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Tales of the Traveling Dust : Heterarchical Narratives of a Dusty Imaginary Lalonde Lavergne, Félix-Antoine 2019-12-19

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BLANKACCREDITA-TIONSTales of the Traveling DustHeterarchical Narratives of a Dusty ImaginarybyFélix-Antoine Lalonde LavergneCommittee:Bachelier ès arts, B.A. Design de l’environnement, Université du Québec À Montréal(UQÀM), 2015Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree ofinThe Faculty of Graduate Studies,School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture,Architecture Program.The University of British ColumbiaDecember 2019© Félix-Antoine Lalonde LavergneMaster of ArchitectureThena Tak (Chair)Prof. Blair SatterfieldDouglas RobbRoy CloutierNicole SylviaviviiABSTRACT Architecture plays a role in the ways we represent, experience, think and therefore produce the world. In an age of environmental instability, this project posit that architecture’s raw material is the vast array of attitudes that we have towards the material world. As such, architecture is both a mean to convey narratives about how we mentally represent our environment to ourselves and a manifestation of those mental representations; An artifact. The goal of this project is to explore how the play between those attitudes can act as a point of contact between human and climatic spatio-temporal scales. Between the architectural narrative and the environmental imaginary. Drawing on concepts such as friction, entanglement, fragmentation and alterity, the project takes form through heterarchical narratives centered around a climatic phenomenon; the movement of mineral dust between two continents.AbstractviiiixContentsFront Matter:  vii - abstract  ix - table of content  xi - acknowledgmentsIntroduction ------------------------------------------------------------- 3Entangled Sites: The Traveling Dust  ------------------------------- 13The Game --------------------------------------------------------------  39Tales of the Traveling Dust:   ----------------------------------------  49    - field of pillars    - cloud towers    - sedimentation device    - interpreter’s house    - wandering hotel    - oasis    - place of reveal    - dust catcherBibliography    --------------------------------------------------------  139xMom, rien de tout cela n’aurait été possible sans ton amour et ton support indéfectible.Cet ouvrage t’es dédié.À Marie. Pour avoir cru en moi lorsque je me faisais défaut. Ton amour est une force.xiAcknowledgments I would like to express my gratitude to advisor extraordinaire Thena Tak, whose amazing insight, guidance, and support have allowed this project to reach its full scale. I would also like to thank Blair Satterfield, Douglas Robb, Roy Cloutier and Nicole Sylvia for their insightful comments and help during our committee meetings. I owe a great deal to Vincent, Nick, Nelly, Gab, Zoe and Tyler who greatly helped with the completion of this project when time and energy were running low.This project and more generally my experience in the MArch program would not have been the same if it had not been from the support, stimulation and inspiration that I owe to dear friends; Seb, Jérémie, Vince, Chris, José, Nick, Gab, Zeke, Nelly, and many others; I have grown and learned a great deal through our conversations.Mes amis, votre travail acharné et votre amitié a laissé une empreinte positive sur moi dont je vous suis éternellement redevable. Merci.2«Architecture helps to replace meaningless reality with a theatrically, or rather architecturally, transformed reality, which draws us in and, as we surrender to it, grants us an illusion of meaning ... we cannot live with chaos. Chaos must be transformed into cosmos.»1Karsten Harries.1. Karsten Harries. As quoted in: Pallasmaa, Juhani. The Embodied Image: Imagination and Imagery in Architecture. Wiley, Chichester, West Sussex, 2011.3Introduction  Generally speaking, architecture is a relational tool. It is a mean to create, suppress, enhance, mitigate (…) relationships between the vast array of elements that composes our reality. Between man and his environment or between people themselves, architecture plays a role in organizing and structuring our world and the way we understand it according to what we know of it and how we know it.As such, in an era of environmental instability, it is a designated tool to explore ways of exploring and perhaps revisiting the ways we have to relate to the material world. 