28 37.68 51. 95 18.74 60.27 7.36 10.15 3.66 11. 78 1 I' 1 , , 1 '===============:=========:=========:=========:========='=========1=========:========= :========= :========= ========= , 1 1 1 , , 1 , 1 , 1 , I 1 , 1 , 1 I BOOSTER TOTAL: : : 6.01: : 2 : 580: 159.90 : 533.34 : 168.64: 32.95, 1 , , 1 1 1 1 1 , , 1 , , , , 1 , II 1 , ===============:=========:=========:=========:========='=========1=========:========= 1========= 1=========,========= , 1 1 1 1 1 , 'I I 1 , , , 1 , , , "C"-RING , 1 , 1 , 1 1 , 1000 All kV :1000-1KV: 1: 16.85: 829.53 2 1720 "D"-RING , , , 1 1 , , , , 1 , , , 1 , 1 6 13.45 2 2040 500 419.49 431.75 109.52 1000 AI 15 kV :1000-15KV: 4500 AI 15 kV '750-15KV : 4500 A PIPE 3"sch.160: 6.00 1. 940 809.54 343.80 360.84 1 115.74 "E"-RING , 1 , , , , , , 1249.02 , 1241.29 : 453.32 : 476.58 : 1000 All kV 1000-1KV: 1 10.80 542.88, 2 2440 595.09, 1137.97 , I 1 1 , , 326.00 283.45 97.46 297.87 350.23 63. 69 55.38 19.04 58.20 68.42 ________________________ , _________ , _________ ---------,---------,---------1--------- , _________ , _________________ _ ---------------1---------,---------1---------,---------1---------,---------,--------- 1--------- ,--------- ---------, 1 , , , 1 1 1 1 1 1 , , , 1 1 1 1 MAIN RING TOTAL: 1 : 49.04: : 6: 6700: 1671.60 : 4558.19 : 1355.02 264.73 1 1 1 1 1 , , II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II ---------------1---------1---------1---------1--------_1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 , _________ ---------1 ---------------1---------1---------1---------,---------1---------,---------,--------- ,---------, 1--------- ---------1 RF BIAS SUBTTL:1000-1KV : 1: 4.00: 156.00: : 400: 139.96 : 295.96:: : ---------------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---______ , _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 11 _________ 1 _________ 1 ---------------1 ---------1 -- ---- ---I ---- -- ---I ---------1 -.--- -- ---I ---------1 -- ------- 1 --- -- ---- , , ------ ---I ---------1 Figure 2 53 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dee-89 PROJECT 2729 SUMMARY DATA, OPTION 2x350 kem;l ~:=::::::=:=:==:===:============:== SUMMARY PER CONDUCTOR TYPE 0.032 e/kWh LOSS COST BASED ON: 195.37 /kWYr :===========:===:::::=:=:===============::===:=:=:=::=~=:=============:=::=::::======:===========: 1========:=:===::===: : CONDUCTOR UN IT : TRAY HARDWARE I: TOTAL : POWER LOSS: : RATING SIZE PARALLEL LENGTH COST COST: LENGTH COST : COST "LOSS COST: : [kml [k$/kml [k$l : [ml [k$l : [k$l [kW) [k$/Y): 1=::=:=:======:==::=:=:::::==:===========::===:===:==============::::::=:==:======:::: 1::::::==: :==:====:==::=::===1 AIR COOLED (CABLES) 1000A 1kV 350-1KV 1000A 8kV 350-8KV 1000A 15kV 350-15KV 3600A 8kV 500-8KV 4500A 15kV 750-15KV 2 60.10 2 4.81 2 26.89 6 1. 20 6 6.00 I I I I I I 24.78 1489.28 I 4400 1332.16 2821.45 1021.71 199.61 31. 53 151. 68 36.17 972.72 43.37 52.04 57.30 343.80 480 119.55 271.23 74.40 3060 726.23 1698.95 I 405.96 100 23.95 75.99 18.74 500 109.52 453.32 97.46 I 14.53 79.31 3.66 19.04 SUBTOTAL FOR CABLE BANKS 99.00 3009.53: 8540 2311.41 : 5320.94 1618.27 316.16: I I I II __________________________________________________________ ___________________________ 11 ________ _ WATER COOLED (PIPE) 3600A 8kV 4500A 15kV 3" 5eh.80 3"seh.160 SUBTOTAL FOR PIPE BUSES 0.44 134.00 58.96 24. 315 83.28 1.94 186.00 360.84 115.74 476.58 419.80 : 140.06: 559.86 I I I I ___________________________________________________ _ __ --- - ---------------------______ 1 ________ _ II II II SUBTOTAL FOR RF DC BIAS CABLES :: 219.75 II II 60.27 297.87 358.15 11. 78 58.20 I 69.97 : I I -------------______ 1 I I I I I I I ====================================================================================================================== II II II II GRAND TOTAL :: 6100.55 :: 1976.41 II II II II I I 386.13 : ====================================================================================================================== Figure 3 54 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 SUMMARY PER CONDUCTOR LOCATION 1 _______________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 1 _________ 11 _________ 1 _________ 1 1---------------1---------1---------1--------- 1---------1---------1---------1--------- 1 1--------- 1---------1---------1 : :CONDUCTOR:PARALLEL : :CONDUCTOR: TRAYS : TRAY :HARDWARE:: TOTAL : POWER : LOSS : : LOCATION : SIZE : CABLES: LENGTH : COST : IN : LENGTH : COST :: COST : LOSS : COST : : : [AWG] : PER CCT: [kro] : [k$] : TUNNEL : [ro] : [k$] :: [k$] : [kW] : [k$/Y] : :===============:=========:=========:=========1 == =======:======== =1 =========1=========: 1========= =========1=========1 : "A" -R I N G: : : I ________ I I I I I I I I I I I 1000 AI 1 kV I 350-1KV : 2 4.80 126.05 I 1 240 72.66: 198.71 "B" -R ING 1000 AI 8 kV 3600 AI 8 kV 3600 A PIPE I I I I I I I I I I I I 350-8KV: 2 4.81 151.68 2 480 119.55: 500-8KV: 6 1. 20 52.04 100 23.95: 3" sch.80 ' 0.44 58.96 24.32 : I I I 271. 23 75.99 83.28 53.97 74.40 18.74 60.27 10.54 14.53 3.66 11. 78 ===============:========= ========= =========1=========1========= =========:=========: 1========= ========= ========= I I I I II I I I I II I I BOOSTER TOTAL: 10.81 : : 3 820: 240.47:: 629.20 : 207.38 40.52 I I I I II I I I I I II I ---------------1--------- __________________ 1 _________ 1 __________________ 1 _________ 11 _________ 1 _________________ _ ------------ --- --------- --------- --------- --------- ---------1--------- ---------11--------- --------- ---------"C"-RING 1000 AI 1 kV 350-1KV "D"-RING I 1000 AI 15 kV :350-15KV 4500 AI 15 kV :750-15KV I 4500 A PIPE :3"sch.160 ' "E"-RING 1000 AI 1 kV I I I I I I :350-1KV 2 2 6 I I I 33.69 26.89 6.00 1. 940 2: 21.61 820.98 972.72 343.80 360.84 542.26 2 3 I 2 I I I I I I I I I 1720 3060 500 2440 I I I I I I 520.75: 1341. 74 726.23 109.52 115.74 738.74 I I 1698.95 453. 32 476.58 1281.00 466.13 405.96 97.46 297.87 501.60 91. 07 79.31 19.04 58.20 98.00 :===============:========= =========:=========:=========1=========1=========:========= ========= :========= ========= I I I I I I I I I I I I :MAIN RING TOTAL: : 90.13: : 7 7720 : 2211.00 : 5251.60 : 1769.03 345.62 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I :===============:========= =========:=========:=========:========= =========:========= :========= :=========1=========: : RF BIAS SUBTTL:350-1KV 2: 4.00: 72.64: 400: 147.11 : 219.75 : : : 1---------------1--------- ---------1---------1--------- 1--------- _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1-________ 1 _________ 1 1---------------1--------- -- -------1-------- -1---------1---------1---------1---------11--------- 1---------1------ ---1 Figure 4 55 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 SUMMARY DATA I OPTION 3xOOOO ================= ============= SUMMARY PER CONDUCTOR TYPE 0.032 c/kWh LOSS COST BASED ON: 195.37 /kWYr ================================================================================================ :===================: CONDUCTOR UN IT : TRAY HARDWARE': TOTAL : POWER LOSS: RA TING SIZE PARALLEL LENGTH COST COST: LENGTH COST : COST : LOSS COST: [km] [k$/km] [k$] : [ml [k$] : [k$] : [kW] [k$/Yl: ================================================================='=================== '========= '===================: AIR COOLED (CABLES) 1000A 1kV 0000-1KV 3 90.14 17.34 1563.43 5620 1913.96 3477.39 1126.56 220.10 1000A 8kV 0000-8KV 3 7.21 22.66 163.44 480 126.78 290.22 : 82.05 16.03 , , 1000A 15kV 0000-15KV 3 40.33 29.48 1188.86 4080 1016.15 2205.01 , 447.70 87.47 3600A 8kV 500-8KV 6 1. 20 43.37 52.04 100 23.95 75.99 18.74 3.66 , 4500A 15kV 750-15KV 6 6.00 57.30 343.80 : 500 109.52 453.32 97.46 19.04 'I SUBTOTAL FOR CABLE BANKS 144.89 3311.57: 10780 3190.37:: 6501.94 '1772.50 346.29: I " I 'I ----------------------------------------------------------------- ---- ---------------, ,---------WATER COOLED (PIPE) 3600A 8kV 3" sch.80 0.44 134.00 58.96 24.315 83.28 4500A 15kV 3"sch.160 1.94 186.00 360 .84 115.74 I 476.58 , , ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ,---------I SUBTOTAL FOR PIPE BUSES 419.80 : 140.06 : 559.86 , , , , 60.27 I I 11. 78 : I I 297.87 58.20: -------------______ 1 358.15 69.97 -------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- ,--------- -------------------, II , " I II SUBTOTAL FOR RF DC BIAS CABLES : 205.27:: II I' =======================================================================:::=======::=================================== " " II II GRAND TOTAL :: 7267.06 :: 2130.65 II II II 'I , I 416.27 : ====================================================================================================================== Figure 5 56 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-0ec-89 PROJECT 2729 SUMMARY PER CONDUCTOR LOCATION 1---------------1---------1---------1---------1-------__ , _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 ,---------------1---------,---------,---------,---------,---------,---------,---------, -________ 11 _________ 1 _________ 1 ---------11---------1---------, I :CONOUCTOR:PARALLEL: : CONDUCTOR: TRAYS: TRAY :HAROWARE: TOTAL :: POWER : LOSS : LOCATION : SIZE : CABLES: LENGTH : COST : IN : LENGTH : COST : COST :: LOSS : COST : : [AWG) : PER CCT: [km] : [k$] : TUNNEL : [m) : [k$) : [k$] : [kW) : [k$/Y) : ===============:=========1=========1=========:=========:========='=========1=========1 ========= :========='=========: "A"-RING : , I , , , , I I I , 1000 AI 1 kV :OOOO-lKV 3 7.20 132.91 1 240 81. 74 214.65 59.52 11. 63 : "B"-RING 1000 AI 8 kV 3600 AI 8 kV 3600 A PIPE I , , I I , :0000-8KV :500-8KV :3" sch.80 3 6 7.21 1.20 0.44 163.44 52.04 58.96 2 : I , , , , I 480 100 126.78 23.95 24.32 290.22 75.99 83.28 82.05 18.74 60.27 16.03 3.66 11. 78 ===============:========='=========1=========:=========,=========1========= ========= ========= :=========:========= I , I I , , , , I , , I I , , BOOSTER TOTAL: : : 15.62: : 3 820, 256.78 : 664.13 : 220.58: 43.09 , , , , , I II , , I , I I I I II II , ---------------,---------1---------,---------1--------_, ________ _ ---------------1--------- ---------,---------,--------- --------- == =======' ='=== ==== = I : = ==== == == : : == == =====: == == ==== = , " I II , I , , " I , , , , , " I I' : "C"-RING , -------- , I' I I I' I I 1000 AI 1 kV :OOOO-lKV 3 50.53 860.49 2 1720 585.77 1446.26 I: 513.87 , I I I , I , , , , : "O"-RING : : , ________ , I , , , : 1000 AIlS kV :0000-15KV , 3 40.33 1188.86 4080 1016.15 2205.01: ' : 4500 AI 15 kV :750-15KV : 6 6.00 343.80 500 109.52 453.32 : 4500 A PIPE :3"sch.160: 1.940 360.84 115.74 476.58: , , I , I , , I , I : "E"-RING : : I ________ , I I , , , 447.70 97.46 297.87 : 1000 All kV :OOOO-lKV 3 32.41 570.02 3 3660 1246.46 : 1816.48 ,: 553.17 , , , , I " '" 100.40 87.47 19.04 58.20 108.07 , , , ,---------------1---------1--------- -----____ -_________________ 1 __________________ , _________ 1 __________________ , ,---------------1---------1---------,---------1--------- ---------,--------- ---------, ,--------- ,--------- ---------1 I I I I I , "' , I "I' , II I , :MAIN RING TOTAL: : : 131.22: 9: 9960: 3073.65 :: 6397.66 : 1910.07 373.17: , I I " ""' , I ""'" II, , ,---------------,---------1---------,---------1-------__ 1 _________ 1 _________ , _________ , , _________ 1 __________________ , ,---------------1---------1---------,---------,---------1---------,---------,---------, 1--------- ,--------- ---------, : RF BIAS SUBTTL:0000-1KV : 3: 4.00: 44.64: : 400: 160.63:: 205.27 : : :===============:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========: :========= :=========:=========: Figure 6 57 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2/29 SUMMARY DATA I OPTION 5x350 kernil :::::::::::::::::::: : ::: : ::::::::: :: SUMMARY PER CONDUCTOR TYPE 0.032 c/kWh LOSS COST BASED ON: 195.37 /kWYr ==================================== == ===== ======================= == ============================ :===================: CONDUCTOR UNIT: TRAY HARDWARE:: TOTAL : POWER LOSS: RATING SIZE PARALLEL LENGTH COST COST: LENGTH COST ': COST : LOSS COST: [kml [k$/kml [k$l : [ml [k$l : [k$l : [kWl [k$/Yl: == ============================== ================ ================='=================== '========= '===================' AIR COOLED (CABLES) 1000A 1kV lOOOA 8kV 350-lKV 350-8KV lOOOA 15kV 350-l5KV 5 150.24 5 12.02 5 67.22 24.76 3720 .33 31. 54 379.20 36.18 2431. 81 4400 660.00, 4380.33 480 72.00 451. 20 3060 459.00 2890.81 408.68 29.76 162.39 79.84 5.81 31. 73 : 3600A 8kV 500-8KV 6 1. 20 43.37 52.04 100 23.95 75.99 18.74 3.66 , , : 4500A 15kV 750-15KV 6 6.00 57.30 343.80 , 500 109.52 453.32 97.46 19.04: , , , , ,------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------- I : SUBTOTAL FOR CABLE BANKS 236.68 6927.18: 8540 1324.47 I: 8251.65 717.03 140.09: , " , I ' ,------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ,--------- -- ---- --------------WATER COOLED (PIPE) 3600A 8kV 4500A 15kV 3" sch.80 3"seh.160 134.00 58.96 1. 94 186.00 360.84  I I I I I , I I I I I I I 24.315 : 83.28: 60.27 11. 78 , I I I 115.74 : 476.58: 297.87 58.20 I I I , ___________ _ ____ _ _______ _ _____ _ __ _ _______ __ __ _ _ __ _ _ ___________________ __ ______ _ ______ 1 _________ 1 __________________ _ I I , SUBTOTAL FOR PIPE BUSES 419.80 : 140.06 : 559.86: 358.15 69.97 : I I I I I I I I _ ___ ______ _ ______________________ _ ____ _ _ _ ___ _ _____ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ ___ __ _ ___ _ _ _ ______________ 1 _ ________ 1 ___________________ 1 I I , ' I I 'I I SUBTOTAL FOR RF DC BIAS CABLES : 219.75 ·: : ,. I , I ======================================================================== ===================:==::===============:====== I' II I' II GRAND TOTAL :: 9031.26 :: 1075.17 I' II I, II I I 210.06 : ==================================================:=========== ====== =======: === =========== ============================ Figure 7 58 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 SUMMARY PER CONDUCTOR LOCATION :===============:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========: :========= :=========:=========: : : CONDUCTOR: PARALLEL : : CONDUCTOR: TRAYS : TRAY : HARDWARE :: TOTAL : POWER : LOSS : : LOCATION : SIZE : CABLES: LENGTH : COST IN: LENGTH : COST :: COST : LOSS : COST : : [AWGl : PER CCT: [kml : [k$l : TUNNEL : [ml : [k$l :: [k$l : [kWl : [k$/Yl : 1===============:=========1=========:=========1=========1=========1=========1=========1 1========= :=========1=========1 I I I I I I "A"-RING I I I I 1000 All kV :350-1KV 5: 12.00 315.12 1 240 36.00 351.12 "B"-RING 1000 AI 8 kV 3600 AI 8 kV 3600 A PIPE I I I I I I I I I I I I I :350-8KV 5: 12.02 379.2: :500-8KV 6: 1.20 I 52.04: 13" sch. 80 I 0.44: 58.96: I I I I I I I 2 480 100 72.00 23.95 24.32 451. 20 75.99 83.28 21. 59 29.76 18.74 60.27 4.22 5.81 3.66 11. 78 =============== ========= =========:=========:=========:========= =========1=========: :========= ========= ========= I I I I II I I I I II I I I BOOSTER TOTAL : 25.22' : : 3 820: 156.26:: 961. 58 : 130.36: 25.47 I I I I II I I I I I I II I I ________________________ ---------1---------1---------1--------- _________ 1 _________ 11 ___ ______ 1 _________ 1 ________ _ ---------------1--------- ---------1--------- -------- -1--------- --------- --------- --------- 1--------- ---------I I I I I I I I I I I I "C"-RING I I I I I 1000 AI 1 kV '350-1KV 5: 84.22 2049.57 2 1720 258.00 2307.57 "D"-RING 1000 AI 15 kV 350-15KV 4500 AI 15 kV 750-15KV 4500 A PIPE 3"sch.160 , "E"-RING I I I I I I I I 5 : 6 67.22 6.00 1. 940 2431.81 343.80 I 360.84 I I I I I 3 : 3060 459.00 2890.81 500 109.52 453.32 115.74 476.58 1000 All kV 350-1KV: 5 54.01 1355.64 2 2440 366.00 1721.64 I I I I I _______________ ---------1---------1--------- _________ 1 __________________ 1 _________ 11 ________ _ ---------------1---------1---------1--------- ---------1---------1--------- ---------11---------I I I I I I I I I I I I II MAIN RING TOTAL: : : 213.39 : 7: 7720 1308.27:: 7849.93 I I I I I II I I I I I II 186.45 36.43 162.39 31. 73 97.46 19.04 297.87 58.20 200.64 39.20 ::::===== ======::: 944.81 184.59 ===============:=========:=========:=========1=========:=========:========= =========: :========= ========= ========= I RF BIAS SUBTTL:350-1KV: 5: 4.00: 72.64: : 400 147.11:: 219.75 I I ---------------1---------1---------1---------1---------1 _________ 1 __________________ 11 ________ _ 1--------- ________ _ ---------------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1--------- ---------11--------- 1---------1---------Figure 8 59 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-0ec-89 PROJECT 2729 TECHN rCAL DATA .=============== "A" RING - DC ( 1 kV Cables) =========:=====:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:========= MAGNET : QTY.: MAGNET: MAGNET : MAGNET: CABLE : PWR. SPPLY: BUS : CABLE : CABLE : PARALLEL : CABLE TYPE : :OC VOLTS: AMPS :VOLT.OROP: DROP : VOLTS : LENGTH : LENGTH : SIZE : CABLES : LOSS : : (Vl : (Al : (Vl : (Vl : (Vl : (ml : (ml : (AWG1: : (kWl =========:=====:=========:=========:=========1=========1=========1===== ====:=========:=========1=========1========= DIPOLE :: : : : : BHZ : 24' 18.6' 880' 446.4 9.14 456 240 • 480 :1000-1KV 1 8.05 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 QUADS I: : : : : QFN 24' 11.5' 800 • 276 8.31 284 240 • 480 :1000-1KV 1 6.65 QON 24 • 4.2 • 770' 100.8 8.00 109 240 • 480 :1000-1KV 1 6.16 SEXTUPOLE SXF SXO C.O.D. 1 1 1 1 12 • 12 • 1 1 48 • TOTAL : 144 : HIPP ENGINEERING LTD 1 1 I 1 5 • 3.7 • I I 50 • 1 I I I 900 • 60 900 • 44.4 I I 10 • 50 1 I I I 9.35 I 69 240 • 9.35 54 240 • I I 0.00 50 1 • 1201 : Figure 9 60 1 I I I 480 : 1000-1KV 480 :1000-1KV 2 0 2402 : 1 1 1 5.00 8.42 8.42 0.00 37.68 KAON FACTORY STUDY 01 -Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 "B" RING - AC ( 8 kV Cables) & Copper Bus Bar. ____ _ ____ 1 __ _ __ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 ________ -1---- _____ 1 _________ 1 ______ _ __ 1 _ ________ 1 _ ________ 1 _________ 1 ---------1--- --1---- - ----1---------1--- - -----1------- - -1------- - -1---------1---- - ----1---------1 ------- - -1---------1 MAGNET : QTV.: HAGNET: MAGNET : MAGNET: CABLE · :PWR.SPPLY: BUS : CABLE : CABLE :PARALLEL: CABLE TYPE : : DC VOLTS: AMPS : VOLT . DROP: DROP : VOLTS : LENGTH : LENGTH : SIZE : CABLES : LOSS : : [V) : [A) : [V) : [V) : [V) : [m) : [m) : [AWG): : [kW) ---------1 - ---- 1----- - ---1---------1---------1--------_1 _ _ _____ _ _ 1 _________ 1 ____ _ ____ 1 _____ _ _ _ _ 1 _________ 1 ___ ____ _ _ ---------1- -- - - 1--- ------1---------1--- - - - - - - 1--------- 1- ------- -1 - ---- --- - 1- -- - --- - -1---------1---------1 - --------DIPOLE:: : : : : : : : : : BHZ : 25' 12.5' 3600 ' 312.5: 5.20: 318 : 100' 1200 :500-8KV: 6: 18.74 QUADS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 QF1 1 12 • 27 • 1000 • 324 10.39 334 240 • 480 :1000-8KV : 1 10.39 1 QF2 1 12 • 27 • 1000 • 324 10.39 334 240 • 480 :1000-8KV : 1 10.39 1 QD 1 24 • 27 • 1000 • 648 10.39 658 240 • 480 :1000-8KV 1 10.39 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 SEXTUPOLE: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 SF! 12 • 1 • 1000 • 12 10.39 22 240 • 480 : 1000-8KV 1 10.39 SOl 12 • 1 • 1000 • 12 10.39 22 240 • 480 : 1000-8KV 1 10.39 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C.O.D. 48 • 1 • 200 • 1 0.00 1 1 • 2 0 1 0.00 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 BUMP 1 • 1 • 1000 • 1 0.00 1 1 • 2 0 1 0.00 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I . SEPTUM 1 • 1 • 1000 • 1 0.00 1 1 • 2 0 1 0.00 TOTAL : 122 : 1203 : 2406 : 7.00: 51. 