UBC Graduate Research

{WIP} Meiklejohn, David Ian; Pavan, Alena Alexandra 2019-12-18

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{WIP}David Ian Meiklejohn (Bachelor of Fine Art, Ceramics, The Metropolitan State University of Denver, 2016)andAlena Alexandra Pavan(Bachelor of Engineering Science, Structural, The University of Western Ontario, 2014)Submitted in partial fulfi llment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture in The Faculty ofGraduate Studies, School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Architecture ProgramCommittee: Thena Jean-hee Tak, Fionn Byrne, Katy YoungThena Jean-hee Tak, GP2 Chair            _________________________________Mari Fujita, GP1 Mentor        _________________________________© December 2019iiiiiF RO N TMATTER01Abstract In an age of almost unbelievable anxiety and uncertainty, people lean more and more on rationality, science, and reason. While these things are certainly valuable, they are not everything. Where’s the humanity, the emotion, the unpredictability, the feeling, the intuition in it all? What does an architecture that embraces the UnReason, the NonScience, the DumbLogic look like? More importantly, what does it feel like? How do we make it? What’s it made of? Who builds it? How do we live in it?To test this out, we find ourselves at the Palm Motel. The Palm is an embodiment of the ordinary and everyday forces which push design forward in a more straightforward way than any architect’s master plan ever could. Life at the Palm is anything but a permanent spectacle. It’s dirty, it’s damp-cracked-and-peeling, it’s partially flooded and clogged with hair and cigarette butts. It counters dogmatic seriousness, absolute certainty, and ultimate efficiency, and instead offers a carnivalesque approach to architecture - one which rejects the pursuit of irrefutable formal solutions, motivated by an acceptance that architecture is hardly immune to the forces of time.1 1 185 Wordsiv vThe abstract is a concise and accurate summary of the graduation project in paragraph form. It should identify thecontext that the project addresses, design strategies, and particular design decisions that were made. Limit to 350 words.The table of contents must include the abstract, other preliminary pages as applicable [i.e. list of tables and/or figures [or illustrations], preface, acknowledgements, dedication, etc.], as well as all main divisions and subdivisions of the report, bibliography and appendices. Page numbers must be provided for each entry and the headings must appear in the correct order.Table ofcontentsvi viiAbstractTable of ContentsList of FiguresList of TablesAcknowledgement (Acknowledgment?)Glossary of termsPreambleCarnival and Spectavcle visualizationsOne Carnival (For context)What are we getting at?Careful and Methodical Site SelectionBoard #1, Large Site ContextBoard #2, Slightly Narrower Site ContextBoard #3, The WorkshopBoard #4, ReceptionBoard #5, Rooms 11-13Board #6, Rooms 14-16Board #7, The pool and rooms 9, 10ModelsThe PresentationAppendix 1 Material Catalogue vol. 1Appendix 2 Material Catalogue Vol. 2Appendix 3 Road Trip DocumentationBibliographyiv  - vvi - viiviii - ixx - xixii - xiii4-1314-1920-3334-3940-4546-5354-5960-6768-7778-8586-9798-105106-113114-121122-127128-159160-189190-321324-327Front MatterEnd MatterMain MatterList off i g u r e sOn separate pages, list tables and figures with their number, full title, and page number. Tables and figures must be numbered consecutively in order of appearance and must be identified with the word “Table,” “Figure,” or other appropriate descriptor, and should include a caption.Images should be identified by type [e.g., Burrard Street Elevation, Section, Looking South]. Identifications of details and conceptual drawings should be specific [e.g., Detail, Main Entrance, Concept, Entry Sequence]. viii ixTable 1 - The List of FiguresFigure 1:  have a great day.png   1Figure 3:  alonebyheart_edit.jpg   6Figure 2:  spaghettibeard_edit.jpg   6Figure 5:  Drunk_Mary.jpg    7Figure 4:  havelock_edit.jpg   7Figure 6:  scootnscoot_edit.jpg   9Figure 7:  diagram01.jpg    23Figure 8:  diagram02.jpg    24Figure 9:  diagram03.jpg    25Figure 10:  diagram04.jpg    27Figure 11:  diagram05.jpg    28Figure 12:  diagram06.jpg    29Figure 13:  diagram07.jpg    31Figure 14:  diagram08.jpg    32Figure 15:  diagram09.jpg    33Figure 16:  plaster collage 01_edit.jpg  42Figure 17:  matches_edit.jpg   44Figure 18:  img002.jpg    45Figure 19:  Thorp_02.jpg    48Figure 20:  IMG_2971.JPG    50Figure 21:  weed 01_downsave.jpg   51Figure 22:  road collage_edit.jpg   52Figure 23:  Driving scan dot j-peg   53Figure 24:  panel-01.jpg    55Figure 25:  panel-01_mapzoom.jpg   57Figure 26:  panel-01_mapzoom_02.jpg  58Figure 28:  panel-01_bunyancollage.jpg  59Figure 27:  panel-01_caprisuns.jpg   59Figure 29:  panel-02.jpg    61Figure 30:  panel-02_sitemap.jpg   63Figure 31:  panel-02_floorplans.jpg   64Figure 33:  panel-02_elevation02.jpg  65Figure 32:  panel-02_section02.jpg  65Figure 34:  panel-02_section04.jpg  65Figure 35:  panel-02_section01.jpg   66Figure 36:  panel-02_section03.jpg  66Figure 37:  panel-02_threshold-detail.jpg  67Figure 38:  panel-02_stair-detail.jpg  67Figure 39:  panel-03.jpg    69Figure 40:  panel-03_saltmandiagram.jpg  71Figure 41:  panel-03_brickworks-plan01.jpg  72Figure 42:  panel-03_brickworks-plan02.jpg 72Figure 44:  panel-03_brickworks01.jpg  73Figure 43:  panel-03_brickworks02.jpg  73Figure 45:  panel-03_workshop-overview.jpg 74Figure 47:  panel-03_workshopdetails01.jpg  75Figure 46:  panel-03_workshopdetails03.jpg 75Figure 48:  panel-03_workshopdetails02.jpg 76Figure 49:  panel-04.jpg    79Figure 50:  panel-04_front-desk.jpg  81Figure 51:  panel-04_front-desk-detail.jpg  82Figure 52:  panel-04_front-desk-detail-zoom.jpg 83Figure 53:  panel-04_key-13-portrait.jpg  84Figure 54:  panel-05.jpg    87Figure 55:  panel-05_back.jpg   88Figure 56:  panel-05_detail-02.jpg   90Figure 57:  panel-05_detail-04.jpg   91Figure 58:  panel-05_rm12plan.jpg   92Figure 59:  panel-05_detail-01.jpg   93Figure 60:  panel-05_detail-01-zoom.jpg  94Figure 61:  panel-05_detail-01-zoom2.jpg  94Figure 62:  Explain these drawings?   94Figure 63:  panel-05_rm13plan.jpg   96Figure 64:  panel-05_detail-05.jpg   97Figure 65:  panel-06.jpg    99Figure 66:  panel-06_back.jpg                  100Figure 67:  panel-06_room-14.jpg   101Figure 68:  panel-05_detail-03.jpg   102Figure 69:  panel-06_room-1516-plans.jpg  103Figure 70:  panel-06_room-1516.jpg                        104Figure 71:  panel-06_room-1516-mikvehboys.jpg 105Figure 72:  panel-07.jpg    107Figure 73:  panel-07_back.jpg                                       108Figure 74:  panel-07_back-detail2.jpg  109Figure 75:  panel-07_pool-overview.jpg  110Figure 76:  panel-07_rms910plan.jpg  111Figure 78:  panel-07_three-ladies-brenda.jpg 112Figure 77:  panel-07_three-ladies-sharon.jpg 112Figure 79:  panel-07_three-ladies-eileen.jpg  113Figure 80:  fireplace shelving 01.jpg   116Figure 81:  fireplace shelving 02.jpg   117Figure 82:  kiln tub 03.jpg    118Figure 83:  kiln tub 02.jpg    119Figure 84:  mikveh 02.jpg    120Figure 85:  mikveh 01.jpg    121Figure 86:  presentation 01.jpg   123Figure 87:  chad flippin through books.jpg  123Figure 88:  folks at the table.jpg   124Figure 89:  folks pointin.jpg   125Figure 90:  mawdels.jpg    126Figure        Pg. number# #Figure 91:  carla flippin through books.jpg 127Figure 92:  vol 1.jpeg   129Figure 93:  vol 1 2.jpeg   130Figure 94:  vol 1 3.jpeg   131Figure 95:  vol 1 4.jpeg   132Figure 96:  vol 1 5.jpeg   133Figure 97:  vol 1 6.jpeg   134Figure 98:  vol 1 7.jpeg   135Figure 99:  vol 1 8.jpeg   136Figure 100:  vol 1 9.jpeg   137Figure 101:  vol 1 11.jpeg   138Figure 102:  vol 1 12.jpeg   139Figure 103:  vol 1 13.jpeg   140Figure 104:  vol 1 14.jpeg   141Figure 105:  vol 1 15.jpeg   142Figure 106:  vol 1 16.jpeg   143Figure 107:  vol 1 17.jpeg   144Figure 108:  vol 1 18.jpeg   145Figure 109:  vol 1 19.jpeg   146Figure 110:  vol 1 20.jpeg   147Figure 111:  vol 1 21.jpeg   148Figure 112:  vol 1 22.jpeg   149Figure 113:  vol 1 23.jpeg   150Figure 114:  vol 1 24.jpeg   151Figure 115:  vol 1 25.jpeg   152Figure 116:  vol 1 26.jpeg   153Figure 117:  vol 1 27.jpg   154Figure 118:  vol 1 28.jpg   155Figure 119:  vol 1 29.jpeg   156Figure 120:  vol 1 30.jpeg   157Figure 121:  vol 1 31.jpeg   158Figure 122:  vol 2.jpeg   161Figure 123:  vol 2 1.jpeg   162Figure 124:  vol 2 2.jpeg   163Figure 125:  vol 2 3.jpeg   164Figure 126:  vol 2 4.jpeg   165Figure 127:  vol 2 5.jpeg   166Figure 128:  vol 2 6.jpeg   167Figure 129:  vol 2 7.jpeg   168Figure 130:  vol 2 8.jpeg   169Figure 131:  vol 2 9.jpeg   170Figure 132:  vol 2 10.jpeg   171Figure 133:  vol 2 11.jpeg   172Figure 134:  vol 2 12.jpeg   173Figure 135:  vol 2 13.jpeg   174Figure 136:  vol 2 14.jpeg   175Figure 137:  vol 2 15.jpeg   176Figure 138:  vol 2 16.jpeg   177Figure 139:  vol 2 17.jpeg   178Figure 140:  vol 2 18.jpeg   179Figure 141:  vol 2 19.jpeg   180Figure 142:  vol 2 20.jpeg   181Figure 143:  vol 2 21.jpeg   182Figure 144:  vol 2 22.jpeg   183Figure 145:  vol 2 23.jpeg   184Figure 146:  vol 2 24.jpeg   185Figure 147:  vol 2 25.jpeg   186Figure 148:  vol 2 26.jpeg   187Figure 149:  vol 2 27.jpeg   188xList ofT a b l e sxitable  1table  2ixxiList of FiguresList of TablesTable 2 - The List of TablesA c k n ow l e d ge m e n txiiIn an acknowledgement, one can acknowledge the extent to which assistance has been extended by members of staff,fellow students, data technicians, editors, and/or others. It may also be appropriate to recognize the supervision andadvice given by one’s supervisor and committee membersxiiiWe would like to thank the people who helped us finish up these drawings and models in the weeks leading up to the final presentation.  Kathy Oke, Pera Hardy, Graham Case, and Victoria Ng. Thanks to Michelle Gagnon-Creeley for lending us her car and getting the ball rolling on this whole thing. Thanks also to our respective cats, Hugo and Schmooze for giving us so so much hair to work with as we tested plasters.  We are sure there are many more people who helped us with this work, either in emotional encouragement, getting us snacks and coffee or just keeping us level headed as we worked.  Thank you.1Figure 1:  have a great day.png2 302 M A I NMATTERS4 5Glossaryof termsABSURDADHOCANECDOTEASSEMBLAGEBRICOLAGEARCHITECTURE(ab· surd | \ əb-’s ərd, -’zərd)(\’ad-’häk, -’hōk;’äd-’hōk\)(an· ec· dote | \’a-nik-’dōtə\)(as· sem· blage | \ə-’sem-blij\)(bri· co· lage | \,brē-kō-’läzh\)(Ar· chi· tec· ture | \’Är-kə-tek-chər\)1. Ridiculously unreasonable, unsound, or incongruous.2. Having no rational or orderly relationship to human life.1. Formed or used for specific or immediate problems or needs.2. Fashioned from what is immediately available.1. Reminds you of a time when [...]1. An artistic composition made from scraps, junk, and odds and ends (like paper, cloth, wood, stone, metal, etc.)2. A collection of persons or things.1. Construction (as of a sculpture, building, or a structure of ideas) achieved by using whatever comes to hand.2. Anything and everything, from anytime.1. Capital A architecture.6 7Carnival (car· ni· val | \’kär-nə-vəl\)noun:adj:verb:anecdote:1. an episodic ritual of reversal in which the absurd triumphs over the austere, through organized chaos.2. "A lusty busty bawdy bitch... who has kicked up her frolicsome heels and masqueraded under many guises and names".3. the opposite of spectacle.1. requiring collective participation.1. assemblage of many parts which would never normally be at home with each other.1. Walking into an art show, expecting a regular art show. You instead find yourself in a dimly lit room with a red spotlight uplighting an enormous disco ball, spinning while thirty women thrash in place to the 1987 hit single "Alone" by Heart, for the entirety of its three minutes and thirty-eight seconds. 2. When your family used to bring the dog on visits to your Nonni's house. Your Nonna would feed the dog a full bowl of spaghetti every time. The bolognese beard would linger for weeks.3. Making friends with crows!4. Walking to your place of work. You make direct eye contact with a stranger. They do a high kick. You don't acknowledge what just happened. You both go your separate ways.5. Someone choosing "Cell Block Tango" as a karaoke song.6. Going on a bicycle bar tour in Nashville, Tennessee. The pamphlet description says BYOB, so you pack accordingly. Of course, you're not allowed to drink while pedaling, and every stop the vehicle makes is at a licensed bar where you’re expected to get out and buy a drink. The tour ends at 11AM, and you’re dropped off in a random parking garage on the edge of town with seven strangers. Each of you left with a backpack of booze, you all proceed to get drunk in the parking garage together. Together, you find your way back into town, go line dancing, exchange information. You return home the next day. You still have their numbers in your phone, and often wonder how Sarah Smith from Boston is doing.7. Going to the Havelock County Fair with your family every year on Thanksgiving Weekend. At the Dog Demo, in which Border Collies normally herd ducks through a series of obstacles and then into pens, a new event is introduced. The demo emcee asks people to send their toddlers into the duck-filled pen for the new mystery event. Giving the Border Collies a rest, eight toddlers are now responsible for herding the ducks. Weirdly, everyone’s part of the Dog Demo now. Applause!1. Three years ago, when I moved to Vancouver, I got myself a small garden plot. Nothing particularly noteworthy, just one of those collections of raised beds that gets built on a soon to be developed piece of land.1 I had grown things before, I worked on farms. I knew what I was doing. I heard that the VPL has a small seed library where people donate seeds for other people to take and grow. I went, and I picked up some cabbage, carrots and spinach.  