4 Latching architectural narratives onto the variety of systems that compose Earth’s climatic system can serve a dual purpose; it expands architecture’s environmental agency towards more than technological and energetic efficiency, and  brings these abstract systems to become sensible by posing them as a fundamental part of the ways we represent, tell and think modes of being in the World. The latter is specially interesting in times of climatic and environmental anxiety as it posit that our species adaptation to a changing planet can only be achieved through revisiting the very nature of our interactions with it. Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy of Design Earth have expressed2 quite concisely the difficulties that impairs our ability to think climate; its intangibility, invisibility and the irrepresentability of its scale, ubiquity and duration makes it a hardly defined topic despite the global urgency of addressing the impact we collectively have on it.Climate is not a monolithic object to which we are passively subjected. It is rather composed of a staggering amount of ramifications – of subsystems that, weaved together, forms a constantly shifting meta system to which we contribute. Borrowing Timothy Morton’s term, climate, is a Hyperobject;  (Hyperobjects) refer to things that are massively distributed   in time and space relative to humans. They involve   	 profoundly	different	temporalities	than	the	human-scale	ones			 we	are	used	to.	(…)	Hyperobjects	occupy	a	high-dimensional		 phase space that results in their being invisible to humans for  	 stretches	of 	time.	And	they	exhibit	their	effects		 	 	 interobjectively; that is, they can be detected in a    space that consists of  interrelationships between aesthetic   properties of  objects.32. Ghosn, Rania and El Hadi Jazairy. «Gaïa Global Circus: A Climate Tragicomedy». Text from: Climates: Architecture and the Planetary Imaginary. Columbia Books on Architecture and the City, New York, NY, 20163. Morton, Timothy, and Project Muse University Press eBooks. Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World. vol. 27, University of MinnesotaPress, Minneapolis, 2013.5These Hyperobjects are hard to grasp. Pure and applied sciences have managed to do so through computational models; simulations based on a set of parameters that are compared to reality for corroboration. But as Adrian Lahoud points out;  «The models used by climate scientists to explicate the    ambiguity of  the material world can be understood in purely  	 scientific	terms,	but	only	at	the	expense	of 	unmeshing	the		 models from the political and economic forces in which they   are installed and called on to work for.»4Following the operative mode of modern epistemology, these scientific models are only part of the equation that allows us to comprehend climate change. As Bruno Latour5 argues, these hybrid objects are only understood partially through our separated epistemological machines. To explain climate change only through scientific data is to obfuscate the anthropic mechanisms that caused or aims to respond to climatic threat. To focus on the political and sociological dimensions of climate mutation is to evacuate the very physical system in which these human negotiations take place. How can we then, understand and address the full complexity of the climatic urgency?This thesis posits that a valid way of proceeding, would be to weave through the various dimensions of knowledge through speculative narratives. Architecture becomes an act of synthesis and exploration and puts forward its ability of mediating the various entities that composes the World. Architecture becomes a tool for building cosmologies. Narratives, then ultimately become tools to perform the mental leap of abstraction required to embrace such hyperobjects, allowing the mind to grasp the slippery aspects of transcending spatiotemporal scales while binding and