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UBC Arts and Culture District Students Living Off-Campus Glass, Liana; Penner, Pearl; Sarshar, Soraya; McNaughton, Mark; Flock, Ian; Luzong, Kevin 2019-04-30

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report UBC Arts and Culture District Students Living Off-Campus Liana Glass, Pearl Penner, Soraya Sarshar, Mark McNaughton, Ian Flock, Kevin Luzong University of British Columbia PLAN 522 Themes: Community, Wellbeing April 30, 2019 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.  Table of Contents  1. Executive Summary 2. Introduction/Background 3. Methodology  2.1 Limitations 3. Literature Review 4. Results 4.1 Survey 4.1.1 Sample Demographics 4.1.2 Attendees 4.1.3 Non-attendees 4.1.4 Open Response 4.2 Focus Group 5. Discussion 6. Recommendations 7. Conclusion Appendices: A. Survey Questions B. Focus Group Questions C. Letter of Information and Consent          1. Executive Summary The UBC Arts and Culture District was conceived in 1957 with the vision of bringing arts and culture onto UBC to enhance campus culture. In its current form it consists of a cluster of buildings on the Northwest portion of campus. Recent effort has been taken to fulfill the original vision for the Arts and Culture District, this is where the impetus for this project originates.   The purpose of this research project was to assess the barriers that are keeping the off-campus population from attending nighttime events in UBC Art and Culture District. Our group narrowed the scope of the study to students living off campus to enhance our ability to obtain representative data. The study also looked at the opportunities for retention and possible incentives to increase the off-campus student population’s attendance at nighttime events.  We conducted a literature review that covered research on the community impact of arts and culture, as well as other institutions’ best practices with their arts and culture districts.  Two data collection methods were used, intercept surveys and a focus group. The surveys were delivered online through various media outlets and social networks, in addition to in person surveys conducted in the AMS Student Nest. At the end of the survey there was a section for further research. An email list was generated from willing participants and invitations for the focus group were sent out. The research was constrained by weather disruptions, limited time and research capacity.  The survey results indicated that 62% of respondents had never attended an evening event in the Arts and Culture District, 28% had, and the remaining 10% had attended an event in the District, but not a nighttime event. The focus group participants expanded on the general trends observed through the survey results. They were generally unfamiliar with the Arts and Culture District. The Chan Centre, Museum of Anthropology, and Belkin Art Gallery were visited by the participants, but only one of them attended a nighttime event at the Chan Centre.  Reasons cited for low attendance included difficulty staying on campus between the end of classes and the start of nighttime programs. Students living off campus usually do not feel like commuting back to for evening events if they have been on campus during the day.  Recommendations for improving the District are increased messaging and advertising of the District, and including more promotion of the free tickets that are available to students. Other recommendations include creating one centralized database that has a complete list of upcoming events in the District for ease of finding events. Finally  the District would benefit from a cohesive brand image to cement it as part of campus life in students minds.  2. Introduction/Background The University of British Columbia hosts an extensive Arts and Culture District, from the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) to the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, offering a diverse range of events and attractions for those who pay it a visit. There has been an ongoing disconnect however between those who attend these events and those who attend the University, with many student and faculty members disclosing that they are unable to attend the nighttime events offered by the University. Our project aimed then to assess the barriers that the UBC population faces from attending nighttime events in the UBC Arts and Culture District, narrowing the scope to students who live off-campus. According to the Student Union Society of the University of British Columbia (2018) – Academic Experience Survey Report, 67 percent of students live off-campus. Figure 1 shows the geographic range covered by UBC students’ homes. With the majority of the student body off-campus, we believed this research was integral in understanding barriers in nighttime event attendance. By conducting qualitative research, we were able to highlight the various barriers students off-campus face, as well as gather recommendations for how to overcome them. Through qualitative analysis we were able to contribute to the ongoing research happening at SEEDS to help maintain and grow the ever-thriving arts community here at the University of British Columbia.  