I planted them all when their season came and waited patiently for harvest. The spinach came up first, delicious. Then carrots, pretty ok. My soil wasn't quite right for carrots.  Then the cabbage. Best goddamned cabbage I have ever eaten. Amazing. Obviously, I let one go to seed and  harvested those at the end of the season; all ready for next year. I outlasted the winter, and when the next mid-summer came and the weather was right, I planted the cabbage. I fought off rats, I watered, I provided shade at just the right time. I was on it. Finally it came time to pick one.  So I 1 It was probably funded by Westbank. Figure 2:  spaghettibeard_edit.jpgFigure 3:  alonebyheart_edit.jpgFigure 4:  havelock_edit.jpgFigure 5:  Drunk_Mary.jpg8 9did. Bitter dissappointment. It was mediocre at best. Maybe it just wasn’t quite ready. I waited two weeks, picked another. Same thing. Meh. I checked my soil, everything was the same. The weather wasn’t appreciably different from the year before. The cabbage should be great. I called my old mentor Lauren (for an entirely unrelated reason) who lives on a farm in Northern Colorado, and asked her what the fuck. Cabbage open pollinates. Unless its one of like 6 heirloom varieties, it’s almost impossible to prevent one variety of cabbage from cross pollinating with another.  Two heads of cabbage can be literally miles away from each other and still cross pollinate. That cabbage I had and loved would never be seen or tasted again. All because some random bee happened to hit my garden plot right after it finished up at Francine’s backyard victory garden in Kits. 2. When I was 19 I had a small breakdown and did a 35 day pilgrimage across Spain. I walked something like 600 miles. While I was there I met a woman named Shayna2. She and I walked together with a quebecois girl named Maika for the Madagascar embassy in Canada for some reason. Maybe a year later, I met a man named Ben. He and I hit it off and became very good friends.3 Eventually I moved back to Colorado and lived my life for like 5 more years. Not suspecting anything. One day, I logged on to Facebook and saw that Ben got married. TO SHAYNA! How the christ did these two people find each other? He lived in Oregon. She lived in Grenada. How? It’s too much coincidence for one story. I still can’t believe it.3. You ride the 99 everyday. Everyday it’s a fresh hell. 2  About a year ago, I was driving home from the Okanagan and listened to podcasts almost the entire way. I binged the shit out of one in particular. The Habitat.  It was an 8 or 9 part series about a group of people who locked themselves inside a large tent on a mountain in Hawai'i for a year to see how a Mars colony could fare when the time comes. Around episode 6 or so, they really dive into the story of one of the women. She sounds familiar, but I can't really place it.  Whatever. In episode 7 they reveal that she's married. To a man named Ben. Thats. Very familiar. IT 'S SHAYNA. This woman who I walked with in Spain for 20 some odd days locked herself in a tent with 5 strangers to see if humans would kill each other on a future Mars mission.2a3  He was a neurosurgeon studying how to attach robotic body parts to monkeys. 2a. This woman has appeared in my life maybe 6 other times. Under similarly outlandish circumstances. 8. So, I just started this new job at a firm I really love. It’s a super tiny place, run out of the home of the two principals. They live upstairs, with their two kids. One of their moms lives next door. Their cat1 wanders in and out of the studio occasionally sits on the models in the main space. There’s an old man who walks past the studio every morning at 9:10AM and raps on the front window with the rubberized end of his titanium cane. He stares at us for a few too many seconds, yells HAVE A GOOD DAY, then wanders down the street. He’s the only person in the neighbourhood their kids are allowed to accept candy from, my boss says. Sometimes their kids wander into the woodshop where I work and play hide-and-go-seek, or sneak cookies into my stuff for me to find later. I’ve been there for a couple months, and already I’ve started to alter the house where I’m working. This started on day one, when I was given the simple task of gluing some cork topography together. They told me to do it out back on the concrete steps, with spray adhesive. The concrete is now stained forever. They didn’t mind at all, and I’ve since continued to make marks and stains all over the place, between the linseed oil I dropped on the patio stones to the shelving unit I’ve begun to permanently install in their main space. It’s weird to think that I’m just passing though, but I’ll have made indelible marks in the space where these two people are raising their kids for the rest of their lives. Some days I feel bad about this, but most days I love it.1 "Cinder".Who’s going to yell at you today? Will it be the quebecois man with the grey hoodie and the beard? Or will it be the tiny woman who refuses to get out of the yellow square? Maybe today you’ll get lucky and get on one of the CAG busses. They have more standing room and don’t have those god forsaken visual sensors on the doors. Today though, no CAG bus. Today it’s the same old articulated from 1995. Today its the same old pickle jar of sweaty people. You’ve already been passed by 4 busses at the Fraser stop.4 So you fight your way on. You press yourself in, just out of bounds of the yellow square. Door closes. You’re standing so close to the woman next to you that you’re essentially hugging.  This woman did not wash her hair today. Nor yesterday. It’s fine. Her face is in someone else’s armpit so you can’t be too annoyed. We’re all in this one together. As the bus rolls on and people get on and off you get forced into the dead zone in the middle of the bus. You stand there for two stops then try to get off at Arbutus. You have to scramble, climb, sidle, push, “Sorry!  Excuse me”, step over someone’s luggage or cardboard box full of old socks. The man in the blue jacket is wearing headphones and doesn’t  move. People outside start getting on. You’re trapped. bing ding dong. You know the sound. Doors close. You’re going to Macdonald!4 Why do they think they can just not stop at Fraser?Figure 6:  scootnscoot_edit.jpg10 11CIRCUS (cir· cus | \‘sər-kəs\)1. A large arena enclosed by tiers of seats on three or all four sides and used especially for sports or spectacles (such as athletic contests, exhibitions of horsemanship, or in ancient times chariot racing).2. Something suggestive of a circus (as in frenzied activities, sensationalism, theatricality, or razzle-dazzle).3. Donald Trump on Twitter.4. Overall, disgusting.COLLAGE (col· lage | \ kə-’läzh, kȯ-, kō-\)1. An artistic composition made of various materials (such as paper, cloth, or wood) glued onto a surface.2. A work (such as a film) having disparate scenes in rapid succession without transitions.DWELL (\’dwel\)1. To exist for a foreseeable period of time, in a particular way.EDITORIAL (ed· i· to· ri· al | \’e-də-’tor-ē-əl)1. A change of hands, paired with a lack of preciousness.2. Loving something, letting it go.GOTHIC (Goth· ic | \’gä-thik\)1. Embraces time and event, combines order and absurdity.2. Not completed in full compliance with an original plan.3. Relating to the Goths; doesn’t necessarily mean you worship Satan.4. Panuh qaþ aftra du im lesus: ik galeiþa,- jah sokeiþ mik, jah in frawaürhtai izwarai gadauþniþ. LODGEMODERNMOTELNON SEQUITUR(\’läj\)(\’mädərn\)(mo· tel | \ mō-’tel)(non se· qui· tur | \nän-’se-kwə-tər\)1. To occupy a space for an unknown period of time (a moment, a minute, year...)1. Carefully planned, without room for chance or coincidence.2. Fundamentally adhered to a strict logic.3. Favouring innovation over resourcefulness.4. (Often) partial to the disappearance of that which came before.1. An accomodation, built for lodging and not dwelling. An anonymous setting which embraces spontaneity and coincidence over long stretches of time.1. Lit. "it does not follow".2. A statement (such as a response) that does not follow logically from or is not clearly related to anything previously said.3. Conversations with Alena's mom.4. Conversations with David's mom.RIGHT NOW (non se· qui· tur | \nän-’se-kwə-tər\)1. A mode of time which results in a flattened experience.Padei ik gagga, jus - ni maguþ qiman.5. Not just a phase, Mom.12 13SPECTACLE (spec· ta· cle | \’spek-ti-kəl)1. Something exhibited to view as unusual, notable, or entertaining. Especially: an eye-catching or dramatic public display.2. The inverted image of society in which relationships between commodities have supplanted relations between people, where "passive identification with the spectacle supplants genuine activity".3. Something which obfuscates the past, imploding it with the future into an undifferentiated mass, a type of never-ending present.4. The opposite of Carnival.14 15P r eamble {WIP} takes its primary cue from the emergence of Spectacular architecture in the late 19th century. At approximately 1850, something changed in architecture: the prevalence of a singularly authored work of architecture became widespread.1This shift in the conception of architecture from a communal act, brought on by many craftspeople and designers, to a work created and conceived by a single entity has had profound impacts on the way we practice architecture today. The current mode of production largely celebrates the singular genius author and rejects the myriad of actors and influences which come together to create architecture. In school, so many of us are trained to embody this mentality. We learn basic construction details and are then encouraged to design new ones without ever consulting the people who will actually have to build those drawings. The discussion of conceptual integrity and formal intent seems almost never ending while, simultaneously, there is a conspicuous absence of discussion on how people actually inhabit the world. Does your sculptural intent inhibit people from using the kitchen? Who cares? These problems have arisen chiefly because of the primacy of the Spectacle in our current age. What exactly is “The Spectacle” though? The noun has about as many definitions as you could imagine, but the one that we have largely used for the conception of this project was offered by Guy Debord in The Society of the Spectacle.2 In his still incredibly relevant text from 1967, he offers 221 different theses to explain the concept. Two have particular relevance here. The first of these is: “The inverted image of society in which relations between commodities have supplanted relations between people, in which passive identification with the spectacle supplants genuine activity.” The spectacle then is essentially mass consumption, largely driven by images which encourage commodification of objects, and of the images themselves. In 1967, when this was first written, Debord was mostly referring to the images of advertising and the (then-new) ever-present media. In fact, he often conflates the Spectacle and the media as being one and the same. It is very important to note that the spectacle is not the images themselves, but rather the societal reality that those images create. Debord illustrates this in his fourth thesis, in which he says: “The Spectacle is not a collection of images, but a social relation among people, mediated by images”.3  The second thesis to note here is “Something which obfuscates the past, imploding it with the futureinto an undifferentiated mass, a type of never-ending present.”4For the majority of European history, the flow 1 There were works of architecture with singular authors before this period (e.g. Brunelleschi’s dome), however they were few and far between. The vast majority of architectural works were undertaken as communal projects, with no desire to pretend that one person had everything to do with the creation of a work.2 Guy Debord, The Society of the Spectacle (New York: Zone Books, 1994).3 Debord, Spectacle, 13-14.4 Debord, Spectacle, 43.16 17 The facts of our daily reality are that the vast majority of information comes from the Internet. Most people are experiencing Architecture through the highly-curated spaces of social media (Instagram especially) and the Internet at large (ArchDaily, Dezeen, Yellowtrace, Pinterest). Whether or not we are willing to admit it, this absolutely includes people practicing and studying architecture.10 The online world presents a myopic version of architecture. It presents projects through a small handful of carefully chosen viewpoints, and through a highly filtered lens. It is not only complicit in creating the Spectacle of Architecture, it actively fosters the Spectacle. The rapidly refreshing scroll feeds and relentless pursuit of the new and the bold foster a selfsame mentality, both in the general public and in architects themselves. Our constant use of these sites for precedent ensures that bold and novel forms are the new normal. As the sculptural and novel forms on ArchDaily become typical, Architecture must get even more Spectacular in order to be featured on the site, thus creating a relentless feedback loop of novelty. In this way Architecture has placed itself into a rarefied space of objectified consumption. The consumption of the architectural image is in no small way impacted by global capital flows.11 These capital flows demand certain attributes. They demand certain finishes and aestetics. They demand scenic views. They demand easy access to nightlife. But most of all they demand that the architectural product will forever increase in value. This implies a level of permanence which, we argue, does not actually exist. The going trend in western architectural design is an outright insistence that architecture is a permanent medium. We routinely celebrate the long lifespans of buildings and theoretically seek to build things that last.12 This idea of architecture is fostered by the spectacle’s insistence on the creation of commodifiable images. We argue that this notion of architecture’s permanence is impossible. We see architecture as a fleeting and constantly changing thing. An inordinate proportion of architects design their work solely with the cutting of the red ribbon in mind. They often lose sight of the life of the building beyond the confines of the design and construction period. Invariably, the people who move in after we issue a certificate of occupancy change things. Our perfectly idealized and rendered image of the building is immediately changed when Susan puts a painting on the wall, or when Anne decides that wall would look a lot better if it was robin egg blue. Or, more significantly: what happens six years from now, when Anne and Susan have their third child and need to build another bedroom to accommodate their growing family? What happens when the windows need to be replaced in ten years, when the Canadian government mandates triple glazing? Is the original architectural statement destroyed? Or has it simply shifted to accommodate the lives of Anne and Susan? This continuous process of renovation and change is always happening in every building any architect has built. Our fetishistic 10 This includes Alena Pavan and David Meiklejohn.  