relating them to human experience.4. Lahoud, Adrian. The Third Degree. In:Weizman, Ines, Architecture and the Paradox of Dissidence. vol. 9, Routledge, London; New York;, 2014;2013. p. 2085. Latour, Bruno. We have Never been Modern. Harvester Wheatsheaf, New york; Cambridge, Mass;, 1993.6 Expanding on the inherent difficulties in mentally picturing the complexity of climatic systems, the notion of scale is a recurring theme. And for cause, in his article «Architecture as Problem, Scale as Trap»6, Adrian Lahoud  produces an eloquent diagram presenting the spatio-temporal scales of scientific inquiry. The global climatic system weaves trough virtually all of them. Involving entities ranging from the size of a particle to planetary phenomena, understanding climate mobilizes a vast array of scientific disciplines, each with their own models and research objects. But the mental leap necessary to picture climatic systems reach its paroxysm when considering both the temporal and spatial scales. For instance, aerosol particles ranging from 0.1um to 10um are known to be unequally distributed, have generally short life spans in the atmosphere while playing a major role in cloud formation. Molecules like CO2 in comparison tends to achieve uniform distribution in the atmosphere and, due to their molecular stability, have a wide spectrum of lifespan that depends on the variety of removal systems. Generally speaking, the emitted atmospheric CO2 might dissolve in the ocean in 20 to 200 years. Scales of Scientific Inquiry. Adrian Lahoud, 2015.6. Lahoud, Adrian. The Third Degree. In:Weizman, Ines, Architecture and the Paradox of Dissidence. vol. 9, Routledge, London; New York;, 2014;2013. p. 208BRIDGING SCALES7But other systems at play implies projection on scales that transcend the human temporal scope in ways that are mentally irrepresentable, calling to deep time or geological time. The emergence of the Anthropocene concept has come to highlight this distance between human and geological temporal scales when our societies came to the realization that these two scales where interlaced and that humanity had become an actant in the grand scheme of the geological time. Referring to the Accelerationist* paradigm, the problem in bridging this distance is exacerbated by the general tendency to think the world through short temporal scales. We are temporally myopic and therefore ill equipped to understand the implication of our agency.However, as Stewart Brand argues in «The Clock of the Long Now»7, human institutions still embodies our relationship with longer temporal scope and these institutions have their function in the structure of our societies. Maybe then, another temporal layer is necessary to bridge the gap between the Long Time and the human temporal scale – and maybe architecture can play a role in establishing such a temporal layer. Pace Layers. Steward Brand, 1999. The Clock of the Long Now, p.377. Brand, Stewart. The Clock of the Long Now: Time and Responsibility. Basic Books, New York, 19998«Climate change occurs in the periphery of our vision, at the limits of our sensorium and understanding. It’s slow, it’s almost invisible, it occurs at multiple temporal and spatial scales simultaneously. This is why climate science and climate visualization are so important as fields of aesthetic production: they are able to generate new sensibilities and imaginaries. But they are also limited by the tyranny of screen culture, of framing – literally, by screens – and the modes of attention that this framing allows. In other words, the hypothesis of this project is that you have to use an environment to tell a story about an environment. That is, to create a situation where the experience of the space within the gallery creates a new correspondence with the space being represented.»8Adrian Lahoud – Climate Crimes8. Project focus - Adrian Lahoud: Climate Crimes. Produced as part of The Future Starts Here(Ran from 12 May 2018 to 4 November 2018) https://www.vam.ac.uk/articles/project-focus-adrian-lahoud-climate-crimes912Dust in the Bodele DepressionNASA Terra MODIS, Image by Jesse Allen.April 22, 2004.13Entangled Sites: The Traveling Dust In 2005, a group of scientists travelled to the middle