95 Figure 10 61 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 "C" RING - DC ( 1 kV Cables) _________ 1 _____ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 --------- -----1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------MAGNET QTY. : MAGNET 1 MAGNET 1 MAGNET 1 CABLE :PWR.SPPLY: BUS 1 CABLE : CABLE :PARALLEL 1 CABLE 1 1 1 1 1 TYPE :DC VOLTS 1 AMPS : VOLT. DROP: DROP 1 VOLTS 1 LENGTH : LENGTH 1 SIZE : CABLES 1 LOSS 1 1 1 1 1 1 [V) 1 [A) 1 [V) 1 [V) 1 [V) 1 [ml 1 [m) 1 [AWGl 1 1 [kW) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 _________ -----1---------1---------1---------1--------- _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ --------- -----1---------1---------1--------- --------- ---------1---------1---------1--------- --------- ---------DIPOLE 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 BHZ 100 • 17.3 • 800 • 1730 29.78 1760 1 860 • 1720 : 1000-1KV 1 23.83 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 QUADS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 QF 24 • 1000 • 0 37.23 37 1 860 • 1720 : 1000-lKV 1 37.23 1 QFl 12 • 8.4 • 877 • 100.8 32.65 133 1 860 • 1720 : 1000-lKV 1 28.63 1 1 QF2 24 • 10.4 • 918 • 249.6 34.18 284 1 860 • 1720 : 1000-1KV 1 31. 37 1 QD 48 • 3.3 * 832 • 158.4 30.97 189 1 860 • 1720 :1000-1KV 1 25.77 .1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 QSFl 4 • 1 • 1000 • 4 1 17.32 21 1 400 • 800 : 1000-lKV 1 17.32 1 QSF2 4 • 1 • 1000 • 4 17.32 21 1 400 • 800 : 1000-lKV 1 17.32 1 QSF3 8 • 1 • 1000 • 8 17.32 25 : 400 • 800 :1000-lKV 1 17.32 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 QSD1 4 • 1 • 1000 • 4 17.32 21 400 • 800 : 1000-lKV 1 1 17 .32 QSD2 4 • 1 • 1000 • 4 17.32 21 400 • 800 :lOOO-lKV 1 17 .32 QSD3 8 • 1 • 1000 • 8 17.32 25 400 • 800 : 1000-lKV 1 17.32 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 SEXTUPOLE 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 SXF 24 • 1000 • 0 37.23 37 860 • 1720 : 1000-lKV 1 1 37.23 1 1 SXD 24 • 1000 • o 1 37.23 37 860 • 1720 '1000-1KV 1 1 1 37.23 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C.O.D. 136 • 1 • 200 • 1 0.00 1 1 1 • 2 12 1 1 37.23 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 BUMP 1 • 1000 • 0 0.00 : 0 1 • 2 0 1 1 0.41 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 SEPTUM 1 • 1000 • 0 0.00 : 0 1 • 2 0 1 1 0.41 1 ----------------------- -- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ------TOTAL 1 426 1 8423 1 16846 1 15.00 : 326.00 1 1 1 1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Figure 11 62 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 "0" RING - AC ( 15 kV CABLES & COPPER BUS ) _________ 1 _____ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _ _ ____ _ _ _ 1 __ _ ______ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 ________ _ 1 _________ --- ------1-----1---------1---------1---------1---------1--------- ---------1---------1---------1---------1---------MAGNET 1 QTY. : MAGNET 1 MAGNET 1 MAGNET 1 CABLE :PWR.SPPLY BUS 1 CABLE 1 CABLE :PARALLEL 1 CABLE 1 1 1 1 , , 1 TYPE , :DC VOLTS , AMPS : VOLT. DROP: DROP 1 VOLTS LENGTH 1 LENGTH 1 SIZE 1 CABLES 1 LOSS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [V] 1 [A] 1 [V] 1 [V] 1 [V] [m] 1 [m] 1 [AWG] 1 1 [kW] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 _________ _____ _________ _________ _________ _________ _______________ ___ _________ _________ ___ ______ , _________ ---------'-----1---------1---------1---------1---------1--------- ---------,---------1---------1---------1---------DIPOLE 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 BHZ 1 100 1 15 • 4500 • 1500 1 21. 66 1 1522 500 • 6000 :750-15KV 1 6 1 97.46 1 1 1 1 1 , --------- ----------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- ---------QUADS 1 1 1 1 , , 1 1 1 1 1 1 QFN 48 • 18 • 928 • 864 40.98 905 1020 • 2040 : 1000-15KV: 1 38.02 QDN 48 • 17 • 984 • 816 43.45 859 1020 • 2040 :1000-15KV: 1 42.75 , 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 , QSF1 4 • 1000 • 19.05 19 440 • 880 :1000-15KV: 1 19.05 Q5F2 4 • 1000 • 19.05 19 440 • 880 :1000-15KV: 1 19.05 QSF3 8 • 1000 • 19.05 19 440 • 880 :1000-15KV: 1 19.05 , 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 QSD1 4 • 1000 • 19.05 , 19 440 • 880 : 1000-15KV : 1 19.05 1 QSD2 4 • 1000 • 19.05 19 440 • 880 : 1000-15KV : 1 19.05 1 1 QSD3 8 • 1000 • 19.05 19 440 • 880 :1000-15KV' 1 19.05 1 , 1 , 1 , 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 SEXTUPOLE 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 SXF 24 • 1000 • 0 44.15 44 1020 • 2040 : 1000-15KV 1 44.15 1 1 SXD 24 • 1000 • 0 44.15 44 1020 • 2040 : 1000-15KV 1 44.15 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C.O.D. 136 • 1 • 200 • 1 1. 33 2 1 • 2 1 12 1 0.27 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 BUMP 2 • 1 • 1000 • 2 0.04 2 1 • 2 :1000-15KV 1 0.04 1 1 , , , 1 1 1 I I SEPTUM 3 • 1 • 1000 • 3 0.04 3 1 • 2 :1000-15KV 1 0.04 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --- ------TOTAL I 317 1 6723 1 13446 I 12.00 I 283.45 I 1 1 1 1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Figure 12 63 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 "E" RING - DC ( 1 kV CABLES ) =========:=====:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========, MAGNET : QTY.: MAGNET : MAGNET : MAGNET: CABLE :PWR.SPPLV: BUS : CABLE : CABLE :PARALLEL: CABLE TYPE : :DC VOLTS: AMPS :VOLT.DROP: DROP : VOLTS : LENGTH : LENGTH : SIZE : CABLES : LOSS : : [V) : [A) : [V] : [V] : [V] : [m] : [m] : [AWG]: : [kW] =========:=====:=========:=========:========='========='========='=========:=========:========='=========:========= DIPOLE:: : : : BHZ : 100 • 61 • 831' 6100 43.89 6144 1220' 1220: 1000-lKV 1: 36.47 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 QUADS:: : : :::QF : 24' 34 • 735 • 816 30.86 847 970 • 970 :lOOO-lKV 1 : QF1 12 • 25 • 900 • 300 37.79 338 970 • 970 :1000-lKV 1 : QF2 12 • 45 • 830 • 540: 34.85 575 970 • 970 : 1000-lKV 1 : QD 48 • 14 • 800 • 672: 33.59 706 1 970 • 970: 1000-lKV 1 : QSFl QSF2 QSF3 QSD1 QSD2 QSD3 SEXTUPOLE SX1 SX2 SD1 1 1 1 1 4 • 4 • 8 • 1 1 4 • 4 • 8 • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 12' 12 • 24 • 1 1 1 1 C.O.D. 128' 1 1 BUMP 1 • 1 1 1 SEPTUM: l' 1 1 1 1 1 • 1 • 1 • 1 1 1 • 1 • 1 • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 • 1. 2 • 3.7 • 1 1 1 1 1000 • 1000 • 1000 • 1 1 1000 • 1000 • 1000 • 1 898 • 351 • 889 • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 • 200 • 1 1 1 1 l' 1000' 1 1 1 1 l' 1000' 4 4 8 4 4 8 60 14.4 88.8 1 1 19.05 , 19.05 19.05 19.05 19.05 19.05 39.65 15.50 45.04 0.00 0.00 0.00 23 23 27 23 23 27 100 30 1 134 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 440 • 440 • 440 • 1 1 440 • 440 • 440 • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1020 • 1020 • 1020 • , , 1 1 1 • 1 I 1 • 1 1 1 • 1 1 1 1 440 : 1000-lKV 440 :1000-lKV 440 : 1000-lKV 1 1 440 :lOOO-lKV 440 :lOOO-lKV 440 '1000-1KV 1020 ,lOOO-lKV 1020 : lOOO-1KV 1020 : 1000-1KV 1 1 1 o o o 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 22.68 34.01 28.93 26.87 19.05 19.05 19.05 19.05 19.05 19.05 35.61 5.44 45.94 0.00 0.00 0.00 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------TOTAL : 406 : 10803: 10803: 16.00: 350.23 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Figure 13 64 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec -89 PROJECT 2729 COST DATA ,;=========== "A" RING - DC ( 1 kV Cables) _________ 1 _____ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 ________ _ ---------1-----1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------MAGNET :CABLE: CABLE : CABLE : CABLE :TERMINAT.: INSTALL.: CABLE :24" TRAY: SPACER :TRAY AND: TOT.RUN TYPE :TERMN: SIZE : LENGTH : COST : COST : COST :C05T TOT.: LENGTH : BLOCKS :BLK.COST: COST : QTY.: [AWG] : [m] : [k$] : [k$] : [k$] ' : [k$] : [m] : real : [k$] : [k$] ---------1-----1---------1---------1---------1--------_1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 ________ _ ---------1----- 1---------1--------- --------- ---------1--------- ---------1 --------- --------- ----- ---- ---------DIPOLE ::: : BHZ 24 :1000-1KV : 480 18.72 2.88: 3.94 1 1 QUADS 1 1 1 QFN 24 :1000-lKV : QDN 24 :1000-1KV : 1 1 SEXTUPOLE 1 1 SXF 12 :1000-1KV 5XD 12 :1000-1KV 1 1 C.O.D. 48 : TOTAL : 144 : 480 18.72 480 18.72 480 18.72 480 18.72 2400 : 1 1 1 1 2.88: 3.94 2.88 1 3.94 1. 44 1. 44 3.94 3.94 25.54 25.54 25.54 24.10 24.10 240 240 240 240 240 : 124.80: _ 240: Figure 14 65 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD 358: 58.53: 183.33 KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 "B" RING - AC ( 8 kV Cables) & Copper Bus Bar. _________ 1 _____ 1 _________ 1 _____ ____ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 _________ 1 ---------1-----1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1---------1 MAGNET :CABLE: CABLE : CABLE : CABLE :TERMINAT.: INSTALL.: CABLE :24" TRAY: SPACER :TRAY AND: TOT.RUN : TYPE :TERMN: SIZE : LENGTH : COST : COST : COST :COST TOT.: LENGTH : BLOCKS :BLK.COST: COST : : QTY.: [AWG) : [111) : [k$) : [k$) : [k$) : [k$) : [111) : lea) : [k$) : [k$) : ---------1--- --1 --------_1---------1---------1--------_1 _________ 1 _________ 1 ___ ______ 1 _________ 1 ____ _____ 1 _________ 1 ---------1-----1---------1---------1---------1---------1- --------1---------1---------1---------1------- --1---------1 D IPOLE:: : : : : : : : : : BHZ : 50 :500-8KV: 1200: 37.20: 5.00: 9.84 : 52.04: 100 : 142: 23.95: 75.99 QUADS 1 1 OF1 12 : 1000-8KV 480 21. 86 1. 44 3.94 27.24 240 QF2 12 :1000-8KV 480 21. 86 1. 44 3.94 27.24 240 QD 24 :1000-8KV 480 21. 86 2.88 3.94 28.68 240 SEXTUPOLE 1 SF! 12 :1000-8KV 480 21. 86 1. 44 3.94 27.24 240 1 1 SD1 12 IIOOO-8KV 480 21. 86 1. 44 3.94 27.24 240 C.O.D. 48 2 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1 BUMP 1 2 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1 SEPTUM 2 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1 TOTAL : 122 : 2406 : : 137.64: 240 : 271: 53.10: 190.74 Figure 15 66 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 "C" RING - DC ( 1 kV Cables) =========:=====:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:========= MAGNET :CABLE: CABLE : CABLE : CABLE :TERMINAT.: INSTALL.: CABLE :24" TRAY: SPACER :TRAY AND: TOT.RUN TYPE :TERMN: SIZE : LENGTH : COST : COST : COST :COST TOT.: LENGTH : BLOCKS :BLK.COST: COST : OTY.: [AWG) : [m) : [k$) : [k$) : [k$) : [k$) : [m) : lea) : [k$) : [k$] =========:=====:=========1=========:=========:=========1=========:========= 1=========:========= 1=========1========= DIPOLE:: :: 1 1 BHZ : 100 :1000-1KV 1720: 67.08: 12.00 14.10 93.18 860 1 1 1 1 OUADS 1 1 1 1 OF 24 :1000-1KV 1720 1 67.08 2.S8 14.10 84.06 860 OFl 12 :1000-1KV 1720 67.08 1. 44 14.10 82.62 860 QF2 24 : 1000-lKV 1720 67.08 2.S8 14.1.0 S4.06 860 QD 48 : 1000-lKV 1 1720 67.08 5.76 14.10 86.94 860 1 1 1 1 QSFl 4 : 1000-lKV SOO 31. 20 0.48 6.56 3S.24 400 QSF2 4 :1000-lKV 800 31. 20 0.48 6.56 38.24 400 QSF3 1 8 : 1000-lKV 800 31. 20 1 0.96 6.56 38.72 400 1 1 QSDl 4 : 1000-lKV 800 31. 20 0.48 1 6.56 38.24 400 QSD2 4 :1000-1KV 800 31. 20 0.48 6.56 38.24 400 QSD3 8 '1000-1KV SOD 31. 20 0.96 6.56 3S.72 400 1 1 SEXTUPOLE 1 1 SXF 24 1000-lKV 1720 67.08 2.88 14.10 1 84.06 860 1 1 SXD 25 ,1000-1KV 1720 67.08 3.00 1 14.10 : 84.18 860 1 1 1 C. O. D. 136 : 2 0.00 : 0.00 0.00 0.00 1 1 1 1 1 BUMP 1 1 2 0.00 : 0.00 0.00 0.00 1 1 1 1 1 1 SEPTUM 1 1 2 0.00 1 0.00 0.00 0.00 1 1 1 --------- ----------------------------- -------------------------------- --- - ---------- -----------------------------TOTAL : 427 : : . 16846: : 829.53: 1720 2563: 419.49: 1249.02 Figure 16 67 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 "D" RING - AC ( 15 kV CABLES & COPPER BUS ) ---------,-----,---------,---------, ---------,---------,--------- ,---------,---------, ----- ----,------- --, ------------------,-----,---------,---------,---------, ---------,--------- ,------- --,--------- ,---------,- --------,- -- ------MAGNET :CABLE: CABLE : CABLE , CABLE : TERM INA T. : INSTALL. : CABLE :24H TRAY , SPACER :TRAY AND , TOT. RUN , , , TYPE : TERHN: SIZE , LENGTH , COST , COST , COST :COST TOT.: LENGTH , BLOCKS :BLK.COST , COST , , , , , , : QTV.: [AWG] , [m] , [k$] , [k$] , [k$] , [k$] , [m] , teal , [k$] , [k$] , , , , , , , , , ---------,-----,---------,---------,---------,---------,---------,---------,---------,---------, ---------,------------------,-----,---------,---------,---------,---------,--- ------,------- --,--------- ---------,---------, ---------DIPOLE , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , BHZ , 60 :750-15KV : 6000 , 277.50 : 7.20 ' . 59.10 : 343.80 , 500 548 , 109.52 , 453.32 , , , , , , --------------------------------------------------------- -- ---------------- ---------- --- ---------------- - ---- ----QUADS , , , , , , QFN 48 :1000-15KV' 2040 : 99.04 6.72 20.09 125.86 1020 QDN 48 :1000-15KV 2040 : 99.04 6.72 20.09 125.86 1020 , , , , QSF1 4 :1000-15KV 880 , 42.72 0.56 8.67 51. 95 440 , QSF2 4 :1000-15KV 880 : 42.72 0.56 8.67 51.95 440 QSF3 8 :1000-15KV 880 : 42.72 1.12 8.67 52.51 440 , , , , QSD1 4 :1000-15KV 880 : 42.72 0.56 8.67 51 .95 440 QSD2 4 : 1000-15KV , 880 ' 42.72 0.56 8.67 51. 95 440 QSD3 8 :1000-15KV: 880 42.72 1.12 8.67 52.51 440 , , SEXTUPOLE , , , SXF 24 :1000-15KV' 2040 99.04 3.36 20.09 122.50 1020 SXD 24 :1000-15KV 2040 99.04 3.36 20.09 122.50 1020 C.O.D. 136 2 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1 , , BUMP , 2 2 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1 I , , SEPTUM : 3 2 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1 TOTAL . : 317 : 13446 : : 809.54: 2040 : 1996: 431. 75 : 1241.29 Figure 17 68 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 "E" RING - DC ( 1 kV CABLES ) =========:=====:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:=========:========= MAGNET :CABLE: CABLE : CABLE : CABLE :TERMINAT.: INSTALL.: CABLE :24" TRAY: SPACER :TRAY AND: TOT.RUN TYPE :TERMN: SIZE : LENGTH : COST : COST : COST :C05T TOT.: LENGTH : BLOCKS :BLK.C05T: COST : QTY.: [AWG) : [m) : [k$) : [k$) : [k$) : [k$) : [m) : tea) : [k$) : [k$) =========:=====:=========1=========1=========1=========1=========1=========:=========1=========:=========:========= DIPOLE BHZ QUADS QF QF1 QF2 QD QSFl QSF2 QSF3 QSD1 QSD2 QSD3 SEXTUPOLE SXl SX2 SOl C.O.D. BUMP 1 SEPTUM : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 100 :1000-1KV 1220 47.58 12.00 10.00 69.58: 1220 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 :1000-lKV 970 37.83 2.88 7.95 48.66 970 : 12 :1000-1KV 970 37.83 1.44 7.95 47.22 970 : 12 :lOOO-lKV 970 1 37.83 1.44 7.95 47.22 970 : 48 :1000-1KV 970 37.83 5.76 . 7.95 51.54 970 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 :lOOO-lKV : 440 17.16 0.48 3.61: 21.25 1 440 1 4 :1000-1KV : 440 17.16: 0.48 3.61 1 21.25 440 8 :lOOO-lKV : 440 17.16 1 0.96 3.61 21. 73 440 1 1 1 1 4 : 1000-lKV : 4 : 1000-lKV : 8 '1000-1KV : 12 1000-lKV 12 ,1000-1KV 24 '1000-1KV 128 1 1 440 440 440 1020 1020 1020 1 1 1 17.16 17.16 17.16 39.78 39.78 39.78 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.48 0.48 0.96 1. 44 1. 44 2.88 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.61 3.61 3.61 8.36 8.36 8.36 0.00 0.00 0.00 21. 25 21. 25 21. 73 49.58 49.58 51. 02 0.00 0.00 0.00 440 440 440 1 1020 : 1020 : 1020 : 1 1 1 TOTAL : 406 : . 10803 : : 542.88: 2440: 3636: 595.09: 1137.97 Figure 18 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD 69 KAON FACTORY STUDY 01-Dec-89 PROJECT 2729 TABLE 1 TABLE 1 CABLES DATA TABLE -------------------------- SPACER 24"TRAY CABLES CABLES CABLES CABLE TERM INA T. CABLE INSTALL. CABLE UNIT BLOCK MATERIAL 24"TRAY 24"TRAY IN SPACER SIZE UNIT 0.0. LABOR WEIGHT CABLE INSTALLD & LABOR CLOSE lOlA. BLOCKS PRICE[$] [mill] [$/m] [kg/kill] COST[$/m] [$ ea] [$/m] SPACING SPACING 24"TRAY ============================:=:========:==:=====:::=====:========================================== 0000-lKV 60 .00 16.53 4.90 1047 11.16 63.00 150.00 36 15 45 350-1KV 80.00 20.62 4.90 1712 18.16 63.00 150.00 29 12 36 500-1KV 100.00 23.68 4. 90 2416 24.51 63.00 150.00 25 11 32 1000-lKV 120.00 33.55 8.20 4803 39.00 63.00 150.00 18 7 22 0000 -8KV 60.00 27.60 4.90 1470 16.00 63.00 150.00 22 9 27 350-8KV 80.00 31.80 8.20 2215 21. 00 63.00 150.00 19 8 24 500-8KV 100.00 35.20 8.20 2990 31. 00 63.00 150.00 17 7 21 1000-8KV 120.00 44.20 8.20 5520 45.55 63.00 150.00 14 6 17 0000-15KV 60.00 31. 80 8.20 1765 20.50 63.00 150.00 19 8 24 350-15KV 80.00 36.07 8.20 2580 26.94 63.00 150.00 17 7 21 500-15KV 100.00 39.70 9.85 3389 35.34 63.00 150.00 15 6 19 750-15KV 120.00 45.62 9.85 4768 46.25 63.00 150.00 13 5 16 1000-15KV 140.00 51.10 9.85 6321 48.55 63.00 150.00 12 5 15 TABLE 2 TABLE 2 CABLE TRAY CALCULATION(CABLES SPACED lOlA.) 1000-1KV 1 PARALLEL CABLES FOR 1000A CCT. ------------------------------------------------ -- --- --------. BUS CABLE REQUIRED CABLES SPACER SPACER TRAY TRAY TRAY TRAY TRAY AND NUMBER LENGTH DIA CABLES IN SPACER BLOCK BLOCK SPACE RUNS LENGTH COST BLOCKS OF [m] IN TRAY BLOCKS COST TAKEN TOTAL COST TERMINATN 24"TRAY leal [k$] [%] [m] [k$) [k$] 'A' RING 240 33.55 10 22 358 22.53 45 1 240 36.00 58.53 'B' RING 240 44.20 14 17 271 17.10 83 1 240 36.00 53.10 'c' RING 860 33.55 30 22 2563 161. 49 134 2 1720 258.00 419.49 '0' RING 1020 51.10 24 15 1996 125.75 164 2 2040 306.00 431. 75 'E' RING 1220 33.55 32 22 3636 229.09 143 2 2440 366.00 595.09 'B' 8KV 100 35.20 6 142 8.95 100 15.00 23.95 '0' 15KV 500 45.62 6 548 34.52 500 75.00 109.52 TOTAL 7280 1691. 45 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------RF BIAS 400 33.55 10 22 596 37.56 400 80 TABLE 3 TABLE 3 CABLE TRAY CALCULATION.(CABLES RANDOM LAID) 1000-1KV 1 PARALLEL CA8LES FOR 1000A CCT. ---------------------------------------------------- --------BUS CABLE PA RALLEL CABLES TRAY TRAY TRAY TRAY LENGTH DIA CABLES IN 24" SPACE RUNS LENGTH COST [Ill) IN TRAY TRAY TAKEN TOTAL [m) [%) [k$) 'A' RING 240 33.55 10 54 19 1 240 36.00 'B' RING 240 44.20 14 41 34 1 240 36.00 'c' RING 860 33.55 30 54 56 1 860 129.00 '0' RING 1020 51.10 24 35 68 1 1020 153.00 'E' RING 1220 33.55 32 54 60 1 1220 183.00 3 LAVERS Figure 19 HIPP ENGINEERING LTD 70 KAON FACTORY STUDY TABLE 1 INSULATORS AND HARDWARE CALCULATION. AA241. . AM297 - ----- ------- -- -- ----------------------------TABLE 1 INSULATR INSULATOR 3"BUS 4"BUS 3"ELBOW 4"ELBOW 3"ELBOW 4"ELBOW 3"EXP. 8 kV 15 kV SUPPORT SUPP.ORT 45de9 45de9 90de9 90de9 SUPPORT [$J [$] [$] [$J [$J [$] [$] [$] [$] 48.25 61. 9 56 .85 73.9 230 305 230 305 718 BUS INSULATORINSULATOR ELBOWS COUPLING INSULATOR ELBOWS COUPLING TOTAL LENGTH SPACING AMOUNT AMOUNT AMOUNT COST COST COST COST [ Ill ) [Ill) rea) rea) rea) [$) [$) [$J [$) 3" sch.80 440 2 220 50 73 10615 . 11500 2200 24315 BUS INSULATOR INSULATOR ELBOWS COUPLING INSULATOR ELBOWS COUPLING TOTAL LENGTH SPACING AMOUNT AMOUNT AMOUNT COST COST COST COST [m) [Ill) rea) (ea) rea) [$J [$J [$) [$) 3"sch.160 1940 2 970 200 323 60043 46000 9700 115743 TABLE 2 OTHER CABLE TRAYS SERVICE LENGTH TUNNEL BUILDING [m) RING BLDG #1 1000 RING'A' BLDG U2 1100 RING'B' BLDG #3 1000 RING'C' BLDG #4 1000 RING'D' BLDG US 1000 RING'E' BLDG ·n6 900 TOTAL LENGTH LENGTH [m] [m] 230 230 230 1075 1075 1075 2200 2200 TABLE 2 TOTAL COST [k$] ------------------------ ------------------ ---========= TOTAL 6000 8315 14315 2147.25 ------------------------ - ------------- -------===~===:= HIPP ENGINEERING LTD Figure 20 71 RF FERRITE BIAS CABLES [m] 1000 1000 1000 1000 SPACERS TERMINAT. COST [k$] 4000 127.16 01 -Dec -89 PROJECT 2729 4"EXP. 3" 4" SUPPORT COUPLING COUPLING [$] [$] [$] 793 30 40 POWER SUPPLIES DISTRIBUTION BOOSTER POWER SUPPLIES RING VERT. P.S. CCT. CCT. POWER SUPPLY QTY VOLT AMP NOTE LENGTH LENGTH Em] Em] 'A' LATTICE DIPOLE 1 450 1000 190 20 'A' LATTICE QF 1 400 900 190 20 'A' LATTICE QD SHUNT 190 20 'A' LATTICE SEX. F 1 100 1000 190 20 'A' LATTICE SEX. 0 SHUNT 190 20 'A' LATTICE COD 48 60 12 PROG.