11 This is an incredibly large topic, and one which is beyond the intended scope of this project, but it is necessary to mention it at least in passing.12 This is less and less true as we move into an era of impossibly cheap and fast construction.of thought and development of culture and ideas has been seen as more or less linear.5 Most people in the West have seen human development as an arrow, a never ending, and ever-forward progression towards an as-of-yet unknown target. Action A causes result B, which causes result C, which causes... and so on, until eventually some ultimate destination of humanity has been reached. But, as people have become increasingly mobile, and increasingly connected, the arrow’s path seems to have begun to wobble and sway. Influences and relationships between cultural movements are increasingly difficult to explain. If one looks at the progression of artistic and architectural styles through history, a clear shift becomes apparent at about 1850. Before then, movements flowed relatively smoothly into one another.6 Gothic gave way to renaissance gave way to baroque gave way to neoclassical and on and on the list goes. But at about 1850 as communication technologies dramatically shifted pace under the influence of the industrial revolution’s peak, and as people were able to travel much faster than was ever possible before7, the smooth progression of European history was disrupted. Suddenly, multiple styles were simultaneously at the forefront of design debates. This sense of simultaneity only got more pronounced as time moved into the 20th and 21st centuries. As communication and travel technologies became increasingly sophisticated (and fast)8 design styles shifted equally as quickly. Here we see the “-isms” phase of art history. Impressionism, fauvism, cubism, surrealism, de stijl, abstract expressionism, pop art, socialist realism... all of these styles, and hundreds more, existed simultaneously. Still today, artists make work which comfortably conforms to these definitions. This has again, only intensified with the present shift into digital technology. Smart phones, bullet trains, social media, millisecond long data transfers have all dramatically altered the way we live our lives. These technologies have begun to collapse time in on itself as the distinctions between individual moments become increasingly irrelevant on a scale which could never have been imagined ten years ago. This age can be described as being entirely focused on the present moment. Social media only furthers this mentality. Instagram in particular forces its users to be hyper-aware of the present moment, but entirely unaware of the present place. When a person posts something, the goal is largely to broadcast their present to the world and make that moment permanent. This pulls people out of their actual present place, as they represent themselves in digital space. Instagram’s refusal to show images in an honest chronological order does quite the opposite, however. The non-chronological display takes present moments and “randomizes” them.9 The inherent structure of the app forces users to abandon any hope of a causal or linear timeflow. All things exist at once. Every present moment is presented more or less simultaneously with a tremendous emphasis on the immediate visual impact. Gone is any sense of beginning, middle or end, it’s just now.5 Whether this is actually true, is very debatable.6 Admittedly with some turmoil and heavy debate in the periods when one style evolved to the next.7 Thanks train travel!8 So fast!9 It’s actually a carefully curated feed of images explicitly designed to make users want to return to the app more frequently. 18 19of the Spectacle, which offer plenty of criticism of the status quo, but offer little in the way of solutions. Our principal mode of reaction to the Spectacle will be to embrace the framework of the carnival. Thoroughly explored and theorized by Mikhail Bakhtin in Rabelais and His World,14 the carnival is by and large the theoretical foil to the Spectacle. Carnivals are spontaneous. They are authorless. They are composed of a myriad of influences and actors who somehow come together to create a cohesive identity. Instead of rejecting this multiplicity of ideas and identities, carnivals embrace them. By nature, carnivals subvert capitalist expectations by embracing communal and spontaneous design. They resist easy definition, and they resist any idea of being permanent. Carnivals are not just Carnivale and Mardi Gras and San Fermines, however. These festivals are simply the most immediately obvious form of carnival. In architecture, carnival often take a somewhat more subdued tone.15  Historically, the architectural carnival can be seen in projects like Gothic cathedrals. These buildings were built communally, with many different people giving input and working on the design of the building. Often there was a master stone mason directing the labour16 force, but that person was not in charge of the design and completion of the building. The most apparent modern example is La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, Spain. Originally a singularly authored work by Antoni Gaudi, the project has shifted into something very different. After Gaudi’s death, work on the cathedral has been taken up by numerous architects. Each architect has tried to progress work on the cathedral in a manner respectful of Gaudi’s intent, despite the fact that, truthfully, his intent is unknown. Thanks to the Spanish civil war and WWII, many of the building’s documents and models were lost. Architects, sculptors, and artisans working on the cathedral today have had to fill in many blanks when it comes to finishing the building. This has made the completion of La Sagrada Familia a fully communal effort. No one person or entity can claim the whole of the cathedral. While history will likely remember that the building was designed by Antoni Gaudi, the fact of the matter is that he realistically had a relatively small part its completion. The entire thing cannot be attributed to him alone.  We believe carnival as a reaction to Spectacle allows us to productively use all of the elements discussed thus far within a single coherent framework, to question the logic and continued prominence of the singular, spectacular architectural author.14 Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World.15 But not always.16 Canadian spelling!idealization of the building’s image is an impossible thing to maintain and is a foolish goal to pursue in our work. This inevitable process of change should not be ignored, nor avoided. By knowingly incorporating elements of adhoc design into our work, we hope to encourage the lives of people to take place within an architectural framework. We seek an architecture which lives with its inhabitants, rather than an architecture that seeks to control and limit them. The Eames Case Study House is a pertinent example here. An almost entirely prefabricated construction method and a highly rationalized interior grid make this house a poster child for the rationality of post-war Modern design. What makes this house interesting in this argument however, and applicable here is its refusal to abide by the rules of the Modern movement. The house acted as a perfect frame for the lives of Ray and Charles Eames. The house neither enforced nor inhibited the way they lived in the house. The architecture here takes a wonderfully metamodernist approach. It rejects the cold rationality and logic of Modernism while still incorporating some of the style’s core elements. One could argue that it is simply the fact that the Eames lived here that made the house what it is. Is it possible that the presence of two of the most important designers of the century simply made the house good architecture? One could also argue that the design of the house was done in such a way as to allow the inhabitants to take over the space completely and make the house their own without compromising its architectural integrity. Imagine the Eames living in Villa Savoye. That house would, we believe, have a profoundly stifling effect on the way the Eames lived their lives. In their own house, the architects embraced notions of adhoc design, impermanence, and constant change to create an architecture which responds to and fosters the lives of the inhabitants. By allowing for transience in their design, they cast aside any preoccupations with Spectacle, and the image of permanence it suggests. We are not arguing that all Spectacle in architecture is a bad thing. Some buildings absolutely should sell themselves as a Spectacle. Art museums, major libraries, city halls - these sorts of major public buildings should probably have an air of the spectacular to them. The problem arises, however, when we as designers start treating every apartment block, every gas station, and every other building in the city as equally spectacular. When everything is spectacular, nothing is. All we’re left with is a landscape of loud, attention-seeking buildings. A field of strange and alienating sculptures that don’t relate to the people who have to live in them. Rem Koolhaas describes the situation in Junkspace as, “superstrings of graphics, transplanted emblems of franchise and sparkling infrastructures of light, LEDs and video describe an authorless world beyond anyone’s claim, always unique, utterly unpredictable, yet intensely familiar... There is no progress; like a crab on LSD, culture staggers endlessly sideways...”.13 So what to do about it? What does an architectural reaction to Spectacle look like? How does that project operate? How does it get created? These are questions that we don’t necessarily have answers for yet. This project seeks to answer these questions; to fill the gap in action left open by works such as The Society 13 Rem Koolhaas, Junkspace.20 21C a r n iS P E C T A C L Ev i s u a l i z a i t o n sv a l /22 231. Crowning of the Fool This first example is not actually ours, but Bakhtin’s, offered up at the beginning of his book. It seemed like the logical place to start when translating his words into simple images.  Bakhtin begins with the scenario of “the crowning of the fool”, by defining the fool - something of a court jester - as an imitation of a noble figure. In the court, the fool dresses himself as a mirror image of nobility, to expose the absurdity of royalty and wealth for the common amusement of the people. Everyone at the festival can see that the fool is dressed like the king. He looks like the king. He speaks like the king. But he’s not the king. Traditonally, this satire was performed in some sort of communal festival, before the general public. The fool would begin the ceremonies, leading a procession through town. Much merriment would follow and for a brief moment, all who were involved were equals. But, despite the idealization of equality within the procession, a hierarchy still existed since the fool had earlier been crowned an ersatz king, which confuses the line of the satire. Here, the image of the spectacle - the king - is well-understood by the masses, even if they’ve never seen them in person. The mirror image of the ugly fool to the king makes the carnival powerful, because one looks so much like the other, but just a little bit off. Early in our process, we recognized that we needed to create clear visualizations of the carnival / spectacle relationship. We were confident in our theoretical position, but people had a hard time understanding what we’re talking about. What good is your idea if you can’t talk to anyone about it?  To summarize Bakhtin’s writings about carnival as succinctly as possible: carnival and spectacle are at odds with each other, but one can’t exist without the other. Often, the presence of the carnival is done by exaggerating the things that make us human - the grotesque parts of ourselves - how we are at our ugliest, uninhibited, and most spontaneous. These diagrams, presented in the format of three triptychs, are visualizations of what that looks like in situationally-specific examples: the crowning of the fool, the running of the bulls, and a punk show.Figure 7:  diagram01.jpg24 25Figure 8:  diagram02.jpg Figure 9:  diagram03.jpg26 272. The Running of the Bulls The running of the bulls is a difficult event to pin down.  