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Vaisselle Perron, Vincent 2020-05

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__VaisselleVincent PerronFig. 1     i ii_AbstractI began the project trying to define reality, understand what is real, if anything is. It is different for each of us. There are no absolutes. Our perception of reality is continuously redefined by the moment we just lived… Each current moment is the closest a person is to some reality, until the moment passes and becomes a memory, a mental image of that past moment. Anyway, that is the closest I had gotten to a conclusion…-During those investigations, a good friend of mine told me to have a look at Sandy Island. She said that for some reason the Island had an ambiguous existence and a strange cult following...iii iv_ContentList of Figures      Acknowledgment     Sandy Island, a vessel Prologue Maps Sandy Island Pony Legends from Sandy Island The Second Discovery Murphy’s Petrel The First Closure The Village The Second Closure Again Epilogue    BibliographyWorking Bibliography    Appendix Introduction The Theater The Event The Desk The Staircase out there Possible ending Bibliographyvixii2981001021014243036465464727890118130144164180202206v vi_List of figures*Fig. 1 Picture of the theater with a picture of the staircase   in its original condition and a picture of the    staircase painted white, Author, 2020; p.0002Fig. 2 Cover of Legends from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.11Fig. 3 Opening page of Legends from Sandy Island,    Alfred Wellington, 1954; p.11Fig. 4 Cover of Three Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington,    1965; p.12Fig. 5 Opening page of Three Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1965; p.12Fig. 6 South Pacific Ocean Map, James Cook,    1774; p.15Fig. 7 Detail of South Pacific Ocean Map, James    Cook, 1774; p.16Fig. 8 Pacific Ocean Map, R.C. Carrington of the    Hydrographic Office, 1908; p.17Fig. 9 Detail of Pacific Ocean Map, R.C. Carrington    of the Hydrographic Office, 1908; p.18Fig. 10 South West Pacific Ocean Map from The World    Atlas, Eliot, George Fielding, 1967, p.233-234. ; p.19 Fig. 11 Detail of South West Pacific Ocean Map from    The World Atlas, Eliot, George Fielding, 1967,    p.233.; p.20Fig. 12 Map of the South West Pacific Ocean from The    Projected Vision, University of Sydney, 2007,    p.8-9.; p.21-22Fig. 13 p.22 of Three Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington,    1965; p.25Fig. 14 p.23 of Three Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington,    1965; p.26Fig. 15 Picture of a Sandy Island Pony, National    Association of Research Societies Press, 1960;    p.27Fig. 16 Picture of a Sandy Island Pony Jaw, National    Association of Research Societies Press, 1960;    p.27Fig. 17 Picture of a Sandy Island Pony Corpse,    National Association of Research Societies    Press, 1960; p.27list of figure*All of the documentation produced by Alfred Wellington or the National Association of Research Society Press is being used with the courtesy of N.A.R.S. 2020.vii viiiFig. 18 p.7 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.31Fig. 19 p.8 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.32Fig. 20 p.9 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.33Fig. 21 p.44 of Three Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington,    1965; p.37Fig. 22 p.45 of Three Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington,    1965; p.38Fig. 23 Lloyd’s Register of British and Foreign Shipping,    Wyman and Sons, 1875; p.39Fig. 24 p.715 of Lloyd’s Register of British and Foreign    Shipping, Wyman and Sons, 1875; p.40Fig. 25 Picture of The Office of the Unknown Captain   of  Velocity, took in 1908, National Association of   Research Societies Press, 1960; p.41Fig. 26 Drawing of Pumice Raft Phenomenon,    National Association of Research Societies    Press, 1960; p.43Fig. 27 Section drawing of Pumice Raft Phenomenon,    National Association of Research Societies Press,   1960; p.44Fig. 28 p.50 of Three Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington,    1965; p.47Fig. 29 p.51 of Three Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington,    1965; p.48Fig. 30 Picture of a taxidermied Murphy’s Petrel,    National Association of Research Societies    Press, 1960; p.49Fig. 31 Picture of a Murphy’s Petrel’s Nest, National    Association of Research Societies Press, 1960;    p.50Fig. 32 Postcard from Sandy Island, Sandy Island    Research Center, 1973; p.51Fig. 33 Backside of a Postcard from Sandy Island,    Sandy Island Research Center, 1973; p.52Fig. 34 p.117 of Three Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington,    1965; p.55Fig. 35 p.118 of Three Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington,    1965; p.56Fig. 36 Drawing of Sandy Island during the First    Closure, Alfred Wellington, 1953; p.57Fig. 37 Plan drawing of Sandy Island during the First    Closure, Alfred Wellington, 1953; p.58Fig. 38 Drawing of Sandy Island during the First    Closure, Alfred Wellington, 1953; p.59-60Fig. 39 Technical drawings of the bridges, National    Association of Research Societies Press, 1960;    p.61Fig. 40 Detail drawings of the bridges, National    Association of Research Societies Press, 1960;    p.61Fig. 41 Detail and structure drawings of the walls    surrounding Sandy Island, National    Association of Research Societies Press, 1960;    p.61Fig. 42 p.78 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.65Fig. 43 p.79 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.66Fig. 44 Plan of Alfred Wellington’s cabin, Alfred    Wellington, 1951; p.67Fig. 45 Analytical drawing of the multiple nested    representations in Fig. 42 from The Projected Vision, University of Sydney, 