-l RACK 190 20 1 KV CABLES 'B' LATTICE DIPOLE 1 600 3500 WATER COOLED 190 5 X 20 'B' LATTICE DMH MAKE-UP 1 2500 800 'B' LATTICE QF 1 3 450 1000 190 20 'B' LATTICE QF 2 SHUNT 190 20 'B' LATTICE QD 3 450 1000 190 20 'B' LATTICE SEX. F 190 20 'B' LATTICE SEX. 0 'B' LATTICE QF MAKE-UP 1 2500 40 'B' LATTICE QD MAKE-UP 1 2500 40 8 KV CABLES 'B' LATTICE COD 48 20Q 25 20 Figure 21 L-___________ --.!...7=..2 ___ Hipp Engineering Ltd. SERVICE BUILDING #1 POWER SUPPLIES RING VERT. P.S. CCT. eCT. POWER SUPPLY QTY VOLT AMP NOTE LENGTH LENGTH [m] [m] 'C' LATTICE QSF1 1 25 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSF2 1 25 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSF3 1 50 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSD1 1 13 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSD2 1 13 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSD3 1 13 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE COD 23 200 60 20 'D' LATTICE SEX. 4 1000 60 20 'D' LATTICE COD 23 200 60 20 'E' LATTICE DIPOLE 2 450 1000 153 50 'E' LATTICE QSFD1 1 25 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSFE1 1 25 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSFF1 1 50 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSDB1 1 13 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSDCl 1 13 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSDD1 1 20 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE COD 22 200 60 20 Figure 22 73 L.-______________ Hipp Engineering Ltd. SERVICE BUILDING» 2 POWER SUPPLIES .----RING VERT. P.S. CCT. CCT. POWER SUPPLY QTY VOLT AMP NOTE LENGTH LENGTH [m] [m] - --'c' LATTICE COD 23 200 '0 ' LATTICE QSFI 1 25 1000 160 50 '0' LATTICE QSF2 1 25 1000 160 50 '0' LATTICE QSF3 1 50 1000 160 50 '0 ' LATTICE QSDI 1 13 1000 160 50 '0' LATTICE QSD2 1 13 1000 160 50 '0' LATTICE QSD3 1 20 1000 160 50 '0 ' LATTICE SEX 4 '0' LATTICE COD 23 200 60 60 'E' LATTICE DIPOLE 2 450 1000 150 50 'E' LATTICE QF 2 400 1000 920 50 'E' LATTICE QFB 1 350 1000 920 50 'E' LATTICE QFC 2 300 1000 920 50 'E' LATTICE QD 2 300 1000 920 50 'E' LATTICE SXl 1 60 1000 920 50 'E' LATTICE SX2 1 20 350 920 50 'E' LATTICE SO 1 100 1000 920 50 'E' LATTICE COD 22 200 60 20 Figure 23 L-____________ 7_4 ___ Hipp Engineering Ltd. SERVICE BUILDING » 3 POWER SUPPLIES RING VERT. P. S . CCT. CCT. POWER SUPPLY QTY VOLT AMP NOTE LENGTH LENGTH em] em] 'c' LATTICE DIPOLE 2 450 1000 380 50 'C' LATTICE OF 1 150 1000 380 50 'c' LATTICE OF1 1 150 1000 380 50 'C' LATTICE OF2 SHUNT 380 50 'c' LATTICE 00 1 75 1000 380 50 'C' LATTICE COD 23 200 60 70 -'0' LATTICE DIPOLE 4 650 3500 WATER COOLED 460 5 X 50 '0' LATTICE 00 4 450 1000 920 2 X 50 '0' LATTICE OF MAKE-UP 1 2500 50 '0' LATTICE SEX. 4 1000 153 50 '0' LATTICE COD 23 200 60 20 -'E' LATTICE DIPOLE 3 450 1000 153 50 'E' LATTICE COD 22 200 60 20 -Figure 24 L-___________ 75 ____ Hipp Engineering Ltd. SERVICE BUILDING # 4 POWER SUPPLIES RING VERT. P.S. CCT. CCT. POWER SUPPLY QTY VOLT AMP NOTE LENGTH LENGTH em] em] 'C' LATTICE QSF1 1 25 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSF2 1 25 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSF3 1 50 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSD1 1 13 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSD2 1 13 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE QSD3 1 20 1000 160 50 'C' LATTICE COD 23 200 60 20 '0 ' LATTICE SEX 4 1000 460 50 '0' LATT ICE COD 23 200 60 20 'E' LATTICE DIPOLE 2 450 1000 153 50 'E' LATTI CE QSFD 1 1 25 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSFE1 1 25 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSFF1 1 50 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSDB1 1 13 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSDC1 1 13 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE QSD01 1 20 1000 160 50 'E' LATTICE COD 22 200 60 20 Figure 25 L...-__ -.-:... _________ 76 ____ Hipp Engineering Ltd. SERVICE BUILDING # 5 POWER SUPPLIES RING VERT . . P.S. CCT. CCT. POWER SUPPLY QTY VOLT AMP NOTE LENGTH LENGTH Em] Em] 'C' LATTICE COD 23 200 60 20 --- ----'0' LATTICE QSFl 1 25 1000 160 50 '0' LATTICE QSF2 1 25 1000 160 50 '0' LATTICE QSF3 1 50 1000 160 50 '0' LATTICE QSOl 1 13 1000 - 160 50 '0' LATTICE QS02 1 13 1000 160 50 '0' LATTICE QS03 1 20 1000 160 50 '0' LATTICE SEX 4 '0' LATTICE COO 23 200 60 20 'E' LATTICE DIPOLE 2 450 1000 63 20 'E' LATTICE COD 22 200 Figure 26 77 L....-. ______________ Hipp Engineering Ltd. SERVICE BUILDING # 6 POWER SUPPLIES RING VERT. P.S. CCT. CCT. POWER SUPPLY QTY VOLT AMP NOTE LENGTH LENGTH Em] Em] 'C'LATTICE DIPOLE 2 450 1000 3BO 50 'C' LATTICE QF 1 150 1000 380 50 'C' LATTICE QF1 1 150 1000 380 50 'C' LATTICE QF2 SHUNT 380 50 'C' LATTICE QD 1 75 1000 'C' LATTICE COO 23 200 60 20 '0' LATTICE DIPOLE 4 650 3500 460 5 X 50 '0' LATTICE DIPOLE MAKE-UP 1 2500 3200 '0' LATTICE QD 4 450 1000 920 2 X 50 '0' LATTICE QD MAKE-UP 1 2500 50 'D' LATTICE SEX 4 1000 460 50 '0' LATTICE COD 23 200 60 20 'E • LATTICE DIPOLE 3 450 1000 153 50 'E' LATT ICE COD 22 200 60 20 Figure 27 78 L--_______________ Hipp Engineering Ltd. P2729 - KAON FACTORY STUDY DATE: NOVEMBER 21, 1989 MAIN RING ENTRY DUCTS SERVICE BUILDING II (ONE) CABLE TRAY ROUTE FROM POWER SUPPLIES TO THE TUNNEL ================================================================================================================== : : : : : : : : TAKEN : CABLE : :TRAY • :CABLES :LAYERS: CABLES : CABLE : CABLE :PARALLEL :TRAY : FEEDER : : IN TRAY: :PER LAYER: SIZE :0.0. [MM] :CA8LES :SPACE [%]: SIDE CABLE LOAD SIDE :NOTES ,----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- . ,------------------------------------------ ---------------------- -------- ------------------------------------ --- -, '" , '14 2: 7 RF COAX 41.3 100 'ANODE P .S:6 x 'C' RING AMPL., :RF CABLE : : 8 x '0' RING AMPL : 2 : :SIGNAL · 3 12 5 6 7 8 2 2 , , 7 1000-1 KV 5 1000-15 K 33.53 55 51.10 , , , , :OSFI, OSF2, OSF3, 'QSDI, aSD2, aSD3 ,SEXTUPOLE , , 'SIGNAL 'C' RING C' C.O.D. ,SIGNAL , , '0' C.O.D. '0' RING 9 , 12 2 6 750-15 KV, 45 .62 6 100 ,RESONANT :WATER COOLED PIPE '0' DIPOLE 10 14 II [2 , 13 : 10 , , 14 : 5 2 7 2 7 7 , :CHOKE , 1000-1 KV' 33 .53 63 ,1000-1 KV 33 .53 46 , , , : RF COAX : 41. 3 36 , , , , " , , , :OSFDI, OSFEI, OSFFI :aSDBI, aSDCI, OSDDI 'DMfI 5 x FERRITE B[AS 'E' RING ,SIGNAL , , :S[GNAL , , , :RF DC BIAS: , , , , ,2 x '0' RING AMPL.,:RF CABLE : : 3 x 'E' RING AMPL. : -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------, -------- -------------------- ------------- ----- --- ---- ---- ------------------------------------ --------------------, Figure 28 79 L..--_______________ Hipp Engineering Ltd._-----' P2729 - KAON FACTORY STUDY DATE: NOVEMBER 21, 1989 SERVICE BUILDING .2 (TWO) CABLE TRAY ROUT FROM POWER SUPPLIES TO THE TUNNEL ==================================================================================================================' : : : : : : : : TAKEN :TRAY • :CABLES :LAYERS: CABLES : CABLE : CABLE :PARALLEL :TRAY : IN TRAY: :PER LAYER: SIZE :0 .0. [MM) :CABLES :SPACE : CABLE : : FEEDER : [Z): SlOE CABLE LOAD SlOE I I :NOTES -==================:=:=-==========:================::-==:================:=:=:====================:=:==:======::== H 2 7 , RF COAX 41.3 100 'ANODE P.S:6 x 'C' RING AMPL.,:RF CABLE '8 X '0' RING AMPL , , 2 :SIGNAL 3 :SIGNAL , , 4 :SIGNAL 5 :SIGNAL , , , , , , 6 , :C' C.O.D. , , , . , I , , , 7 , '0' C.O.D. , , , 8 14 3 5 : 1000-15 K: 51.10 94 QSFI, QSF2, QSF3, '0' RING , OSOI, OS02, OS03 , , SEXlUPOLE , , , , , , 9 12 2 6 :750-15 KV 45.62 6 100 :RESONANT ,WATER COOLED PIPE '0' DIPOLE , 'CHOKE , , I , , 10 16 3 7 : 1000-1 KV 33.53 73 :OMH, IlF, IlFB, QFC, 'E' RING I QO, SXI, SX2, SO II SIGNAL I , , 12 ,SIGNAL 1 , I I , , , , 13 10 2 7 1000-1 KV, 33.53 46 15 X FERRITE BIAS :RF DC BIAS: , , , I , , , , I , I , H '1. 7 ,RF COAX , 41.3 28 :2 x '0' RING AMPL.,:RF CABLE , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , I 1 ______ _ ____________ _ _________ _ _ _ _____ _ _______________________________________ _ __ _ _____________ _ __ _ _____________ __ 1 ,-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------, Figure 29 L--____________ --.:8=o __ Hipp Engineering Ltd._--, P2729 - KAON FACTORY STUOY DATE: NOVEMBER 21, 1989 SERVICE BUILDING .3 (TIIREE) CABLE TRAY ROUT FROM POWER SUPPLIES TO THE TUNNEL =========================================================== ================================ === ============= ======= : : : : : : : : TAKEN : CABLE : :TRAY • :CABLES :LAYERS: CABLES : CABLE : CABLE :PARALLEL :TRAY : FEEDER : : IN TRAY: :PER LAYER: SIZE :0.0. [MM] :CABLES :SPACE [%]: SIDE CABLE LOAD SlOE 1 1 :NOTES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------2 3 4 5 10 2 6 7 B 6 2 9 12 2 10 2 II 12 13 7 5 6 7 1 1 1 1 ,1000-1 KV: 33.53 1000-15 K 51.10 , 1 1750-15 KV , 45.62 1 1 1 1 1000-1 KV ' 33.53 46 40 6 100 10 -1 1 1 1 , , 1 1 , 1 1 1 , 1 , 1 : DMH, OF, OF I , :00 1 1 SIGNAL SIGNAL SIGNAL SIGNAL OF2, 'C' RING 'C' C.O.O. '0' C.O.D. :OMH, OF, SEXTUPOLE '0' RING 1 1 RESONANT :WATER COOLEO PIPE '0' OIPOLE CHOKE 1 1 'OMH 'E' RING SIGNAL ,SIGNAL 1 1 :SIGNAL 1 1 :SIGNAL 1 1 14 1 I: : -------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------, 1-------------------------- ----- -- ------------------------------------ --------------------------------------------1 Figure 30 '---____________ 8_1 ___ Hipp Engineering Ltd._--, P2729 - KAON FACTORY STUDY SERVICE BUILDING I. (FOUR) CABLE TRAY ROUT FROM POWER SUPPLIES TO THE TUNNEL : : : : : : : : TAKEN :TRAY • :CABLES :LAYERS: CABLES : CABLE : CABLE :PARALlEL :TRAY : IN TRAY: :PER LAYER: SIZE :0.0 . [MM] :CABLES :SPACE : CABLE : : FEEDER : [X]: SIDE DATE: NOVEMBER 21. 1989 CABLE LOAD SIDE :NOTES -- - ----- ----- - - - -- -- --- -- - - - ------------ - - --- - ------ -- - --- - ----- --- - - - - --- - - - - ---- - -- - -- ------------- - ---- - --------------- ------- - - - - - - - - -- ------- -- --------- -- - - -------------- -- ----- - -- - - - - - - - - - ----- -- - - --_ .. _----- -_. _------------82 '------------______ Hipp Engineering Ltd._----' P2729 - KAON FACTORY STUDY OATE: NOVEMBER 21, 19B9 SERVICE BUILDING '5 (FIVE) CABLE TRAY ROUT FROM POWER SUPPLIES TO THE TUNNEL =============== ====== == ======= ========= ==== == ========:============================================================ : : : : : : : : TAKEN :TRAY • :CABLES :LAYERS: CABLES : CABLE : CABLE :PARALLEL :TRAY : IN TRAY: :PER LAYER: SIZE :0.0. [MM] :CABLES :SPACE : CABLE : : FEEDER : [%]: SIDE CABLE LOAD SIDE I I :NOTES -========== ========== == == ==== =========== === ========= ================= ==== === == ==================================== 14 2 7 :RF COAX 2 3 5 41.3 100 :ANOOE P.S:6 x 'C' RING AMPL. :RF CABLE 'B x '0' RING AHPL. : I I :SIGNAL I I :SIGNAL I I :SIGNAL I I :SIGNAL I I I I 6 I I 7 14 2 5 1000-15 K 51.10 94 :OSFI, OSF2, QSF3, :0501, OS02, OS03 :SEXTUPOLE B 9 12 2 6 750-15 KV 45.62 6 100 ,RESONANT :WATER COOLED PIPE :CHOKE I I I I 10 1000-1 KV 33.53 :OHH II I 12 : I I I I : 13 10 2 7 1000-1 KV , 33.53 46 :5 x FERRITE BIAS I I I I I I I I : 'C' C.O.O.: I I : '0' RING I I '0' C.O.D.: I I '0' OIPOLE: 'E' RING ,SIGNAL , I :SIGNAL I I :RF DC BIAS : 14 2 7 I RF COAX : 41. 3 2B : 2 x '0' R) NG AMPL. : RF CABLE I I I I 1 ______ -------- ------------------- --- -- - -------------- _____ _ ______ _ ___ _________________ _ ___ ___ ____ ___________ _ _ _ _ _ ,--------------- ---------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------ -------- ---- -- ---Figure 32 83 1.-_______________ Hipp Engineering Ltd._----I P2729 - KAON FACTORY STUOY OATE: NOVEMBER 21, 1989 SERVICE BUILDING 16 (SIX) CABLE TRAY ROUT FROM POWER SUPPLIES TO THE TUNNEL ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- - ----- - ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------: : : : :: : TAKEN : CABLE : :TRAY • :CABLES :LAYERS: CABLES : CABLE : CABLE :PARALLEL :TRAY : FEEDER : : IN TRAY: :PER LAYER: SIZE :0.0 . [MMI :CABLES :SPACE [sl: SIDE CABLE LOAD SlOE , , :NOTES --- - --- - ---------------------------- ----- - -------------------------- ------------------------- - ---------------------- - ----------------------------------- - ---------------------------------- ------------------------------------- - --2 3 4 5 12 1000-1 KV, 33.53 6 7 8 12 2 7 1000-15 K 51.10 BHZ, OF, OFI, OF2, 00, SEXTUPOLE OHH, aD, SEXTUPOLE :SIGNAL , , :SIGNAL , , 'SIGNAL 'C' RING 'C' C.O.D. '0' C.O .D. ' '0' RING , I 9 12 2 6 ,750-15 KV 45.62 6 100 RESONANT ,WATER COOLED PIPE '0' DIPOLE: CHOKE 10 2 I I 7 1000-1 KV 33.53 :OMH 'E 'RING 11 SIGNAL 12 SIGNAL 13 SIGNAL 14 SIGNAL , , I I I I ----- -- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----, -------------------- --------------------------------------------------- --------------- ---- -- ------ --------------- , Figure 33 84 '----------------_ Hipp Engineering Ltd. _ --, EXPERIMENTAL, EXTRACTION AND NEUTRINO FACILITIES - DESIGN PACKAGE 4 Chapter 5 Contents 5 EXPERIMENTAL, EXTRACTION AND NEUTRINO FACILITIES-DESIGN PACKAGE 4 1 5.1 Introduction... .. 1 5.2 Design Criteria ... 5.2.1 Architectural 5.2.2 Structural. 5.2.3 Mechanical 5.2.4 Electrical . 5.3 Design Brief 5.3.1 General Description 5.3.2 Alternatives 5.3.3 Future Investigations 5.4 Outline Specifications .... 5.4.1 Division 3 - Concrete 5.4.2 5.4.3 5.4.4 5.4.5 5.4.6 5.4.7 5.4.8 5.4.9 Division 4 - Masonry Division 5 - Metals Division 6 - Wood and Plastics Division 7 - Thermal and Moisture Protection Division 8 - Doors and Windows Division 9 - Finishes . . . . . . . Division 14 - Conveying Systems Division 15 - Mechanical 5.4.10 Division 16 - Electrical . 5.5 Drawings ..... . 5.5.1 Drawing List ..... . 1 1 2 4 4 4 5 9 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 13 16 18 18 5 EXPERIMENTAL, EXTRACTION AND NEUTRINO FACILITIES-DESIGN PACKAGE 4 5.1 Introduction Phillips Barratt Kaiser Engineering Ltd. was retained on 20 April 1989 to carry out conceptual and preliminary engineering of the Extraction, Experimental and Neutrino Facilities as part of the Project Definition Study for the proposed KAON Factory. The work was to include the preparation of preliminary drawings and a design brief, and was carried out in the period from May to November 1989. The scope of the work included all the Architectural, Structural, Heating and Ventilation, Plumbing, Fire Protection, Drainage and Electrical Services for the following facilities: • Extraction Hall: where the beam lines are extracted from the main accelerator rings to be transported to the experimental areas. • Experimental Hall, including the 6 Ge V Annex: together they house the experimental areas for KAON. • 20 Ge V Tunnel: this tunnel transports the beam line to the 20 Ge V Hall. • 20 Ge V Service Building: Housing mechanical services for the 20 Ge V Tunnel. • 20 GeV Hall: Housing the 20 GeV experiment. • Neutrino Facility: consisting of a large diameter decay tunnel and beam dump fol-lowed by the Neutrino Experimental Hall. The work has been carried out in close cooperation with UMA Spantec, TRIUMF-KAON Personnel and the other associated project consultants. 5.2 Design Criteria 5.2.1 Architectural The primary design function is to provide access to, and means of egress from, all · areas within the several facilities, while at the same time to provide basic amenities, such as washrooms, for operating personnel and visitors. 1 Building exterior finishes are intended to be minimal in number, economical, suitable for the enclosed function, and similar in texture and quality to the existing TRIUMF Facility. The Experimental Hall exterior requires a customized treatment to segment the very large building mass and length. A further requirement is the provision of adequate natural light to the building interior. The above requirements are accomplished by maintaining the high level perimeter translucent glazing, and by introducing very large translucent glazed panels at selected spacings on the long faces. 5.2.2 Structural The basis for the structural design of the Experimental, Extraction and Neutrino Facility is the British Columbia Building Code 1985 (BCBC) Part 4. The design of components is in accordance with the following codes: • CAN/CSA3-A23.3-M84 - Design of Concrete Structures for Buildings. • CAN/CSA3-S16.1-M78 - Steel Structures for Buildings - Limit States Design. • CSA S304-M - Masonry Design for Buildings • Steel Deck Shear Diaphragm Design Manual. • CAN/CSA-S6-88 - Design of Highway Bridges. A Limit States Design approach was taken using the following load factors and combina-tions to determine maximum stresses for design: • 1.25 D + 1.5 W • 1.25 D + 1.5 L • 1..25 D + 1.5 Q • 1.25 D + 1.05 L + 1:05 Q • 1.25 D + 1.05 L + 1.05 W • 0.85 D + 1.5 W (uplift wind only). • D = Dead loads and superimposed dead loads. 2 • L = Live loads for use and occupancy. • Q = Earthquake lateral loads. • W = Wind live load. Foundation soil properties used for the preliminary design are based on the verbal recom-mendations of Golder Associates. The following values were used: Modulus of Subgrade Reaction Allowable Bearing Pressure 40,000 to 80,000 kN 1m3 480 kPa The design loads used based on the BCBC, CAN ICSA-S6-88 and manufacturers' literature were as follows: Loads Snow(l) - ground = 1.9 kN/m2 Wind(2) - QlO = 0.45 kN /m2 Q30 = 0.55 kN/m2 End 6 m zone Other Frames Uplift on roof Girts Cranes - 50T - 74 m span Cranes - 50T - 24 m span Cranes - 30T - 30 m span Quake(3) Receiving Bay Mezzanine Other Mezzanines Mezzanines Truckload Tunnel Truck Load M & E Rooms (Extraction Hall) Shielding Slab Loads . Office Areas Roof - 4 ply B.U.R. - Gypsum Brd 12 tk - Metal Deck Trusses + OWSJ M & E (Roof) Insulation (4 in. rigid) Corner Dead Load Corner Live Load Corner Dead Load Corner Live Load Corner Dead Load Corner Live Load Za = Zv = 4 v = 0.20 3 Magnitude 1.52 kN /m2 plus build up 0.63 + 0.44 kN /m2 0.41 + 0.39 kN /m2 0.55 and 1.10 kN/m2 1.13 kN/m2 540 kN 260 kN 65 kN 255 kN 80 kN 170 kN 0.088W CS 600 Truck Axles or 12 kN/m2 4.8 kN/m2 CS 600 Truck CS 400 30 kN/m2 300 kN/m2 4.8kN/m2 0.22 kN/m2 0.09 kN/m2 0.12 kN/m2 0.5 kN/m2 0.5 kN/m2 0.07 kN/m2 Metal Wall system (incl. girts and inner liner) Soil- ID = 22 kN/m3, IB = 14 kN/m3 Ka = 0.5 Kp = 3.0 0.5 kN/m2 (l)Snow load S = So Cb Cw C, Cal Cb = 008 Cw = 1.0, C, = 1.0, Ca in accordance with Figure H4 and/or H6 in NBC supplement. Therefore S = 1.52 Ca. (2)Wind loads for primary structural action will be based on Figure B6 and Bll Q30. For secondary cladding members base wind loads on figures B7 and Bll using Ql0. (3)Earthquake lateral force V = v SKIFW. Based on the proposed concept the frame will resist lateral forces with ductile moment resisting space frame. Use K = 1.0 (maybe refined to K = 0.8). The building need not be classified as post-disaster, with an earthquake importance factor of 1=1.0. Dense to very dense sandy soils imply F=1.00 Therefore V=0020 SW. 5.2.3 Mechanical The primary basis for the design of the mechanical systems is to provide basic heating, ventilating, plumbing and fire protection services appropriate to the industrial nature of the facility. The following specific criteria have been used for the mechanical design: Outdoor winter design temp Indoor design temp. Minimum air change rate Soil Drainage Flow Rate 5.2.4 Electrical -7.2°C (19°F) 22.2°C (72 OF) 1 A.C./hr 0.0032 f/sec/m 2 (0.0046 GPM/ft2 ) The basis for the design of the electrical system is the provision of lighting, grounding, power for experimental areas, power for mechanical systems, and fire alarm system as is appropriate for a research facility housed in industrial type buildings. Components were designed in accordance with the Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, fifteenth edition. 5.3 Design Brief This section contains a general description of the facilities with comments on the function-ing of the buildings, building systems, alternatives and possible future investigations for the next phase of the programme. 