Figure 1: Distribution of UBC Student Population    Source: Campus and Community Planning (2016)  3. Methodology The focus of the project is to understand the gap in attendance at UBC Arts and Culture nighttime events amongst UBC students who live off-campus. Our assigned group was “people affiliated with UBC who live off campus”. To narrow down the subject to a more feasible scope, we chose to focus on students who live off campus. The main goals of the project were to:  a) Identify inhibitors to attendance at nightlife events; b) Assess opportunities for student retention on campus; and c) Examine the work that other universities have done to promote their respective arts and culture districts. In order to meet the goals of the project, our group completed a review of relevant literature, intercept surveys and a focus group. The literature review covered other institutions’ approach to arts and culture access, and academic articles about arts and culture impact. In the primary data collection stage of our project, we followed a mixed inductive and deductive research methodology: we provided possible responses to some questions, while others were open-ended. This mixed methodology allowed us to evaluate whether our research corroborated our observations and literature review findings, as well as leaving the possibility of previously un-considered responses to be given by  participants. To do this, we conducted a survey both online and through intercepting participants; and held a focus group, the questions for which can be found in appendices A and B respectively.  For the intercept surveys, our group went out in pairs to the nest to intercept participants, offering Tim Bits as incentive and compensation for participation. The Nest sample was made up of predominantly those who identified as women. The survey was also circulated on the internet. Around two thirds of participants indicated they have not attended an event in the Arts and Culture District. Most of the respondents were Graduate students. Most students who live off campus have a commute between 30-60 mins compared to a smaller 0-30 minute commute. Finally, the focus group was made up of survey participants who indicated that they were willing to take part in further research. The focus group helped us better understand the barriers that students face in attending events at the Arts and Culture District here at UBC, and allowed us to explore possible incentives to increase attendance in the future. The focus group was conducted by three of our group members, and participants signed the letter of Information and consent shown in appendix C.  3.1 Limitations Similar to many research projects, there were limitations to our research. As a result of having a small (N=50), sample size, the results are perhaps not indicative of the overall population. Further, the intercept survey participants predominantly identified as female, reflecting another limit to the representativeness of the sample. Finally, time was also a limitation to our project. The time available to investigate the research problem was constrained by the limited time frame of the assignment. With more time available, we could have collected more survey and focus group results, permitting for a more representative sample.  4. Literature Review The articles summarized below cover the range of research from the impact of arts and culture on communities to arts and culture districts in practice. An understanding of how arts and culture districts influence their surroundings is an important starting point when thinking of the benefits that can be shared from developing arts and culture districts. With recent efforts to develop UBC’s Arts and Culture district specifically, the relevant research can serve inspiration on how to manage the trade-offs that can occur through the arts.    Guetzkow, J. (2002). “How the Arts Impact Communities: An Introduction to the Literature on Arts Impact Studies”   This paper covers the question of the impact of arts and culture on communities, and the theoretical problems inherent in this question. We often think of arts and culture as being good for individuals and the surrounding communities, but how exactly are the benefits of the arts distributed? To link impact of arts in any sense means thinking about the different mechanisms that arts and culture operate on: direct involvement, audience participation, and the presence of artists and arts organizations. Guetzkow looks at three claims related to the impact areas of the arts: The arts increase social capital and community cohesion, the arts have a beneficial impact on the economy, the arts are good for individuals.  While there is evidence in each of the claims, it is complicated by the ability to imply a causal relationship. This is because the benefits from the arts are very difficult to measure in any concrete way. The author suggests we instead look at opportunity costs instead of the benefits of the arts. The importance of asking specific questions about the impact of arts, allows us to ascertain whether there is a real effect of arts and culture on the community or not.  We must also be careful to be specific in our definitions when posing a question of art impact. Asking specific questions can guide better inquiries to assessing the real impact of arts and culture in a community.   