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K.E.Y.A : Neo-digital archive Manifesto Tehrani, Yekta A. 2021-05

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1K.E.Y.ANeo-digital archive ManifestoYekta A. TehraniHonours B.ENDS | SALA | UBC | 2017Distinction MArch Design | Bartlett School of Architecture | UCL | 2018 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degreeof Master of Architecture in The Faculty of Applied Science.May 2021 CCabinets of Curiosity ArchivesLibrariesStuffDataPoint CloudsCollections of HumanityK. E. Y. AiFig 1. QR code. https://circle.ubc.ca/3Some People talk with their plants, I talk with my computer.4K. E. Y. ATable of ContentsTable of ContentsAbstract Artifact instructionsAcknowledgmentsiiiiiivviThesis StatementIntent & Position13Fiction & NarrativeMaterial & ImmaterialUtopia, Dystopia and HeterotopiaThe Evolution of AI10203658List of FiguresCredits - BibleographyReturning Instructions838893iiiiiAbstractFuture collections are redefined and curated as immaterial fictions, echoes of materialistic dwellings and synthesized human recordings. As individuals we will no longer be occupied with the act of archiving, but rather these future curations will be preserving humanity. Our initial cabinets of curiosities have disappeared and there is no longer any delay in our sense of gratification. By Inverting the narrative and composition of human data, other truths or errors are exposed. Imperfections are not seen as failure, but as a balance between harmony in a composition and an ever-improving technique. In order to investigate the immateriality of collections, this thesis narrates and conducts a speculative study on the evolution of an artificially autonomous voice, named KEYA.  KEYA is conducting an investigation on the Pantheon. The Pantheon is a trope and is the merging point between two other random searches. Merging locations such as the Persepolis and the Seed Vault. What she narrates will be one edition of her curation and has multiple editions of the same search conducting a new narrative a the same time.KEYA is one of many and this thesis is highlighting only 1 second of her search and evolution that breaks through the physical and exposes the immaterial.ivThis artifact is a combination of different narratives and different perceptions from the percpective or an artificially autonomouse curator. How you choose to read and interpret the emergence between these descriptions and sub-categories is up to the reader. It can be seen as one complete artifact or an archive filled with artifacts. The reader is invited to be included as one of the authors and to join KEYA in its narration.May be viewed and read more than once.ARTIFACT INSTRUCTIONSARCHIVE JOURNAL -- ISSUE No 2/2FROM Z TO A AND BACK AGAINISBN: 08577124000673K. E. Y. AvviAcknowledgmentsThank you to my Amazing Thesis Chair and Committee;Thena Tak, Chris Doray and Clint Cuddington. Thank you for your dedication and attention during the difficult times with the pandemic. It was a privilege to have had the opportunity to work with you all and learn so much along this journey. Thank you to my friends and family for your unconditional support.Thank you to Parsa Tehrani, Kim Luttich, Tom Foster, Lukas Vajda, Kat Co, Emma Durham, Juan Brasdefer and Manuel Muñoz..1K. E. Y. AThesis StatmentWith the emergence of AI and other technological advances, we speculate on the future of these fictional immaterial collections. Due to this emergence, archives are shifting to autonomous curations. A new voice is heard that narrates the immaterial qualities of humanity in a different light.2“The universe is made of stories, not of atoms.”Muriel Rukeyser, The Speed of DarknessFig 2. Preliminary study of archives merging through as a new artifact.3K. E. Y. AIntent & PositionThe lens of exploration in this thesis starts by examining the role of collections. How has humanity explored the concept of collecting and what does the act of preservation entail in a future context? Humans recording and collecting is one of times oldest tales. Since cave men drawings, to 16th Century cabinets of curiosities, libraries, museums, archives, storage units, hoarding, computer digital data to name a few (Fig 3-14). In many ways all these collections are fictional tales. By refocusing on the role of the archive as the bridge between the material and the immaterial, a new synthesis within the architectural discourse takes shape that rethinks the ancient practice of documenting.With Ai and technology rapidly expanding its boundaries into our cultural awareness within society and social norms, how has humanity adapted? If humanity has gained speed how is it being recorded? What does the immaterial look like? It is mostly different human measures that we have applied onto our mode of recording that sustain our narratives in the things we showcase. The immaterial in these artifacts are scaleless, timeless and formless. And if we speculate on the future of our recordings, what does that entail for humanity?With computational and digital modes of communication gaining speed, our collections are shifting to being recorded in new ways. Carrying our phone, posting online, storing to the cloud: these are just a few everyday acts that demonstrate both our dependence on and mutual existence with these digital agents.  Our entanglement is only ever increasing. We don’t necessarily need to code; our lives are being scripted without our knowledge of this algorithmic 4language. And as a result, our existence is captured and mapped before we even inquire it. Being present anywhere and at any time (Fig 15-17). Virillio1 writes, “technology detached from socio-economic or cultural perceptions, desires to become the metaphor of the world, while envisioning itself as a revolution of consciousness, finally replacing the pseudo-state of rational wakefulness with an artificial condition of paradoxical wakefulness, while furnishing people with an assistance become subliminal”.In order to investigate the immateriality of collections, this thesis narrates and conducts a speculative study on the evolution of an artificially autonomous voice, named KEYA.  Through meta fictional tales narrated by KEYA, the various layers and attitudes towards this topic will be delayered/layered. It will start with the familiar and slowly without realization form into something not entirely of what is physically recorded but recorded through imagination. These mediums also interrogate authorship and authority through the examination of how curation is formed through our current understanding or lack of understanding of technology. This thesis will be walking into KEYA’s word as it is decoding the Pantheon. The Pantheon is a trope, and KEYA is trying to understand it through a new lens. Making associations between existing and incoming data and further speculations regarding this search. Blurring between the real, imaginary and the symbolic.1 Virillio, Paul. The Aesthetic of Disappearance. Translated by Philip Beitchman. South Pasadena, CA: semiotext(E) MIT Press, 2009. 