4 5.3.1 General Description a. Architectural Overall the design concept for the Experimental, Extraction and Neutrino Facilities is one of an industrial complex to house the beam lines, shielding, experimental areas and services for those facilities. Provision has been made for ancillary functions and employee facilities and for future expansion of the building. The Experimental, Extraction and Neutrino Facilities require large open spaces free from structural framing elements. In addition most buildings require complete crane coverage of the floor area. Each building is partially below grade or has significant as-sociated below grade structures. To provide for beam lines and associated equipment between buildings, tunnels with varying soil cover for shielding are required. Under the British Columbia Building Code the facilities covered by this chapter classify as Group F Division 3 buildings. The experimental hall and 6 Ge V annex total approximately 15,500 m2 in building area, single story, facing two streets for fire truck access, therefore the building must comply to clause 3.2.2.52 requiring non combustible construction and a one hour fire rated roof assembly. The rating for the roof assembly may be deleted provided the building is sprinklered in accordance with clause 3.2.2.8.(1). We have therefore chosen to sprinkler this building. h. Structural All below grade structures and building components are cast-in-place concrete con-struction. To provide the necessary large spaces and reduce mass, all above grade structures and building components are structural steel. Typical roof structures are constructed of a metal roof deck welded to open web steel joists. The open web steel joists span between trusses in the case of the Experimental and Extraction Halls, and between perimeter beam lines on the 20 GeV and Neutrino Halls. Long span steel trusses frame across the Halls to perimeter columns. The roof deck is used as a diaphragm on all buildings. For the Extraction and Experimental Halls, the long span trusses are used as rigid frames to withstand lateral forces. The remaining buildings rely solely on the roof diaphragm and wall bracing. All structures are founded on either spread footings or raft foundations bearing on a very dense silt and sand layer. This competent soil layer is readily available for all structures and no piled foundations are required. The above grade wall structures use metal cladding and insulation connected to coldform girts which span between columns. Where diaphragms transmit forces to the eaves, cross bracing within the wall structure is used. Below grade walls are cast-in-place concrete with pilasters as required for columns. All walls have a water proofing membrane below grade. All walls have been designed to withstand a full hydrostatic head. This provision makes allowance for a transient hydrostatic build up which may develop from rainfall saturating perimeter soils. This pressure will dissipate when this water percolates down to be drained by the under slab drainage system. 5 All slabs are cast-in-place concrete. All halls use a raft-slab which transmits super-structure, experiment and shielding loads to the soil. All slabs have an underdrain system to prevent the build up of hydrostatic pressures. Thick floors, such as that of the Extraction Hall, will be poured in two lifts. Floor slabs will have control joints spaced 20 m apart in each direction. Non metallic floor hardener will be applied to the El.54 floor in the Extraction Hall and to 20% of the Experimental Hall floor. All tunnels are cast-in-place concrete structures designed to withstand the overbur-den soils plus truck loading. A full hydrostatic head is assumed to exist. Water proofing is provided around the complete perimeter. An under slab drainage system similar to the Halls is also provided. All movable shielding is excluded from this design task. Provision for the shieldings load and placement has been made in slab and vault designs. c. Mechanical The mechanical building services include the following: - heating and ventilating systems - hydrogen target exhaust in Experimental Hall - soil drainage and holding sump/pump systems - sump/pump system for holding floor drainage - plumbing systems - compressed air plant and distribution • Heating and Ventilation - Heating and ventilation will be provided by roof top or ceiling mounted gas-fired air handling units. Ductwork systems will distribute heated air to near floor level in all buildings. Return air will be collected by the units at roof level. Air quantities will be calculated so as to provide a minimum of 1 air change per hour. Minimum outside air supply will be 20% of total supplyair. • Hydrogen Exhaust - Roof mounted exhaust fans will provide evacuation of hydrogen from the experimental areas in the Experimental Hall. Ducts from the fans to near floor level would be provided in the future where and when required for individual experimental areas. • Roof and Storm Drainage - Systems will consist of standard drains installed on all roof areas. Horizontal runs of rainwater leaders will be insulated; water will be conveyed through rainwater stacks to the storm drainage systems. • So~l Drainage - Underslab weeping tile systems will be provided for soil drainage. Water will be collected in holding sumps where it can be sampled for radioac-tivity. When released, the water will be pumped to the site storm drainage system. • Sanitary Drainage - Sanitary -drainage systems will convey sewage from all washrooms through underground pipes by gravity to connections with the site 6 sanitary sewer system. Drainage from washrooms at the Experimental floor level will be drained by gravity to a sump and pumped to the site sewer system. • Floor Drainage - Water from floor drains will be collected in holding sumps where it can be held for monitoring of radioactivity, and dilution if required. When released, the water will be pumped to the site sanitary sewer system. • Domestic Water Distribution - Domestic water supply will enter buildings via water meters located in mechanical areas. Water will be distributed to wash-room facilities, hose stations, drinking fountains, emergency eye wash stations, etc. Domestic water heaters will be provided to supply washroom facilities. A perimeter loop will be provided in the Experimental Hall to allow for future water supplies to experimental areas. • Fire Protection - Fire protection will include preaction sprinkler protection within the experimental hall and 6 Ge V annex. Sprinkler alarm valves will be located in a mechanical room or valve room for each building. The design densities in each area will be provided in accordance with NFPA and Factory Mutual standards, as required. Independent fire hose standpipe systems will be provided in each building. The sprinkler and standpipe systems will be fitted with flow pressure and posi-tion monitors (detectors) ready for connection to the building fire alarm systems. Fire extinguishers of suitable types will be provided as required. Fire protection provisions will be based on a building classification of F3. • Natural Gas Distribution - Natural gas distribution systems will include dis-tribution piping and valves required to supply the gas fired heating equipment. Meters and pressure regulators will be located outside each building adjacent to the mechanical areas. • Compressed Air Distribution - The Experimental Hall and Extraction Hall will be provided with oil free, instrument quality compressed air systems. One compressor will be located in each of these buildings and the systems will be interconnected through the extraction tunnel. Compressors, dryers and air re-ceivers will be located in mechanical areas. Distribution will be via perimeter piping loops. • Services to Experimental Areas - Piped services will be provided around build-ing perimeters and at or near experimental areas as required. The services will include the following: d. Electrical City water Compressed air Power will be supplied by transformers dedicated for the building services only. At the Experimental Hall, power will be received at 4.16 kV and stepped down by 7 outdoor oil- type transformers to 480 V 3 phase, 3 wire for distribution to lighting, experimental stations and mechanical systems. In the Extraction Hall power will be received at 480 volts directly. Power is distributed to the various components by fused switches in motor control centres (MCC's) and armored TECK cable in cable trays (or outside-direct buried). A separate electrical room located next to each 4.16 kV transformer, houses each MCC and its associated lighting panels and transformers. Provision has been made for thirteen experimental areas - eleven in Experimental Hall and one each in the Neutrino and 20 GeV Halls. At each location one welding outlet (460 V , 3 phase) and a variety of 115 V /208 V receptacles will be provided. Lighting in the open areas with high ceilings provided by high efficiency metal halide luminaries. Elsewhere fluorescent fixtures will be used. Lighting levels will be as follows: Open areas: 500 lux Galleries, corridors, equipment rooms: 400 lux Tunnels: 300 lux A multiplex programmable switching system will be provided to permit energy con-servation measures. However, 10% of the lighting will be unswitched, 9% will be connected to the diesel generator emergency power system and 1%, including exit signs will be connected to the UPS sources. In addition to the normal equipment grounding, grounding plates will be provided at regular intervals around the walls for electrical equipment and experimental equip-ment connections. Also, four data grounding plates will be provided, one at each end of the Experimental Hall, one in the Neutrino Hall and one in the 20 GeV Hall. Each will have its own separate grounding electrodes and be tied to the building ground. The fire alarm system will be non-coded single stage, class 'B' with panels and annunciators for each hall. Manual pull stations, smoke detectors, sprinkler system monitoring and alarm bells will be provided in accordance with the B.C. Building Code. Each building will be monitored at the Booster Building Control room. An empty conduit system will be provided for use by B.C. Telephone. Telephone outlets will be installed at each experimental station, together with general service outlets in the Experimental and Extraction Halls and 20 Ge V Tunnel Service Building. B.C. Telephone is providing a public address system less speakers and speaker wiring. 30 watt, wall mounted speakers and wiring back to B.C. Telephone's system will be provided. The Extraction and Experimental Halls will each be supplied by a 480 volt feeder from the emergency power bus in the Diesel-Generator Building. 10% of lighting, sprinkler system and soil drainage pumps will be connected to the emergency power bus via automatic transfer switches. 1% of lighting, exit lights, public address, telephone and fire alarm systems will be connected to UPS sources. 8 5.3.2 Alternatives The optimum frame spacing for the Extraction and Experimental Halls was determined by designing various bay spacing configurations and finding the minimum steel tonnage. In addition practical consideration of access between column lines also helped determine the optimum framing. The following framing and support spacings were explored: Extraction Hall 1. Trusses, columns and crane supports @ 10,000 o/c. 2. Trusses, columns and crane supports @ 8,000 o/c. 3. Trusses , columns and crane supports @ 6,000 o/c. Experimental Hall 1. Trusses, columns, crane support @ 8,000 o/c 2. Trusses, columns, crane support @ 6,000 o/c 3. Trusses, columns, crane support @ 5,000 o/c 4. Trusses at 2000, columns and crane support @ 6,000 ole. Lateral forces from earthquake and wind are resisted by rigid frame action of Truss/ column frames. Longitudinal forces are resisted by roof diaphragms and braced column bays. Thermal induced forces are resisted by a centrally braced column bay. Expansion joints are not used. For the Extraction Hall the second option was found to be operationally preferred and about the same weight as the third option. The second option was used. For the Experimental Hall the second option was found to be the least weight and opera-tionally acceptable. This option was used. Lighting - Where ceilings are high enough, high pressure sodium, metal halide or mer-cury vapor are the preferred light sources. As the color of high pressure sodium (a pale gold/orange) is much poorer than the other two (although 30% more efficient than metal halide) it was discarded in favor of the other two. Both metal halide and mercury vapor (deluxe white) have good color rendition but metal halide is nearly 90% more efficient, which makes its capital cost about 50% that of mercury vapor, when supply and wiring costs are included. Operating costs of the two lights are about the same when energy costs are included. Therefore metal halide lights were selected. 9 5.3.3 Future Investigations As the design concept developed, much changed in the height and location of berms. The concrete walls and pilasters extending up from the main floor slab elevation in the Extraction and Experimental Halls retain soil and transmit superstructure loads (lateral and vertical) to the substructure. The detailed design phase should include an evaluation of these walls as now shown versus a counterfort wall perhaps with beams under the floor slab at counterfort locations. The counterforts will increase form work and excavation but will reduce concrete quantities. Casting some of the shielding beams in place to form struts to relieve the retaining wall pressures should also be considered. The full hydrostatic head may not need to be considered in the design of the walls and this should be further investigated at the final design stage. No economy in the use of precast box or precast arch sections for the tunnels was found. This is mainly due to the size, shape, and total length of a given tunnel section. A more detailed review of a precast option for the 20 Ge V tunnel should be made during detailed design. Further study on methods of construction of the Neutrino tunnel is recommended. Specif-ically the use of a multiplate pipe section to act as the primary structure or as a form should be explored. Also the use of precast arch segments should be explored. No venting of the 20 GeV tunnel has been included, however this should be further inves-tigated at the final design stage. 5.4 Outline Specifications The design conforms to the British Columbia Building Code 1985 and to the latest editions of the Codes noted in the following outline specifications: 5.4.1 Division 3 - Concrete • Code: CAN/CSA-A23.1-M • Reinforcement: 15 m larger, Grade 400 MPa 10 m smaller, Grade 300 MPa • Cement: Normal, type 10 • Concrete: 28 day compressive strength, 30 MPa 10 • Floor Hardener: Non metallic applied at 6 kg/m2 • Low Sodium concrete (0.01%): In top 500 mm of Extraction Canyon Floor and Extraction Canyon walls to U /S of removable shielding beams 5.4.2 Division 4 - Masonry • Code: CAN/CSA-A371-M • Concrete Block: Compressive strength of units, 15 MPa • Mortar: Type N or S • Bar Reinforcement: Grade 400 MPa • Joist Reinforcements: Ladder type to CSA-G30.3-M • Grout: 28 day compressive strength, 20 MPa 5.4.3 Division 5 - Metals • Code: CAN/CSA-SI6.1-M • Structural Steel: Grade 300 W to CAN/CSA-G40.21 • Hollow Structural Sections: Grade 350 W Class C • Steel Deck: to CSSBI 101 M Grade A galvanized to CSSBI 40.6 with Z275 zinc coating 5.4.4 Division 6 - Wood and Plastics • Translucent Fibreglass Panels: Profile to match adjacent steel cladding with flame spread rating not to exceed 75 5.4.5 Division 7 - Thermal and Moisture Protection • Sheet Membrane Waterproofing: "Bituthene" or equal • Membrane Roofing: 4 ply built-up roofing with fibreglass felts, or 2 ply modified bitumen sheet roofing, on 50 mm "Base Cap" fibreglass insulation 11 • Preformed Cladding: Vertical prefinished metal wall cladding, comprising the largest portion of external cladding surfaces will be 75 mm deep profile, .76 mm in thickness, including cap flashings at eaves. Cladding will be single skin type, uninsulated. Lower elements of cladding to the Experimental Hall will be prefinished horizontal metal cladding 38 mm profile uninsulated. 5.4.6 Division 8 - Doors and Windows • Hollow metal doors and pressed steel frames: for all interior and exterior man doors, the only exception being the main entry double doors, which will be fully glazed and framed in anodized aluminum • Industrial doors: heavy duty steel roll-up shutter type, both to loading bays and to service elevators • Glazing to public and service galleries: 6 mm clear float glass, framed in aluminum sash. Perimeter high level glazing and large panel glazing in the Experimental Hall will be translucent plastic, designed to meet fire resistive requirements as required in the BC Building Code. Large panel glazing will be back-framed with a steel grid. 5.4.7 Division 9 - Finishes • Floors: Applied sealer to steel trowelled concrete in public and service galleries, and in stairwells. Service rooms, E1.54 floor in Extraction Hall and 20% of Experimental Hall floor to receive non-metallic hardener. Ceramic tile to all washrooms. • Walls: Ceramic tile to all washrooms. Painted concrete or masonry to service rooms and stairwells. Concrete walls in experimental areas to be unpainted. • Ceilings: Suspended T-bar and lay-in mineral acoustic tile in all galleries and washrooms. All other areas to remain as unpainted exposed structure. • Steel: All structural steel to be prepaintedj exposed steel deck will remain unpainted. 5.4.8 Division 14 - Conveying Systems • Elevators: Hydraulically operated service elevators with a lift rate of 10 to 15 m/minute. Platform size 3m x 4m with a load capacity of 5,000 kg. • Cranes: All cranes would be class B and have A/C Thyristor stepless static speed controls on all motions, a maximum deflection of 1/750 of the span, enclosed control cab, radio controls and load indication. 50 tonne cranes would have 10 tonne auxiliary 12 hoists and 30 tonne cranes would have 6 tonne auxiliary hoists. The following crane numbers and capacities have been included: - Extraction Hall: one 50 tonne crane - Experimental Hall: two 50 tonne cranes (one with two 25 tonne hoists) (Mobile control cabs moving independently of the hoist trolley) - 6 Ge V Annex: one 30 tonne crane - 20 GeV Hall: one 30 tonne crane - Neutrino Hall: one 30 tonne crane • Monorails: Electrically operated, 2 tonne capacity hoist. 