Is it a spectacle?  Yes.  is it a carnival?  Also yes.  Your particular answer depends largely on where you sit in relation to the actual events at San Fermines. For most of us, we see the bulls tear down the streets of Pamplona from the safety of our own homes. In this situation, we take the role of a pure spectator.  We are entirely divorced temporally and spatially from the event. In this case, the running is a spectacle.  The spectator (you) is entirely removed from the event in question.   As we zoom in to the event, the carnivalesque starts to reveal itself.  Let’s say that you decided to go to the running of the bulls.  You take a flight to Madrid, get on a bus, and head North to Pamplona.  You check in to the hotel, buy a red bandana and start drinking.  A new frined of yours has a hotel room with a balcony overlooking hte main street where the bulls will be running, and he invites you to his room for the festivities.  As the bulls sprint down the street, you and he and 10,000 other people are screaming wildly and clapping and groaning and drinking and chearing and covering your eyes and being filmed. In this case, you are not directly part of the event, but you are not not part of the event.  You are somewhere in between, both participant and spectator.  To the people watching at home, you are part of the spectacle, but from your particular stance, you are part of the event.  You’re there.  Seeing men get gored by bulls, feeling the heat of the sun bouncing off the stone building, hearing the medics trying to do their jobs.   Zooming in one step further:  Your friend decided that she wanted to be a bit closer, so she skipped the balcony and moved to the street where all the action is.  As the bulls charge down the street, she feels the tremors in the earth as they run past.  A man jumps out of the way and climbs the barrier, his sweat  flies off his face and hits hers.  Another man tries to do the same, but not as successfully.  His blood is everwhere as men and women from the crowd nearby jump the barrier to try and contain the bull, at least for long enough to get the man out of there.  Here, there is no distinction between crowd, spectator, event and performer.  Everyone is everything, simultaneously spectator and performer. As time passes, people move from being in the crowd to being the performer and vice versa.  Figure 10:  diagram04.jpg28 29Figure 12:  diagram06.jpgFigure 11:  diagram05.jpg30 313. The Punk Show This third and final illustration of the carnival / spectacle relationship is also perhaps the most contemporary - the punk show.  In this case, the spectacle of the performer is rendered blurry, because they are so often absorbed by the audience. In the spirit of carnival, the goal of the punk show is to level the field between performer and crowd, celebrating rejection of societal norms, freedom in anarchy, and naive intention. Blondie was chosen specifically for the image because of the spectacle because, yes, she is widely considered one of the “godmothers of punk”. But she’s also Blondie. She’s not blonde. Debbie Harry is a brunette; she changed her looks for the ‘biz. She’s put a lot of work into being who she is. She presents as a super-polished ultra-feminine beautiful woman, but it’s all so she can get the crowd to do what they’re supposed to do - react to her performance and blur the division between her and the stage. At some point during the punk show, Debbie or any other performer would incite such a srong reaction within their crowd that a physical response would occur. At the show, this would take the form of a mosh pit, in which a mass of gross and sweaty bodies would be pushing each other around, probably swearing and spitting and shoving and yelling until someone in the crowd gets lifted above the rest. The carnival exists only in the moment when there is complete fluidity between the performer and the crowd, and there is no distinction between the stage and the floor. This moment dissolves when a member of the crowd is hoisted high in the crowd, and becomes the main event of the show over the original performer.Figure 13:  diagram07.jpg32 33Figure 15:  diagram09.jpgFigure 14:  diagram08.jpg34 35 In the middle of Barcelona sits a strange behemoth of glass, metal, and stone. With its first stone set over a century ago, the Basílica i Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família is an accumulation of materials both young and old, and currently the longest-running {WIP} in the world. Antoni Gaudi, who is largely credited with its design, intended for the church to be the most magnificent manifestation of Christ on Earth. Maybe it is that, but it is also a testament to the messy and collaborative spirit of carnival in architecture. Sagrada Familia operates as an open-source building. It is contingent, collaborative, and craft-based. Carnival is alive and well in Sagrada Familia. Its story can be told without beginning or end. Following the nature of Gothic, the project is always starting and restarting and changing hands, meaning it can never be assigned a finite slice of history, or irrefutable singular author. Sagrada Familia was originally intended to be a purely Neo Gothic building. Its first architect was not actually Gaudi, but Francisco de Paula del Villar y Lozano, who was hired by philanthropist Josep Maria Bocabella to draw up plans for the building in 1874 - the same year Bocabella launched his campaign for the church. A vocal anti-revolutionary, Bocabella wanted to build a temple which would stand as a monument against sinners. He intended for the building to essentially be crowdfunded by “penitent sinners”, with the notion that the majesty of Sagrada Familia would be so striking that it inspired public patronage. Unknowingly, Bocabella was following carnivalesque logic from the beginning, when he aimed to subvert capitalist expectations by embracing communal and spontaneous design inherent to a Neo Gothic building. Del Villar stepped down as lead architect after a dispute with Bocabella. Despite having little formal experience, Antoni Gaudí was hired by Bocabella to take his place for reasons which cannot be corroborated.17 Young and full of bravado, Gaudí immediately redirected the project in a more Art Nouveau style. His blend of Neo Gothic and Art Nouveau resulted in something completely unrecognizable, which combined craft and technology in an overall composition which seemed to creep organically from the earth.  Neo Gothic (which will be referred to as Gothic here, for simplicity) was originally chosen by Bocabella and del Villar because it was in vogue at the time, as a style which easily communicated the majesty of God. Popular among intellectuals such as Pugin, Ruskin, and Carlisle18, it is characterized by the close relationship it fosters between art, craftsmanship, and technique. In the mode of Gothic, craftspeople were constantly working together, under the coordination of a master builder or architect. As a carnival, these individuals 17 The rumour? Gaudi got the job because he looked like a fair-haired knight who rescued Bocabella in a dream. Maybe inception is the future of CVs.18 Just a few of the original hipsters.O n e( f o rc o n t e x t )C a r n i v a l 36 37were not always trained designers, but they operated with the tools they had in service of a larger collective goal. Gothic was inextricably linked to social cohesion on the job site, where collaboration led to a complex and layered design. Despite straying from del Villar’s original design to more explicitly organic elements into the design, Gaudí still operated in a highly Gothic manner. Aware that the complexity of his grand Art Nouveau designs could not be completed in his lifetime, Gaudí planned the building to be phased in modules, and change hands several times in the building’s inevitably long timeline. Knowing his choice would necessitate other architects to assume his work, Gaudí felt confident that collaboration on Sagrada Familia would result in a more majestic monument, and has been quoted as saying, “Great temples have never been the work of just one architect”.19  Part perfectionist, part mad scientist, Gaudí was committed to experimentation and trial-and-error approaches to problem solving. Models were extremely important to him, and took precedence over orthographic production, since testing and correction could not be done with the same fidelity in 2D drawings as they could in 3D models. He generally built plaster models in 1/25 scale, and moved to 1/10 when precision was needed.16 While his workshop and living quarters were located in the crypt of Sagrada Familia, Gaudí was never operating alone. His work and legacy would have been impossible without a multidisciplinary team of other designers, sculptors, woodworkers, metalworkers, and ceramists. These individuals, who were close friends of his, were often as vital to the design and build of the temple as Gaudí himself. These artisans and craftspeople were often also collaborators on other projects by Gaudí, and were chosen for both their exceptional skill and their work histories with Gaudí. Good working relationships in collaborative processes were critical to successful execution of his vision for Sagrada Familia. Gaudí needed to ensure that the work he left behind before he died was coherent, so his successors could properly continue the temple. While very serious about the work he was performing, Gaudí also brought an undeniable sense of play to the job site when he ensured he was surrounded by his most trusted friends and collaborators at all times. This playfulness is characterized in the haphazard nature of Gothic production. The absurd verticality of Sagrada Familia, in combination with its abundance of ornament and great number of imperfections demanded the kind of experimental nature Gaudí brought to his practice. Sagrada Familia can be defined by the paradoxical combination it presents between impossible care and reckless expediency. While Architecture today20 feels largely frozen in a finite slice of time, the Gothic nature of Sagrada Familia embraced adjustments in real time. In the same way we now orbit massing models in three-dimensional Rhino-space, mashing on and cutting off as we please, it was standard practice to allow Gothic buildings to assume form organically without being too absolute, because the reality of maintaining a connection between drafted building and built form 19 "How Was Construction Done in Gaudí’s Time?" October 31, 2018. Accessed February 02, 2019. https://blog.sagradafamilia.org/en/divulgation/how-was-construction-done-in-gaudis-time/.20 Since the advent of Modernism, and eventual proliferation of Spectacle buildings.was little to none. Given the amount of spontaneous action inherent to the craftwork occuring on the job site, marks made purely by chance were inevitable to daily activity at Sagrada Familia. In carnival mode, work at the temple has historically welcomed spontaneous and indelible changes made by a myriad of actors over long spans of time. Recognizing that Sagrada Familia would inevitably be constructed ad hoc in the future, Gaudí had to be strategic about which components he built first in order for the building to be legible to those assuming its work after his death. As the first highly-visible piece, Gaudí chose to build the Nativity Facade, to fully embody the structure and character of the building. This choice served two purposes. Firstly, the complexity of structure and detail demonstrated how details could be resolved for subsequent components of the design. This allowed the Nativity Facade to essentially act as a roadmap for completing other portions of the temple. Additionally, building the Nativity Facade first directly aligned with Bocabella’s intention of crowdfunding the building; Gaudí designed this facade to be the most ornate and aesthetically-pleasing, and so magnificent as an essay of Christ’s life rendered in stone that it would inspire donations to the campaign which would fund the remainder of Sagrada Familia.21  With the exception of the Nativity Facade, Gaudí truly felt no rush to finish the job. Knowing that the project was too large of an undertaking to be completed under his leadership alone, he did not force the schedule of Sagrada Familia. Believing he was designing in God’s service, Gaudí famously22 claimed: “My client is in no hurry”.23 Then, one day, while walking back to the job site after confession, Gaudí was killed after being struck by a tram.24  This was one of many events which defined Sagrada Familia in the Gothic style. Gothic, like carnival, is riddled with interruptions, in structure, detail, ornament, etc. Sagrada Familia follows this same logic, in its entire culmination. The story of the temple is full of disruptions by death, fire, collapse, and war (to name a few). The most notable interruption to elucidate is the chaos that occurred at Sagrada Familia following the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War. At this time, anarchist labour unions seized control of Barcelona, making religious buildings major targets. Most of Gaudí’s work at Sagrada Familia was torched and destroyed. Models and sculptures were smashed, drawings and photos were burned, and the crypt was set ablaze. Sagrada Familia was left severely damaged, but still standing.25 As hard as Gaudí may have tried to keep the temple completely 21 Katie, Mingle. "La Sagrada Familia." 