Rich, M. A. and Tsitsos, W. (2016), Avoiding the ‘SoHo Effect’ in Baltimore: Neighborhood Revitalization and Arts and Entertainment Districts. Int J Urban Regional, 40: 736-756.  The focus of this paper is on how arts and culture districts affect urban neighbourhoods. For the purpose of this analysis, the researchers looked to the Station North Arts & Entertainment District in Baltimore, Maryland as a case study. It is notable that the neighbourhood is surrounded by three major universities: Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), Johns Hopkins University (JHU), and the University of Baltimore. Since its designation as an arts and entertainment district in 2002, the neighbourhood has seen the emergence of public–private partnerships to develop artist housing, artist studios, and arts educational buildings. Three main community groups–legacy residents, artists, and middle/upper-class homeowners–negotiate with one another at the micro-level, shaping the social dynamics of the neighborhood. Larger institutions, including JHU, MICA, community development corporations, and the city, appear to exert undue influence over the physical and  economic status of the neighbourhood. In conclusion, the researchers have found that Station North presents a case of an arts and cultural district that, on the surface, is doing everything it can to avoid gentrification, while at the same time, is using creative placemaking strategies to brand the neighbourhood as a palatable neighbourhood for middle-class professionals to consume experiences and reside.  Zanke, M. (2018). The History of UBC’s thriving Arts & Culture District. Retrieved from https://www.ubc.ca/ubc-now/2018/arts-and-culture-district.html  In 1957, UBC started a committee dedicated to creating an arts centre on campus. The hope of the committee was to redefine the campus atmosphere and provide an opportunity to instill new energy and creative expression on campus. As a result, the Frederic Lasserre building opened in 1962 and the Frederic Wood Theatre opened in 1963 followed by the School of Music. In 1965, the arts centre was socially titled the UBC Norman MacKenzie Centre for the Arts. Many more buildings have been added to the arts centre since the first three buildings were built. The Centre for the Arts, now known as the Arts and Culture District, continues to be a distinct cultural and educational experience. Additionally, the Arts and Culture District continues to encourage free artistic expression. Presently, the Arts and Culture District is home to the Museum of Anthropology, the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, and the Beatty Biodiversity Museum. The vision for the Arts and Culture District is led by Deb Pickman who is a UBC Alum and is active in the arts. Pickman has witnessed the growth of the Arts and Culture District first hand. Unfortunately, Pickman has noticed that students rarely attend events in the Arts and Culture District. Lastly, Pickman encourages students to attend events in the Arts and Culture District as the District is a place to discover new passions.  Bristol, U. of. (2006). A vision for the University’s cultural life. Bristol, UK: The University of Bristol. Retrieved from http://www.bristol.ac.uk/university/governance/policies/cultural.html This paper provides a brief overview of the University of Bristol's existing cultural life, and sets out aims and objectives to guide future cultural activities in the area. This paper helps to recognize, promote and sustain, as well as broaden the aspect of the University’s life which is its cultural district. The paper also helps to situate the University of Bristol into the larger context of the city and its role as an institution icon with a reputation recognized around the world. In order to help bring forth the  cultural aspect of the University, the paper lists six objectives in which the University should adopt. 1. To establish a broad policy and development framework while acknowledging the existing aspects of the University’s cultural life. This includes integrating cultural activities into the planning and decision-making of the University, as well as interpreting, developing and implementing a Cultural Vision for the future. 2. To help existing and proposed cultural enterprises at the University succeed and to safeguard and promote their cultural assets. This will come by looking at the potential of existing infrastructure that exists at the institution for cultural activities. 3. To help faculties, departments, division and student groups identify and pursue new cultural opportunities. 4. To achieve greater internal and external recognition of the institution’s cultural strength, and to bring them to light within the institution and the city. 5. To integrate current cultural activity in their Positive Working Environment agenda, as well as Education Strategy. 