5.4.9 Division 15 - Mechanical • Heating and Ventilating Units - Units will be roof top or ceiling mounted indirect gas-fired type. Each unit will consist of the following components: - return air damper section - return high efficiency filter section - return fan section - exhaust air damper section - outside air damper mixing section - supply fan section - indirect fired gas burner section - supply high efficiency filter section Each unit will be provided with the following accessories: - Roof curbs for outdoor units - Gas flue extensions for indoor units - stainless steel heat exchanger - control panel - control transformer - space thermostat - motor starters - disconnect switch - low limit switch - 10:1 burner turndown ratio 13 - burner ambient lockout - 50 mm replaceable pre-filters - 25 mm acoustic insulation • Roof Mounted Hydrogen Gas Exhaust Fans - Fans will be upblast configuration with aluminum housings. Fan motors and housings will be explosion proof. Each fan will include the following: - gravity backdraft damper - birdscreen - disconnect switch - 300 mm factory roof curb • Ductwork - Supply, return and exhaust air ductwork will be of lock forming steel with zinc coating to ASTM A525-79 (275 g/m2 zinc coating). Gauge of ducts will be in accordance with recommendations of ASHRAE and SMACN A. Ductwork will be constructed to withstand 11/2 times working static pressure with leakage rate of 5% maximum. Ductwork will be uninsulated. • Air Compressors - Air compressors will be 100% oil free rotary, air cooled type. The compressor stage will be flanged onto a common gearbox. Operating pressure will be 690 kPa. Compressors will be provided with the following components: - air inlet silencer - paper cartridge type intake filter - intake throttle valve (unloading) - blow-off valve - servo-valve for throttle and blow-off valves - intercooler with stainless steel tube bundle - intercooler moisture separator - intercooler safety valve - discharge silencer - discharge check valve - squirrel cage induction type motor - acoustic enclosure - water cooled liquid ring - flexible discharge connection - centralized condensate collector - flexible shaft coupling 14 - control panel Air Dryers - Compressed air dryers will be self-contained hermetically sealed refrig-eration type complete with: - air cooled heat exchanger - desiccant - 30°C dew point - moisture removal trap - automatic controls Air Receivers - Air receiver tanks will be provided with a capacity 4.0 m3 . Tanks will be built to CSA B51-1975 and Provincial regulations for working pressure of 860 kPa. Compressed Air Outlets - Compressed air outlets will be 12 mm diameter one way shut- off sockets. Construction will be brass with locking pawls. Sleeve spring and valve spring will be stainless steel. • Sewage and Drainage Pumps - Pump casings will be nickel cast iron. Impellers will be iron, semi-shrouded construction, with ground vanes to pass large solids. Shafts will be SPS-245 steel with cast bronze sealed lower bearings and adjustable top thrust bearings mounted in cast iron housing. Intermediate bearings will be furnished .for each 2 m of depth and will be grease lubricated through copper lubrication lines from cover plate. Motor mounting stools will be cast iron construction. The following accessories will be provided for each pump: - control panel - mercury switch level controls - audible high level alarm • Plumbing Fixtures - Conventional vitreous china fixtures will be provided in all wash-rooms. Washroom sinks will be enamelled steel and counter sinks will be stainless steel. • Piping Materials Service Natural Gas Equipment Drains Vents Domestic Water Equipment Overflows Compressed Air Material Schedule 40 black steel Type L hard copper Type K hard copper or schedule 40 steel 15 Sanitary and Storm Drains and Vents [inside buildings] Ground Water Drainage Buried Sanitary Drains Buried Storm Drains Cast iron PVC type DWV perforated PVC type DWV • Insulation - insulation will be provided for the following: - hot water storage tanks - hot and cold water piping - horizontal and concealed inside rainwater leaders Insulation thicknesses will be as follows: Up to 25 mm piping 13 mm Piping larger than 25 mm 25 mm Insulation for piping will be mineral fibre sectional pipe insulation with integral jacket. A continuous vapour barrier will be provided for cold water pipe insulation. All pipe insulation will be finished with a PVC covering. Hot water tanks will be provided with factory installed insulation complete with metal jacket. 5.4.10 Division 16 - Electrical • 'Transformer - 4.16 kV transformers will be outdoor, oil-type, air cooled with attached primary switch as specified in design package 3. 480 V transformers will be indoor type, air cooled with 4-2.5% taps. • Motor Control Centers (MCC's) - MCC's will be EEMAC class 1 type, type B with EEMAC 1 gasketted enclosure, copper bus bars, plug-in-units, HRC fusible discon-nect switches and motor starters, digital metering and with spaces fully equipped to accept a starter. • Wiring - Wiring will consist of armoured TECK cables in cable tray. • Cables will have copper conductors with RW90 X-link insulation and overall PVC jacket. Cable trays will be aluminum, CSA class C1, ladder type, supported at 3 m intervals. • Lighting - Luminaries will be metal halide or fluorescent type (depending on ceiling height) with 277 V integral high power factor ballasts, as detailed on the drawings. Control shall be by a 2 wire dc multiplex system, Douglas type WR or equal. 16 • Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) - Shall consist of charger, battery, inverter, automatic transfer switch, alarms and controls. Output shall be three phase 277/480 V or 120/208 V (±4% maximum), 60 Hz (±0.05% maximum) in phase with the Utility, and with a half load harmonic distribution of 5% maximum. Minimum power storage capacity will be 20 minutes. Maximum audible noise will be 60 dB at 1 m. 17 5.5 Drawings 5.5.1 Drawing List PAK-OOOl D PAK-0002 D PAK-0003 D PAK-0004 D PAK-0005 D PAK-0006 D PAK-0007 D PAK-0008 D PAK-0009 D PAK-0010 D PAK-OOll D PAK-0012 D PAK-0013 D PAK-0014 D PAK-0015 D PAK-0016 D PAK-0017 D PAK-0018 D PAK-0019 D PAK-0020 D PAK-0021 D PAK-0022 D PAK-0023 D PAK-0024 D PAK-0025 D PAK-0026 D PAK-0027 D PAK-0028 D PAK-0029 D PAK-0030 D PAK-0031 D PAK-0032 D PAK-0033 D PAK-0034 D PAK-0035 D PAK-0036 D PAK-0037 D PAK-0038 D PAK-0039 D Architectural - Grade and Road Plan Architectural - General Arrangement Plan ArchitectUl:al - Extraction Hall- Plans Architectural - Extraction Hall - Elevations Architectural - Experimental Hall - 52.5 Level Floor Plan Architectural - Experimental Hall - 60.0 Level Floor Plan Architectural - Experimental Hall - 65.0 Level Floor Plan Architectural- Experimental Hall- Sections Architectural - Experimental Hall - Elevations Architectural - 20 Ge V Hall - Plan, Section and Elevations Architectural - 20 Ge V Service Building - Plan, Section and Elevations Architectural- Neutrino Facility - Plan, Section and Elevations Structural - Extraction Hall - Foundation Plan Structural - Extraction Hall - Roof Plan and Details Structural - Extraction Hall - Sections Structural - Experimental Hall - Floor Plans Structural - Experimental Hall - Roof Plan Structural - Experimental Hall - Sections Structural - 20 Ge V Hall - Plan, Elevations and Sections Structural- Neutrino Facility - Plan, Elevations and Sections Structural - Truss Details Mechanical - Extraction Hall - Plan - Below EL.63.0 Mechanical - Extraction Hall - Plan - Above EL.63.0 Mechanical - Extraction Hall - Building Sections Mechanical - Experimental Hall - Plan - Below EL.60.0 Mechanical - Experimental Hall - Plan - Above EL.60.0 Mechanical - Experimental Hall - Building Sections Mechanical - Small Buildings - Plan - Below Grade Mechanical - Small Buildings - Plan - Above Grade · Mechanical - Details Mechanical - Equipment Schedules Electrical - Experimental Hall - Grounding Plan Electrical - Extraction Iian - Single Line Diagram Electrical - Extraction Hall - Plan Electrical - Experimental Hall - Plan Electrical- 20 GeV /Neutrino Halls - Plan Electrical - 480 MCC's Electrical - Equipment Schedule Electrical - Legend and Schedules 18 FACILITES PROGRAMMING, SUPPORT BUILDINGS AND SITE DEVELOPMENT - DESIGN PACKAGE 5 Chapter 6 Contents 6 FACILITIES i'ROGRAMMING, SUPPORT BUILDINGS AND SITE DEVELOPMENT-DESIGN PACKAGE 5 1 6.1 Introduction.. .. .. 1 6.1.1 Study Period . . . . . 1 6.1.2 Scope of Work . .. . 1 6.1.3 Objectives and Goals. 2 6.2 Design Issues . . . . . 3 6.2.1 Existing Site .. . . 3 6.2.2 Proposed Site . . . . 3 6.2.3 Access and Parking 4 6.2.4 Control and Security . 5 6.2.5 Pedestrian Circulation 6 6.3 Landscaping.......... 6 6.3.1 Use Zones . . . . . . . 7 6.3.2 Systems - Structural, Mechanical, Electrical. 9 6.4 Design Concepts .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 6.4.1 Design Philosophy and Approach. 10 6.4.2 Concept Alternatives. 10 6.4.3 Proposed Concept 14 6.4.4 Structural Systems . 18 6.4.5 Mechanical Systems 20 6.4.6 Electrical Systems 23 6.4.7 Landscape... . . . 27 6.4.8 Building Area Summary . 31 6.5 Items Recommended for Further Study. 31 6.6 Facilities Program .. 33 6.7 Outline Specifications 61 6.8 Design Guidelines. . . 76 1 6 FACILITIES PROGRAMMING, SUPPORT BUILDINGS AND SITE DEVELOPMENT-DESIGN PACKAGE 5 6.1 Introduction 6.1.1 Study Period The consulting services of Chernoff Thompson Architects were retained by UMA Spantec in April 1989 to undertake the study and development of the KAON Factory Study Design Package 5 - Facilities Programming, Support Buildings and Site Development. Subconsultants for this work were: • Cornerstone Planning Group Limited - Faciliaties Programming • Bush, Bohlman & Partners - Structural • Keen Engineering Co. Ltd. - Mechanical • Gaarder, Lovick Engineering - Electrical The study was scheduled to commence in April 1989 and be completed during November 1989. 6.1.2 Scope of Work The initial assignment for the KAON Project Definition Study was to work within a multi-disciplinary design team whose task was to advance the design of the conventional construction portion of the project. The 1985 study served as the original outline for describing the anticipated facilities. The terms of reference at that time for the Chernoff Thompson Architects' assignment were as follows: • Facility planning and functional programming with particular regard to research lab-oratories and offices, administrative offices and support accommodation throughout the KA 0 N Factory. • Establish guidelines for the exterior appearance of all structures to be added as part of the KAON Factory project. 1 • Site development for overall site including clearing and grading demolition of existing facilities if required, roads, parking lots, fencing and landscaping. • Complete architectural, structural, mechanical and electrical consulting services for the following facilities: - A technical support building housing electrical equipment, laboratories and of-fices. - An injection and control building housing offices and control room plus an adjacent access structure servicing the booster complex below (designed under Package 1). - Access and equipment buildings complete with overhead craneage located around the perimeter of the accelerator ring. • The mechanical design to cover the conventional plumbing, heating, ventilation and fire protection systems. • The electrical design to cover conventional building requirements. 6.1.3 Objectives and Goals The objective of the assignment was to gain an understanding of the future KAON factory and translate these findings into an overall site design with specific facilities that support the physics research contemplated in the new expansion. Initially, several goals were established as essential to a good design. Development of a facility program identifying the users, their facility requirements and ultimately their space needs was essential in planning the buildings for the factory. Another goal the design team considered to be important was the establishment of an overall site development concept that was compatible with the surrounding lands in Pacific Spirit Park, University of British Columbia and the Point Grey residential community. The activities that occur in particle research labs are of great interest, but are often somewhat mysterious, to the public. A key goal that emerged during the interview process with senior TRIUMF people was the strong desire to create a new facility where the public would feel welcome and be encouraged to visit. The expanded lab would clearly become a major world facility in particle physics research. The client emphasized to the team the importance of ensuring that the physical design be attractive but also maintain a goal of producing cost effective, functional buildings. 2 Once the objective and key goals were defined, the design guidelines, site development concepts and program documents were produced in order to provide the necessary guidance for the design of the project. 6.2 Design Issues 6.2.1 Existing Site The property is located in a setting with a natural landscape character as part of the University of British Columbia campus and a neighbour to the Pacific Spirit Park. The park is heavily treed with indigenous forest growth and has many pedestrian, horse and bicycle trails throughout, two of which have trailheads adjacent to the KAON factory site along the 30 m right-of-way buffer. On the west, the site is bounded by a relatively dense strip of trees adjacent to Marine Drive, a four lane highway. The northwest end of the site abuts U.B.C. agricultural research lands which are generally open fields. Discovery Park, an area established for research facilities lies to the north and contains the Paprican Building adjacent to 'the TRIUMF parking lot. The existing TRIUMF facility is largely industrial in character with metal clad buildings and considerable paved areas. A single office and administration building is located at the main entry to the site and the remainder of the buildings are experimental or support facilities. 6.2.2 Proposed Site The new KAON research lab will require considerably more land than is occupied by the current TRIUMF facilities. The new land area would be approximately 32.8 hectares versus the present 6.09 hectares. Some U.B.C. uses will require relocation such as the nurseries, agricultural research fields, garbage compactor and the south campus stores building. The new south boundary is situated north of the U.B.C. chemical waste disposal facility at the existing fence line thus allowing the disposal to remain and preserving land for relocation of the garbage compactor and soil storage area. 3 PACIFIC SPIRIT PARK 8 -----------------------------------DISCOVERY PARK U.s.C. AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 6.2.3 Access and Parking Figure 1: Proposed Site FIGURE I PROPOSED SITE The main access for visitors and users of the KAON Factory will be Wesbrook Mall. The principal entry to the site occurs slightly south of the Paprican research building and provides two alternate routes to the parking. 4 Another entry point to the site is proposed from Marine Drive to permit a secondary access to a south parking lot and provide a bicycle/pedestrian route for employees arriving by bus and for users of the park. This alternate access will also facilitate large service deliveries to KAON and a route for vehicles destined for the V.B.C . Chemical Waste Disposal. FIGURE ]I ACCESS a PARKING Figure 2: Access and Parking 6.2.4 Control and Security In any operation such as the KAON facility where industrial activity occurs, it will be necessary to establish fences to control access into potentially hazardous areas. A secure 5 zone will occur along portions of the site perimeter and into the property to areas where the public must be restrained from penetrating beyond the safe public zone. The lab produces low levels of radiation which will be shielded through use of berming around beam lines and risk of contamination leaving the secure zone is controlled at monitored control points around the site. 6.2.5 Pedestrian Circulation Pedestrian access to the site will not be a major requirement. The property is a considerable distance from connecting access roads and will result in most people driving to the KAON facility. Once at the site, however, pedestrian circulation is an important consideration. Provision of access to the Pacific Spirit Park trailheads from the parking lots will be required. Pedestrian linkages must be provided around the site for visitors, users and tour groups, which should preferably be weather protected and facilitate pleasant, convenient, safe circulation to the various destinations. 6.3 Landscaping The new KAON laboratory will be an industrial type facility with many utilitarian build-ings and large paved areas. With the location of the KAON Factory beside a park and the U.B.C. campus, it should be designed to fit into its natural forest setting. Ideally, the landscaping should flow through the entire site especially around places where people circulate and work. Large excavations will occur for construction of the beam line tunnels, service buildings and experimental buildings. The impact of this earthwork could result in a site that looks manipulated and artificial without sensitive treatment of the overall grading and planting scheme. 6 ----------------------------------LANDSCAPING 6.3.1 Use Zones Figure 3: Landscaping FIGURE ]I[ LANDSCAPING In the initiaf stage of the PDS study, the design team determined that it was essential to prepare an overall land use plan for the present and the future. This plan establishes the placement of the various uses on the site and specific parcels of land are preserved for future uses. This type of laboratory typically experiences continual change in response to new discov-7 eries in science. By assigning the use zones, changes can occur within an overall compre-hensive plan and an orderly pattern of growth can be maintained. The zones identify the following land uses: 1. Entry Zone 2. Parking Zone 3. Office/Administration Zone 4. Future Office/Small Labs with Parking Zone 5. Service Zone - Main Ring 6. Service Zone - Booster 7. Service Zone - Existing TRIUMF Experimental Support and future KAON Exper-imental Support 8. Service Zone - Extraction 9. Service Zone - KAON Experimental 10. Service Zone - Future Experimental 11. Future Residential Zone 8 -----------------------------------FIGURE 12: USE ZONES 6.3.2 SysteITls - Structural, Mechanical, Electrical The issues for structural, mechanical and electrical systems can be divided into two cate-gories. The first is to produce a design that meets the B.C. Building Code which includes items such as seismic design, heating, ventilation and plumbing, and installation of the electrical work to code. The other issue relates to the fact that the design requirements vary considerably among the various facilities being provided in the project. The diversity of requirements includes basic shop space, multistorey below grade buildings, large expanses of roof with open sides, normal office space, computer rooms, research lab space requiring cranes and special equipment, cafeteria and auditoritun. A particular structural concern is that users of particle research labs tend to use ceiling space for hanging additional equipment. The 9 roof/floor system has to be designed with the knowledge that additional loads might find their way onto the roof/floor system through user alterations thus creating a potential loading problem. The anticipated additional loading resulting from unpredictable future changes is up to 1.0 kN/m2 • 6.4 Design Concepts 6.4.1 Design Philosophy and Approach The design of a particle physics research laboratory is very strongly influenced by the design and requirements of the machine itself. Locations of rings are dictated by the physics and the buildings are determined by these locations in conjunction with the space needs to service the facility and carry out the research. Although the scientific requirements predominate any design solution, the site in its context . is also a major factor in the final scheme. The design philosophy for this project is to expand the existing TRIUMF Facility in response to changes in contemporary physics research while establishing a compatible relationship with its surroundings and the community. The design process was a co-operative evolution of the design parameters as they were learned during the study. The program established a description of the space needs through interviews of the users and discussions with TRIUMF members of the PDS group. The other technical requirements emerged as each of the study teams came to understand the specific aspects of the facilities included in their scope of work. As the work proceeded, the master site plan was updated and issued with each update to reflect the current information of the time. Concurrent with development of the site plan, the individual building studies were proceeding and being provided to the client for comment. 