99% Invisible. October 24, 2017. Accessed February 14, 2019. https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/la-sagrada-familia/.22 And insanely?23 Giles, Fraser. "Barcelona's Sagrada Família: Gaudí's 'cathedral for the Poor' – a History of Cities in 50 Buildings, Day 49." Guardian. June 3, 2015. Accessed February 14, 2019. https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/jun/03/barcelona-sagrada-familia-gaudi-history-cities-cathedral-poor-church-religion.24 No bueno.25 Benjamin, Sutton. "The Tortured 136-Year History of Building Gaudí’s Sagrada Família." Artsy. November 21, 2018. Accessed 38 39sacred, it was not safe from the entropic forces of its politically charged world. This only reinforced that no element of Gothic in its whole existence, can ever be autonomous. Gothic and carnival always relate to their proximate elements, cognizent of the forces which shape the way we live. The elemental nature of Gothic proved to be valuable when work on Sagrada Familia was continued after Gaudí’s death, by Catalan architect and friend of Gaudí’s, Domènec Sugrañes i Gras. Sugrañes spent most of his tenure as lead architect piecing together fragments of Gaudí’s earlier work to repair damages and move forwards. Work on the temple was able to continue with thanks to documentation by visitors.26 These, in combination with Gaudí’s immense collection of detailed physical models, were key to its conceptual reconstruction. Despite being smashed during the riots, these models survived the fire because they were rendered in plaster - an inert material. Fragments of the models were identified and put back together with great patience, allowing the project to continue in the face of adversity. Perhaps because Gaudí was being recognized as an architect of merit, or perhaps because the temple had survived a number of overwhelming challenges, Sagrada Familia began to gain notoriety as a tourist destination in the 1950s. As such, the Sagrada Familia Council gave the green light for construction of the Passion Facade. Two years later, the temple had its first major successful public fundraiser. Tourism in Spain had begun to serve double-duty as a crowdfunding campaign for the temple.  The fundraising success of this first major campaign has been continued every since 1955, allowing construction to continue. However, not everyone was pleased. In 1965, a letter was published by a group of intellectual heavy-hitters, including Corbusier, Aalto, and Miro, to bring the project to a halt. Presumably a reaction to the Passion Facade, the letter stated that Gaudí’s work could not be reasonably continued following his death. They the Nativity Facade should be kept in homage to Gaudí, but all other work should be stopped to allow for a competition for a new building. The Council, committed to the ideals of Gaudí and Bocabella, ignored these pleas. Rather, they embraced the tourism the Spanish economy was enjoying, relying on it as a very slow crowd-sourced funding model for the temple. This funding model has not changed since the 1960s; Sagrada Familia still operates on private donations in order to continue progress.22 No individual can reasonably claim the entirety of the temple as their own. Gaudí knew this. In the long-term story of the building, he has played a nominal role in the work completed on Sagrada Familia. After his death, work was carried on by other architects and craftsmen from his workshops. Still today, we follow Gaudí’s intent as well as we can, thanks to the documentation salvaged after the Civil War riots, and the efforts of countless other architects and craftspeople. In the same way that Gaudí relied on three-dimensional testing February 14, 2019. https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-tortured-136-year-history-building-gaudis-sagrada-familia.26 Gaudi had started to gain international attention by the early 1900s, and a higher number of visitors, many of whom were artists and intellectuals, were drawing, photographing, and writing about  Sagrada Familia. through model-making and his other smaller projects27, workers on the site today employ a combination of the ultra-precise and the free-form.28 Their work is structured through collaborative efforts of ARUP, 2BMFG Architects, and an on-site model makers’ workshop. These groups are governed by the Sagrada Familia Foundation, in charge of fundraising and advocacy for the project, who in 2012 hand-picked Jordi Fauli as the architect to lead the project towards completion. Under his charge, the project is currently approximately 70% complete, and is supposed to be done in 2026. But the question remains - can a Gothic29 building ever be truly “done”? Gothic is carnival. By nature, Gothic buildings are vulnerable to change over time. They embrace time and spontaneity, and find a seemingly impossible order in absurdity. Sagrada Familia, as a carnival building, is a manifestation of time on space. Its plan, section, and elevation have historically only facilitated comprehension of the whole, which has always been subject to change. Nothing in Gothic or carnival has ever been completed in full compliance with an original plan. In both, the roles their actors play are kept largely anonymous, with contributions fading in and out of importance over long stretches of time. Carnival is imperfect by nature, resulting from a massive long-form essay of bricolage, performed by monumental accretion of coincidences made by anonymous hands. While carnival is critical of Spectacle and all that it entails, it never intends to antagonize. Rather, by remaining anonymous in its bricolage-based production, carnival mode welcomes several scales and speeds of time at once, all in service of the forces which shape the everyday realities of our lives.     27 Gaudi spent 43 of his 48 years as an architect actively working on Sagrada Familia. Inevitably, he combined his work on the temple with the work he was doing on his other, smaller projects. Sagrada Familia features elements which heavily draw inspiration from earlier Gaudi works. In some ways, these smaller buildings can be thought of as a series of study models for components of Gaudí’s magnum opus. 28 As an example: the pre-tensioned stone panels used on the towers today, which are fitted with millimetric precision around metal components. The work on their general forms is done digitally for precision, but the detail which follows Gaudí’s intent needs the work of stonecutters, which can only be performed in the analog.29 Read: Carnival.40 41W h a tw e g e tt i n g a t ?a r e42 43 To put it very simply, the Spectacle is all of the flashy, bold, New, and highly commercialized architecture that has taken over in the last few decades. The Spectacle is the gleaming tower that looks more like a sculpture on the skyline than something people live in.  It’s the concert hall or the art museum that cares more about its own form and its own conceptual understanding of itself than it does putting on concerts or showing art. It’s the exclusive apartment building with unusable kitchens, but gorgeously-framed views to the North Shore.    If Spectacle is the idealized, beautiful, and rational side of us, carnival is the opposite. Carnival is the side of ourselves that we hesitate to acknowledge. It’s the irrationality, the weird sex, the profanity, the 3AM poutine, the clutter, and the vulnerability that we all-too-often try to ignore, or cover up. Carnival is spontaneous, deceptive, and authorless. It embraces the passage of time over a variety of scales and speeds. It is an assemblage of several fleeting parts which would never normally be at home with each other. In its resistance of a singular author, it requires collective particpation of everyday actors in pursuit of a common goal. Carnival mode welcomes many minds and many hands, cognizant of the myriad of influences which collectively shape the way we live.30 We argue that carnival is a constantly present force in our everyday lives. The messiness and unfinished nature of Carnival is inevitable in the way we inhabit the world. Across all scales of daily life, we leave behind indelible trails of mess - marks of living, which tell stories about how we exist. Whether it’s the small spot on the bathroom wall which has become stained by a damp towel in the apartment you’ve rented for three years, or the melting of our polar ice caps, these marks are undeniable. Hard as we may try, people are not clean beings. The mask we present to the world rarely reflects the reality of ourselves.30. You go to a party one night.1 A party where you only vaguely know the host, and can maybe recognize one or two voices in the din of the room. Wary of small talk with strangers, you head for the drinks. Nervous, you gulp down a few. You quickly need to use the bathroom. You do the thing, and find a matchbook next to an empty dish resting on the toilet tank. You light the match, let the flame creep towards your fingertips for a moment, then shake it out. The light disappears, is replaced by a brief scent of sulfur dioxide in the space of your hands. Evidence of what 1 Anecdotal!Figure 16:  plaster collage 01_edit.jpg44 45 If this is how we live, why are we so afraid to show it? We see this especially in how our homes are designed and constructed. We cover up the chance and coincidence of our histories, starting anew every time. We prefer clean white rooms where there is no past, and the future could be anything. This attitude denies the effects of time in our daily lives, and flattens our lived experiences to only consider the “right now”.   We need to embrace the carnivalesque to avoid being caught in the dullness of life. Carnival asks us to celebrate the mundane, and find absurdity in day-to-day choreography. Life is only dull if we let it sit still. Carnival life is in perpetual motion, changing states at any moment, minute, or year.  To demonstrate our thesis through a design project, we have chosen the motel as a typology which renders the carnivalesque visible, in a way which is easy to understand. The motel is constantly refreshing its character, with a rotating cast of occupants, each with their own unique modes of living, lengths of stay, and unshakable habits. The motel is where people go to live without inhibition of the marks they leave behind - not to dwell, but to lodge. When in the motel, people tend not to overthink their behaviour, acting as they are, and not how they wish themselves to be seen. Life at the motel fully embraces the spirit of carnival: A jumble of overlapping times and events, experienced in one anonymous setting which embraces spontaneity and coincidence over long stretches of time.happened in the porcelain below you is gone. You leave the dead match in the dish. Flushed from your drinks, refreshed from your flush, you re-enter the party. You lean from side to side for a few hours, have a few nice conversations with strangers. At the end of the party, you need to use the bathroom again. You look down in the dish, and see a tiny wreath of burnt-out matches, all different lengths. Who put these here? Was it Ann, the woman in the blue sweater who just moved here from Topeka? Was it Ralph, the guy wearing an anklet over his toe socks? Or maybe Susan, who hated your joke about a tiger who played for the New York Rangers. Maybe it was all of them, maybe it was none. The tiny bathroom wreath stays on the toilet tank that night. It stays there for three nights, until the host tosses it away as they change the trash bag in the bathroom.Figure 18:  img002.jpgFigure 17:  matches_edit.jpg46 47Careful- t h o d - i c a ls i t e selection& m e48 49The summer before GP2 began, we took a road trip with our friend and ghost-hunting accomplice, Michelle1. You can see the formal results of this roadtrip in appendix 3.  We did the roadtrip for a few reasons.  1. It was summer and we wanted to.  2. We needed to live out our developing theory a little bit.  We needed to be spontaneous, live without a plan and just see what came of it. 3. We needed to see a bunch of motels, and what better place to do that than in rural America?  We drove for a while, seeing what we saw, and making plans as they felt right, until day 6.  Day 6 was hen we discovered the Palm motel and Cafe.  We were driving on the 101 Northbound from Eureka / Arcata headed for the Oregon coast. We passed into a tiny little town just barely north of a chunk of the redwoods.  It was nothing to note.2  We passed a motel that seemed kinda cool, but just kept driving. Then Alena said, “No!  Turn around.  We have to look at that one a bit closer.”  So we did.  And that’s how we found our site.  1 Surname not included for privacy reasons. She’s very blonde and very cute and cries when you mention the  fact that trees have families. You know her, you love her.2 The town, not the redwoods.  The redwoods are majestic as hell. Figure 19:  Thorp_02.jpg50 51USA prideliterally no one on the streetsbrixxxwhat seems like the greatest cocktail bar of all time(we didn’t go)blinking martinitelephone polewireswiresgrassy hillwiresFigure 21:  weed 01_downsave.jpgFigure 20:  IMG_2971.JPG52 53Figure 23:  Driving scan dot j-pegFigure 22:  road collage_edit.jpg54 55Figure 24:  panel-01.jpgB o a r d #    1L a r g es i t ec o n t e x t56 57Here’s Orick, situated in Humboldt County, Northern California. In terms of context, there really isn’t much. You’ve just got the Redwoods, a couple of college towns down south, San Francisco way down south, and too many Paul Bunyan statues to count. The 101 is a major artery in this part of California, but it doesn’t bring many long-term visitors to Orick. Everything and everyone that finds its way there isn’t around for long. Wandering elk, washed-up bottles from local industry, gum stuck to tires, discarded love notes, a lonely tumbleweed, fish bones dragged in by cats, etc. Everything arrives, but nothing stays. Refer to Carnival Material Palette No. 1, where we’ve documented all of these scavenged sources, and several unusual ways in which they could be used1. 