6. To increase the University’s engagement with cultural events that are already happening in the city. Finally, the University recognizes the opportunity it has to bring forward cultural activities on campus, and the benefits it will bring to the quality of life of both students and staff. Given its identify and reputation, the University wants this endeavor to hold a close relationship with the city-region and to formally adopt the 6 objectives in a comprehensive and thorough plan.  5. Survey 5.1. Survey          In this section we will summarize and analyze the results of the online survey. First, we will outline the basic identifiers and demographic data collected in the survey, through respondents’ selections of formulated, multiple-choice options. Next, we will compare the demographic data of off-campus students who have attended nighttime events in the Arts and Culture District with those of off-campus students who have not. Finally, we will analyze and present the responses to the open-ended survey questions. 5.1.1.  Sample Demographics Fifty off-campus students completed the online survey. Considering basic identifiers, 54% identified as female, 44% as male, and 2% preferred not to share their gender.  Fifty percent of respondents were graduate students, and 46% undergraduate, with 4% choosing not to indicate their level of study.           As is shown in Figure 2, survey results further showed that 62% of respondents had never attended an evening event in the Arts and Culture District, 28% had, and the remaining 10% had attended an event in the District, but not a nighttime event. Finally, to gain some perspective on where students are coming from to access events, we asked for their commute times to and from campus. Forty-two percent of respondents reported a commute time of between 0 and 30 minutes, while the remaining 58% commute for between 30 and 60 minutes.          Two questions relating directly to the Arts and Culture District itself were also covered. As Figure 3 shows, the Chan Centre and MOA were the most-attended event-spaces. The survey also included a question addressing students’ awareness of the free student tickets available to Arts and Culture District events. The response to this was that students overwhelmingly do not: 72% of respondents did not know about the free tickets, 22% knew, and 6% chose not to respond.      Figure 3: Most Attended Event Centres Figure 2.Participant Attendance Source: UBC Arts and Culture District Survey     Source: UBC Arts and Culture District Survey  5.1.2. Attendees Considering only respondents who had attended a nighttime event in the Arts and Culture District, the demographics change: 47% of attendees were women, 46% were male, and the remaining 7% chose not to respond to this question. These results show a more even divide between male and female than the overall survey responses, and a higher portion of non-responses. Graduate students made up 40% of attendees, undergraduates 53% and non-responses 7%. In this sub-group, undergraduates make up the larger portion of respondents, while in the overall sample graduates are more highly represented. The breakdown of attendees’ commute times is very similar to that of the overall sample: forty percent of attendees were in the under 30-minute commute group, and the other 50% commuted between 30 and 60 minutes. 5.1.3. Non-attendees Looking at respondents who had not attended a nighttime event in the Arts and Culture District, the data is slightly different again. In this sub-group, 58% were women, and 42% men, no respondents chose not to answer this question. This represents the largest difference between respondents by gender groups when compared to the other sub-group and the sample as a whole. Fifty-two percent of these respondents were graduate students, with 42% being undergraduate students  and 3% chose not to answer.  Finally, in the non-attendee sub-group, 45% of respondents commuted less than 30 minutes to campus, and 55% commuted between 30 and 60 minutes, representing a higher weighting toward the longer commute than the attendee sub-group.  5.1.4. Open Responses  In this section, we will analyse and present the results of the open-response questions from the survey. The majority of these questions were structured as multiple choice, with the option to select “other” and provide additional information. The responses in this “other” group were coded following an inductive approach: we did not impose predetermined categories, but rather identified categories of responses that emerged from the data. The questions and their responses were as follows:  Can you identify any barriers that are stopping you from attending an event in the Arts and Culture District?  In the first stage of responding to this question, students were able to select all that applied from don’t know, time of events, types of events, unaffordability, and other. As Figure 4 shows, don’t know, and other were the most commonly selected responses, while time of events was also a considerable barrier.   Figure 4: Barriers to Attending Events in Arts and Culture District  Source: UBC Arts and Culture District Survey Figure 4 further shows the main categories that emerged within the other responses where students chose to elaborate. These main categories of barriers were lack of awareness of events, distance of events, and lack of interest. The most predominant other barrier identified was lack of awareness. Some examples of the responses given  by participants in these categories are shown in the callouts stemming from them in Figure Y as well. In addition to these examples, written responses included, “it’s not advertised,” and, “UBC is too far from East Vancouver to travel to on a regular basis.”  What would compel you to attend an event in the Arts and Culture District?  