6.4.2 Concept AlternC!tives In developing the design of the KAON Factory, the team explored alternative concepts for the overall site development and the individual buildings. A. Site The position of the booster and main rings largely determined the general placement of the new facilities in the use zones. The alternatives considered in the site planning 10 involved the investigation of preferred building placement, establishing the best lo-cations for the cooling towers, locating the new electrical substation and the covered walkway. The stores/receiving building and relocated helium building were initially adjacent to one another with the common storage yard beyond on the west end. However, the preferred alternative placed the two buildings apart from one another with a shared storage compound between. This configuration achieved the best proximity to the storage yard for both buildings while providing good access from the loading courtyard. Two major alternatives for siting of the new office building were explored. One proposal involved placing the building relatively close to the main entry. The primary difficulty with the office building close to the main site entrance was that it became too remote from the existing office building and other destination points from the new building. The preferred location was in a position which still provides a high profile from the site entrance and serves as a bridge that links the office facilities into an integrated building complex rather than individual separated buildings. The cooling towers are a source of noise and water vapour clouds. Several approaches were investigated including a large single facility, several dispersed towers or two towers with one serving the main ring and one for the booster. The chosen alternative was the two tower scheme. Use of two towers disperses the noise and vapour clouds versus a large, single tower and avoids the cost of several smaller facilities in numerous locations on the site which could be more disruptive by creating numerous noise sources around the site. In studying the placement of the towers, it was determined by the team to locate them in the industrial parts of the site where noise disruption would be minimized. The largest tower cluster is located west of the extraction hall, facing Marine Drive, a busy highway. The other location, for the booster cooling, is near the booster complex separated from the parking lot by landscaping and distant from Pacific Spirit Park. The electrical substation was considered ir two locations. The initial placement was adjacent to the present South Campus Substation, but that position would reduce the land available f<,lr future experimental expansion area. It would also increase the length of cable from the main supply power line, hence increase the cost. The final placement was east of the existing meson hall relatively close to the power line but far enough south to optimize the parking layout in the northeast corner of the property. A key element of the site development concept is the covered walkway system linking the parking area and several buildings on the site. The purpose of the covered walkway is to provide a weather protected linkage between buildings and create an element that visually ties a collection of quite different structures together. 11 The walkway began as an elevated, covered pedestrian system between buildings which connected to the second floor of the existing administration building, one level above the vehicular traffic. The walkway concept changed to become a covered system at grade and was extended around the perimeter of the booster building to provide a direct covered pedestrian walk from the parking to the front door of the office building. B. Buildings The office building is comprised of a number of different uses some of which are large space components. The auditorium and cafeteria consume a large portion of the floor they occupy and therefore, variations in their placement in the building result in significantly different concept layouts in the proposed three storey envelope. During the design process, three alternative concepts were developed. The concept studies explored the relative advantages and disadvantages of alternative arrange-ments of the auditorium on the lowest floor with the cafeteria on the second floor; the auditorium on the second floor with the cafeteria on the top floor; and the audi-torium on the top floor with the cafeteria on the second floor. The option that appeared to provide the best solution placed the cafeteria on the second floor close to the public zone and at an intermediate level for central access by TRIUMF staff. The auditorium on the first level allows sloping of the seating to provide good sight lines and ease of access from the main entry level. The library is on the third level near the theorists and away from the public zone. The other arrangements resulted in conflicts of mixing noisy, public related functions with quieter office functions and in the scheme with the auditorium on the second floor, the sloping of seating without disrupting the floor to floor heights would be difficult. Alternate layouts in the east wing of the new office building were prepared but the general configurations of the types of space were consistent in all schemes. The only variations were the placement of the particular groups (eg. theorists, sci-entists, etc.) in different locations on different floor levels. Their placement reflected the variations in preferred proximities for the auditorium and cafeteria locations. Although the service buildings and booster complex changed during the design pro-cess, the changes mainly responded to the electrical and mechanical requirements for the machine. As more information was available, the size and configurations were altered to suit the systems they were to house. 12 ~l ..... ~ ---" -rr~ /" 7' 67 ,/ MU< "., .. ~' "'" , , , , , , " " ... , RJn.IE a=A:E ... , !MIU LJr8S , , , ~... ,,' , , , , , , "''''... " " ..... .; /' , , ".,/' 49 48 4' FRASER RIVER .:.- i o ., 6.4.3 Proposed Concept A. Site The KAON research laboratory is a facility that has the primary objective of con-ducting particle physics research. The requirements of the predominant industrial type use are a major influence on the site design but there are also other factors that contribute to the master plan. The site concept is designed to be compatible with its neighbours. A minimum ten metre landscape strip is provided at the perimeter of the site to provide a screen, a buffer and a transition to the surrounding sites. The underlying objective of the con-cept is to bring the natural forest character to the adjacent lands into the KAON site through use of a comprehensive landscape concept that includes landscaped parking areas, screen planting, planting against fences, landscape clusters and enhancement of existing planting especially along Marine Drive. The site to a visitor will feel open and friendly. The main entry at Wesbrook Mall and South Campus Road will greet the visitor with a natural landscape on both sides of the road which includes large rhododendrons relocated from the U.B.C. nursery. From the entry, the public oriented "image" portion of the new office building will be visible and identify the main entry for visitors. On the left at the entry, the visitor will see the booster complex with its unique shape that is derived from the circular rings below. A total of 1043 parking spaces will be provided on the site in three clusters. The cluster concept will break up the scale of the parking areas and combine with the island planting to soften the impact of the parking. Visitor stalls will be provided near the main entry and user spaces are available in the north portion of the north cluster, the northeast cluster and the southeast cluster. A new access road will connect the lots together along the east service right-of-way. A turnaround and drop-off will be provided at the building entry. TRIUMF's existing apple trees will be transplanted into the center of the new drop-off island, if possible. The office cluster will be interconnected via a system of bridge connections and covered walkways at grade. This canopy will provide a weather protected linkage that allows TRIUMF people and tour groups to move among the buildings almost as though they were a single building. The main ring zone will be screened from the road and contain a local roadway system that runs on the inside of the ring and connects to a road leading to the experimental buildings. This road will be offset from the ring tunnel to permit installation of survey stations with projecting concrete caps. Six service buildings with capacitor farms and four capacitor buildings will sit on the inside line of the road at approximately eight metres from the main ring tunnel. 14 Service access will occur in two locations. Regular deliveries will come past the new office building and into the loading courtyard to do their business. Large infrequent deliveries will be routed via Marine Drive to the south end control station. The site will undergo major excavation for tunnels and buildings. In addition, the beam lines require a minimum coverage for radiation shielding resulting in a need for earth berming in some areas. The site design concept for grading will be to minimize the visual impact of this major earthwork. The method for achieving minimal impact will be to grade in such a manner as to avoid 'bumps' over the tunnels and create single slope gradients from tops of berms where possible by filling one side to create a level grade. In the southerly experimental zone "bumps" are unavoidable. The approach in this area will be to plant wildflowers and berry shrubs to provide an attractive ground cover and bird habitat. The Pacific Spirit Park borders the KAON property on the east boundary. Currently, there are two trailheads into the park, one at the north end and one at the south end. In the site development concept, provision will be made to improve access to the trailheads on the new roads from Marine Drive and from Wesbrook Mall. New parking for ten cars is proposed at each trailhead with access to the KAON parking as overflow space. The trailheads are not only an entry to the park but are also an exit. The landscape treatment at the points along the KAON site will have special planting with emphasis on the adjacent forest character. B. Buildings 1. Existing Administration Building: The existing administration building is currently supporting office and lab uses. The approach for this building will be to minimize the alterations to suit the new users. The building is in reasonable condition and with the appropriate users, changes can be kept to a minimum. • Alterations include numerous wall relocations, installation of the new bridge walkway to the new office building, infill of offices in the existing lobby and partial enclosure of the courtyard. The entire interior will be repainted. Al-though office space is being added in the lobby, an entrance will be maintained at grade with access from the covered walkway located along the front of the building. The ex:terior will remain as present and the old auditorium will receive no alterations except repainting. 2. New Office Building: The population of TRIUMF personnel will approximately dou-ble in -the KAON Factory. This increase combines with the need to replace offices currently housed in portable buildings to generate a large increase in the need for additional space. A new office building will be provided to satisfy a large proportion of this requirement. 15 • With the increase in the size of the KAON lab, other facilities also become nec-essary. A conference centre with a 250 seat auditorium and associated meeting rooms will be an essential part of the normal activities in a lab of this size. The larger working population and conference facility require a 200 seat cafeteria which will be much larger than presently exists to provide adequate service. • The public interest and frequency of tour groups in the new KAON facility will demand space for display and a tour staging area. • The office building is designed to fulfill both the public related requirements and the provision of office space. The public related functions in the building will be grouped nearest to the main entry. This portion of the building is distinct on the outside and inside presenting a corporate image of a national research facility. By separating out the public functions, the building will provide a formal entry to the site and create a more private area in the building where offices and work areas for KAON personnel are located away from the group activities. • The exterior finished construction of the public portion will be reinforced con-crete which is consistent with housing these types of activities and the structural requirements for large occupancy spaces. On the east office portion, the build-ing will be metal clad with steel structure similar to the existing administration building. By using the two forms of construction, the maximum economy can be achieved by limiting more expensive concrete construction to where it is necessary for the type of space provided. • The individual working spaces in the building are people's homes for the working day. A key objective in the design of people spaces in all of the KAON buildings will be to provide access to natural light and wherever possible, views out to the natural landscaping throughout the site. In the office building most offices and work spaces will have windows to introduce natural light into the building. 3. Booster Facility: The booster complex will be a multi-storey building with three storeys below grade containing electrical and mechanical equipment for the machine and three storeys above grade with workshops and offices. • On the ground level, the primary function will be to provide loading access to the vertical shaft, provide space for electrical and mechanical equipment serving the machine and various types of workshop space for support groups. Two mezzanines will occur within the high (7 m) ground floor space to accommodate additional electrical/mechanical equipment and on the south side to provide a link to the bridge walkway connected to the office building. • The upper two floors will contain more typical office space. Computer rooms and the control room in the large centre part of the second floor will be well located away from natural light with support office space around the perimeter of the building. The top floor will be office space with service space for the building mechanical system. 16 • Research facilities are by their nature a creative problem solving environment. One means of communication among researchers is spontaneous meetings and discussions that occur in hallways during the course of normal movement through the buildings. The office building and booster building will include conversation areas to facilitate these casual meetings. The areas will be provided with chairs and a white board in pleasant locations beside windows. • The exterior finishes on the booster building will be a concrete facing with metal cladding infill. This treatment will provide an economical enclosure for the building and at the same time, create a visual relationship with the metal cladding and concrete finish on the office building. Interior finishes will be ' standard partitions, exposed structure ceilings on the ground floor and T-bar ceilings on the office floors. 4. Service Buildings: The service buildings, located around the main ring in the industrial portion of the site, will be enclosures for electrical and mechanical equipment. A small workbench area and washrooms will be primarily provided for personnel in buildings 1-6. The building design at the surface will conform with design guidelines in which metal cladding is the predominant material with translucent panels and windows used to provide natural light inside. • Service access occurs from the ring road and will be located in the building in two places. An at-grade loading bay, plus a direct access to the shaft servicing the four equipment floors below grade, will be provided. • Adjacent to the actual service buildings, there will be large outdoor capacitor farms. The capacitors will be covered with a continuous roof structure that will be an extension of the service building roof to provide weather protection. The sides will not be enclosed. Another small roof will cover kicker cable drums at one end of the service building. There will also be outdoor transformers in a chain link fence compound at the end of each of service buildings 1-6. • Below grade, buildings 1-6 will have four levels to contain equipment for the machine. A tunnel connecting the service buildings to the main ring tunnel will occur on the lowest level. • In addition to the six service buildings, there will be four capacitor buildings around the main ring provided to house electrical and mechanical equipment associated with the machine. The buildings will also provide a roof cover over capacitor farms similar to the service buildings. 5. Stores/Receiving and Helium Buildings: The stores/receiving and helium buildings will be located adjacent to the loading courtyard. The function of this group of buildings will include receiving of goods and materials to the site, control of access for delivery vehicles and pedestrians to the secure zone and selling of liquid helium to industrial purchasers. 17 • The buildings will be treated as industrial buildings and will conform with the design guidelines. • The east end of the stores/receiving building will be the location for issuance of dosimeters to users and visitors. A large waiting area will be provided to accommodate tour groups as well as TRIUMF personnel without overcrowding. This area will be seen by the public and will be the gateway to the experimental areas. Hence, the entry to the building at this point is designed to create emphasis of this gateway. • The helium building currently exists to the west of the existing meson hall. In the new KAON scheme, the helium building conflicts with the new experimental hall and will be relocated. The building structure will be reused and the cladding will be altered to conform with the design guidelines. 6. Workshop: With the expansion of all facilities to meet the needs of KAON, the workshop will be enlarged by one third. The exterior treatment of the addition will be the same as the existing building. 7. Other Buildings: During the PDS study the general scope of building construction has been defined. Most of the buildings have been designed to a concept design level with room layouts, cross sections and elevations. However, there are two industrial type buildings which appear on the site plan that are not fully developed. These structures will be designed within the design guidelines and will be similar in appearance to the service buildings. • One building is a structure that covers a main ring access hatch for the magnet transporter. The other building is a technical services support building of 1000 m2 for use during construction of the machine and subsequent occupancy for workshops and assembly areas. 6.4.4 Structural Systems The structural systems will vary among the various types of buildings. In the office building the west wing will be constructed of reinforced concrete incorporating a two-way grid of reinforced concrete slabs, beams and girders. The east wing of the office building will be built with a steel frame structure with reinforced concrete slabs on steel deck and an open web steel joist roof structure with steel deck. The booster building structure will be reinforced concrete slabs on steel deck on steel beams and girders with the electrical mezzanine suspended from the floor above. The roof will be steel deck on open web steel joists. 