2007, p.118-119. ; p.69-70Fig. 46 p.53 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.73Fig. 47 Picture of the bench, National Association of    Research Societies Press, 1978; p.75Fig. 48 p.54 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.76Fig. 49 p.99 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.79Fig. 50 p.100 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.80Fig. 51 Picture of a Model of Sandy Island made    in 1953 by Alfred Wellington (the dates on    Fig. 51 are not accurate),  National     Association of Research Societies Press, 1960;    p.81Fig. 52 p.100 of Legend from Sandy Island, Alfred    Wellington, 1954; p.82Fig. 53 Cover of Jesting Pilate, The Diary of a Journey,    Aldous Huxley, 1926; p.85Fig. 54 p.213 of Jesting Pilate, The Diary of a Journey,    Aldous Huxley, 1926; p.86ix xFig. 55 Cover of I Came Out of the Eighteenth Century,    John Andrew Rice, 1942; p.87Fig. 56 p.100 of I Came Out of the Eighteenth Century,    John Andrew Rice, 1942; p.88Fig. 57 Sandy Island on Google Earth before 2012,    Google Earth, 2012; p.93Fig. 58 Sandy Island on Google Earth after 2012,    Google Earth, 2020; p.94Fig. 59 Cover of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.103104 Fig. 60 p.ii-iii of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.105Fig. 61 p.iv-v of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.107Fig. 62 p.vi-vii of Vaiselle, Author, 2019;     p.109Fig. 63 p.viii-ix of Vaiselle, Author, 2019;     p.111Fig. 64 p.1-2 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.113Fig. 65 p.3-4 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.115Fig. 66 p.5-6 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.117Fig. 67 p.7-8 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.119Fig. 68 p.9-10 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.121Fig. 69 p.11-12 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.123Fig. 70 p.13-14 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.125Fig. 71 p.15-16 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.127Fig. 72 p.17-18 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.129Fig. 73 p.19-20 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.131Fig. 74 p.21-22 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.133Fig. 75 p.23-24 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.135Fig. 76 p.25-26 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.137Fig. 77 p.27-28 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.139Fig. 78 p.29-30 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.141Fig. 79 p.31-32 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.143Fig. 80 p.33-34 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.145Fig. 81 p.35-36 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.147Fig. 82 p.37-38 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.149Fig. 83 p.39-40 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.151Fig. 84 p.41-42 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.153Fig. 85 p.43-44 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.155Fig. 86 p.45-46 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.157Fig. 87 p.47-48 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.159Fig. 88 p.49-50 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.161Fig. 89 p.51-52 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.163Fig. 90 p.53-54 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.165Fig. 91 p.55-56 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.167Fig. 92 p.57-58 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.169Fig. 93 p.59-60 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.171Fig. 94 p.61-62 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.173Fig. 95 p.63-64 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.175Fig. 96 p.65-66 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.177Fig. 97 p.67-68 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.179Fig. 98 p.69-70 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.181Fig. 99 p.71-72 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.183Fig. 100 p.73-74 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.185Fig. 101 p.75-76 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.187Fig. 102 p.77-78 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.189Fig. 103 p.79-80 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.191Fig. 104 p.81-82 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.193Fig. 105 p.83-84 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.195Fig. 106 p.85-86 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.197Fig. 107 p.87-88 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.199Fig. 108 p.89-90 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.201Fig. 109 p.91-92 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.203Fig. 110 p.93-94 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.205Fig. 111 p.95-96 of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.207Fig. 112 Backcover of Vaiselle, Author, 2019; p.209*More details can be found on p.109 in Fig. 62 for Fig. 59 to Fig. 112*xi xii_AcknowledgmentsThis master became more than what I thought it could be only because of all the people I met here in the last three years.Thanks to Thena, Félix, Zeke, and Alfred.