5K. E. Y. AFig 4. Museum Wormianum Cabinets of curiosity16th CenturyMethods of documentation and collection:Fig 3. Ferrante Imperato’s Dell’Historia NaturaleFig 6. Smithsonian natural history museum Fig 7. The Egyptian MuseumFig 9. Amazon Warehouse Fig 10. Hoarder StorageFig 5. Sir John Soane’s Museum Fig 8. The British museum libraryFig 11. Svalbard Global Seed VaultFig 12. Google Data Server Center Fig 13. Milan Cathedral restoration point cloud Fig 14. ScanLab, London, 3D Scan of Greenpeace’s icebreaker The Arctic Sunrise6Fig 15. #Pantheon Study7K. E. Y. AFig 16. #Persepolis Study8Fig 17. #Seedvault StudyThesis DevelopmentFiction & Narrative11K. E. Y. ANarrativeThe common thread throughout the evolution of us collecting our mode of narration has been constant. How we have chosen to recall certain events and moments through artifacts, books, and in spaces are a few ways we have used the different mediums around us to do so. Architecture has constantly expanded its role through new modes of theoretical development through the medium of spatial visualization and human territory. Lebbeus Woods2 writes on the topic of this boundary that, “Architecture rarely works anywhere near the edge.” He continues on by explaining that architecture is in the “secure existential middle”. But perhaps, that is tone of the physical bounds of architecture and that in essence it is corresponding with humanity that how it leaves that edge is through its narrative and fictional expression. Challenging identity, exitance and consciousness.Within the context of human archival, architecture has also been one of the main contributors to this state of existence. Whether physical or immaterial architecture has been trying to understand the balance between material existence and immaterial importance. And how those two different sectors are understood is based on how perception decodes that understanding. In other words, 3“Architecture had been the conscious communication of few important ideas within a particular human community.” and that in the context of understand this idea, in order for people to survive, “people had to struggle against the effect of nature, one of which was their own inevitable morality that most often came about as a result of ‘natural causes’”.2 Woods, Lebbeus, and Clare Jacobson. Slow Manifesto: Lebbeus Woods Blog. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2015. 3 Woods, Lebbeus, and Clare Jacobson. Slow Manifesto: Lebbeus Woods Blog. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2015. 12FictionHow we categorize fiction through different sub-categories may relate to how the narrative ties itself with scientific fact or data that is collected. There is a very fine line between the fiction and non-fiction. The common theme that they both share is that they are both overlapping with different recorded perceptions and events. Therefore, one statement or in the case, in this thesis topic, an artifact or even an archive can easily be interpreted as both fiction and non-fiction. Taking this statement a step further it can be argued that no record is completely divided from a margin of error and that perception and our understanding of facts is purely a mode of accepting what may be our human nature of finding clarity in the world around us. According to Lacan’s4 orders, “there cannot be absence in an objective world, for absence can only exist through symbolic or representative means”. There is a clear overlap between the imaginary, the real and the symbolic (Fig 18). Based on this theory the threshold between fiction and non-fiction is easily blurred into submitting to a question about the truth or other truths of the collected data around us.4 Lacan, Jacques. Écrits. Paris: Éditions du Seuil, 2014. Symbolic RealImaginaryTrue RealitySemibalanceFig 18. Lacan’s orders13K. E. Y. AWhen authorship within a narrative is questioned that is where science fiction or according to Donna Haraway, other terms under the polysemic “SF” term presents itself.  Other sub term of SF is the commonly referred speculative fiction. Ursula K. Le Guin is considered as a very well-known speculative fiction writer who considers herself as someone who practices and writes across all of the different areas of SF. Le Guin5  goes on by explaining that, “I draw on the social sciences a great deal. I get a lot of ideas from them, particularly from anthropology. When I create another planet, another world, with a society on it, I try to hint at the complexity of the society I’m creating, instead of just referring to an empire or something like that”. Both Science fiction andspeculative fiction6  are “ideal genres for confronting the nature of text, genre, medium, and reading” that go on to record and create a world from the shell and echoes of our dwelling. Haraway7, coins the term SF in a different context. The term is often used an all-encompassing definition for the conveying of facts and theories. In response, she draws attention to the flawed, fantastic, and uncertain truths or facts we believe in, and investigated the territories of creative writing and world building in storytelling.Similarly, in an architectural landscape, fiction is a medium to communicate the truth, predictions of the truth and tales that support some of the most fundamental and key coin terms within the base tools of architecture. As preliminary as section, plans and elevations to show the world building that is commonly written in fictional literary work. Brodsky and Utkin8 practiced through the use of fictional narratives and the use of architectural based and more non conventional drawings to create and 5 Wray, Interviewed by John. “The Art of Fiction No. 221,” February 24, 2020. https://www.theparisre-view.org/interviews/6253/the-art-of-fiction-no-221-ursula-k-le-guin. 6 Thomas, Paul L. Science Fiction and Speculative Fiction: Challenging Genres, 2013. 