18 The service buildings will have reinforced concrete floors, beams, columns and foundation walls. A steel deck roof on open web steel joists on steel beams will be provided with accommodation for a 10-tonne overhead crane. Similar to the service buildings, the receiving and stores building will be a steel structure except the storage/warehouse area will be clear span column free space. The ring access building will be a simple steel structure with a reinforced concrete slab floor and a steel deck on steel beams. Provision will be made for a 30-tonne overhead crane. Overhead walkways spanning between buildings will be constructed of steel girders span-ning between buildings and supporting a reinforced concrete slab on a steel deck on steel beams. The steel roof deck will be supported by steel purlins on steel frames on the floor girders. The structural systems for the buildings will be designed to the following criteria: Roofs Roof snow load (plus applicable snow build-up) Live load (in addition to snow - for service building roofs equipment and services) Dead loads (in addition to structure dead loads) Suspended Floor Live Loads Office areas Exits, lobbies, and walkways Mechanical areas and mezzanines All other areas Suspended Floor Dead, Loads (In addition to structure dead loads) Allowance for partitions, ceilings, and services, on all floors 1.5 kN /m2 (32 psf) 1.0 kN /m2 (20 psf) 1.0 kN /m2 (20 psf) 2.4 kN/m2 (50 psf) 4.8 kN /m2 (100 psf) 4.8 kN/m2 (100 psf) 4.8 kN/m2 (100 psf) 1.0 kN/m2 (20 psf) 19 6.4.5 Mechanical Systems A. Introduction This section outlines the proposed mechanical engineering design for the new Office Building, the Booster Building (above grade floors), the extension of Workshop and the Receiving Stores for the proposed KAON Factory. B. Design Conditions • Outdoor: Winter (January 1%) Dry Bulb - minus goC Wind - 7 m/s Summer (July 2-1/2%) Dry Bulb - 26°C Wet Bulb - 19oC Wind - 3.5 m/s These conditions are not the extremes that may likely be encountered. • Indoor: Winter Dry Bulb - 21°C ReI. Humidity - 50% Summer Dry Bulb - 23°C ReI. Humidity - 50% • Rainfall (15min) 10 mm • Domestic Hot Water 65°C • Indoor Lighting and Power Load 65 w/sq. m. C. HVAC System • The System Selection A mixed all-air system and air-and-water system will be used. The interior area will be served by variable volume diffusers while the perimeter is served by fan coil units or radiation panels. This system can be accommodated to use the waste heat generated by the future low conductivity water (LCW) system. • Heating - gas fired boilers will be used as heating source. - Separate circulating duty and standby circulating pumps will be provided for the boilers. A further group of circulating pumps( one duty and one standby) will be provided to circulate water to air handling unit coils, fan coil units and unit heaters, etc. Coil circulating pumps will be provided at each air handling unit to prevent freezing inside the pre-heat coil. - Hot water fed force flow units will be provided at the main entrances. 20 - All service areas, except the electrical room, in the Administration Building and Booster Building, will be heated by water fed unit heaters. The services areas will cover the switchgear rooms, loading bays and mechanical plant rooms . • Air conditioning shall be provided for office areas, dining area and auditorium. Chilled water will be obtained from a chiller. Heat from the chiller will be rejected to the booster water cooler. Chilled water is supplied to the air handling units to maintain air leaving the units at 12.7°C to the fan coil units and variable volume diffusers during the cooling period. Duty and standby circulating pumps will be provided to circulate water from chiller to fan coil units and air handling units. Duty and standby pumps will be provided to pass water from chiller condensor to the booster water cooler . • Zoning - Office Building, East Wing All the areas will be served by one constant volume air handling unit com-plete with filter, preheat coil and cooling coil. The unit is located on the equipment penthouse. The perimeter areas will be served by 4-pipe fan coil units with 3-way control valves while the interior areas will have variable volume diffusers, complete with static pressure plenum relief feature, to at-tend to the fluctuating cooling load during winter when the chiller is shut down. The fan coil units in the perimeter will mix the area return air with the air from air handling unit and discharge into perimeter at the desired temperature. The space above false ceilings will act as a return air plenum. Return air will be ducted back to the air handling unit. - Office Building, West Wing Office Area The system will be similar to that for the Administration Building east wing. Variable volume diffusers will also be used for the library and the reception area. Air will be supplied to the computer area (VAX1) for further conditioning by a computer room air conditioner. - Office Building, Dining Area This area will be served by a dedicated air handling unit complete with cooling coil and heating coil. Its capacity shall be sized to meet the exhaust hood requirement in the kitchen. Air from the dining area will be exhausted to the outside or routed to the kitchen area for the kitchen staff comforting and the kitchen exhaust hood requirement. During summer time when the ambient temperature is low, "free cooling" will be used. - Office Building, Auditorium This area will be served by a dedicated air handling unit complete with heating and cooling coils. The air will be returned to the air handling unit. - Booster Building Office Area The system will be similar to that for the Administration Building east wmg. Air will be supplied to the computer areas (CTR1, CTR2, CCR1 21 and CCR2) from the air handling unit for further conditioning by respective computer room air conditioning units. - Booster Building Work Areas The work areas at grade level will be served by a separate air handling unit complete with heating coil. Economizing cycle will be used during summer time. No other special ventilation system is allowed for this area. - Extension to the Workshop There is a boiler serving the existing workshop. Existing hot water pipework will be extended to a new unit heater for the extension. - Receiving Stores All offices, workstations, workbenches, public areas and control areas will be air conditioned to allow comfort to the staff and to dissipate heat from machinery. One AHU complete with gas fired heater and direct expansion coil will be placed on roof. Return air plenum above false ceiling will be used. Roof exhaust fans will be installed in washrooms, locker rooms and plant storage rooms. The secure storage area and receiving area will have their own outside air propeller fan. Separate mechanical ventilation will be provided to flammable liquid storage and gas bottle storage. - Washrooms Individually switched dedicated exhaust system will be provided to serve washrooms. The fans will be located in the washroom to reduce excess duct routing. - Computer Areas The computer areas (VAX1, CTR1, CTR2, CCR1 and CCR2) will be con-ditioned by computer room air conditioners. These units will be water cooled with heat dissipated via the chiller water tower. • Controls The entire plant will be monitored and controlled by a DDC (direct digital control) system. Separate monitoring and control stations will be provided in each equipment room. A separate, remote, monitoring only, station will be mounted in the KAON Factory control room in the Booster complex. All plant controls will be electric. D. Plumbing • Site Services All sanitary, storm and water lines will connect to the existing mains. All paved surfaces will be drained. • Sanitary Sanitary drainage will leave each building at one location (150 mm dia. for administration buildings, 100 mm dia. for other buildings) and connect to the existing sanitary main. 22 • Storm All roof and overhangs will be drained. Rainwater leaders within the building will be insulated. Footing drainage will be provided around the perimeter of the building. Storm drainage will leave each building perimeter at one location. It will pick up any area drainage and connect to the existing storm main. • Domestic Water Domestic water will be served from the new incoming water connection. Do-mestic hot water at 65°C is generated using a gas fired domestic hot water boiler. • Plumbing Fixtures All plumbing fixtures will be of institutional quality. Provision will be made for handicapped use. • Fire Protection System All areas will be sprinklered, designed in accordance to the requirement of Or-dinary Hazard Occupancies (Group l) except the Booster Building, flammable liquid storage and gas bottle storage area (Extra Hazard Occupancies (Group 2)). All computer areas (VAXl, CCRl, CCR2, CTRl and CTR3) and tape storage area (CCR3) will be protected by a Halon system. The transformer compound outside the Booster Building will be sprinklered as well. E. Sources Gas shall be available by connecting to the existing gas distribution network in UBC. Electrical power shall be available from the KAON Factory electrical distribution at 480/277V for motors. 6.4.6 Electrical Systems A. Power • Supply and installation of service conductors will be fr0ffi the load side of 480 V air circuit breakers within building for the Booster Building and Office Buildings (served from Booster Building) and within the building for the Service Buildings. Supply and installation of 480 V service conductors for the Technical Support and Machine Shop buildings will be provided from existing TRIUMF facilities. Supply and installation of 480 V service conductors from Service Building No. 1 will be provided to the Main Ring Access Building. The Receiving, Stores and Helium Building will have 480 V service conductors brought to the service equipment under Package No.3. 23 • Supply and installation of all service and distribution equipment such as dis-tribution transformers and panelboards as indicated on the drawings will be included. • Switchboards will utilize draw-out power air circuit breakers with long-time, short-time, instantaneous and coordinated ground fault sensing or will utilize QMQB fusible switches as indicated on the one-line diagrams. • Site utilization level power will be 480 V 3-phase, 3-wire. Accordingly for larger buildings (Booster and Office), a 480 to 480/277 V transformer will be provided so that 277 V fluorescent lighting can be used. • General utilization power will be derived from 480 to 208/120 V, 3-phase, 4-wire, distribution transformers. • Buildings will generally be of non-combustible construction and accordingly services shall be wire in conduit, armoured cable, or type 'FT-4' 'Teck' cable as appropriate. • A dedicated 'data ground' will be provided for each building. Refer to detail on Drawing PAQ-0003D. B. Emergency Power • 'CRITICAL' emergency power, will be available as two separate uninterrupted power supplies (UPS) - one for DATA and one for SAFETY. These services will be received at 208Y /120 V, 3-phase, 4-wire. The DATA source will be utilized for machine control and data only. The SAFETY source will generally be uti-lized for exit signs, stairwell emergency lighting, and special lighting situations, Fire Alarm, Radiation Alarm, Public Address, and 5 HP anode cooling pumps in Service Building Nos. 1, 2, 4 and 5. • 'ESSENTIAL' emergency power, which is available within ten seconds after power failure, will be received at 480 V, 3-phase, 3-wire and will service the following loads. - Booster Building: - general emergency lighting - 1 elevator - 1 power receptacle in each corridor - 1 sanitary pump - 1 storm pump - 1 supply/exhaust fan for smoke removal - 2 stair pressurizing fans - New Office Building: - general emergency lighting - 1 power receptacle in each corridor 24 - Service Buildings: - general emergency lighting - 1 sanitary pump - 1 storm pump - 1 supply/exhaust fan for smoke removal - 1 stair pressurizing fan Buildings not serviced with emergency power include the Main Ring Access Building, the Technical Services Building, the Machine Shop and the Receiving, Stores and Helium Buildings. Emergency lighting for these buildings will be provided by battery pack units. A separate 30 kW UPS will be supplied and installed within this package for the Booster Building to service all CRITICAL loads from grade level up and in particular the Control Room. As part of the work within this package, each UPS power supply source will be provided with a branch circuit panelboard and the extension of all branch circuits to the various loads served therefrom. C. Devices and Branch Circuiting • This section will include supply and installation of all power outlet, light switches and branch circuit wiring utilizing wire in conduit and not armoured cable. All conduits and raceways will be complete with a copper bonding conductor such that equipment grounding is not dependent upon raceway integrity. D. Motors • Supply and installation of Motor Control Centres with full voltage, reduced voltage, reversing and non-reversing starters to suit motor requirements will be included. Building automation DDC interface relays and controls will be provided within separate MCC sections for connection by Package No.2. • The supply and installation of power factor correction capacitors dedicated to individual motors will be included. E. Lighting • Supply and installation of lighting fixtures and lamps and control devices and wiring for site lighting as described below and for interior lighting for buildings will be forming part of this Package. • Lighting will generally be fluorescent operating at 277 V in the Booster and Office Buildings. Elsewhere, lighting will operate at 120 V. Lighting levels will be based upon the recommendations of the Illuminating Engineering Society for offices and industrial complexes. 25 • Interior lighting will generally be controlled by a low voltage remote control relay system with interface into the site Building Management DDC System and with building and local area over-ride switches. F. Communication Systems • The following communication systems will be employed in the various buildings. The control equipment, devices and wiring within the buildings will form part of the work of this package. The facility-wide site and interconnected systems are noted thus (*) and these systems shall be brought to the buildings by Package No.2 or 3. - telephone * (3) - intercom * (3) - data network * (3) - paging * (3) - fire alarm and pressurizing and smoke evacuation * (3) - building automation * (2) - radiation control * (3) - master clock * (3). • Intrusion recognition systems, card access systems and closed circuit T.V. sys-tems have not been requested by the users. • Cable trays above accessible ceilings will be utilized wherever possible so as to provide system flexibility. G. General Items • Electrical equipment and services and light fixtures will be restrained against the forces of an earthquake to the extent required within the B.C. Building Code. • All openings in horizontal or vertical fire separations will be fire/smoke sealed appropriately. • All systems shall be tested and adjusted, commissioned, and demonstrated to the users. • Record Drawings and Maintenance Manuals will be provided. H. Site Development • Demolition The existing UBC Storage Building will be demolished and the Botanical Gar-dens' Nursery with its attendant greenhouses will be relocated. These facilities will require disconnection of existing 120/240 V service drop and telephone drops. The existing overhead pole lines serving these facilities will be removed back to Wesbrook Mall. 26 The existing Helium Building will be relocated. The existing underground power and telephone services to the building will be abandoned and service conductors pulled back to their source. New underground duct banks will be installed to service the expanded Machine Shop and the relocated Receiving, Stores and Helium Building. • Site Lighting New and existing roadways will be serviced with 7.5 m high, 150 watt, colour corrected, high pressure sodium (HPS) roadway cut-off luminaires on approx-imate 45 meter spacings to achieve an average roadway illuminance of 11 lux with a maximum 1 to 5 minimum to maximum ratio. The existing TRIUMF pole-top luminaires in the staff parking area will be relocated to the new southeast staff parking area. The new public and visitor parking area will be illuminated to an average illu-minance of 33 lux and will utilize 150 watt, colour corrected, HPS 'architectural' post-top luminaires utilizing minimum 7.5 m poles. The existing TRIUMF pole-top luminaires around the existing site will remain in place with the intention being of replacing them with the newer style lumi-naire as the existing ballasts fail over time. New pedestrian walkways will be illuminated using lighting sources forming part of adjacent buildings or by pedestrian scale pole-top 70 watt, colour corrected, HPS luminaires. There is no site perimeter security lighting planned. Site lighting will operate at 480/247 V to be consistent with the remainder of the facility. Underground services will be derived from power services in various buildings and these lighting services shall be under the common photocell/time control of the facility building management system. • Signage Allowance should be made for an electrified sign at the entrance to the facility and at the main point of access to each major building on site. ' As part of this signage we suggest that it might be desirable to incorporate a fire alarm signal indication so as to assist in the routing of fire trucks to the source of alarm. 