of the Chadian desert, a three days drive from the capital, N’Djamema – to inquire on results obtained from a NASA remote sensing unit;9A relatively small region of the sub-Saharan desert was responsible for two fifths of the world’s global dust emissions. On site, the scientists are puzzled. Expecting to find an landscape of sand dunes, they find themselves in a desert with a surprisingly compact and crusty surface. How this solid ground can produce the clouds of dust surrounding them is not clear.Ensuing is a decade of inquiry – the situation became clearer. They were standing on the remnants of a dried up lake bed. The crusty surface was in fact a sedimentary mineral called diatomite, composed of billions of microorganisms’ shells.250km up to the North-East, a topographical gully formed by the Tibesti Mountains and the Ennedi Plateau – channels the sand charged winds towards this location. The porous mineral gets eroded through aeolian deflation and the resulting dust gets picked by high winds – travelling as far as the next continent and, in doing so, was responsible for the fertilization of the Amazon basin.A spot in the middle of the desert – pretty much the epitome of nowhere – became a place. A place of planetary significance: The Dustiest Place on Earth, entangled with its counterpart; the Amazon Rainforest.9. Giles, Jim. “The Dustiest Place on Earth.” Nature, vol. 434, no. 7035, 2005, pp. 816-819.14Dust Plume1 : 20 800 000 Aerosol Optical Thickness Data from MODIS TerraWind Speed Data from    2018/07/010˚ 5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚ 30˚5˚10˚15˚20˚25˚30˚35˚40˚45˚50˚55˚60˚65˚70˚75˚80˚85˚0˚5˚10˚15˚20˚25˚30˚35˚40˚45˚50˚5˚10˚15˚20˚ 0 1000 2000 kmWINTERSUMMER Bodélé DepressionAmazon Basin15Dust Plume1 : 20 800 000 Aerosol Optical Thickness Data from MODIS TerraWind Speed Data from    2018/07/010˚ 5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚ 30˚5˚10˚15˚20˚25˚30˚35˚40˚45˚50˚55˚60˚65˚70˚75˚80˚85˚0˚5˚10˚15˚20˚25˚30˚35˚40˚45˚50˚5˚10˚15˚20˚ 0 1000 2000 kmWINTERSUMMER Bodélé DepressionAmazon Basin16Dust Travel ModelNASA maps by Pete Colarco and Robert Simmon, based on GEOS-5 model data from July 1, 2009.17CALYPSO LIDAR Atmospheric SectionsVisualization depicting Saharan dust travelling across the Atlantic Ocean to the Amazon Basin. MODIS imagery shows a 2D representation of the dust cloud, which is then com-pared to CALIPSO data curtains showing dust throughout the air column.NASA Visualization Studio, 201518CALYPSO Satellite ObservationsNASA, CALIPSO data (from 3/25/2010 to 4/2/2010) with two sets of back-propagated dust routes over the same period. Markers along the routes represent 24hr intervals. 1920CHADLIBYACHADSUDANCHADNIGERNIGERALGERIANIGER MALI The Bodélé Depression1 : 2 500 000 5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚15˚20˚25˚15˚20˚25˚5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚0 250 500 kmTIBESTI MOUNTAINSEmi Koussi - 3445mENNEDI MASSIF1450mBODÉLÉ DEPRESSIONDiatomite Outcrops - 155m LAKE CHAD286m21CHADLIBYACHADSUDANCHADNIGERNIGERALGERIANIGER MALI The Bodélé Depression1 : 2 500 000 5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚15˚20˚25˚15˚20˚25˚5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚0 250 500 kmTIBESTI MOUNTAINSEmi Koussi - 3445mENNEDI MASSIF1450mBODÉLÉ DEPRESSIONDiatomite Outcrops - 155m LAKE CHAD286m22Diatomite OutcropHudson-Edwards, Karen A., et al. “Solid-Phase Phosphorus Speciation in Saharan Bodélé Depression Dusts andSource Sediments.” Chemical Geology, vol. 384, 2014, pp. 16-26.23Diatomite Outcrop - Aeolian ErosionSource: Bristow, Charlie S., Nick Drake, and Simon Armitage. “Deflation in the Dustiest Place on Earth: The Bodélé Depression, Chad.” Geomorphology, vol. 105, no. 1, 2009, pp. 50-58.24Diatomite Magnified 1800xSource: Bristow, Charlie S., Nick Drake, and Simon Armitage. “Deflation in the Dustiest Place on Earth: The Bodélé Depression, Chad.” Geomorphology, vol. 105, no. 1, 2009, pp. 50-58.25Fossil in DiatomiteSub-fossil skeleton of a 1.15 m long Nile Perch preserved within diatomite on the floor of palaeolake Mega Chad within the Bodélé Source: Hudson-Edwards, Karen A., et al. “Solid-Phase Phosphorus Speciation in Saharan Bodélé Depression Dusts andSource