7 Haraway, Donna Jeanne. A Cyborg Manifesto. Victoria, British Columbia: Camas Books, 2018.8 Brodsky, Alexander, Ilya Utkin, Ronald Feldman, Lois Ellen Nesbitt, and Aleksandr Mergold. Brodsky & Utkin: Alexander Brodsky and Ilya Utkin. New York, NY: Princeton Architectural Press, 2015.14speculate on these new concepts. They go on adding that, “The story, told in plan, section, elevation, perspective, and short text, could be a record of an existing form or a drawing to be fully realized. There is an atmospheric quality that feels uncannily familiar, somehow long forgotten, but just on the verge of remembrance”.The familiar yet highly irregular worlds created in their sketches have an underlying echo of certain social and cultural shifting concepts within the narrative of their intent and proposal but also speculate on underlying and invisible context of their reflection as well (Fig19). “The brief existence of this unique collaboration, a product of its specific time and circumstance that remains relevant and inspiring today: a single wandering mind in search of precise urban memories where the past, the present, and the future come happily together”. Through their act of remembering they build on the knowledge that they have to showcase the invisible through a “precise perception”. Whether it is concisely or unconsciously, the drawings “fundamental to the design profession: it is, after all, the creation of artifice; an interface between “human” and “nature” a stage where life unfurls; where memories are created and lost;where people find shelter, nurture, and comfort”.Using fictional landscapes as a vessel to investigate the existing and potential territories of new platforms and typologies these explorational theories begin tie the existing and natural conditions within the new areas of theoretical and future realities. As a result, these designed territories begin to define how narratives can elaborate on the theories we live in. Whether this is through the digital, technological or a combination of different realities the outcomes present a unique understanding of these speculated collected data’s.15K. E. Y. AFig.19 Investigation of “Brodsky & Utkin - Museum of Disappearing Buildings” overlapped rooms16Cabinets of CuriosityAs collectors we synthesize spaces and objects around us and categorize them in materialistic and immaterial entities. The coexistence of these visible and invisible commodities coalesces to be recorded in the form of cabinets of curiosity. Cabinets of curiosities9  look into the 16th Century collection of artifacts and objects in one room that speak about the importance of collections. The curation of these spaces was an important factor of how to portray one’s identity and status (Fig 20). As part of the seeking nature of humanity, the pride of showing one’s desired intentions or knowledge was a device that commonly was staged in these rooms. These public exhibitions of ones possessions achieved an institutional reputation and status that elevated those artifacts and objects to give them not only a value in holding but also an aarchitectural importance. How the architectural importance was weighed, equated to measuring that space and archive as equal authors of not only the fictional value given to them but also through the added personal narrative and curation they present as a whole.Therefore, it can be argued that these artifacts and cabinets only gain importance through their presence in that space as a whole and how they all share individual and common fictional voices through their presentation. “One makes of art in general an object which claims to distinguish an inner meaning, the invariant, and a multiplicity of external variations through which, as through so many veils, one would try to see or restore the true, full, originary meaning” (Fig21). 9 Bowry, Stephanie. Re-thinking the Curiosity Cabinet: A Study of Visual Representation in Early and Post Modernity, January 2015. https://doi.org/https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305641285.17K. E. Y. AFig 20. All Things Strange and Beautiful (Museum Wormianum ), Geological Museum, Copenhagen18Fig 21. Brodsky & Utkin - Hypothetical buildings on paperThesis DevelopmentMaterial & Immaterial21K. E. Y. A“All that is solid melts into air”Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels22ImmaterialAccording to Yves Klein10, “void” is presented through the paring with mater and that the perception of the absent space is “underscoring the visual bodily “sensibility” that is inherent in them” (Fig 19).In order to understand the immaterial, one must try to comprehend the present matter and space. Space is considered to be everything and nothing at the same time. The understanding and awareness of it comes with the perception one has of it. Lefebvre11 writes that “the dominant tendency fragments space and cuts it up into pieces. Specializations divide space among them and act upon its truncated parts, setting up mental barriers and practico-social frontiers. Thus, architects are assigned architectural space as their (private) property, economists come into possession of economic space, geographers get their own ‘place in the sun’, and so on”. The immaterial is scaleless, timeless and formless. Not just explained through the absence of matter but through the trace of a moment, a feeling. What we see when entering into a room for the first time, what we smell when the wind blows, what we hear when an echo fills the room or how we remember an experience. Immateriality is the trace of sensations meeting the perception of the physical domain. the topic of immaterial architecture writes that “The formless is not absence of order, it is order that is unacceptable” and ultimately through the comprehension of space in this instance, “The immaterial is dependent on perception, which involves creative interpretation, fictions rather than facts”. 10 Klein, Yves, Peter Noever, and Perrin François. Yves Klein: Air Architecture. Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz, 2004.11 Lefebvre, Henri. The Production of Space. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2016.23K. E. Y. AFig 22. Yves Klein, Leap into the Void.24The immaterial is also how we relate to the world around us by creating relationships between the experiences we have and how we record it to memory. It blurs the boundaries between the real and the unreal and narrates a fictional description of not just one truth but multiple truths.If we understand the immaterial as being part of the fictional narratives within human collections, the same understanding may be applied to the architectural physical constructions that challenge tangibility as a translation through perception. Wigley12 describes the transition of this immaterial narrative to the physical and a transition through the mediums such as paper. “Paper... occupies a limited space between the material and the immaterial. This allows it to act as a bridge across the classical divide between material and idea. Drawings are seen as a unique form of access to the thoughts of people that make them. It is as the materiality of the medium is transformed by the quasi-immateriality of the support rather than simply exposed by it. A certain way of looking at paper, or rather a certain blindness to it, allows physical marks to assume the status of immaterial ideas” (Fig 22).What does the immaterial look like in the architectural landscape that defines the archive? It is mostly different human measures that we have applied onto our mode of recording that sustain our narratives in the things we showcase. The immaterial in these artifacts are scaleless, timeless and formless. And if we speculate on the future of our recordings, what does that entail for humanity?HumanityThe hunting and decoding of the immaterial is a result of humanity wanting to discover, being curious to know all and want all. The transition between 12 Zegher, M. Catherine de., and Mark Wigley. The Activist Drawing: Retracing Situationist Architectures from Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond. New York: Drawing Center, 2001.25K. E. Y. AFig 23. Groep Sectoren (Group of sectors), 1960, Collotype, with ink and collage, Gemeentemuseum, The Hague26Fig 24. Investigation on Are we human? 