This question received fewer responses than the previous one. Structured the same way, the initial options from which participants could choose were other, more applicable programming, lower ticket prices, and don’t know. In contrast to the previous question, to which unaffordability was the least common response, lower ticket prices was the most commonly identified response that would compel attendance, as is shown in Figure 5. The general theme of responses in the other category was of students indicating they were too busy with school or other commitments to attend Arts and Culture District nighttime events.  Figure 5: Factors to Compel Attendance to Events in Arts and Culture District  Source: UBC Arts and Culture District Survey  What does compel you to attend events in the Arts and Culture District?  With data provided from another group who held a pop-up engagement at an Arts and Culture District evening event, we were able to analyze reasons for which off-campus students do attend these events. The most common categories of responses in this data included the low cost of events, the availability of free food, the effectiveness of their advertising, and the locations of the events on campus.   While our project is aimed at identifying barriers for students who do not attend, it is worthwhile to note that some of these responses contradict the barriers identified in the first open-ended question. This is a positive indication that once these barriers are removed, students do feel compelled and are able to attend events.   What are some ways to engage fellow students to encourage attendance at vents in the Arts and Culture District?  This was the final question in our survey. The multiple-selection options we provided were don’t know, increased transportation options, lower ticket prices, more applicable programming, more evening food options, and other. The responses were all selected by at least two students, with lower ticket prices being the most selected option. Within the other response, the categories of responses included increase advertising, reduce academic conflicts, and integration with off campus opportunities. These responses included suggestions of working with faculty to include event-attendance in their courses, or to reduce conflicts with class times; and to hold more events off campus. The flow of these responses is reflected in Figure 6. Figure 6: Ways to Encourage Student Attendance at Arts and Culture District Events  Source: UBC Arts and Culture District Survey  5.2 Focus Group As part of our data gathering process, we conducted a focus group on March 4, 2019. This focus group was targeted towards individuals who completed our earlier survey and identified as UBC students living off-campus. The purpose of this focus group was to identify the needs, gaps, challenges, and opportunities, with regard to nighttime events at the UBC Arts and Culture District. In total, there were three participants. Through this activity, they engaged in a facilitated discussion, guided by a series of focus questions. The focus questions and participants’ responses are as follows: How familiar are you with the Arts and Culture District at UBC?  The participants were unfamiliar with the Arts and Culture District on a whole, but they were all familiar with the different facilities that comprise the district, including the Museum of Anthropology, Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, Belkin Art Gallery, etc. Have you attended any events in the Arts and Culture District? If so, which ones, and why? What was your experience? Two out of the three participants had previously attended events in the Arts and Culture District. One had previously attended a performance at the Chan Centre, while the other frequently visited the Museum of Anthropology and the Belkin Art Gallery. Both participants expressed that they enjoyed their experiences. Of the events that you’ve attended in the Arts and Culture District, were any of them evening events? The participant who attended a performance at the Chan Centre confirmed that it was an evening event. However, the participant who frequently visited the Museum of Anthropology and the Belkin Art Gallery had only visited during the daytime hours.   What, if anything, makes attendance at these evening events difficult for you? The participants unanimously agreed that the biggest hindrance to their attendance at evening events is the inconvenience of staying on campus to wait for the start of these events. They expressed that there is a long gap between the end of their classes and the start of these evening events, and since they also have long commutes off-campus, they would prefer to go home instead of staying at UBC. The participants were not interested in returning to campus in the evening after already going home. One participant also commented that he lives with his family and has obligations in the evening, which further prevents him from attending evening events. What would compel you to attend more evening events at the Arts and Culture District? The participants agreed that a greater variety of events, along with an increase in the number of showtimes, could compel them to attend more evening events within the Arts and Culture District. They also mentioned that lowering the cost of tickets or offering free tickets to students would encourage them to attend more events. Two of the three participants were unaware that students are already able to get free tickets. What are ways in which you think the school, and particularly the Arts and Culture District, could do in order to engage more with students are living off-campus?  