-Sandy Island, a vessel was made with the help of Félix, Thena, Chad, Chris, Nick, Alfred, Lisa, Arnold, Hussam, Loulou, Zeke, and Derek. It was edited by Thena, Chad, and Nick.ackSANDY ISLAND, A VESSELsandy islandSandy Island, a vesselby Vincent PerronMay 1st 2020For Alfred7 8CONTENTPROLOGUEMAPSSANDY ISLAND PONYLEGENDS FROM SANDY ISLANDTHE SECOND DISCOVERYMURPHY’S PETRELTHE FIRST CLOSURETHE VILLAGETHE SECOND CLOSUREAGAINEPILOGUE10142430364654647278909 10Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselProloguePROLOGUEI was going through a pile of old books that I had never taken the time to read. I stumbled across a paper published by the National Association of Research Societies Press on an exhibition they conducted about an island named, Sandy Island. The exhibition was created to explore the different perceptions cast from a number of unrelated individuals regarding the Island’s ambiguous history. Its director was Alfred Wellington who, I soon found out, was deeply consumed by the Island’s existence. As I found myself becoming one of those individuals, I felt compelled to make a compendium of all the known documentation of Sandy Island. Among the writings of James Cook and others, it became impossible to write about the Island without a closer inspection of Wellington’s work, who dedicated much of his lifetime to researching the Island. His prolific writings cover, in great detail, the Island’s history starting from its discovery in 1774 up until his death in 1963. For anyone interested in the haven, his writings are an unquestionable keystone.*Alfred Wellington was born around 1884 and raised in an orphanage, inheriting an unsure lineage. Little is known about his upbringing or even how Sandy Island came to his knowledge. What is known however, is that he first visited the Island in 1902 just before the first closure. He was denied access for the next few years and the Island became an old, inaccessible memory. By 1945, he was finally able to return to the Island where he spent the rest * Since Wellington could not write clearly, it is hard to decipher most of his notebook writing. He was left-handed and lost his left hand when he was 14 years old: an axe accident with his father.  As such, there will be some speculation on the documentations that could not be read.11 12Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselProloguePrologueLegends from Sandy Island and The Contemplative Traveler’s HobbyAlfred Wellington, 1954.Three Sandy Island: History of an Unknown IslandThe book was published posthumously, two years after the death of Wellington. It was completed on June 24th, 1963. Inside is where most of the factual information of the Island was found.Alfred Wellington, 1965.of his life researching the Island from his cabin. From his writings, two books were published: Legends of Sandy Island and The Contemplative Traveler’s Hobby (1954) and Three Sandy Island: History of an Unknown Island (1965). He claims to have died on the Island in 1963.Since Wellington’s death, there have been many attempts to determine the veracity of his work, as he was known to have a fluid vision of reality. One such attempt has been from the University of Sydney, where a group of post-graduate students published extensive research on the life of Wellington and his claimed findings on the Island. Their investigation has been an additional resource for this compendium.This compendium continues to build and re-frame the history of Sandy Island. The following nine chapters are a collection of writings, photographs, and drawings that have been structured around two main categories largely based on the work of Wellington: legend stories, marked by a red tab, and historical findings, marked by a blue tab.With each new chapter, the stories build upon experiences and relationships that may become increasingly familiar, however strange. The intent is that this compendium only finds itself complete through the contemplation and interpretation of each unique reader, not unlike the Island itself.Fig. 2     Fig. 3     Fig. 4     Fig. 5     13 14Sandy Island, a vesselMapsChapter 1Sandy Island, a vesselMAPS1774 - 2012In 2012, a few hundred miles east off Australia, a boat of Australian scientists is at the location of Sandy Island. It is the first boat floating at this position while being aware that the Island exists since the second discovery of the Island in 1875 by one of the five English Velocity ships. The Island was first discovered in 1774 by Captain James Cook, two hundred and twenty six miles east of its currently mapped location.These moments are real.15 16Sandy Island, a vesselChapter 1Chapter 1Sandy Island, a vesselChart of Discoveries made in the South-Pacific Ocean Chart of Discoveries made in the South-Pacific Ocean South Pacific Ocean MapThis is the first time the Island is seen on a map.James Cook, 1774.Note that North is pointing to the right.First appearance of Sandy Island, detail of South Pacific Ocean MapThe Island was situated north of New-Caledonia when James Cook discovered it.James Cook, 1774.Note that North is pointing to the right.Fig. 6     Fig. 7     17 18Sandy Island, a vesselChapter 1Chapter 1Sandy Island, a vesselChart of the Pacific Ocean (South West Sheet)Chart of the Pacific Ocean (South West Sheet) Pacific Ocean Map The map is currently held at the Auckland Museum. R.C. Carrington of the Hydrographic Office, 1908.Second appearance of Sandy Island, detail of Pacific Ocean MapIt is noted on this map that Sandy Island was discovered in 1875 by a boat named Velocity. The Island was found 60 miles North West of New Caledonia. R.C. Carrington of the Hydrographic Office, 1908.Fig. 8     Fig. 9     19 20Sandy Island, a vesselChapter 1Chapter 1Sandy Island, a vesselAustralia, Oceania, Physical. The World Atlas.Australia, Oceania, Physical. The World Atlas.South West Pacific Ocean MapAn atlas from David Rumsey’s map collection.The World Atlas, Eliot, George Fielding, 1967, p.233-234.Sandy Island, detail of South West Pacific Ocean MapThe Island could be found on most maps until 2012. While its location varies, it is always around drawn the coordinates 19.00°S 160.00°E.The World Atlas, Eliot, George Fielding, 1967, p.233. Fig. 10     Fig. 11     21 22Sandy Island, a vesselMapsMapsChapter 1Chapter 1Sandy Island, a vessel Map of the South West Pacific Ocean