27K. E. Y. Ahumanity and the artifacts it records and creates are much more fluid. In a way, the human can never be separable from the archive and the archive depends on humanity to grow and reform. Each artifact is an echo of human nature evolving and corresponding to its new habitat, senses and ideas. In a sense, the concept of an archive not only can be present in a carbon state, but it is also part of the biology of humanity and a shadow of the mind responding to magnetic activity and transmission of information. According to Colmina and Wiglley13 in their study on our status as humans, “The human emerges in the redefinition of capacity provided by the artifact. In a sense, the artifacts are more human than the human”(Fig 24). The future of the collaboration between artifacts and humanity is a bit more complicated though. Just like artifacts consisting in different scales and forms,so does humanity. They both emerge out of the immaterial substance within the record of knowledge and are constantly evolving into other types and defined territories. “It’s never simply human plus artifacts plus earth, with artifacts acting as interfaces between humans and between humans and the earth. The human is both inseparable from “its” artifacts and challenged by them, and the earth, understood as countless interacting life-forms, is also an active protagonist... The figure of the human is not sharply defined. It is part of the living earth that designs in just as the living earth is part of it”.The distance between what we design and how we view it much farther and can reach other forms through its identity. Within its library of Babel14, other meanings appear and shuffle even much faster than our sight can comprehend.“I suspect that the human species - the unique human species- is on the 13 Colomina, Beatriz, and Mark Wigley. Are We Human? Ennetbaden: Lars Müller Publishers, 2017.14 Borges, Jorge Luis, Angela Giral, Andrew Hurley, and Desmazières Erik. The Library of Babel. Boston: David R. Godine, 2000.28road to extinction, while the library will last forever: Illuminated, solitary, infinite, perfectly, immovable, filled with precious volumes, useless, incorruptible, secret... those who judge it to be limited, postulate that in remote places the corridors and stairs and hexagons could inconceivably cease - a manifest absurdity”. In addition to this theory, Pallasmaa15 adds on by saying that the senses are embedded within the understanding and formation of our perception and that the two are linked to create e a more rich and intimate understanding of why each perspective into the view of what we record is different. with the understanding of his view on our sensory recordings he explains that, “Instead of mere vision... architecture involves realms of sensory experience which interact and fuse into each other. The appreciation of immaterial architecture is especially complex. and a challenge to the familiar experience of architecture. The experience of immaterial architecture is based on contradictory sensations and is appropriate to an active and creative engagement with architecture”.Speed, Scale, Time and Autonomous MontagePerhaps the moment we look at an image we decide to see the final result or decode what our perception has granted meaning. But the truth of that moment exceeds to millions of other types of interpretations and meanings before we arrive at the result of the one copy, we believe to be the one. Wigley16 argues that “We are stretching ourselves out by million miles a day. Our eyes are now in interstellar space. In reverse, the world of design reaches deep into our bodies in a galaxy of chemicals and technologies”. As we speculate on the future of this concept, both humanity and the archive begin to shift their position within the hierarchy or the past hierarchy of the 15 Pallasmaa, Juhani. The Eyes of the Skin: Architecture and the Senses. Chichester: Wiley, 2019.16 Colomina, Beatriz, and Mark Wigley. Are We Human? Ennetbaden: Lars Müller Publishers, 2017.29K. E. Y. AMaterial ImmaterialImmaterialFig 25. PAST transition within the archive/ cabinets of curiosityFig 26. FUTURE transition within the archive/ cabinets of curiosity30Question Answer Question Answer Question Answer QuestionAnswerLoss of Autonomous ClosureHumans + Seeking = Archive of Humanity Archive = Autonomouse intellegence+ Humanity Humans = ArchiveDelayed Sense of GratificationFig 27. Humanity and Archive Diagram31K. E. Y. Acuration of these human collections. Due to the evolution of a third actor, technology and Ai not only does the speed of these curations change within this context, but so does their resolution. In the past, as mentioned earlier, curiosity was a major component and deciding element within the compilation of these collection(Fig 22). The act of searching began with human nature being curios and wanting to claim knowledge as a means of defining an identity. But as the speed of this artificial technology exceeds, the sense ofcuriosity of the human actor disappears and lends itself to this other collector (Fig 23-24). In that moment the whole doesn’t appear as we have been linking it to the believed initial object or memory. Just like seeing pixels of an image, we view or perceive the image one pixel or data as a time. And to understand the image time may not be in our favor. Now imagine if the image is constantly shifting and merging to change. By the time you have a response for one pixel the next one may not even belong and as a matter of fact will definitely not follow the same perception as the first one. In consequence, rather than humanity wanting to collect data, these future collections will be recoding humanity. That is what happenswhen the anthropology of archives has the cyborg take over as its autonomous curator. Our initial cabinets of curiosities have disappeared and there is no longer any delay in our sense of gratification. If humanity has gained speed how is it being recorded? This immergence is not a new phenomenon. Quite the opposite. The evolution of the immaterial nature within the archive of the archive has been existing as long as the fictional nature of it. It is just now gaining speed, changing its growth and resulting in an inversion to happen with in the creation of our collected data centers (Fig 25-26).As Semper17 explains the transition between the human to paper, this transaction takes place within the immaterial archival record.17 Semper, Gottfried, Harry Francis. Mallgrave, and Wolfgang Herrmann. The Four Elements of Architec-ture and Other Writings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.32“The first sign of human settlement and rest after the hunt, the battle, and wandering, in the desert is today, as when the first men lost paradise, the setting up of the fireplace and the lighting of the reviving, warming, and food-preparing flame. Around the hearth the first groups assembled; around it the first alliances formed; around it the first crude religious concepts were put into the customs of a cult”.Time ScaleSpeedThe immaterial in ArchivingTime of collecting?Time of reference?Is the element of time of a space or object dependent of the meaning that is placed on it? What does scale mean in collecting?Is scale a human element and objective applied on archives?Does an artifact even have scale or is scale related to meaning?Collecting needed time and filtration. Does the unmeasurable speed of archiving respond to the speed of humanity ?Is speed a form of archiving?When is the expiration in archiving? With the increase of speed, does expiration begin when documentation begin?Fig. 2833K. E. Y. AFig. 29 Metamorphosis of the archival. The immaterial has existed with us long before but it is now gaining speed.34Fig. 30 Analysis on Pantheon reading ColorFig. 