The participants agreed that better branding of the Arts and Culture District and increased advertising of the events would be greatly beneficial. One participant recommended that a weekly or monthly newsletter be sent to students with a calendar of all the upcoming events within the district. Another participant recommended that social media, particularly Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, be utilized to create a recognizable brand for the district. One also mentioned the success of the UBC Connects public lecture series and suggested that the Arts and Culture District use similar tactics to promote its events.  6. Discussion  Based on the discussion with our focus group participants, we recognize that there was a general lack of awareness about the UBC Arts and Culture District. While the students were familiar with individual facilities, such as the Chan Centre for Performing Arts and the Museum of Anthropology, they were unaware that these are all designated under a single district on the UBC campus. The participants were also unaware of student incentives, such as free tickets to shows and events. Overall, the participants agreed that improved branding of the Arts and Culture District as a unique entity and increased advertising of the events would be beneficial.  From their comments, it was clear that the biggest deterrent to their attendance at nighttime events was the inconvenience of staying on campus and waiting for the events to begin. However, more diverse programming and additional showtimes could encourage them to attend. As in the Maryland case study, it is clear that intentional and active branding and placemaking efforts can be effective in this regard. The Bristol case highlights the role that university policy could play in enlivening the District, and that such places are important for the opportunities they provide students. From the literature review overall, we learn that arts and culture districts benefit individuals as well as the community, and the participants in our study certainly reflected the belief that this could be the case at UBC’s District as well. Overall, the participants agreed that the Arts and Culture District is a great benefit to UBC and that they would like it to have a more prominent presence on campus.  7. Recommendations  Based on the findings from our survey and focus group results, we recommend that the UBC Arts and Culture District undertake the following actions: 1. Increase advertising of events both through traditional media, such as posters and student papers, and through social media.   2. Increase promotion of free student ticket availability by making this a central component of the advertising recommended above. Students indicated both that ticket prices were a barrier to attending, and that roughly three quarters of them are unaware of the availability of free student tickets. This represents an opportunity to increase awareness of an already-existing solution to this barrier.  3. Create a centralized and accessible events calendar or directory. Paired with increased advertising, this will facilitate students’ access to events in the Arts and Culture District.  4. Create and promote a cohesive brand for the Arts and Culture District. Many students indicated that they were not aware of the District as a unified entity. Increasing brand recognition and that this is tied to a specific geographic location on campus would help generate awareness of and interest in Arts and Culture District events.  5. Create, or encourage partner organizations on campus to create places on campus where students feel welcome and comfortable to stay while they wait for evening programming the Arts and Culture District. This would help with the identified issue that students are deterred from attending events by the need to wait on campus after their other commitments have ended.   8. Conclusion Throughout this report we have attempted to answer the research question: What are the primary factors that determine attendance at nighttime Arts and Culture events amongst UBC students who live off-campus? Through an extensive literature review, intercept surveys and participatory focus groups, we seek to answer this question, and to provide further recommendations. Our surveys indicated that 62% of respondents never attended an evening event in the Arts and Culture District, with 58% had a commute time between 30 and 60 minutes to and from campus. When asked to answer what barriers they found in attending nighttime events in the Arts and Culture District, the predominant choice answered was the time of the events. Other comments included lack of awareness, distance, and lack of interest.  