6.4.7 Landscape A. Area 1 - South Campus Road • Existing Vegetation The southern-most end of South Campus road is planted with mature, tall-growing rhododendrons, set against a background screen of tall evergreen and deciduous trees. The remaining section has not yet been constructed and it is presumed that the area will be clear cut. 27 • Proposed Planting The same theme of large rhododendrons and mixed screen will be continued on both sides of South Campus Road. The rhododendrons will be planted close to the road edge so that no bare ground is visible once the plants have matured completely. A selection of 4 or 5 varieties will be planted in drifts and plants will already be a minimum of 5 ft in height. Suggested varieties are: Jan Dekens (rich pink, May flowering) Loderi (white, May flowering) Pink Pearl (pink, May flowering) Alice (deep pink, May flowering) Anna Belford (mauve, May flowering) The screen behind will consist of: 50% Douglas Fir (30% 4 m, 25% 2 m, 45 1.25 m) 20% Western Hemlock (30% 4m, 25% 2 m,45% 1 m) 30% Big-leafed Maple (50% 2 in. cal, 50% 3/4 in cal) B. Area 2 - The Visitor's Parking Lot • Proposed Planting - The median strips between the parking stalls will be planted with maples (acer platinoides "Deborah") at regular intervals, with a low-growing ground cover (mahonia aquifolium compacta). The maples will be of a uniform height and caliper (minimum 5 in. cal.). Norway maples have a formal, densely-branched shape, are fast-growing, withstand pollution and have both spring flowers and rich, autumn foliage. Commonly used as a street or ornamental tree, Norway maples are clean and rarely drip sap. - The islands in the parking lot will be planted with a tough, drought-resistant shrub such as berberis or cotoneaster. These will be planted as 2-gallon container size. c. Area 3 - Screening at Parking Lot Perimeter and Around Booster Building This area will be planted with a combination of shrubs (mixed shrub border) with a few clumps of deciduous trees (i.e. acer palmatum). Shrubs will range in height from 2 ft to 6 ft, allowing enough light in and vision out. Shrubs will be in 2 to 5 gallon containers (50/50 mix). Trees will be a minimum 6 ft in height. D. Area 4 - Wesbrook Mall • Existing Vegetation This stretch of Wesbrook Mall is primarily wide strips of grass boulevard, with little or no planting. Outside the entrance to TRIUMF, there is a circular bed with fruit trees in it. 28 • Proposed Planting This area will be planted similar to Area 1. Rhododendrons backed by a mixed evergreen/ deciduous screen will create a dense screen between the main formal entry and the industrial main ring area. E. Area 5 - The Bank at the East End of the Tunnel Ring A ground cover planting will help keep the bank from eroding and minimize main-tenance. The ground cover will consist of fast-spreading procumbent roses such as Rosa wichuriana or Rosa spinosissima. This will create quite a striking effect when in bloom. To help screen and down-scale the experimental hall, up to 50% of the bank surface will also be planted with higher shrubs such cornus stolinifera (red osier dogwood), rubus or broom. These will be 1-gallon size; roses will be of 2-gallon size. F. Area 6 - The Main Ring • Existing Vegetation Although this area is presently heavily wooded with a mix of deciduous and evergreen trees, it is not expected that any clumps of forest will be able to be saved. It is assumed that the area will be cleared completely. • Proposed Vegetation This area will be sown with a wildflower/grass mixture. Grasses will be a mix of bentgrass/fescue/clover. Wildflowers will include severai rarer varieties of native wildflowers i.e. cammassia, dodecatheon, yellow columbine. The shorter, finer grasses will keep the meadow from looking too much like a "hayfield" and the right selection of wildflowers will allow mowing in the spring again in July and August to minimize the wild appearance and the risk of fire. In addition, the areas between proposed service buildings will be planted with masses of fast-growing shrubs such as those suggested for the east bank. Shrubs will be of 1-gallon and 2-gallon sizes (50/50 mix). G. Area 7 - Various Medians and Open Spaces Along Roads Some of these areas will be left in grass (those areas that are most accessible to machinery) while others will be seeded with mixed colours of lupines. The lupines will self-seed and spread quickly, soon reverting to their wild form. Smaller areas or islands in the roads where tougher plants are needed will be planted as in the parking lots i.e. ground cover such as berberis, cotoneaster, mahonia or ivy (kept neatly clipped at the edges). H. Area 8 - The Experimental Site • Existing Vegetation Presumably there will be none. The area is to be covered in a series of banks or berms. The soil will presumably be recently excavated and therefore some erosion control will be necessary. Also, it will be good to cover the area to keep back the weeds which will inevitably take hold. 29 • Proposed Planting The whole area will be done quite inexpensively by seeding it in ornamental flowering grasses, planted in strips or drifts to create a patchwork-like effect. The sides and tops of the berms will also be seeded. The edges of this area will be seeded with lupines as in other areas of the site. Flowering grasses which grow to no more than 50 cm, are relatively sun and drought tolerant and are usually available include: briza media (quaking grass) festuca (blue fescue) phalaris canariensis ( canary grass) agrostistenius (fine bent) trisetum flavescens (yellow oatgrass) The difference in foliage form and colour and the differences in flower colour will create a very unusual effect. Although the seed head of the ornamental grasses will already attract many species of birds, fruiting plants such as vaccinium and blackberries will also be planted and allowed to spread quickly. I. Area 9 - Southeast Parking Area This area will be done basically the same as Area 2, the Visitor's Parking Lot. J. Area 10 - The Strip Along Marine Drive • Existing Vegetation The area inside the fence line consists of typical second growth forest - 50% evergreen and 50% deciduous (big-leafed maple and alder) trees. • Proposed Planting The existing vegetation will be retained to ensure maximum screening from Marine Drive. Old, dead or unhealthy growth will be cleaned out and additional cedars (seedlings) will be planted on the inside of this screen to replace any lost in clearing the site. An underplanting of low-growing shrubs such as vaccinium ovatum, mahonia aquifolium and gaultheria shallon will complete ~he screening. These will be planted as I-gallon size plants, at a distance of 5 ft to 10ft and allowed to fill in over time. Deer fern aI].d sword fern (also in 1 gallon containers) will also be planted. On the strip of boulevard between the fence line and Marine Drive itself, small Douglas Fir will be planted in random groupings, as has been done further east on Marine Drive. Planted in a variety of sizes, from 2 gallon to 6 ft or 8ft in height, these trees will help hide the fence line and integrate the whole area. K. Fences Chain link fences will contain most of the KAON site. It is very important that these fences not be visible to the public and that they should run between layers of plant material so that the trees and shrubs grow into and obscure the fences. Also, 30 fast-growing vines such as species clematis, ivy and parthenocissus will be planted and allowed to grow through and over the chain link. The vines will be planted as I-gallon size plants. L. Irrigation Permanent in-ground irrigation will be required only in Area 3, the mixed tree/shrub border surrounding the booster complex. Temporary irrigation will be necessary throughout the landscaped areas during the first two years until the plants are well established. Hose bibbs will be installed at 30 m intervals to provide the water for this initial period and ongoing maintenance. 6.4.8 Building Area Summary A summary of the areas of the Package No. 5 buildings involving new construction or alteration is outlined below: Building Office Building Service Buildings Workshop Building existing proposed Receive/Stores Building Helium Building Existing Administration Building existing proposed Main rung Access Building Technical Services Building Capacitor Building Existing Stores Building existing proposed Gross Area (sm) 9650 4694 920 1322 1000 279 3192 3262 93 1000 . .00 279 399 6.S Items Recommended for Further Study Over the course of the PDS study, the design team and client identified several items and issues that should be reviewed in the next phase of the KAON project. 31 A. A complete program review with TRIUMF personnel to ensure that all requirements are included. Specific aspects currently identified include: a technical services build-ing program; further refinement of the future use of existing facilities, particularly the meson hall; plant electrical/ mechanical space; confirmation of space types, sizes and uses established in this study; further definition of placement and space needs of Micro Structural Electronics; need for a document/reproduction centre. B. Number of data grounds in each building. c. Consider a round turning circle near the entry versus the proposed racetrack shape to suit the TRIUMF symbol. D. Consider the possibility of locating covered walkway between booster and office build-ing at grade. E. Review main ring service building crane/elevator shaft locations. F. Review all service building equipment layouts especially the separation between the possibly contaminated areas from the not contaminated areas. G. Review truck and personnel access to the Booster Complex. H. Consider the Marine Drive access as being primary service delivery point. I. Should the computer room fire extinguishers be halon or water. J. Re-examine the potential for using waste heat to heat the buildings. K. The proposed booster cooling is screened from the electrical substation with a land-scaping strip. Review the location of the cooling towers to ensure that no humidity problem will exist for the electrical. L. Reconsider the proposed switchgear location in the first level of the office building. M. Review site communications including pager and P.A. N. Consider the possibility of providing an overhead walkway from the parking lot to the new office building. o. Continue discussions with the Provincial Department of Highways regarding the sec-ondary access from Marine Drive. P. Review space requirements for kicker magnet system on ground floor of Booster Build-mg. 32 6.6 Facilities Program 33 [P#\~~[l,~'jj'~~~ [P~©®~#\[Mj] TRIUMF - KAON Factory November 1989 Cornerstone Planning Group Limited 22 Creekhouse, 1551 Johnston Street, Granville Island Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6H 3R9 Telephone (604) 687-5896, Facsimile (604) 684-6201 TABLE OF CONTENTS 6.6.1 Introduction to the Facilities Program ........ ... ...... .... 1 6.6.2 Site Context .. ... ... ..... .. .................. ...... .. .............. ....... 2 6.6.3 Summary of Required Area .. ........ .. .. ........ .. .... .... .. .. S 6.6A Personnel Estimates .. .. ..... ................ .... ....... ... .... ... . 10 6.6.5 Spatial Organization ........... .... ..... ...... ... .. .... .. .. ..... .. lS 6.6.6 Accommodation Schedule .............. .. ...... .... ... .. .. 2) Note: The document is structured to fit the format and numbering system established for the entire project team by UMA Spantec. The Facilities Program is part of Chapter 6, Facilities Programming, Support Buildings and Site Development - Design Package 5. The prime consultants for Design Package 5 are Chernoff Thompson Architects. Cornerstone is a part of the Chernoff Thompson team with primary responsibility for the facilities programming. 34 6.6.1 INTRODUCTION TO THE FACILITIES PROGRAM Purpose The purpose of the Facilities Program was to provide the design team with a documented description of the facilities required to accommodate the people, equipment and activities envisioned for the TRIUMF site after the KAON Factory has been installed and is fully operational. The focus of the facilities programming work was to define the scale and nature of the 'conventional' facilities, as differentiated from the 'non-conventional' facilities more closely associated with the KAON ring itself. Reference Section 6.6.3 for a complete listing of conventional and non-conventional facilities. Given the complexity of the facilities being planned, as well as the limited timeframe, it was necessary for many interrelated aspects of the project to be addressed simultaneously. Specifically, the facilities program was developed parallel with the design, rather than prior to the design as is traditional. The program was delivered to the design team in a series of interim documents combined with verbal reviews. In this context, the Facilities Program as presented herein documents direction given as opposed to instructions to be followed. The collaborative nature of the project also explains why many qualitative aspects of the program, such as the site design guidelines, have been presented as part of the design concept. Approach Existing TRIUMF facilities and operations were studied to provide a basis from which to determine requirements for the TRIUMF site after the installation of the KAON Factory. An inventory of existing facilities was developed in which all workstations and individual spaces were catalogued and assigned to a Component (coherent groupings of spaces with related functions and needs). Senior TRIUMF staff were interviewed to develop an understanding of current functions, as well as to obtain opinions and recommendations regarding the future development of TRIUMF-KAON. Expected growth patterns were developed by combining the results of these interviews with preliminary personnel projections. Preliminary estimates of space required for conventional facilities were developed by extrapolation from the inventory of existing facilities. The estimates accounted for the expected increase in the number of staff, plus other qualitative factors which were identified during the interviews. These initial estimates of space were reviewed and modified in an iterative process involving the design team and TRIUMF managers. Once the overall scale of the conventional facilities was established, it was necessary to assign each Component to specific buildings, both existing and new. Building assignments were based on functional relationships among the Components, site planning guidelines, and the appropriateness of each building. The initial assignments were reviewed and modified by senior TRIUMF personnel. 35 Interim Documentation As mentioned, the facilities programming for this project was a collaboration with the design team. The interim documentation was, in fact, the material which provided the information upon which to base the design. Key interim facilities programming documents were: 1. Existing Facilities Database, late June 1989. 2. Interview Notes, late June 1989. 3. Revised Interview Notes, early July 1989. 4. Existing Facilities Program, mid-July 1989. 5. Preliminary Units Database, early August 1989. 6. Preliminary Facilities Program, mid-August 1989. 7. Updated Program Information, late September 1989. 36 2 6.6.2 SITE CONTEXT The schematic site plan on page 4 identifies the key existing and planned buildings on the expanded TRIUMF site. Many of buildings illustrated on the site plan were not addressed as part of the facilities programming work, except as locations for certain personnel groups. Facilities programs were developed for the buildings illustrated in the following diagram. Diagrammatic Site Plan Showing Conventional Facilities ::.:!::::!:!::: Existing Building D New Building ~ Restricted Zone Public ~ ••• Access~P Main Pedsetrian Circulation Stores/ Receving Building New Office Building Booster Complex Specifically, requirements were defmed for the following buildings: 1. Existing Administration Building. 2. Existing Stores Building. 3. Existing Liquid Helium Building (to be relocated). 4. Existing Workshop plus addition (not illustrated). 5. New Office Building. 6. New Booster Complex (the portion containing conventional facilities). 7. New Stores/Receiving Building. The key buildings addressed as part of the facilities program are illustrated in the Diagrammatic Site Plan Showing the Conventional Facilities. The diagram also 37 3 indicates the primary circulation links between the buildings. The parameters used to determine the location of each building were developed in response to the highly specific constraints established by the KAON ring and the associated experimental facilities, as well as the functional requirements of the non-conventional facilities. As described in the design concept, the Booster Complex is inside the security perimeter, as is the Workshop. The remaining buildings which were programmed are outside the security perimeter. The edge of the restricted zone is illustrated in the above diagram. The office, lab and support functions located in the programmed buildings are interrelated. Staff access among the buildings, and from the buildings to the rest of the site, should be convenient. In particular, the link between the New Office Building and the Existing Administration Building should be direct and protected from the weather. Visitors to the site will be received in the public part of the New Office Building. 38 4 Schematic TRIUMF-KAON Site Plan New Facilities 80: Booster Complex EH: Experimental Hall ET: Extraction Hall GV: 20 GeV Hall GS: 20 GeV Hall Service Building NU: Neutrino Hall OL: Office Building SB: Service Buildings SR: Stores/Receiving Building WS: Workshop Addition Existing Facilities AB: Accelerator Building AD: Administration Building 8M: Biomedical Facility CA: Chemistry Annex HE: Liquid Helium Building (10 be moved) ME: Meson Hall Extension MF:M-15Ha1 (tobebulft) MN: Maintenance Shed MS: Meson Hall Service Annex OS: Stores Building PE: Proton Hall Extension RH: Remote Handling Facility SA: Service Annex SE: Service Annex Extension WS: WOIkshop .... : :'. ::-"-:: '.:':\ :.:.::.::./:.:.: .... : 39 Primary ~' Secondary Access WSIWA 5 6.6.3 SUMMARY OF REQUIRED AREA Area of Programmed Buildings As summarized in the following table, new programmed buildings for the KAON Factory development will total an estimated 11,754 m2. This combines with the existing 5,277 m2 for a total of 17 ,772 m2 conventional facilities. The usable area available is estimated at 12,009 m2. Summary of Space for Programmed Buildings GROSS AREA CODE BUILDING NET AREA EXISTING NEW AD Administration Building 2,368 m2 3,409 m2 n/a OS Stores Building 283 m2 311 m2 n/a HE Helium Building 434 m2 558 m2 n/a WS Expanded Workshop 1,248 m2 999 m2 521 m2 OL New Office Building 4,778 m2 n/a 7,154 m2 BO Booster Complex 2,086 m2 n/a 3,021 m2 SR New Stores Building 812 m2 n/a 1,058 m2 Total Area -------'-=-12,009 m2 5,277 m2 11,754 m2 Component Area Summary The following two tables summarize the estimated floor areas for each Component. The first table presents the estimates for the functions to be accommodated in the existing facilities. The second table summarizes the estimated areas for the Components to be housed in new buildings. Accommodation for three Components is divided between two buildings: • Common Resources are divided between the New Office Building and the Existing Administration Building roughly in proportion to the total number of personnel being accommodated in each facility. • Scientists Offices are divided between the New Office Building and the Existing Administration Building depending on the space available in the current facility. The number of personnel to be accommodated in each building was determined in the design of the Existing Administration Building. • Stores is divided between the relocated Helium Building and the New StoreslReceiving Building depending on the space available in the existing facility. 'Net Area' is the area available to accommodate the functions. 'C.G.Area' refers to 'Component Gross Area', which is the Net Area plus allowances for circulation and walls within the Component. The percentage figure between the Net and Component Gross Area columns is the efficiency factor (Net divided Component Gross Area) . The factors reflect the nature of the space. For example, Components with many small offices will require relatively more circulation than another Component with large open areas. The Booster Complex calculations do not reflect the additional mechanical space requirements due to below grade space and equipment. Every building was assigned a two-letter code, while all Components received a three-letter code. These are used consistently throughout the Facilities Program. The staff assigned to each Component is listed in the final column. Refer to Section 6.6.4 for a more detailed outline of personnel estimates. 40 6 Component Areas for Existing Buildings BUILDING AD Existing Administration Building COMPONENT NET AREA C.G.AREA STAFF ADC Administrative Computing 57.5 69% 83 6 AUD Auditorium 190.0 90% 211 0 BSO Business Office 171.0 69% 248 20 CRM CRM Lab 119.4 78% 153 9 DIO Diagnostics Offices 44.0 70% 63 5 DSO Design Office 618.0 72% 858 37 ETO Electronics Offices 365.5 . 70% 522 38 GEL GeneralElectronicsLab 149.9 75% 200 3 RES Common Resources 117.4 70% 168 0 SCo Scientists Offices --=-=-5--:-35=-.-=-1 _69_%_0 775 _75_ Total Net and Component Gross Areas 2367.8 72% 3,281 193 Estimated Net and Actual Gross Areas 2367.8 69% 3,409 os Existing DSH Diagnostics Shop 144.7 80% 181 5 o 5 Stores Bldg ELS Experimenters Lab Total Net and Component Gross Areas Estimated Net and Actual Gross Areas 138.5 80% 173 283.2 80% 354 283.2 91% 311 HE Relocated THE Helium Operations 123.8 85% 146 2 Helium Bldg STR Stores 310.0 85% 365 0 Total Net and Component Gross Areas 433.8 85% 510 2 Estimated Net and Actual Gross Areas 433.8 78% 558 Wi Workshop MSH Machine Shop 1127.4 90% 1,253 35 MSS Machine Shop Support 120.5 75% 161 6 Total Net and Component Gross Areas 1247.9 88% 1,413 41 Estimated Net and Gross Areas 1247.9 82% 1,520 Actual Gross Area 999 Estimated Size of Addition 521 41 7 Component Areas for New Buildings BUILDING COMPONENT NET AREA CGA STAFF OL New CAF Cafeteria 501.0 76% 659 6 Office CNC Conference Centre 416.0 84% 495 0 Building DOF Directors Office 139.5 70% 199 10 EPO Fnginre7Physilsts afres 719.4 70% 1,028 75 INF Information 86.5 70% 124 7 LIB Library 279.5 78% 358 9 PER Personnel 68.0 70% 97 6 REC Reception 122.0 65% 188 2 S