All known expeditions and their respective trajectories on the same map.The Projected Vision, University of Sydney, 2007, p.8-9.Fig. 12     23 24Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselSable Island PonyChapter 2SANDY ISLAND PONY1774 - In 1774, James Cook left four horses on the Island.Today, there is a population of around five hundred horses on the Island. They are called the Sandy Island Ponies, in reference to another strangely similar story.The horses feed on patches of grass. Their main cause of death is starvation as they do not have any predators and their teeth erode because of the sand. It makes them unable to eat grass. They die starving, protecting the Island from overpopulation.The documents on p.15 were originally produced as part of a display for the exhibition about Sandy Island, they are used throughout the book.25 26Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselSable Island PonySable Island PonyChapter 2Chapter 2Sandy Island PonyThree Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1965, p.23.Sandy Island PonyThree Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1965, p.22.Fig. 13     Fig. 14     27 28Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselSable Island PonySable Island PonyChapter 2Chapter 2Sandy Island Pony A Sandy Island Pony strolling in the grass.National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960.Sandy Island Pony Corpse A dead Sandy Island Pony. Most of the corpses are found on beaches around the Island. The horses spend their last days drinking water.National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960.Sandy Island Pony JawThe bones can be found on the beaches around the Island. The teeth are eroded by the sand.National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960.Fig. 15     Fig. 16     Fig. 17     29 30Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselLegends from Sandy IslandChapter 3LEGENDS FROM SANDY ISLAND1954Legends from Sandy Island is a book compiling short stories all happening on Sandy Island. The legends are closely related to the actual life of the author, Alfred Wellington; he looked for the Island for most of his life, writing book after book from his modest cabin. The short stories are a combination of the Island’s history and his. The first chapter of the legend book is about someone looking for his past that would exist on the Island. It is the first time Wellington mentions the existence of a cabin on the Island in his writing. He does it here through the memory of a protagonist. 31 32Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 3Chapter 3The Navigator, the Creator & the Past: searching for a forgotten souvenirThe Navigator, the Creator & the Past: searching for a forgotten souvenirChapter One - The Navigator, the Creator & the Past: searching for a forgotten souvenirLegends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.8.Chapter One - The Navigator, the Creator & the Past: searching for a forgotten souvenirLegends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.7.Fig. 18     Fig. 19     33 34Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselLegends from Sandy IslandChapter 3Chapter 3The Navigator, the Creator & the Past: searching for a forgotten souvenirChapter One - The Navigator, the Creator & the Past: searching for a forgotten souvenirThis legend could be based on the Second Discovery, the Navigator being the Captain of Velocity (see p.36)Legends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.9.Fig. 20     35 36Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselThe Second DiscoveryChapter 4THE SECOND DISCOVERY1875 - 2012Sandy Island was located for the second time in 1875.It was discovered by an English ship named Velocity. The name of the captain is unknown. Between 1874 and 1875 there were five English boats named Velocity navigating the seas. Even with today’s data, the person that discovered the Island for the second time is still unknown. Upon this second discovery, the Island was 256.3 miles west of its original location. On today’s maps, the Island is drawn at the same location as what is seen on the 1875 maps. There are no maps, with the exception of the original one, showing the location of its first discovery. There are theories that James Cook might have seen a pumice raft: an agglomeration of floating rocks, a mirage, or that the Island was a simple mapping mistake.As the first discovery is hardly related to the second one, some say that James Cook never discovered an island and that the second discovery was just the discovery of an entirely different island. However, this theory does not explain the existence of a colony of horses on the Island.37 38Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselThe Second DiscoveryThe Second DiscoveryChapter 4Chapter 4The Second DiscoveryThree Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1965, p.45.The Second DiscoveryThree Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1965, p.44.Fig. 21     Fig. 22     39 40Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 4Chapter 4Lloyd’s Register of British and Foreign ShippingLloyd’s Register of British and Foreign ShippingLloyd’s Register of British and Foreign ShippingA document of all registered boats of the British Empire between 1874 and 1875.Wyman and Sons, 1875.Lloyd’s Register of British and Foreign ShippingOn page 715, there are five boats called Velocity.Wyman and Sons, 1875.Fig. 23     Fig. 24     41 42Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselThe Second DiscoveryThe Second DiscoveryChapter 4Chapter 4The Office of the Unknown Captain of VelocityPicture from 1908, the photographer is unknown.National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960.Fig. 25     43 44Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 