Sediments.” Chemical Geology, vol. 384, 2014, pp. 16-26.26Lake MegaChadAdapted from: Bristow, Charlie S., Nick Drake, and Simon Armitage. “Deflation in the Dustiest Place on Earth: The Bodélé Depression,Chad.” Geomorphology, vol. 105, no. 1, 2009, pp. 50-58.LAKECHAD289m329m185m BODELEDEPRESSION27Aeolian Deflation ProcessAdapted fromReptation>500 um particlesAverage sand grain250umSaltation60 - 1000um particlesLong Term Suspension<20um particlesShort Term Suspension20 - 70um particles28Bodele Low Level JetAdapted fromBODELE LOW LEVEL JETDiatomite OutcropSuspension DeflationHARMATTAN HIGH WINDS29Bodele Low Level Jet Wind RoseAdapted fromNORTHEASTSOUTHWind Prevalence (%)Wind Speed (m/s)7060504030201020 15 10 5 0030March of the BarchansAdapted fromMastodon350 - 600m (width)8 - 15m / yr.00.55km4321Large150 - 350m (width)15 - 30m / yr.Medium100 - 150m (width)30 - 45m / yr.Small<100m (width)up to 100m / yr.c = RWRate of displacementWidth of slip face (m)Constant = 4575m2/yr26o31Mastodon350 - 600m (width)8 - 15m / yr.00.55km4321Large150 - 350m (width)15 - 30m / yr.Medium100 - 150m (width)30 - 45m / yr.Small<100m (width)up to 100m / yr.c = RWRate of displacementWidth of slip face (m)Constant = 4575m2/yr26o32The Amazon Basin1 : 3 500 000 5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚15˚20˚25˚15˚20˚25˚5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚0 250 500 km33The Amazon Basin1 : 3 500 000 5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚15˚20˚25˚15˚20˚25˚5˚ 10˚ 15˚ 20˚ 25˚0 250 500 km34Rainfall Cycle in the Amazon BasinAdapted from: Pöschl, U., et al. “Rainforest Aerosols as Biogenic Nuclei of Clouds and Precipitation in the Amazon.” Science, vol.329, no. 5998, 2010, pp. 1513-1516.Release of BVOC(Biogenic Volatil Organic Compounds)Evapotranspiration(up to 1000L of H2O / day / tree)Fertilization & LeechingCloud SeedingDust/BVOC + Moisture(impurities acts as condensation nuclei)Rainfall(Carries dust particles to the ground)Gravitational Sedimentationof Dust Particles35Amazon Land UsesAuthor 2019, Based on GIS Satellite Imagery38DustAuthor, 201939The Game The game starts with five attitudes. Five distilled ways of apprehending the world that serve as the raw material of the narratives. These attitudes are then hybridized to produce a series of disjointed - heterarchical fictions about dust – substantiated through architectural artifacts and hinged around scientific readings and data on the phenomenon. Each narrative is the result of the hybridization between two or more attitudes.The aim of the hybridization game is not to balance the different attitudes to obtain a compromised or mediated mean between the attitudes respective inclinations. Rather, it tries to «harmoniously» blend their extreme manifestation towards what Reiser + Umemoto describes as a dynamic tension between them. A state of poise.«A state of poise is not an average or a mean in the Aristotelian sense, and while operating in a state of poise may incorporate extremes, it does not seek equilibrium through weakening of excess or deficiency. Rather it seeks a dynamic tension between them.»1010. Reiser, Jesse, and Nanako Umemoto. Atlas of Novel Tectonics. Princeton Architectural Press, New York, 2006. p. 83.40DUST...is but a part of a complex system. A Machine-World. Product of interactions fundamentally translatable into data and reductible to mathematical laws.41DUST...is nothing but matter. As such it entails risks and potentialities. It is a ressource.To be extracted. Traded.Its value can be quantified,by compounding its use and availability.42DUST...is a trace.Remains of a near or distant past accessible through study and analysis.A fossil. Hint of a story bigger than ourselves.Waiting to be deciphered.43DUST...is the stinging sensation of the storm.A crunch under the tooth. Its the dryness of your throat and the color of the wind.It is the taste of the rain. The haze of the summer. The scattered light at dusk.It is a veil of clouds. A thin layer on the ground.44DUST...is part of the unfathomable Whole.It cannot be reduced to the material world. Dust is part and manifestation, of the Whole. Through dust, we commune.45Tales of the Traveling DustAuthor, 2019Tales of the Traveling Dust50Pillars51Somewhere...52... in the Bodélé Depression,Fig. 1 - Dust in the Bodele Depression - NASA Terra MODIS, Image by Jesse Allen. April 22, 2004.53...lives a tribe of gardeners employed;By a foreign nation.Each day, they tend to their creation;54A field of rock pillars stemming from the desert floor...Fig. 2 - Author, 201955...to support distant fields.A trade of climatic span.Fig. 3 - Pillar Detail.  