Incentives to coming to these events recorded in the survey included increasing advertisement, reducing academic conflict as well as integration with off-campus opportunities. Furthermore, our focus group provided further insight indicating that overall there was a lack of awareness about the UBC Arts and Culture District. While students were aware of individual facilities, they were unaware of the District as whole and all the program and events it has to offer. A recurring recommendation was to  improve the branding of the Arts and Culture District in order to create a unified identity. This was paired with a recommendation on a centralized and accessible events calendar or directory to compliment this branding. Overall, our team and our participants unanimously agreed that the Arts and Culture District is a great benefit to the University of British Columbia, in which we would like it to have as a more prominent presence on campus. We hope our research, findings and recommendations can help lead to a more notable and utilized Arts and Culture facility at our University.          Bibliography:  Bristol, U. of. (2006). A vision for the University’s cultural life. Bristol, UK: The University of Bristol. Retrieved from http://www.bristol.ac.uk/university/governance/policies/cultural.html  Guetzkow, J. (2002). “How the Arts Impact Communities: An Introduction to the Literature on Arts Impact Studies”   Rich, M. A. and Tsitsos, W. (2016), Avoiding the ‘SoHo Effect’ in Baltimore: Neighborhood Revitalization and Arts and Entertainment Districts. Int J Urban Regional, 40: 736-756.   Zanke, M. (2018). The History of UBC’s thriving Arts & Culture District.  Retrieved from https://www.ubc.ca/ubc-now/2018/arts-and-culture-district.html                 Appendix A: Survey  PLAN 522 Arts and Culture District Survey  Start of Block: Default Question Block   Q1 Hello! We are conducting research on how to engage students in attending events at the Arts and Culture District at UBC with Campus and Community Planning (SEEDS) and Deb Pickman from the Office of the Dean. This is a short survey to engage students in attending events at Arts and Culture District.    What do you most identify with? o Woman  (1) o Man  (2) o Two-spirit  (3) o Non-binary  (4) o Prefer not to answer  (5)     Q1b At what level are you currently studying? o Undergraduate  (1) o Graduate  (2) o P.H.D.  (3) o Other  (4) ________________________________________________ o Don't know  (5) o Prefer not to Answer  (6)     Q2 What housing situation do you most identify with? o Student housing  (1) o Housing on UBC  (2) o Non affiliated member of the public  (3) o Off campus (0-30 min)  (4) o Off campus (30-60 min)  (5) o Don't know  (6) o Prefer not to answer  (7) o Other  (8) ________________________________________________      Q3 What faculty are you currently a part of? o Faculty of Applied Science  (1) o Faculty of Arts  (2) o Sauder School of Business  (3) o Faculty of Medicine  (4) o Peter A. Allard School of Law  (5) o Other  (6) ________________________________________________  o Don't know  (7) o Prefer not to answer  (8)     Q4 Intro: The UBC Arts and Culture District, located at the north end of UBC’s Point Grey campus, is home to the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, Museum of Anthropology, the Morris & Helen Belkin Art Gallery, the Audain Art Centre, the Old Auditorium, the Frederic Wood Theatre and the UBC School of Music.  Have you attended at least one evening event in the Arts and Culture District at UBC? o Yes  (1) o No  (2) o I have attended an event in the Arts and Culture District but not in the evening  (3) o Don't know  (4) o Prefer not to answer  (5)   End of Block: Default Question Block   Start of Block: Student who live off campus Display This Question: If Q4 = Yes   Q5 At what venue did you attend this event(s)? Please select as many as applicable ▢        Chan Centre  (1) ▢        Museum of Anthropology  (2) ▢        Belkin Art Gallery  (3) ▢        Audain Art Centre  (4) ▢        Old Auditorium  (5) ▢        Frederic Wood Theatre  (6) ▢        UBC School of Music  (7)  ▢        Don't know  (8) ▢        Prefer not to answer  (9)     Display This Question: If Q4 = Yes   Q6 What would compel you to attend more events on campus? Please select as many as applicable ▢        Lower ticket prices  (1) ▢        More applicable  programming  (2) ________________________________________________ ▢        More evening food options  (3) ▢        Increased transportation options  (4) ▢        Other  (5) ________________________________________________ ▢        Don' know  (6) ▢        Prefer not to answer  (7)     Display This Question: If Q4 = Yes   Q7 What are some ways to engage fellow students to encourage attendance for events in the Arts and Culture District? Please select as many as applicable ▢        Lower ticket prices  (1) ▢        More applicable programming  (2) ________________________________________________ ▢        More evening food options  (3) ▢        Increased transportation options  (4) ▢        Other  (5) ________________________________________________  ▢        Don't know  (6) ▢        Prefer not to answer  (7)   End of Block: Student who live off campus   Start of Block: Student who live off campus Display This Question: If Q4 = No Or Q4 = I have attended an event in the Arts and Culture District but not in the evening Or Q4 = Don't know Or Q4 = Prefer not to answer   Q8 Have you ever heard of UBC’s Arts and Culture District? o Yes  (1) o No  (2) o Don't know  (3) o Prefer not to answer  (4)     Display This Question: If Q4 = No Or Q4 = I have attended