4Chapter 4Possible explanation of the First DiscoveryPossible explanation of the First DiscoveryPumice Raft Phenomenon, DrawingA raft made of an agglomeration of pumice stones. Pumice Raft can be as large as Manhattan Island (2.3 miles wide by 13.4 miles long), the size of the Island in James Cook’s maps. National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960.Pumice Raft DrawingThe pumice stones are produced by an underwater volcano. The stones float as they are filled with gas during their volcanic formation. National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960.Fig. 26     Fig. 27     45 46Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselMurphy’s PetrelChapter 5MURPHY’S PETREL1918 - Murphy’s Petrel came to live on the Island after human inhabitation ceased. The Island became a migratory stop over for the species of small birds. The birds helped the Sandy Island Ponies by bringing them a diversity of nutrients. The birds would fly in plants from other territories to build their nest during their stop at the Island. Over time, a variety of nest compositions created a diversified ecosystem on the Island and allowed the horses to thrive. In 1966, a few years after Wellington’s death, there was a group of scientists that had an urge to protect the birds. They had to be certain that the birds would keep their lovely habitat, untouched.When nature takes over a territory on earth, humans are compelled to maintain a stable environment for those animals. The same animals that found the Island suitable by its lack of humanity. Given this, the Island became a bird observatory and a remote research center for those studying the Sandy Island Pony. With time, the Island was opened to tourism in order to finance the researchers. Through years of study, the environment of the Island became intimately familiar and known to the researchers, just like so much of the world now taken by humans.47 48Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 5Chapter 5Birds on Sandy IslandBirds on Sandy IslandBirds on Sandy IslandThree Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1965, p.51.Birds on Sandy IslandThree Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1965, p.50.Fig. 28     Fig. 29     49 50Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 5Chapter 5Documentation of Murphy’s Petrel by Alfred WellingtonDocumentation of Murphy’s Petrel by Alfred WellingtonAn imageA taxidermied Murphy’s PetrelBeyond the colony on Sandy Island, The Murphy’s Petrels have a colony, the second largest in the world, on the Oeno Island, another Island in the Southern Pacific Ocean. They are known to carry their nest with them throughout their migration.National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. Murphy’s Petrel’s NestA found nest made with horse mane hair.National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. Fig. 30     Fig. 31     51 52Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 5Chapter 5Tourism on Sandy IslandTourism on Sandy IslandPostcard from Sandy Island Pictures showing the various places visited by tourists including the Research Center on Sandy Island.Research Center, 1973.Postcard from Sandy IslandProduced by the Research Center under the direction of the National Association of Research Societies.Research Center, 1973.Fig. 32     Fig. 33     53 54Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 6The First ClosureTHE FIRST CLOSURE1903There are very few writings about the First Closure of the Island. The most revealing is a short text written by Wellington in his book Three Sandy Island (See p.55).The First Closure occurred only a year after Wellington left the Island from his first visit. According to Wellington’s notebooks*, the Island had to close following an alarming increase in the death of ponies and villagers from an unknown disease. The Island was walled off and could only be accessed by bridges. He was clearly bitter about the closure, writing in his last paragraph that closing the Island due to the disease was not justified. The disease, however, was more dangerous than what he presumed.* It is unclear from the writing if the First Closure really happened. No ruins were found. Only construction drawings of the bridges that would have been built around the Island were found. 55 56Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 6Chapter 6The First ClosureThe First ClosureThe First ClosureThree Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1965, p.118.The First ClosureThree Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1965, p.117.the small textFig. 34     Fig. 35     57 58Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 6Chapter 6Alfred Wellington’s Speculation on the First ClosureAlfred Wellington’s Speculation on the First ClosureSandy Island during the First Closure National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. Sandy Island during the First Closure This drawing and the following on the next pages were made by Alfred Wellington for the exhibition to show the transition from the First Closure to the Opening.National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. Fig. 36     Fig. 37     59 60Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 6Chapter 6Sandy Island during the First Closure National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. Alfred Wellington’s Speculation on the First ClosureAlfred Wellington’s Speculation on the First ClosureFig. 38     61 62Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselThe Second ClosureChapter 6Chapter 6Infrastructure DrawingsStructure of the closure wallDetail and structure drawings of the walls.*National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. Structure of the closure infrastructureTechnical drawings of the bridges.