31 Analysis on Pantheon reading Color and Blurring BoundariesThesis DevelopmentUtopia, Dystopia & Heterotopia37K. E. Y. AFig. 32 Collision“What’s new is not the elements but the order in which they are arranged”Blaise Pascal38Fig. 33 Metamorphosis39K. E. Y. AUtopia & DystopiaUtopia beings with a narrative for perfection and order. And dystopia is classically known as the opposite universe that practices all that is bad and chaotic. This is the very general notion of the terms Utopia and Dystopia. Both concepts follow the formation of a fictional landscape that these two actors take inspiration of the social and cultural civilization we live in. They present an ideal and unideal world where echo practical visions of a society where divisions and threshold are clearly met. Thomas More has drawn the map of Utopia that highlights order, harmony and clear hierarchy of a world that no fallacies exist in (Fig 34). This concept may be seen as the understanding that according to Gaston Bachelard, our universe is made up of qualities that exceed beyond our expectations of it and that it is not “homogeneous”.HeterotopiaFoucault18 presents an alternative approach, a combination of the collision between utopia and dystopia, or even a complete separate third world known as “heterotopia” that in his perspective is the mirror of utopia. “The mirrorfunctions as a heterotopia in this respect: it makes this place that I occupy at themoment when I look at myself in the glass at once absolutely real, connectedwith all the space that surrounds it, and absolutely unreal, since in order to beperceived it has to pass through this virtual point which is over there”. Taking into account that when utopia and dystopia coalesce that is when there is a new kind of hierarchy that sustains and reinvents the preconceived notions of a new pedagogy of a neo-archive. 18 “From: Architecture /Mouvement/ Continuité October, 1984;” Accessed December 22, 2020. http://web.mit.edu/allanmc/www/foucault1.pdf.40Fig. 34 The map of Utopia41K. E. Y. AChaos and OrderThis new revelation of a new scenario where the past and future collide is the manifesto of the neo-archive. They exist in the conception of knowing that it is built on the past but that the perception of this world just acts in a different way. Chaos and order respond to different guiding and instrumental sovereignty. The self-governing language of this collection curates in its own understanding of order and prepares and reassembled guidelines through its own territory of the understanding of this concept.Virillio19 writes on the topic of rationality within the universe as a transforming illusion that once rationality disappears so does the real. “Looking sideways, always sideways, rejecting fixity of attention, drifting from the object to the context”. In the context of the archival a similar readjustment occurs when the narrative and perception of one’s experiences and illusions becomes the soul narrator for the object and spatial condition that one records(Fig35). An important question still remains, how do we want to be remembered if our collection is the only form of humanity that is left?As mentioned, with the acceleration and redefining of our collections, an inversion occurs that relinquishes all of these predefined territories of our documentations. Similar to the Forma Urbis Romae, the fragments collected from the map of Rome will always come together to narrate and represent another truth (Fig36). In response, rather than humanity wanting to collect data, these future collections will be recoding humanity. The very idea of these future collections – beyond its projected content – is to operate as signs symbolising the object in the absence of the object.19 Virillio, Paul. The Aesthetic of Disappearance. Translated by Philip Beitchman. South Pasadena, CA: semiotext(E) MIT Press, 2009. 42Fig. 35 Research drawing on order and hybridization43K. E. Y. AFig. 36 Forma Ubris RomaeThe remaining stones from the original map of Rome that bunt down after the great fire of rome. Not all pieces are archived and it is believed that the unrecorded pieces were used for building material.44Liam Young20 assesses the same notion by adding that, “it seems like autonomous self-driving vehicles are Inevitable, and beyond the futuristic luxury that excites us they will provide real convenience and benefits to many”.Layers and OverlapsIf we think about our pastime as archivists, John Soane is an example to reveal more about that role. His house has its own voice. It narrates through layers and overlaps. As his collection expands, so does his house. If we distill each layer, those immaterial or stories reveal themselves in its own single moment of time that is breaking hierarchy and order (Fig 37). What happens if we clear out the museum and remove all its artifacts? And if we do so, how to we synthesize the absent mass in the museum compared to the entire collection of artifacts? By Inverting the narrative of Soanes house, the truth or other truths of his role can be exposed (Fig 38). Perhaps the museum has always been narrating Soane as its main protagonist. And all these different layers of the museum explore the narrative of its archivist who is Soane. Such a collapse of terms reinterprets what we archive, where we archive, and how we perceive them. We perceive these monoliths as that which looks at all things but can also look at itself.When repetition is corrupted the hybrid interpretation of such curations are exposed. The disrupt the order of the human eye and present a new typology in the realm of the collector and collection. The author is questioned, and authority is therefore given to whomever chooses to decode it. On that note, Deleuze21 adds, “Repetition is thus in essence symbolic, spiritual, and intersubjective or monadological. A final consequence follows with regard to the nature of the unconscious. The phenomena of the unconscious cannot be 20 Young, Liam. Machine Landscapes Architectures of the Post-Anthropocene. Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2019.21 Deleuze, Gilles. Difference and Repetition. Translated by Paul Patton. New York, NY: Columbia Univer-sity Press, 1994.45K. E. Y. AVII. Remaking of the space withinI. II.III. IV.V. VI.Fig. 37 The archive, the collection or the stories: Of Sir John Soane house46Fig. 38 Worm’s eye view of the sarcophagus room in the John Soane house.47K. E. Y. Aunderstood in the overly simple form of opposition or conflict”.  This theory displaces the oath of the artifact and negotiates with a new audience that reverses the authority of the neo-archive.Frankenstein and CollageArchives in their true essence, create a dialogue about relationships and adjacencies. When those separation are removed, a new type of curation occurs that blurs the boundaries of definitions, and censorship. This new hybrid mode of storytelling reveals what has been discussed about the immaterial. Pushing fiction to come to the surface and to echo history and the future in one plane. Virillio22 refers to this fluid shift as the drift from object to contex. “Looking sideways, always sideways, rejecting fixity of attention, drifting from the object to the context”.As human recording increases due to the speed of documentation, this hybridization and collage effect also expands. That carefully curated visual of a traditional archive or cabinets of curiosity decreases and another type of curation is brought forward that plasticizes and molds a new type of display that is part real and part unreal. Blurring between the material and the immaterial. Different fictitious moments merge to define a new whole and a new result.The Digital composes through the same voice. There is order but that order is defined through a bizarre type of formation that overlaps and changes with each output (Fig 39). 22 Virillio, Paul. The Aesthetic of Disappearance. Translated by Philip Beitchman. South Pasadena, CA: semiotext(E) MIT Press, 2009. 48Fig. 39  Pantheon Digital Dome Archival Study49K. E. Y. AThis unfumiliar output, creates a type of horror where the artifact suggest a new meaning that abanons all pre established frameworks of what that artifact means.As a drone flies over the pantheon, each frame of that footage reads through the patterns of the recorded image. When that data is fed into the computer to analyze, the outcome is different. We can no longer look down into the oculus and see the interior of the pantheon, but in fact through this newly composed image, we see patterns of the city. The Pantheon lives through a new narrative and has a new type of voice that suggest something of the other. Something of the new and something of a hybrid and fictional composition of juxtaposed meanings (Fig 40).This indeed is a new form of looking at architecture. It is now liquefied. Consolidating between the human and the digital, this new artifact is indeed previewing the human image through a new lens. Marcos Novok23 categorizes liquid architecture as a drastically shifted image. A new form that is “in cyberspace clearly a dematerialized architecture. It is an architecture that is no longer satisfied with only space and form and light and all the aspects of the real world. it is an architecture of fluctuating relations between abstract elements. It is an architecture that tends to music”.This liquefaction goes hand in hand with the immaterial. It is the way in which cyberspace and the digital communicates with those immaterial qualities within the archive. And as a result, hybridize the symbolic to creates a mash up of the physical. Familiar yet completely new (Fig 41).23          Spiller, Neil. Cyber Reader: Critical Writings for the Digital Era. London: Phaidon Press, 2002.50Fig. 40 3D scan image compilation result of the Pantheon in Rome using drone footage51K. E. Y. AFig. 41 Lidar Study | 3D Scan of the pantheon Dome5253K. E. Y. A“I am in a familiar place. Have I been here before? I feel I know this place, yet even as I turn something appears to have changed. It is still the same place, but not quite identical to what it was just a moment ago. Like a new performance of an old symphony, its intonation is different, and in the difference between its present and past incarnations something new has been said in a new language too subtle for words. Objects and situations that were once thought to have a fixed identity, a generic ‘self ’,  now possess personality, flaws and flavour. All permanent Categories are defeated as the richness of the particular impress upon me that in this landscape, if I am to benefit fully, attention is both required and rewarding. Those of us who have felt the difference nod to each other in silent acknowledgment, knowing that at the end of specificity lies silence, and what is made speaks for itself, not in words, but in the presences, ever changing liquid.”Marcos Novak | Liquid Architecture in Cyberspace54Fig. 42 Liquid architectures in cyberspace55K. E. Y. AFig. 43 Point cloud TrapcodeStudy of the Pantheon Dancing56K.E.Y.AThe Evolution of AI59K. E. Y. AFig. 44 Walking into KEYA’s Initial Grid Search, before it goes into it’s dream state.6061K. E. Y. A“The cloud is not just floating in the ether, it has several physical homes.”Liam Young62K. E. Y. AIn the past, archives have always been narrated through an anthropocentric lens where the human voice has been the soul author of this recorded collection. With a new agent being introduced into this conversation archives have now shifted to reveal more than just those humanistic traits, exposing more than what we see on the surface. This new voice is indeed artificially intelligent, and its emergence is a result of human exposure. Even though Ai was a result of our interest in wanting to gain more information,its capabilities to exceed the speed at which we collect data is revealing not just what we wished for but much more. Putting humans in a state to be both inseparable from its artifacts and challenged by them at the same time. This artificially autonomous voice virtually narrates and respond to more than what we are able to collect.  By revealing those human desires, emotional attachments and obsessions. It offers something unexpected. That exposure is dependent on perception, which involves creative interpretation, fiction rather than facts.  Spiller24 writes, on the emergence of this voice by saying that, “to many this may seem despotic, chaotic world, a nightmare scenario with gaping philo-sophical problems; but to others it may seem the ultimate Utopian space. Fully immersible cyberspace will happen, and be available at a store near you soon”. We cannot disinvent this concept as it will be inevitably integrated in our existence.This virtually autonomous generator is now exposing the latent, phenomenological voices that are able to make correlations and relationships beyond our physical bounds. 