1 Appendix 1Figure 25:  panel-01_mapzoom.jpg58 59Figure 26:  panel-01_mapzoom_02.jpgFigure 27:  panel-01_caprisuns.jpgFigure 28:  panel-01_bunyancollage.jpg60 61Figure 29:  panel-02.jpgB o a r d #  2S l i g h t l ynarrowersitecontext62 63The second panel illustrates the site as it is, as we found it. In this site plan, you can see roughly 90% of the town of Orick. Below the site plan are some floor plans we drew, annotated for you to cross-reference with the rooms we’ve operated on in the motel. For convenience sake, we have these as-is plans printed at a more detailed scale on the table in the centre of the room. Additionally, we’ve drawn a couple choice details which highlight the already-strange construction of the building (which we used to construct all of these panels). A weird little step that’s a little higher than it logically should be, and a staircase which has been lifted in a bizarre manner.The motel is shown in maroon. The Redwoods Creek is labelled for you. The motel sits north of the creek, which floods yearly. As it’s now abandoned, we predict that the motel would be flooded and significantly damaged over time, after which we would come in and help it get back on its feet. We’ve illustrated this process in these sections and elevations, with the as-is condition drawn in red, and decayed condition in black. This same notation system is used throughout the rest of the drawings on our panels.Figure 30:  panel-02_sitemap.jpg64 65Figure 32:  panel-02_section02.jpgFigure 33:  panel-02_elevation02.jpgFigure 31:  panel-02_floorplans.jpgFigure 34:  panel-02_section04.jpg66 67Figure 35:  panel-02_section01.jpgFigure 36:  panel-02_section03.jpgFigure 37:  panel-02_threshold-detail.jpg Figure 38:  panel-02_stair-detail.jpg68 69Figure 39:  panel-03.jpgB o a r d #  3T h ew o r k s h o p70 71While our approach to the site was pretty loose, we did have a set of particular formal strategies which fall into the carnivalesque mode we are proposing. We begin to illustrate these in our third panel, operating under the first strategy, which is to accept what we have.Following the flood, we would responsibly have to take stock of what already exists on site for us to use. In addition to the materials we identified in the greater region of the county, locally at the Palm we have a bunch of wood, debris, and construction materials from the South and West buildings, illustrated in this book. Refer to Carnival Material Palette No. 22. Additionally, we would have access to the region’s relatively rich clay deposits. We plan to completely gut the south building and part of the west building for its useful materials, cannibalizing them into the renovations done on the rest of the site. This would include converting part of the west building into a workshop and material storage warehouse, using the south end of the site for storage of motel operations vehicles.During these initial renovations, we would also convert the first floor of the east building into a clay workshop for bricks and tiles, which would form the groundwork for the subsequent renovations. This salt man diagram goes into the brickworks, explaining one of the ways we propose using discards as raw materials for our edits. In this instance, bath salt and dead skin would be collected from spent bathwater upstairs in the east building, dried, then used as colorant for ceramic glazes. Since each bather possesses a slightly different combination of elements, each batch of glaze would be unique, acting as a living record of the site and its occupants.2 Appendix 2.Figure 40:  panel-03_saltmandiagram.jpg72 73Figure 41:  panel-03_brickworks-plan01.jpgFigure 42:  panel-03_brickworks-plan02.jpgFigure 43:  panel-03_brickworks02.jpgFigure 44:  panel-03_brickworks01.jpg74 75Figure 46:  panel-03_workshopdetails03.jpgFigure 47:  panel-03_workshopdetails01.jpgFigure 45:  panel-03_workshop-overview.jpg76 77Figure 48:  panel-03_workshopdetails02.jpg78 79Figure 49:  panel-04.jpgB o a r d #  4R e c ep t i on80 81Panel number four illustrates one of the simplest things we worked on - the reception and front desk area. After taking a look at the reception, we quickly decided... it was fine. There wasn’t anything we really needed to re-do. So all we did was replace the definitely-rotten carpet with some cleaned-up floorboards, repaint it, and provide the motel some new key tags, using the same processes employed for the bricks and tiles.Figure 50:  panel-04_front-desk.jpg82 83Figure 51:  panel-04_front-desk-detail.jpgFigure 52:  panel-04_front-desk-detail-zoom.jpg84 85Figure 53:  panel-04_key-13-portrait.jpg86 87Figure 54:  panel-05.jpgB o a r d #  5R o o m s 1 1 - 1 388Figure 55:  panel-05_back.jpg89The second of the three carnivalesque modes we propose is: embrace unexpected and often subtle interactions between people.  This is shown in the following two panels (five and six).  These panels illustrate the renovations for rooms 11 - 16, on the second floor. These rooms are directly above the brick workshop in the east building.  Here, we propose a series of brick insertions which bridge the gap between activities which wouldn’t normally intersect -- the motel rooms above, and the brickworks below. A fireplace heats a sauna as well as drying racks in the workshop, A brick arch creates the employee lunchroom, while supporting a large sunken tub above. One of the rooms has become an informal lounge. That is not Justin Bieber behind the bar.  To illustrate one room in detail: in room number 13, the bathtub is connected directly to the kiln stack below.  As the workshop fires the kiln, the stack naturally heats up.  That heat transfers to the brick surround in the chimney as well as to the rest of the brick construction.  A seat in the bath takes full advantage of that fact, creating a warm and comfortable spot to sit, shave your legs, drink a brandy or just stare wistfully out the window. Since it would be super unpleasant to lay directly on bricks in a bathtub, we’ve lined this one with untreated cedar. The cedar would release oils and aromas, and in conjunction with the radiant heat from the kiln create one heck of a bath.Nice.90 91Figure 56:  panel-05_detail-02.jpg Figure 57:  panel-05_detail-04.jpg92 93Figure 58:  panel-05_rm12plan.jpg Figure 59:  panel-05_detail-01.jpg94 95Figure 60:  panel-05_detail-01-zoom.jpgFigure 61:  panel-05_detail-01-zoom2.jpgFigure 62:  Explain these drawings?96 97Figure 63:  panel-05_rm13plan.jpg Figure 64:  panel-05_detail-05.jpg98B o a r d #  6R o o m s 1 4 - 1 699Figure 65:  panel-06.jpg101100Figure 66:  panel-06_back.jpgFigure 67:  panel-06_room-14.jpg102 103Figure 68:  panel-05_detail-03.jpg Figure 69:  panel-06_room-1516-plans.jpg104 105Figure 70:  panel-06_room-1516.jpgFigure 71:  panel-06_room-1516-mikvehboys.jpg106&107Figure 72:  panel-07.jpgB o a r d #  7R o o m s 9 - 1 0the pool109108Figure 73:  panel-07_back.jpgThe third and final carnivalesque mode that we worked with was to subvert expectations.  You can see this one throughout the work that we’ve done,  but it is perhaps most evident here in the pool, and in rooms 9 and 10.  When we first saw the motel, the pool had been drained and filled with potted plants, making it a little makeshift greenhouse.  We thought that was cool, so we kept the spirit of it.  In our renovation, we’ve refilled the pool and converted about 20% of the water area to a shallow pond planting,  This marsh does two things, one it keeps the water clean without having to use chlorine or any other harsh chemicals.  And two:  it subverts your expectation of what a motel pool is. As you drive up it’s unclear what exactly is happening there.  Is it a greenhouse, is it a pool?  Who knows?  But I’m definitely going inside.   Keeping on with the marsh theme, we have rooms 9 and 10, in which we renovated the rooms to include outdoor bathing space. The baths that we’ve designed are connected both to the interior baths as well as to these marsh plantings, which serve to filter the greywater coming from the showers. These outdoor baths were carved out of the existing floor plan, and so some of the walls that made up this part of the plan, have been switched from interior to exterior. In the spots that we’ve moved outdoors, we’ve left the interior finishes largely as they were. The only major changes there were to replaster the walls with a waterproof plaster made of oyster shells then washed with soap made of elk fat. This creates a very durable and surprisingly very waterproof wall. We really like that this technique keeps a much more formal record of the changes we’ve made. There is a clear indication that this part of the room used to be something else entirely. The history of the building is made legible, without being precious about that history. Figure 74:  panel-07_back-detail2.jpg110 111Figure 75:  panel-07_pool-overview.jpg Figure 76:  panel-07_rms910plan.jpg112 113Figure 77:  panel-07_three-ladies-sharon.jpgFigure 78:  panel-07_three-ladies-brenda.jpgFigure 79:  panel-07_three-ladies-eileen.jpg114 115ModelsWe made three models to illustrate the physical form of  three of the motel room interventions.  These models are sectional illustrations of rooms 11, 13 and 16 respectively. 116 117Figure 80:  fireplace shelving 01.jpg Figure 81:  fireplace shelving 02.jpg118 119Figure 82:  kiln tub 03.jpgFigure 83:  kiln tub 02.jpg120 121Figure 84:  mikveh 02.jpg Figure 85:  mikveh 01.jpg122 123Figure 86:  presentation 01.jpgFigure 87:  chad flippin through books.jpgT h e Presen-tationl124 125Figure 88:  folks at the table.jpgFigure 89:  folks pointin.jpg126 127Figure 90:  mawdels.jpg Figure 91:  carla flippin through books.jpg128 129A p p e n1- di xFigure 92:  vol 1.jpeg130 131Figure 93:  vol 1 2.jpeg Figure 94:  vol 1 3.jpeg132 133Figure 95:  vol 1 4.jpeg Figure 96:  vol 1 5.jpeg134 135Figure 97:  vol 1 6.jpeg Figure 98:  vol 1 7.jpeg136 137Figure 99:  vol 1 8.jpeg Figure 100:  vol 1 9.jpeg138 139Figure 101:  vol 1 11.jpeg Figure 102:  vol 1 12.jpeg140 141Figure 103:  vol 1 13.jpeg Figure 104:  vol 1 14.jpeg142 143Figure 105:  vol 1 15.jpeg Figure 106:  vol 1 16.jpeg144 145Figure 107:  vol 1 17.jpeg Figure 108:  vol 1 18.jpeg146 147Figure 109:  vol 1 19.jpeg Figure 110:  vol 1 20.jpeg148 149Figure 111:  vol 1 21.jpeg Figure 112:  vol 1 22.jpeg150 151Figure 113:  vol 1 23.jpeg Figure 114:  vol 1 24.jpeg152 153Figure 115:  vol 1 25.jpeg Figure 116:  vol 1 26.jpeg154 155Figure 117:  vol 1 27.jpg Figure 118:  vol 1 28.jpg156 157Figure 119:  vol 1 29.jpeg Figure 120:  vol 1 30.jpeg158 159Figure 121:  vol 1 31.jpegThis page is blank.  160 161Figure 122:  vol 2.jpegA p p e n2- di x162 163Figure 123:  vol 2 1.jpeg Figure 124:  vol 2 2.jpeg164 165Figure 125:  vol 2 3.jpeg Figure 126:  vol 2 4.jpeg166 167Figure 127:  vol 2 5.jpeg Figure 128:  vol 2 6.jpeg168 169Figure 129:  vol 2 7.jpeg Figure 130:  vol 2 8.jpeg170 171Figure 131:  vol 2 9.jpeg Figure 132:  vol 2 10.jpeg172 173Figure 133:  vol 2 11.jpeg Figure 134:  vol 2 12.jpeg174 175Figure 135:  vol 2 13.jpeg Figure 136:  vol 2 14.jpeg176 177Figure 137:  vol 2 15.jpeg Figure 138:  vol 2 16.jpeg178 179Figure 139:  vol 2 17.jpeg Figure 140:  vol 2 18.jpeg180 181Figure 141:  vol 2 19.jpeg Figure 142:  vol 2 20.jpeg182 183Figure 143:  vol 2 21.jpeg Figure 144:  vol 2 22.jpeg184 185Figure 145:  vol 2 23.jpeg Figure 146:  vol 2 24.jpeg186 187Figure 147:  vol 2 25.jpeg Figure 148:  vol 2 26.jpeg188 189Figure 149:  vol 2 27.jpegThis page is also blank190A p p e ntrois- di xMT ELOAn entirely true and admittedly subjective story by David Meiklejohn and Alena Pavan191192 193Dorothy Zbornak, is that you?GLOSSARY OF TERMS19519419610ABSURDADHOCANECDOTEASSEMBLAGEBRICOLAGEARCHITECTURE(ab· surd | \ ԥb-’s ԥrd, -’zԥrd)(\’ad-’häk, -’hǀk;’äd-’hǀk\)(an· ec· dote | \’a-nik-’dǀtԥ\)(as· sem· blage | \ԥ-’sem-blij\)(bri· co· lage | \,brƝ-kǀ-’läzh\)(Ar· chi· tec· ture | \’Är-kԥ-tek-chԥr\)1. Ridiculously unreasonable, unsound, or incongruous.2. Having no rational or orderly relationship to human life.1. Formed or used for specific or immediate problems or needs.2. Fashioned from what is immediately available.1. A situation or series of situtions used to describe a feeling which is difficult to conventionally put into words.2. Reminds you of that time when...1. An artistic composition made from scraps, junk, and odds and ends (like paper, cloth, wood, stone, metal, etc.)2. A collection of persons or things.1. Construction (as of a sculpture, building, or a structure of ideas) achieved by using whatever comes to hand.2. Anything and everything, from anytime.1. Capital A architecture.197199VancouverYakimaSurreyBurnabyAbbotsfordEverettRedmondSeattleTacomaEllensburgVancouverSurreyBurnabyAbbotsfordEverettRedmondSeattleTacomaEllensburgCanadaincredibleMexican food198If you’re thinking about going to Yakima, Washington.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................maybe don’t.overcast skyBIGBIGBIGBIGlady walking around in a bicycle helmet (around the corner)201chain link fencetreessunroof(scratchy) felt roof of the carparking lothi-densitysodium lampovercast skyBIG200We are typically quite punctual people. Unless we’re not. If we’re gonna be late, we’re gonna be veeeeeery late. He won’t though! that became very clear later. See Day 5 for some hot goss.        xoxo Gossip Girl  Technology is making me very uncomfortable lately. I dont like it. I give it 3 years until I fully become a druidic hermit and move to the woods. Why are people so gung ho about this?  