Author, 2019Man-made offeringsTo be consumed by the wind.The task is endless.Fig. 4 - Author, 20195758Fig. 6 - «Pillars»Mixed Media Collage 20’’x23’’Author, 20195960Cloud Towers61Somewhere...62... in the Amazon Basin,Fig. 7 -  QGIS Satellite Imagery, 201963... towers are erected.Sharp metal arms, reaching into the sky...Fig. 8 -  Author, 201964...to soften it; with the ingredient of the clouds.Fig. 9 -  Author, 201965Mimicking what used to be.Before the plantations and ranches.Fig. 10 -  Photograph by George Steinmetz, NatGeo Image Collection66Before the hunger of the growing masses.Fig. 11 -  Author, 201967Rainmakers. Punctuating innumerable fields.Fig. 12 -  Author, 2019Vain emulators.Operating with the invisible dust.Fig. 13 - Author, 20196970Fig. 14 - «Cloud Towers»Mixed Media Collage 20’’x23’’Author, 20197172SedimentationDevice73Somewhere...74... in the Amazon Basin,Fig. 15 -  Photography by Carl de Souza, AFP, 2017.75A concrete vessels has been built to record, over an extended period of time,an accumulation of matter. Of dust.Fig. 16 -  Author, 201976The structure however, recorded more than was intended.For when people heard about the noble endeavor of the device, recording a history bigger than their own;They built access to the pit.Fig. 17 -  Author, 201977Some, falling for the meaningful promises of posterity; jumped into the sedimentation device that became inadvertently a recording of the  -oh so Human- fear of being forgotten.Fig. 18 -  Author, 2019The shell of the simple device,being subjected to the very time it aimed to record.Its own particles – ripped by rain and wind, by and by became part of the sedimentation process.The device recorded its own existence … along with those of its makers.Fig. 19 -  Author, 20197980Fig. 20 - «Sedimenter»Mixed Media Collage 20’’x23’’Author, 20198182WanderingHotel83Somewhere...84... in the Bodélé Depression,Fig. 21 -  QGIS Satellite Imagery.85... wandering amongst the dunes, is a hotel, a room, reserved for the most special guests;Those longing for the secrets of arrant solitude.For a meditation only troubledby the screaming World.86Being truly lost is a luxury –Available only to the most demandingand committed travelers.Those whose wishesare to experience being abandoned ;to the will of the winds.Fig. 22 -  Author, 201987Composed of a single room, the hotel is modest yet agreeable.To those who brought sustenance for their stay.88The traveler however,might find himself sharing his simple room withan expected guest;The dust that wandered inside, now searching its way to exit the anomalous building through the maze of its stout walls.Fig. 23 -  Author, 201989Mastodon350 - 600m (width)8 - 15m / yr.0 0.5 5km4321Large150 - 350m (width)15 - 30m / yr.Medium100 - 150m (width)30 - 45m / yr.Small<100m (width)up to 100m / yr.c = RWRate of displacementWidth of slip face (m)Constant = 4575m2/yr26oMoving according to the winds, the hotel accompanies the traveler, the dust, and the herd of diatomite dunesin their slow journey through the vast desert.Fig. 24 -  Author, 2019But in an ever-changing landscape,no one really knows if the simple accommodation...Fig. 25 -  Author, 201991...is still moving or not.92Fig. 26 - «Wandering Hôtel»Mixed Media Collage 20’’x23’’Author, 20199394Interpreter’sHouse95Somewhere...96... in the Amazon Basin,Fig. 27 -  QGIS Satellite Imagery.97Lives a man secluded from society.98He gets news from the moving world by carefully collecting the dust and rain... ...that gets trap by his house.Fig. 28 - Author, 2019.99Day-to-day the man feels the dust and waterin multitudinous waysto extract and interpret its messages;Stories of events,taking place in distant lands.The Interpreter consign the stories before releasing the messengers...Fig. 29 -  Author, 2019.101...to continue their journey.102Fig.30 - «Interpreter’s House»Mixed Media Collage 20’’x23’’Author, 2019103104Oasis105Somewhere...106... in the Bodélé Depression;Fig. 31 -  QGIS Satellite Imagery.107A curious construction has been completed.Its makers calls it,«The Oasis».AABCDEFGHIE'A'B'F'C'G'D'H'I'HDG CEAFBFig. 