an event in the Arts and Culture District but not in the evening Or Q4 = Don't know Or Q4 = Prefer not to answer   Q9 Can you identify any barriers that are stopping you from attending an event at UBC’s Arts and Culture District? Please select as many as applicable ▢        Time of events  (1)  ▢        Types of programming  (2) ▢        Unaffordability  (3) ▢        Other  (4) ________________________________________________ ▢        Don't know  (5) ▢        Prefer not to answer  (6)   End of Block: Student who live off campus   Start of Block: Conclusion   Q10 Are you aware that there are a limited number of free tickets that are available to UBC students? o Yes  (1) o No  (2) o Don't know  (3) o Prefer not to answer  (4)     Q11 Are there any final comments you have for how to engage students to attend event in UBC’s Arts and Culture District? o Yes  (1) ________________________________________________ o No  (2) o Don't know  (3) o Prefer not to answer  (4)     Q12 Thank you for your interest and participation in this important research. Would you be willing to be contacted for future studies on this research? o Yes (Please enter your email)  (1) ________________________________________________  o No  (2) o Don't know  (3) o Prefer not to answer  (4)   End of Block: Conclusion       Appendix B: Focus Group Questions  Background -  We are conducting research on how to engage students in attending events at the Arts and Culture District at UBC with Campus and Community Planning (SEEDS). This is a focus group questionnaire to understand the barriers students who live off campus face in attending events at the Arts and Culture Districts, and to explore possible incentives to have them attend in the future.    Questions   1. How familiar are you with the Arts and Culture District at UBC?  2. Have you attended any events in the Arts and Culture District? If so which ones, and why? What was your experience?   3. Of the events that you’ve attended in the Arts and Culture District, were any of them evening events?  4. What, if anything, makes attendance at these evening events difficult for you?     5. What would compel you to attend more evening events at the Arts and Culture District?   6. What are ways in which you think the school, and particularly the Arts and Culture District, could do in order to engage with students who are living off campus more?        Appendix C: Letter of Information and Consent  Letter of Information and Consent  Off-Campus Students’ Attendance at UBC Arts and Culture District Nighttime Events  Graduate Student Researchers Liana Glass, Pearl Penner, Soraya Sarshar, Mark McNaughton, Ian Flock, Kevin Luzong  Master of Community and Regional Planning The University of British Columbia liana.glass@ubc.ca Research Supervisor/ Instructor  Sara Ortiz Escalante  School of Community and Regional Planning The University of British Columbia  sara.ortizescalante@ubc.ca   Purpose of the Study:  The purpose of this study is to complete a gap analysis of UBC Arts and Culture District events. Specifically, our aim is to explore and identify the factors that contribute to off-campus students’ attendance at nighttime events in the UBC Arts District. The end result of this study will be a report to the UBC Arts and Culture District with the aim of providing valuable information to them for future engagement and awareness-raising initiatives.   Procedures involved in the Research: First, we will conduct a survey of off-campus students. The survey will be available online, and we will conduct intercept surveys as well. These will be conducted at transit hubs, in an effort to intercept mostly off-campus students. The survey is quite short, and contains questions around students’ knowledge of the Arts and Culture District, and ideas around student engagement. The second phase of the research will be to conduct a focus group with interested students to gain a deeper understanding of the topics covered in the survey.   Potential Harms, Risks or Discomforts:  The potentials harms, risks, and discomforts associated with this study are minimal. There is the possibility that being approached for an intercept study will make students uncomfortable, or that some of the questions in the survey or in the focus groups may be personal to participants. Please note that participation in this survey and focus group is entirely optional, and participants may withdraw at any time.   Compensation and Potential Benefits: Students who complete the survey will have the opportunity to enter into a draw to win one of two iPads. Students will also be compensated with food and drink for participating in focus groups or interviews. The potential benefits of participation include contributing to the Arts and Culture District’s knowledge of student behaviour allowing for improved outreach in the future. Students may also benefit from acquiring new knowledge of arts and culture events on campus they may wish to attend.      Consent:   By signing below, I, ____________________, agree to participate in this study as outlined above.   Printed Name    ___________________             ___________________ Participant Signature        Date   We thank you for your time and input in our research,  Soraya, Pearl, Mark, Ian, Kevin, Liana  

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