People like Stu are just giddy with the promise of the robotic future. He would 100% get an AI brain implant when they come out 2029;)10ABSURDADHOCANECDOTEASSEMBLAGEBRICOLAGEARCHITECTURE(ab· surd | \ ԥb-’s ԥrd, -’zԥrd)(\’ad-’häk, -’hǀk;’äd-’hǀk\)(an· ec· dote | \’a-nik-’dǀtԥ\)(as· sem· blage | \ԥ-’sem-blij\)(bri· co· lage | \,brƝ-kǀ-’läzh\)(Ar· chi· tec· ture | \’Är-kԥ-tek-chԥr\)1. Ridiculously unreasonable, unsound, or incongruous.2. Having no rational or orderly relationship to human life.1. Formed or used for specific or immediate problems or needs.2. Fashioned from what is immediately available.1. A situation or series of situtions used to describe a feeling which is difficult to conventionally put into words.2. Reminds you of that time when...1. An artistic composition made from scraps, junk, and odds and ends (like paper, cloth, wood, stone, metal, etc.)2. A collection of persons or things.1. Construction (as of a sculpture, building, or a structure of ideas) achieved by using whatever comes to hand.2. Anything and everything, from anytime.1. Capital A architecture.202You’re already late. You were supposed to meet your friends for breakfast at 10:30 at Slickity Jim’s but it’s 10:18 now and you’re still waiting for your friend who’s staying with you while he’s out of a place til he moves to Madrid to get out of the shower so you can walk all your shit to the evo and drive over to Main Street. You hate being late. This is the worst. You get to Main, are happy to see you’re not the last to arrive. David & Michael are on time, but Michelle & Stew are tied up somewhere on Commercial. After a small wait for Sunday brunch, you pack up the car you’re borrowing for the road trip, say your goodbyes, and get on the highway. You, David, Michelle, and her husband Stew, who’s loaning you the car. He works for Microsoft, and he’ll be fine without it for a week. On your way down to the border, it becomes clear that the car you’re borrowing is the most sophistocated robot you’ve ever encountered. Everything is automated. A human driver, or passenger for that matter, felt redundant. Stew, is driving you through the border from Vancouver, is wearing an Apple watch synced to the car’s nervous system. After dictating his destination to the vehicle, the car pre-selects a route for Stew, and for each turn or slight move he makes, it sends a vibration up his forearm, reminding him to turn left, merge right, slow down, go to the bathroom, etc. You grew up driving your dad’s boat of a pickup truck from the ‘80s; this scares the shit out of you.You take the highway down to the Point Roberts border crossing. Stew is unreasonably nervous about talking to a government official. Like our-seat-cushions-are-made-of-bricks-of-coke-I have now been living in Canada long enough that I don’t have any American stuff anymore. I have a Canadian Driver’s liscence. My bank is Canadian. I don’t have a canadian credit card though. Becuase this country literally will not give me one. I ’ve tried. So many times. And all they will offer me is a 1000 dollar credit card that I have to buy from the bank with a 1000 deposit. What kind of nonsense is that?Point of that is to say that Canadian debit cards DO NOT WORK in the good ol’ USA. Michelle paid for almost everything. 11Carnival(car· ni· val | \’kär-nԥ-vԥl\)noun:adj:verb:anecdote:1. an episodic ritual of reversal in which the absurd triumphs ovrthe auster, through organized chaos.2. "A lusty busty bawdy bitch... who has kicked up her frolicsome heels and masqueraded under many guises and names".3. the opposite of spectacle.1. requiring collective participation.1. assemblage of many parts which would never normally be at home with each other.1. Walking into an art show, expecting a regular art show. You instead find yourself in a dimly lit room with a red spotlight uplighting an enormous disco ball, spinning while thirty women thrash in place to the 1987 hit single "Alone" by Heart, for the entirety of its three minutes and thirty-eight seconds. 2. When your family used to bring the dog on visits to your Nonni's house. Your Nonna would feed the dog a full bowl of spaghetti every time. The bolognese beard would linger for weeks.3. Making friends with crows!4. Walking to your place of work. You make direct eye contact with a stranger. They do a high kick. You don't acknowledge what just happened. You both go your separate ways.5. Someone choosing "Cell Block Tango" as a karaoke song.6. Going on a bicycle bar tour in Nashville, Tennessee. The pamphlet description says BYOB, so you pack accordingly. Ofcourse, you're not allowed to drink while pedaling, and every stop the vehicle makes is at a 203204 205I am so happy we did. Very fruitful desicion. robot carMichelleDavid’sshoulderdash(good for drying swimsuits)chain link fenceroadsigntrafficmountains treesscrubthe highway’sshoulderpartial cloudsgas stationDavid’s foreheadsunroofceilingI mean. What can I say about this bull man? Other than it is literally the icon that Moses warned the Isrealites about when he brought down the 10 commandmentsor bull LAAADY! 2019.trashtrashbushthin cloudart decocommemorativeplaquebank-looking bldgthe mayor?poise2.4.the more you lookmaybe she’s alrightuh ohDavidbetternow207portrait of a ghostlyVictorian woman1.3.the scarier she getssecurity cameraleather bagtoy soldiernopejust a hat?cabinet206208 209Aaaah!  Ah!  Oh no!    What?! What happened?There was a duck!  I almost killed it!  Why was it just walking across the road?  You can fly!  Just fly across the road!You take Highway 821 towards Yakima. GPS says the drive is about three hours long. At mile marker 7, David almost runs over a duckling crossing the road on foot.Almost!Almost.really nothing but skycar heresame old skydumb mountainsit’s that cute cloud againfarmhousesMichael would have killed me if I bought that alarm clock.At the antique barn, you roam around the store for a bit. Bottom floor is mostly jam and wine. The upstairs though? Bonkers. You find a used ouija board (incredibly haunted, no doubt), dozens of styrofoam heads sporting a variety of hat styles through time (also haunted), and an insanely loud alarm clock (who are we kidding this is haunted too). David gets a teal button-up western shirt. You buy a black suede fringe jacket. Someone asks where the hell you’re going to wear that thing and you think that’s a ridiculous question because you’re going to wear it every day for the rest of your life. Alright, so back in the car where the group figures you can either take the fast route or the scenic route through the Yakima Valley.Everybody votes scenic. And then Yakima.blue skycute little cloudwispy cloudsbarnsillegible signagemore sky210But first.. . Capri Suns. You stop and get Capri Suns and a bunch of other stuff from the local Target.This was when we discover. That Capri Suns. While delicious, come in an entirely unrecyclable plastic and foil package.  Sorry Earth. suede fringe jacket freight traintiniest cloud(spoils the view)a landscape so pretty you could barf11Carnival (car· ni· val | \’kär-nԥ-vԥl\)noun:adj:verb:anecdote:1. an episodic ritual of reversal in which the absurd triumphs over the austere, through organized chaos.2. "A lusty busty bawdy bitch... who has kicked up her frolicsome heels and masqueraded under many guises and names".3. the opposite of spectacle.1. requiring collective participation.1. assemblage of many parts which would never normally be at home with each other.1. Walking into an art show, expecting a regular art show. You instead find yourself in a dimly lit room with a red spotlight uplighting an enormous disco ball, spinning while thirty women thrash in place to the 1987 hit single "Alone" by Heart, for the entirety of its three minutes and thirty-eight seconds. 2. When your family used to bring the dog on visits to your Nonni's house. Your Nonna would feed the dog a full bowl of spaghetti every time. The bolognese beard would linger for weeks.3. Making friends with crows!4. Walking to your place of work. You make direct eye contact with a stranger. They do a high kick. You don't acknowledge what just happened. You both go your separate ways.5. Someone choosing "Cell Block Tango" as a karaoke song.6. Going on a bicycle bar tour in Nashville, Tennessee. The pamphlet description says BYOB, so you pack accordingly. Of course, you're not allowed to drink while pedaling, and every stop the vehicle makes is at a 211Real pretty.Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeal long.And you need Capri Suns.No... need.212misleading signdangerdangerdangerdangerflickering torchno roomstry again dangerdangerdangerdangercouple treesdanger213Yakima is eerily empty. We don’t know what we you were expecting, but you recognized the city name, and you certainly weren’t expecting this. The city centre is completely deserted, This, combined with ostentatious displays of wealth downtown, leaves you uneasy. Downtown Yakima is all expensive-looking bank towers, masonic temples, a lifeless Hilton.Michelle’s on map duty. She says the motels you’re looking for are along the far edge of town, north of where you are on First Street.First Street seems promising as you approach. You come across a place called the Bali Hai Motel. It’s got an incredible sign of a neon-lit tiki hut and palm tree, complete with a torch off to the side. The flame flickers every few seconds, dancing around in the black desert sky for the weary roadtrippers wandering down First. The sign says VACANCY. You pull in to talk to the night manager and ask about getting a room for the night. You park the car in the only open spot in the lot, which might not even be a spot at all. It’s impossible to tell on this patch of tarmac which hasn’t seen maintenance in decades. Weeds shoot through cracks in the pavement, roots from nearby trees heave and rut the asphalt everywhere. The lot is filled with camper vans and broken-down sedans with crowns of rust around the tires. David remarks that people definitely live here and you can’t help but agree. It might not be a great idea for you to stay at this place with your obnoxiously fancy robot car. Still, the sign is cute and you want to see what the deal is. There’s a great-looking margarita bar across the street. Shoutout to curb appeal.If this were writing, you’d have to call this bad writing.But it’s real.Selected Reviews of the Bali Hai Motel: ;“Dont trust the woman at thte front desk. She seems nice but she will steal your thigs.” 3/5“Affordable” 2/5“This place is so nasty. Don’t clean any-thing. Wifi don’t work. Blood in doors. Sleep in your car, you’re better off.” 1/5“OK” 5/5215At the office window, you ring the service bell. A minute or two passes. You ring it again, and a little old lady wanders out from the back telling you before you can even get a sentence out that she doesn’t have any rooms for you. You point to the sign that says vacancy and she says she only has a closet with a small cot that the three of you would have to share. Sorry. She closes the sliding window, returns to the back of the office. You keep driving down First. Every spot is one horrorshow after the next. Each motel you pull into is more disorienting than the last with their labyrinthine plans staged piecemeal according to no discernible logic. In the City of Yakima where question-mark-activity happens, this means most of the room doors are open to the evening heat, revealing portraits of America you forgot about in the climate-controlled comfort of Stew’s robot car. Men in their undershirts holding baseball bats stand in most of the doorways, staring at your car as you try to make your way out of the parking lot. Dozens of bicycle parts are being loaded out of the back of a van into a room at the corner of couryard number three of the Yakima Inn. Someone is prying the air conditioner out of one of the room windows. Outside the front office, a group sits playing cards in a circle of lawn chairs and flicks their cigarettes as you cruise past them and get back onto  First Street. You can’t stay here. And you understand that even if you did stay there and something happened to you it would be your own damn fault. Yakima didn’t do this to itself. It’s a victim of countless unfortunate circumstances.You decide it’s safest to avoid cute and kitchy tonight. You’re staying at a chain. You’re on edge from the drive and need a place with a tiniest cloud(spoils the view)freight train11Carnival (car· ni· val | \’kär-nԥ-vԥl\)noun:adj:verb:anecdote:1. an episodic ritual of reversal in which the absurd triumphs over the austere, through organized chaos.2. "A lusty busty bawdy bitch... who has kicked up her frolicsome heels and masqueraded under many guises and names".3. the opposite of spectacle.1. requiring collective participation.1. assemblage of many parts which would never normally be at home with each other.1. Walking into an art show, expecting a regular art show. You instead find yourself in a dimly lit room with a red spotlight uplighting an enormous disco ball, spinning while thirty women thrash in place to the 1987 hit single "Alone" by Heart, for the entirety of its three minutes and thirty-eight seconds. 