32 -  Author, 2019.108IHalf buried in the desert,  the anomalous building’s purpose is to provide; - a micro-climate – a room.Free of the ubiquitous dust.AABCDEFGHIE'A' B'F'C'G'D'H'I'HDGCEAFBFig. 33 -  Author, 2019.109The room is located at the end of a journey that one must share with dust.Until along the way, defeated by gravity......the dust settles.AABCDEFGHIE'A' B'F'C'G'D'H'I'HDGCEAFBFig. 34 -  Author, 2019.110Fig. 35 -  Author, 2019.111But in the dustiest place on Earth, the visitor reaching the Room......might feel that the absence of dust prompts the strongest recall of its presence..And in this building, this filter of dust that no one will ever be able to clean…Fig. 36 -  Author, 2019.113It might at long last become the dustiest place.Of the dustiest place on Earth.114Fig. 37 - «Oasis»Mixed Media Collage 20’’x23’’Author, 2019115116Place of Reveal117Somewhere...118... in the Amazon Basin, lies a former industrial town. Abandoned by the industry but still inhabited, its people gather...Fig. 38 -  QGIS, Satellite Imagery.119...to a place of intermittent presence;A field. Silent at day, open and punctuated of concrete elementsFig. 39 -  Author, 2019.120But sometimes, the night expose a different scene.Fig. 40 -  Author, 2019.121When from their concrete nest embedded in the ground;Curtains of light deploys.Cutting through the dense and humid air.Fig. 41 -  Author, 2019.Forging space. Revealing its fullness.For the usually mute dust now sings its ubiquity, slowly falling.Fig. 42 -  Author, 2019.123124Fig. 43 - «Place of Reveal»Mixed Media Collage 20’’x23’’Author, 2019125126Dust Catcher127Somewhere...128... between the Bodélé Depression and the Amazon Basin,129an observatory tower follows the dust charged winds to gather data.Inscribing the flow, quantity andcomposition of the dust trapped by its detector, the observatory works steadily.Fig. 44 -  Author, 2019.130The captured dust is analyzed,before being melted and forged into glass orbs......into which the data is coded, into which the data is engraved.Fig. 45 -  Author, 2019.131The dust becomes the data about itself.Stored at the base of the tower.The data piles up. It compiles.Waiting to be made sense of.Until, accumulating beyond their container, the pile of glass orbs impaired the functioning of the observatory......to the point of self-inflicted obsolescence.Fig. 46 -  Author, 2019.133Exposed to the friction of the world,the orphaned data might one day... ...return to its previous formto be carried by the wind again.134Fig. 47 - «Dust Catcher»Mixed Media Collage 20’’x23’’Author, 2019135136137138Scientific LiteratureMorton, Timothy, and Project Muse University Press eBooks. Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World. vol. 27, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 2013.Mostafavi, Mohsen, and David Leatherbarrow. On Weathering: The Life of Buildings in Time. MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass, 1993.Nesbitt, Lois E., Alexander Brodsky, and Ilya Utkin. Brodsky & Utkin: The Complete Works. Prince-ton Architectural Press, New York, 2003.Pallasmaa, Juhani. The Embodied Image: Imagination and Imagery in Architecture. Wiley, Chiches-ter, West Sussex, 2011.Reiser, Jesse, and Nanako Umemoto. Atlas of Novel Tectonics. Princeton Architectural Press, New York, 2006.Sample, Hilary. Maintenance Architecture. The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2016.Till, Jeremy. Architecture Depends. MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass, 2009.Tschumi, Bernard. Architecture and Disjunction. MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass, 1994.Virilio, Paul. La Vitesse de Libération. Édition Galilée, Paris, 1995. Wigley, Mark. The Architectural Cult of Synchronisation. The Journal of Architecture, vol. 4, no. 4, 1999, pp. 409-435.Zumthor, Peter, Mari Lending, and Hélène Binet. A Feeling of History. Scheidegger & Spiess, Zurich, 2018.Allen, Christopher J. 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