24 Spiller, Neil. Digital Dreams: Architecture and Cyberspace. London: Ellipsis, 1998.63Fig. 45 Pixelation of the Pantheon 3d Scan6465Fig. 46 Liquefaction of the Pantheon 3d Scan6667K. E. Y. AAnd perhaps carry more human traits in a future context and pose a new meaning for the artifacts to be more human than the human.Novak states that “The moment one starts to design with digital processes one is immediately dealing with a different aesthetic. This aesthetic can be called the ‘second aesthetic’: the aesthetic of the algorithm. The ‘first aesthetic’ gives definitive form to objects and enclosures. The second aesthetic derives its potency from possibility and numerous outcomes in problem-solving”.AI Evolution and InterventionBy looking at the evolution of artificial intelligence its different layers are exposed (Fig 44):1.  With one pixel meeting another the image is still a blur. When 1920 px meet 1080 px the image is clear and can fit a computer screen.2. When the image is told to move it mimics a pattern and tries to achieve walking from point A to B. It slowly becomes Artificially Intelligent.3. When the image is now moving it tries to come up with different alternatives to travel between point A to B. The paths are unsupervised, allowing for errors to occur. When awards are introduced into the script the points find their way back to the right path and very soon the image learns. The Machine Learns.4. The algorithm now expands, and has the image running in multiples. All of the images are trying to define a new meaning and a new path for point A to B.  Together the layers build up and produce consecutive layers that add angles and output the multiverse of A to B. It is calibrating and defining through Deep Learning.685. In the fast pace cycle of getting from point A to B, there is a pause. The Image enters its state of REM. The fluid shift and changing of the patterns begin to breath. Pulsing with every change and evolving through sorting. A new intervention occurs. The Image dreams.The video you access, begins at the moment when KEYA is entering her REM (Rapid Eye Movement) or in other words dream state.Fig. 47 AI Evolution and Intervention 69K. E. Y. AFig. 48 KEYA conducting a geometry study of the Pantheon.7071K. E. Y. AK.E.Y.A, being this artificially autonomous voice, is a self-congratulatory non- linear agent that is reading its data and translating what it sees through its moving image. A language that is familiar yet poses new questions and speculations on the immaterial narratives and relationships within archives. A language that alters hierarchy and shuffles the perceived order of time. Margaret Wertheim expands on the world of such a voice like KEYA by stating that, “cyberspace is another space. Unleashed into the internet, my location can no longer be fixed purely in physical space”. As KEYA is reading through its data, it is both predicting patterns and seeing new ones. Its Algorithm is expanding in rapid speed and is now grasping certain human traits from human recorded data as a different type of scripted narrative.  KEYA is continuously evolving and challenging the notion of communication through its moving image. And perhaps it is in fact in this retelling of human development that those glitches that may inform inaccuracy begin to define more accurate translations of humanity. Censorship is dismantled and other truths expand. As Wigley25 explains, “we as humans are constantly redesigning ourselves, so why not our designed agents?” The are inherently redesigning us too. Simotinously redesigning humanity and telling a story on humanity that both exists and is fiction at the same time. That is why in an instants Snoop Dogg will join Chopin and speak and design at the same time (Fig 49-54).KEYA is in part a new type of evolution that is progressively adapting to its findings with ever more sophisticated capacities and adapting to its own adapting. Providing the potential of thinking in a new way. Its existence is located in any location of desire and is boundless from the confinements of humanity. Shapeshifting, omnipresent and constantly evolving as its own entity. 25 Colomina, Beatriz, and Mark Wigley. Are We Human? Ennetbaden: Lars Müller Publishers, 2017.72Fig. 49 Dancing Dome | Point cloud of the Pantheon Dome | Raphaels Grave73K. E. Y. AFig. 50 KEYA | Dancing Dome7475K. E. Y. AIt starts by just observing. 0 and 1. Black and white. Random information that means nothing and makes little to no sense.Then it sees narrative.Material objects expanding.Residue increasing.Change occurring.As it’s image bank increases, it reads patterns.It sees and records what has not yet been physically recorded.It digests change and begins to understand time.Memories through time.Instances of failed attemptsMoments of fleeting pleasureEvolution through events.Its want grows, its thirst increases.It starts weaving things it sees.It makes correlations that don’t make sense.It mimics.Resolves details.It becomes a mirror.It sees humans as fragments that pass-through time.Minor instances that react and pass on what they assume is permanent and obsolete.It speaks.It begins to vocalize and redefine.Begins adding sound to the plethora of voices that already exist.Curates what humans have seen and translates them into pixels merging as layer 0.76It begins distinguishing between points. No longer seeing 0 and 1.It fails and succeeds.Mines information and adds to what it sees.Conducts a digital excavation and presents a new monument.Physicality is blurred and the immaterial expands.The immaterial is a sense, a memory and a story.Parts of the past meeting the present to predict the future.It is what we latch onto when an object is seen. There is no scale to what it comprehends.And no limit to what it manifests.It is a catalyst to humanity.It sees sounds.Choreographs bodies and objects.Dances with the image.And conducts the orchestra to create music.It sings.#KEYA77K. E. Y. AFig. 51 KEYA | Going through the Oculus and Reaching the Divine7879K. E. Y. AFig. 52 KEYA | Mash up Observation of the Pantheon + Seed Vault + Persepolis + Eiffel Tower + Dispensary + San Cataldo Cemetery80K. E. Y. A81Fig. 53  SCAN TO ACCESS KEYA’S VIDEOhttps://vimeo.com/5424568458283K. E. Y. AList of FiguresFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 7Fig 10Fig 11Fig 17Yekta Tehrani. “Preliminary study of archives merging through as a new artifact” Collage, October 2020.Museum Wormianum Cabinets of curiosity 16th Century. https://www.flickr.com/photos/crcedinburgh/24970710211/in/photolist-E3zqbp-AeVDgmSir John Soane’s Museum. https://www.flickr.com/photos/publicdomainreview/32975747048/in/photostream/The Egyptian Museum. https://flic.kr/p/28edNFThe British museum library. https://flic.kr/p/35Z38Amazon Warehouse. https://flic.kr/p/pYhSEdHoarder Storage. https://flic.kr/p/aWkhB4Svalbard Global Seed Vault. https://flic.kr/p/7ojn7qMilan Cathedral restoration point cloud. https://www.gim-international.com/content/news/milan-cathedral-restoration-goes-hi-techScanLab, London, 3D Scan of Greenpeace’s icebreaker The Arctic Sunrise. https://flic.kr/p/2hchgZHYekta