*National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. Details of the closure infrastructuresDetail drawings of the bridges.*National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. *All signed by Wellington. Although, he could not have drawn them because he did not know what the Island looked like during its first closure as he was trapped in the outside world.Fig. 39     Fig. 40     Fig. 41     63 64Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 7The VillageTHE VILLAGE1934The cabin, first mentioned in the third chapter, is described as much in the Legends from Sandy Island as it is in Three Sandy Island. It is the place where Wellington died in 1963 and where all his writings were originally found. This story presents the creator in his cabin before it was cast in concrete as it is described in The Navigator, the Creator & the Past: searching for a forgotten souvenir (see p.30). In this legend, Wellington projects himself as the creator, again, struggling with his memories. He creates an image of himself, trapped in his room, trapped in ongoing memory. He does so by nesting the cabin within itself through the drawings pinned on the wall of the cabin (see p.65).*This interpretation of the legend was investigated with great detail by the group of post-graduate students from the University of Sydney (see p.70).* There are speculations that the cabin was not even situated on the Island, as you can read on p.30, in The Navigator, the Creator & the Past; searching for a forgotten souvenir, the protagonist never finds the Island. If this is the case then legend would be seen as fact.65 66Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 7Chapter 7The VillageThe VillageChapter Eighteen - The VillageLegends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.78.Chapter Eighteen - The VillageLegends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.79.THE VILLAGEFig. 42     Fig. 43     67 68Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 7Chapter 7The VillageThe VillagePlan of Alfred Wellington’s cabin Remnant of the drafted plan pinned to the wall of his cabin.National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. Fig. 44     69 70Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 7Chapter 7The Projected VisionThe Projected VisionAnalytical drawing of the multiple nested representations in The Village drawing The Projected Vision, University of Sydney, 2007, p.118-119.the nalysisFig. 45     71 72Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselThe Second ClosureChapter 8THE SECOND CLOSURE1954The legend of the Second Closure is a combination of the First Closure and Wellington’s fascination for the bench that was built as a memorial. For him, the bench touched upon ideas relating to contemplating, waiting and dying. This particular legend gives yet another view to the control he wanted to have over his environment and his life up until his death.By writing about the bench as a memorial to not forgetting, Wellington shows how the action of not forgetting sometimes ends up meaning more than what is being remembered. In the legend, the bench only achieves its original purpose, a memorial, when the villagers forget that it was once a place to die.This legend might be his way to reconcile the part of his life he spent without access to the Island and the people he lost during that period. It is easier to cope with isolation and loss when it is given meaning.** Strangely, ruins of the bench and the crosses were found on the Island. This closure to a certain extent has more proof of being real than the first one.73 74Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselThe Second ClosureChapter 8Chapter 8The Bench & the Second ClosureChapter Seven - The Bench & the Second ClosureLegends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.53.Fig. 46     75 76Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 8Chapter 8The Bench & the Second ClosureThe Bench & the Second ClosureChapter Seven - The Bench & the Second ClosureLegends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.54.Picture of the bench National Association of Research Societies Press, 1978. Fig. 47     Fig. 48     77 78Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselAgainChapter 9AGAIN1954Over the course of his life, Wellington met the author Aldous Huxley multiple times. Their relationship and its influence can be traced throughout both of their lifetimes. In Huxley’s Jesting Pilate, for instance, he directly discusses the first time he found out about Wellington in 1926 (see p.86). His final book, Island, written in 1962, was also partly inspired by Wellington’s long standing obsession with Sandy Island. As for Wellington, he was equally taken with their relationship: experimenting with mescaline he found new limits to what he could consider true. The following text is an obvious example of those experimentations, his writing is more disjointed and surreal. Wellington also claims that he was inspired by how Huxley had a changed perception of the world after he retrieved his lost sight around 1952, one that he could hardly relate to the memories he had of seeing. However, no recording of them meeting after 1945 was ever found. Wellington also had ongoing connections with one of the founders of Black Mountain College, John Andrew Rice. The methods of teaching Rice was advocating for were another influence towards the more experience based and self-guided work made by Wellington. Rice writes in his autobiography I Came Out of the Eighteenth Century how he was persuaded that Wellington had to completely immerse himself into his work to find truth (see p.88).79 80Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 9Chapter 9Two StructuresTwo StructuresLast Chapter - Two StructuresLegends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.99.Last