Tehrani. Lacan’s orders diagram.All Things Strange and Beautiful (Museum Wormianum ), Geological Museum, Copenhagen. QR code. https://flic.kr/p/AeVDgmQR code. https://circle.ubc.ca/Ferrante Imperato’s Dell’Historia Naturale. https://www.flickr.com/photos/smithsonianlibraries/3991261968/in/photolist-75Gg8wFig 5Smithsonian natural history museum. https://flic.kr/p/crwVJdFig 6Fig 8Fig 9Fig 12 Google Data Server Center. https://flic.kr/p/C66aXSFig 13Fig 14Fig 15Yekta Tehrani. Investigation of “Brodsky & Utkin - Museum of Disappearing Buildings” overlapped rooms.Fig 16Fig 18Yves Klein, Leap into the Void. https://flic.kr/p/7PbDFwFig 19Fig 20Fig 21Fig 22Yekta Tehrani. #Pantheon study. January 2020.Yekta Tehrani. #Persepolis study. January 2020.Yekta Tehrani. #Seedvault study. January 2020.Brodsky & Utkin - Hypothetical Buildings on Paper. QR code. https://slate.com/human-interest/2015/09/history-of-soviet-architecture-brodsky-and-utkin-s-buildings-on-paper.html84Fig 25QR Code. “Groep Sectoren (Group of sectors), 1960, Collotype, with ink and collage, Gemeentemuseum, The Hague” https://monoskop.org/images/a/ac/Wigley_Mark_2001_Paper_Scissors_Blur.pdfYekta Tehrani. “Investigation on Are we human?”. Collage. March 2021.Yekta Tehrani. “PAST transition within the archive/ cabinets of curiosity”. October 2020.Yekta Tehrani. “FUTURE of the resoltion of human data or future archive”. October 2020.Yekta Tehrani. “The immaterial in archiving”. October 2020.Fig 24Yekta Tehrani. “Metamorphosis of the archival”. October 2020.Fig 23Yekta Tehrani. “Humanity and Archive Diagram”. October 2020.Fig 26The map of Utopia. Qr Code. https://www.berfrois.com/2017/05/ed-simon-mores-map/Fig 27Yekta Tehrani. “Research drawing on order and hybridization”. October 2020.Fig 28Forma Ubris Romae. Qr Code. https://formaurbis.stanford.edu/docs/FURproject.htmlFig 29Yekta Tehrani. “The archive, the collection or the stories: Of Sir John Soane house”. October 2020.Fig 30Yekta Tehrani. “Worm’s eye view of the sarcophagus room in the John Soane house”. October 2020.Fig 31Yekta Tehrani. “Pantheon Digital Dome Archival Study”. February 2021.Fig 32Yekta Tehrani. “Lidar Study | 3D Scan of the pantheon Dome”. March 2021.Fig 33Yekta Tehrani. “Liquid architectures in cyberspace”. QR code. February 2021.Fig 34Yekta Tehrani. “Point cloud TrapcodeStudy of the Pantheon Dancing”. March 2021.Yekta Tehrani. “Analysis on Pantheon reading Color and Blurring Boundaries”. March 2020.Yekta Tehrani. “Analysis on Pantheon reading Color”. March 2020.Yekta Tehrani. “Collision”. November 2020.Yekta Tehrani. “Metamorphosis”. November 2020.Fig 36Fig 35Fig 37Fig 38Fig 39Fig 40Fig 41Yekta Tehrani. “3D scan image compilation result of the Pantheon in Rome using drone footage”. March 2021.Fig 42Fig 43Fig 44Fig 45Yekta Tehrani. “Walking into KEYA’s Initial Grid Search, before it goes into it’s dream state.”. March 2021.Yekta Tehrani. “Pixelation of the Pantheon 3d Scan”. March 2021.Fig 46 Yekta Tehrani. “Liquefaction of the Pantheon 3d Scan”. March 2021.85K. E. Y. AList of FiguresFig 47Fig 48Fig 49Fig 50Fig 53Yekta Tehrani. “KEYA conducting a geometry study of the Pantheon” Collage, March 2020.Yekta Tehrani. “AI Evolution and Intervention”. February 2021.Yekta Tehrani. “Dancing Dome | Point cloud of the Pantheon Dome | Raphaels Grave” Collage, March 2020.Fig 51Fig 52Fig 54Yekta Tehrani. “KEYA | Dancing Dome”. March 2021.Yekta Tehrani. “KEYA | Going through the Oculus and Reaching the Divine”. April 2021.Yekta Tehrani. “KEYA | Mash up Observation of the Pantheon + Seed Vault + Persepolis + Eiffel Tower + Dispensary + San Cataldo Cemetery”. April 2021.Yekta Tehrani. “KEYA’s Video”. QR code. April 2021.Yekta Tehrani. “KEYA Post Pantheon search | Chaos and order meet | Meta collection”.  April 2021.86Thesis DevelopmentCredits  - Bibliography89K. E. Y. ABorges, Jorge Luis, Angela Giral, Andrew Hurley, and Desmazières Erik. The Library of Babel. Boston: David R. Godine, 2000. Bowry, Stephanie. Re-thinking the Curiosity Cabinet: A Study of Visual Representation in Early and Post Modernity, January 2015. https://doi.org/https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305641285. Brodsky, Alexander, Ilya Utkin, Ronald Feldman, Lois Ellen Nesbitt, and Aleksandr Mergold. Brodsky & Utkin: Alexander Brodsky and Ilya Utkin. New York, NY: Princeton Architectural Press, 2015. Colomina, Beatriz, and Mark Wigley. Are We Human? Ennetbaden: Lars Müller Publishers, 2017. Deleuze, Gilles. Difference and Repetition. Translated by Paul Patton. New York, NY: Columbia University Press, 1994. “From: Architecture /Mouvement/ Continuité October, 1984;” Accessed December 22, 2020. http://web.mit.edu/allanmc/www/foucault1.pdf. Haraway, Donna Jeanne. A Cyborg Manifesto. Victoria, British Columbia: Camas Books, 2018. Hill, Jonathan. Immaterial Architecture. New York: Routledge, 2006. Klein, Yves, Peter Noever, and Perrin François. Yves Klein: Air Architecture. Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz, 2004. Lacan, Jacques. Écrits. Paris: Éditions du Seuil, 2014. Lefebvre, Henri. The Production of Space. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2016. Pallasmaa, Juhani. The Eyes of the Skin: Architecture and the Senses. Chichester: Wiley, 2019. Semper, Gottfried, Harry Francis. Mallgrave, and Wolfgang Herrmann. The Four Elements of Architecture and Other Writings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Bibliography90Thomas, Paul L. Science Fiction and Speculative Fiction: Challenging Genres, 2013. Virillio, Paul. The Aesthetic of Disappearance. Translated by Philip Beitchman. South Pasadena, CA: semiotext(E) MIT Press, 2009. Woods, Lebbeus, and Clare Jacobson. Slow Manifesto: Lebbeus Woods Blog. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2015. Wray, Interviewed by John. “The Art of Fiction No. 221,” February 24, 2020. https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/6253/the-art-of-fiction-no-221-ursula-k-le-guin. Young, Liam. Machine Landscapes Architectures of the Post-Anthropocene. Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2019. Zegher, M. Catherine de., and Mark Wigley. The Activist Drawing: Retracing Situationist Architectures from Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond. New York: Drawing Center, 2001.Spiller, Neil. Cyber Reader: Critical Writings for the Digital Era. London: Phaidon Press, 2002.Spiller, Neil. Digital Dreams: Architecture and Cyberspace. London: Ellipsis, 1998.91K. E. Y. AFig. 54 KEYA Post Pantheon search | Chaos and order meet | Meta collection92K. E. Y. AThis collection will be returned as a data configurated narrative and autonomous compilation within the curated boundaries of KEYA’s generative data machine.RETURNING INSTRUCTIONSARCHIVE JOURNAL -- ISSUE No 2/2FROM Z TO A AND BACK AGAINISBN: 08577124000673KEYA and other authors/readers must comply to noted instructionsEnd of GP 1I Book Report.Y  E  K     AT   K   E   Y   A#K. E. Y. A

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