Chapter - Two StructuresLegends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.100.Fig. 49     Fig. 50     81 82Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselChapter 9Chapter 9Two StructuresTwo StructuresLast Chapter - Two StructuresLegends from Sandy Island, Alfred Wellington, 1954, p.101.Model of the Island National Association of Research Societies Press, 1960. Fig. 51     Fig. 52     83 84Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselAgain AgainChapter 9Chapter 985 86Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselAgainAgainChapter 9Chapter 9Cover pageJesting Pilate, The Diary of a Journey, Aldous Huxley, 1926.p.213.One of the pages where Wellington is mentioned.Jesting Pilate, The Diary of a Journey, Aldous Huxley, 1926, p.213.AGAIN1Fig. 53     Fig. 54     87 88Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselAgainAgainChapter 9Chapter 9p.100I Came Out of the Eighteenth Century, John Andrew Rice, 1942, p.100.Cover pageI Came Out of the Eighteenth Century, John Andrew Rice, 1942.AGAIN2Fig. 55     Fig. 56     89 90Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselEpilogueEPILOGUE2020With all the research surrounding the Island, there is an absurd disconnection from one legend, story, and moment of recorded history, to the other - especially the nine chosen for this document. The author’s interpretation consolidates these nine parts as each of them was written in direct relation to what he assumed the history of the Island was. While any given interpretations are understood by the viewer as absolutes, these absolutes are changing throughout the stories. They are bendable: Sandy Island becomes a looking glass to one’s inner orientation. Perhaps this is why Wellington, and myself, spent and spend, respectively, all our time with the Island. To those new to the Island, this endeavor may understandably come across as frivolous and insignificant. What meaning could an inconsequential island and its slippery existence possibly hold? Beyond what is known to me, I have found that the Island indeed works in mysterious ways. Being able to fully describe something that is impossible to fully grasp makes the Island analogous to a feeling. It is now more real to me than the things I know to be facts. It has become a personal proxy for the fluidity of reality, of truth, and of self. To borrow from William Blake, who coincidentally was another one of those unrelated individuals taken by the Island, it is “to see a world in a grain of sand”.** Beginning line of the poem Auguries of Innocence by William Blake written in 1803 and first published in 1863.91 92Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselEpilogueEpilogueThe boat of scientists mentioned at the beginning, did not find Sandy Island. In 2012, they discovered that a non-existing island made its way to Google Earth. It was real to those that were not there.93 94Sandy Island, a vesselSandy Island, a vesselEpilogueEpilogueSandy Island on Google Earth before 2012Google Earth, 2012.Sandy Island on Google Earth after 2012Google Earth, 2020.Fig. 57     Fig. 58     N.A.R.S. 202097 98_BibliographyHuxley, Aldous. Jesting Pilate: The Diary of a Journey.   Chatto & Windus, London, 1926.Rice, John A. I Came Out of the Eighteenth Century.   Hillary House, New York, 1942.Wellington, Alfred. Legends from Sandy Island,    National Association of Research    Societies Press, London, 1954.Wellington, Alfred. Three Sandy Island: History of an   Unknow Island, National Association of    Research Societies Press, London, 1965.bibliography10099_Working BibliographyBaudrillard, Jean. Simulacra and Simulation.    University of Michigan Press, Ann    Arbor, 1995.Bechir Kenzari, Architecture and Violence, Actar, New   York, 2011.Borges, Jorge Luis. Collected Fictions. Viking, New   York, 1998.Calvino, Italo. If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler.    Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York,    1981.Craig, James A., Matt Ozga-Lawn, Pamphlet    Architecture 32: Resilience, Princeton    Architectural Press, New York, 2012. Debord, Guy. The Society of the Spectacle. Zone    Books, New York, 1994.Dossey, Larry. “The Sandy Island Syndromes: On   Seeing what is Not there and Not Seeing    what is there.” Explore: The Journal of    Science and Healing, vol.11, no. 4,    2015, pp. 239-248.Eisenman, Peter. Re-Working Eisenman. Academy   Editions, London, 1993.Hannah, Dorita, Event Space: Theatre Architecture and  the Historical Avant-Garde, Routledge,    New York, 2019.Hoffman, Dan, Architecture Studio: Cranbrook    Academy of Art 1986-1993, Rizzoli ,    New-York, 1994.Huxley, Aldous. Island. Chatto & Windus, London,   1962.Lippard, Lucy R. Six Years: The Dematerialization   of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972,    University of California Press, Berkeley, 1997.May, John Signal. Image. Architecture: Everything is   Already an Image. Columbia Books on    Architecture and the City, New York,    2019.Parker, Kevin, Simper, Dominic, Watson, Jay, The   Projected Vision, Sydney University Press,    2007.Rossi, Aldo. A Scientific Autobiography, MIT Press,   Cambridge, 1981.Seton, Maria, et al. “Obituary: Sandy Island (1876–  2012).” Eos, Transactions American    Geophysical Union, vol. 94, no. 15,    2013, pp. 141-142.Spiller, Neil, Architectural Design; Drawing    architecture; John Wiley & Sons, 2013.Stracey, Frances. Constructed situations: A new history   of the situationist international. London,    Pluto Press, 2014.Vassallo, Jesús,. Seamless: Digital Collage and Dirty   Realism in Contemporary Architecture. Park   Books, Zurich, Switzerland, 2016.Wall, Jeff. Jeff Wall: Selected Essays and Interviews,   Museum of Modern Art, New York,    2007.Weschler, Lawrence. Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet Of Wonder:   Pronged Ants, Horned Humans, Mice on Toast, and   Other Marvels of Jurassic Technology, Pantheon   Books, New York, 1995.working102_AppendixThe following book is a cross-section of my thinking taken throughout the fall of 2019. It was written as an ongoing thought process to develop some sort of a method to tackle the topic of reality. However, that is something I can only write now looking back on the book, as I had no precise idea of what I was doing making it. It is only from this process of ongoing uncertainty that the project went into places I was not familiar with.-For you, as a reader, it might help you to see the following book as the methodology used to create Sandy Island, a vessel.-The book was read and criticized by Félix, my dad, my mom, Charline, Carl, Thena, Chad, Chris, Lisa, and Arnold. This copy was annotated by my mother in December 2019 and by Lisa and Arnold in May 2020. The scans were made in May 2020, five months after its creation.appendix101103 104AppendixVaisselleFig. 59     105 106AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleAbstractAbstractFig. 60     107 108AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleContent ContentFig. 61     109 110AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleList of figures List of figuresFig. 62     111 112AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleAcknowledgment AcknowledgmentFig. 63     113 114AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleIntroduction IntroductionFig. 64     115 116AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleIntroduction IntroductionFig. 65     117 118AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleIntroduction IntroductionindrouctionFig. 66     119 120AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleIntroduction IntroductionFig. 67     121 122AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleIntroduction IntroductionFig. 68     123 124AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleIntroduction IntroductionFig. 69     125 126AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleIntroduction IntroductionFig. 70     127 128AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleIntroduction IntroductionFig. 71     129 130AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Theater The Theaterthe theaterFig. 72     131 132AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Theater The TheaterFig. 73     133 134AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Theater The TheaterFig. 74     135 136AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Theater The TheaterFig. 75     137 138AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Theater The TheaterFig. 76     139 140AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Theater The TheaterFig. 77     141 142AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Theater The TheaterFig. 78     143 144AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventeventFig. 79     145 146AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventFig. 80     147 148AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventFig. 81     149 150AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventFig. 82     151 152AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventFig. 83     153 154AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventFig. 84     155 156AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventFig. 85     157 158AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventFig. 86     159 160AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventFig. 87     161 162AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Event The EventFig. 88     163 164AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Desk The DeskdeskFig. 89     165 166AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Desk The DeskFig. 90     167 168AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Desk The DeskFig. 91     169 170AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Desk The DeskFig. 92     171 172AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Desk The DeskFig. 93     173 174AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Desk The DeskFig. 94     175 176AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Desk The DeskFig. 95     177 178AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Desk The DeskFig. 96     179 180AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircasestaircaseFig. 97     181 182AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircaseFig. 98     183 184AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircaseFig. 99     185 186AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircaseFig. 100     187 188AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircaseFig. 101     189 190AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircaseFig. 102     191 192AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircaseFig. 103     193 194AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircaseFig. 104     195 196AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircaseFig. 105     197 198AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleThe Staircase The StaircaseFig. 106     199 200AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleFig. 107     201 202AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaissellePossible Ending Possible Endingpossible endingFig. 108     203 204AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaissellePossible Ending Possible EndingFig. 109     205 206AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleBibliographyBibliographybibliographyFig. 110     207 208AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleFig. 111     209 210AppendixAppendixVaisselleVaisselleFig. 112     211AppendixVaisselle

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