2. When your family used to bring the dog on visits to your Nonni's house. Your Nonna would feed the dog a full bowl of spaghetti every time. The bolognese beard would linger for weeks.3. Making friends with crows!4. Walking to your place of work. You make direct eye contact with a stranger. They do a high kick. You don't acknowledge what just happened. You both go your separate ways.5. Someone choosing "Cell Block Tango" as a karaoke song.6. Going on a bicycle bar tour in Nashville, Tennessee. The pamphlet description says BYOB, so you pack accordingly. Of course, you're not allowed to drink while pedaling, and every stop the vehicle makes is at a 214familiar layout and basic amenities which don’t include getting stabbed in a parking lot. Your mom would be so disappointed if you died on the first night of this trip. Just a room with a bed with clean sheets and a bathroom that’s not filled with spiders. If you’re lucky, there’s a bar nearby because you really feel like you need a drink.On the edge of Yakima is a little town called Union Gap. They’ve got a Quality Inn and by the looks of the parking lot there’s plenty of room. The lady at the front desk gives you Room 120 for $80/night. You take it, not caring too much about budget for the evening. The front desk is attached to a balcony overlooking an outdoor pool. You make a note of this, say you’re going to check it out later but you probably won’t. It’s late and it would be a little weird for you to go swimming with only the company of the night manager a flight of stairs away.Room 120 at the Union Gap Quality Inn is pretty much as nondescript as it gets. It’s on the bottom level of a two-storey  brick rowhouse of identical lodging. The room is on the south side of the property, tucked behind a pie shop. Your room, your building, could be anywhere, but it happens to back out onto a junkyard. Heaps of wrecked scrap metal pile up on the other side of your shower stall. You wouldn’t know though, because your room doesn’t have a window. The people who built this wouldn’t consider that a view worthy of a break in the envelope. The three of you unload your stuff from the car, flop down on the beds, check out the room. Real basic. Two beds with two pillows each. Two towels, two tables, two soaps, two cups. A door adjoining to the room west of yours, to make it two rooms if you really wanted. 216room to the leftrobot carwelcome to room 120nothing worth a window over hereroom to the rightfamiliarstrangersthis waythis way to the pool21721812licensed bar where you're expected to get out and buy a drink. The tour ends at 11AM, and you're dropped off in a random parking garage on the edge of town with seven strangers. Each of you left with a backpack of booze, you all proceed to get drunk in the parking garage together. Together, you find your way back into town, go line dancing, exchange information. You return home the next day. You still have their numbers in your phone, and often wonder how Sarah Smith from Boston is doing.7. Going to the Havelock County Fair with your family every year on Thanksgiving Weekend. At the Dog Demo, in which Border Collies normally herd ducks through a series of obstacles and then into pens, a new event is introduced. The demo emcee asks people to send their toddlers into the duck-filled pen for the new mystery event. Giving the Border Collies a rest, eight toddlers are now responsible for herding the ducks. Weirdly, everyone's part of the Dog Demo now. Applause!1. Three years ago, when I moved to Vancouver, I got myself a small garden plot. Nothing particularly noteworthy, just one of those collections of raised beds that gets built on a soon to be developed piece of land.1 I had grown things before, I worked on farms. I knew what I was doing. I heard that the VPL has a small seed library where people donate seeds for other people to take and grow. I went, and I picked up some cabbage, carrots and spinach.  I planted them all when their season came and waited patiently for harvest. The spinach came up first, delicious. Then carrots, pretty ok. My soil wasn't quite right for carrots.  Then the cabbage. Best goddamned cabbage I have ever eaten. Amazing. Obviously, I let one go to seed and 1 It was probably funded by Westbank. 219220 22122212licensed bar where you're expected to get out and buy a drink. The tour ends at 11AM, and you're dropped off in a random parking garage on the edge of town with seven strangers. Each of you left with a backpack of booze, you all proceed to get drunk in the parking garage together. Together, you find your way back into town, go line dancing, exchange information. You return home the next day. You still have their numbers in your phone, and often wonder how Sarah Smith from Boston is doing.7. Going to the Havelock County Fair with your family every year on Thanksgiving Weekend. At the Dog Demo, in which Border Collies normally herd ducks through a series of obstacles and then into pens, a new event is introduced. The demo emcee asks people to send their toddlers into the duck-filled pen for the new mystery event. Giving the Border Collies a rest, eight toddlers are now responsible for herding the ducks. Weirdly, everyone's part of the Dog Demo now. Applause!1. Three years ago, when I moved to Vancouver, I got myself a small garden plot. Nothing particularly noteworthy, just one of those collections of raised beds that gets built on a soon to be developed piece of land.1 I had grown things before, I worked on farms. I knew what I was doing. I heard that the VPL has a small seed library where people donate seeds for other people to take and grow. I went, and I picked up some cabbage, carrots and spinach.  I planted them all when their season came and waited patiently for harvest. The spinach came up first, delicious. Then carrots, pretty ok. My soil wasn't quite right for carrots.  Then the cabbage. Best goddamned cabbage I have ever eaten. Amazing. Obviously, I let one go to seed and 1 It was probably funded by Westbank. Travel Route - Day 2There is no better feeling than leaving Yakima.  Its really too bad that the landscape around that town is so breathtakingly beautiful.   223224 225A quick little breakfast at a diner on the edge of Union Gap and then you’re on your way. Time to get the hell out of Yakima. We need to drive south, towards town names we actually recognize and aren’t secret horrorshows. You get some really good ice cream in The Dalles. Tillamook creamery dairy. Really, really good. Two scoops - coffee, and rhubarb. You probably shouldn’t have had that much cause you can’t tolerate dairy too well but whatever you’re on vacation and no one really knows about your lactose issue. You’ll just find a very private bathroom and it’ll be fine.We started driving south from Yakima, and took the smaller twistier of the two possible highways. I admit that I had no idea that we were driving through native land. #colonizer. I didn’t even think about it. Sorry to the Yakama Nation. Thank you for letting us pass through. After that, we wound up in a little town on the columbia river called The Dalles. Its a pretty ok little town. I entertained moving there for like a half an hour while we were getting ice cream and coffees. Fun fact, the Dalles is the French word for ‘slabs’ because there are huge slabs of basalt in the river near town which make it particularly tricky to navigate in a ship of any significant size. Je ne sais pas pourquoi nous utilisons le mot français. I think Slabs, OR has a better ring to it. Also, the area has been continuously inhabited for about 12,000 years and is currently considered the richest archaeological site in North America. We found a car dealership that Jeremy is destined to buy and turn into a movie theatre/ used car dealership, and this little tidbit. The oregonian paints a grim picture of summer in America. 22612licensed bar where you're expected to get out and buy a drink. The tour ends at 11AM, and you're dropped off in a random parking garage on the edge of town with seven strangers. Each of you left with a backpack of booze, you all proceed to get drunk in the parking garage together. Together, you find your way back into town, go line dancing, exchange information. You return home the next day. You still have their numbers in your phone, and often wonder how Sarah Smith from Boston is doing.7. Going to the Havelock County Fair with your family every year on Thanksgiving Weekend. At the Dog Demo, in which Border Collies normally herd ducks through a series of obstacles and then into pens, a new event is introduced. The demo emcee asks people to send their toddlers into the duck-filled pen for the new mystery event. Giving the Border Collies a rest, eight toddlers are now responsible for herding the ducks. Weirdly, everyone's part of the Dog Demo now. Applause!1. Three years ago, when I moved to Vancouver, I got myself a small garden plot. Nothing particularly noteworthy, just one of those collections of raised beds that gets built on a soon to be developed piece of land.1 I had grown things before, I worked on farms. I knew what I was doing. I heard that the VPL has a small seed library where people donate seeds for other people to take and grow. I went, and I picked up some cabbage, carrots and spinach.  I planted them all when their season came and waited patiently for harvest. The spinach came up first, delicious. Then carrots, pretty ok. My soil wasn't quite right for carrots.  Then the cabbage. Best goddamned cabbage I have ever eaten. Amazing. Obviously, I let one go to seed and 1 It was probably funded by Westbank. 227Bend, Oregon is the home of the last remaining Blockbuster in the world. They still use the little laminated cards. Since the rest of the company has completely folded, they cannot update their computer system or it will update to the bankrupted and defunct system information and would wipe out their customer data. It was actually busy when we were there. Still hoppin.Good for them.  Bend reminds you a lot of every Whiteperson Town you ever holidayed at with your parents. Nice towns, very quaint, but insanely whitewashed. Always a theatre town. If someone isn’t Katharine Hepburn (god love her) level waspy, it’s because they own the ‘ethnic’ restaurant in town. Or they’re playing Othello in this summer season of Shakespeare In The Park. Every shop in Bend sold really weird town merch and all the restaurants seemed super pricey. So we ended up eating at a brewery which we could have anticipated doing anyway.After eating dinner you walk around the town for a while. You mostly find a lot of cowgirl chic garb (got nothing on your fringe jacket) and hand carved wooden signs about standing by your man and having six kids before you’re thirty. Okay they don’t actually say that but that’s certainly the vibe. It just gives you a glimpse into what your life could be like if you made certain choices. If you had stayed at your old job back home, and you were a manager by now. Sure you’d be making three times as much as you every might as an architect or whatever you end up doing with your life but also you probably would still be trying to convince yourself that you’re mostly straight and you’d be married to Cody who was super nice and had a boat that you sometimes went fishing on together but you knew it was never right. You’re not meant to be with a ‘Cody’. Maybe you could live somewhere with a fish mounted on the wall, but that would probably be someplace where you lived alone. Or with Katharine Hepburn. The motel you end up checking into is the Cascade Lodge. There were a bunch of nice-seeming places along the motel strip of Bend. 228 229For all its whiteness, it actually seems like a decent town, even though it’s been totally destroyed by Silicon Valley. Kind of sad. It’s nice that the motels have stuck it out through all of this. You wonder if anyone lives here, cause the real estate is probably so insane now that people fly into San Francisco from Bend every morning. If they do it’s got to be way different from the situation in Yakima. The Cascade Lodge seems like it is mostly for travelers though. The front desk is filled with little maps and travel brochures to outlet malls where you can get discount fleece and those cargo shorts that unzip at the knee. Tevas everywhere. Hell yeah. Lemme see those toes, Oregon! The motel has a swimming pool in the centre which is literally red white and blue. Two men in full hunting gear are hanging out by the pool with their German Shepherds. They seem nice. The dogs. The men seem friendly enough too but they’re in dark camo and must be roasting in this heat. You don’t really trust anyone who won’t dress for the weather. Plus you’ve been listening to a lot of those murder podcasts lately and you’re trying to be less polite for no reason. It’s nice to be nice but when you outweigh me by 150 lbs you need to earn your trust. Oregon’s liquor laws need to calm down. We went to a brewery for some drinks post dinner, had a couple delightful beers around a fire. The atmosphere was exactly like every local brewery in a smallish American town that you’ve ever been to. Dogs, food trucks, fire pits, string lights, that stupid game where people throw bean bags through a board with a hole in it. That part was fine. Then afterwards, we tried to go to a bar that was more in the city, and the bartender was just the worst. This is not the first time this has happened, but the second anyone in Oregon sees a foreign driver’s licence they freak out and start yelling. “I can’t serve anyone without an American id.” “It ’s il legal for you to be in here.” “I don’t think you’re underage, but I can’t verify your ages with Canadian licenses.” “I can’t serve any of you.” “Are you with the OLC?” “Get out.” “But, I ’d like to make some money tonight, so have a seat.” “What can I get you?” It always feels more xenophobic than it does prudent. But that really just describes the entire country doesn’t it?For all its whiteness, it actually seems like a decent town, even though it’s been totally destroyed by Silicon Valley. Kind of sad. It’s nice that the motels have stuck it out through all of this. You wonder if anyone lives here, cause the real estate is probably so insane now that people fly into San Francisco from Bend every morning. If they do it’s got to be way different from the situation in Yakima. The Cascade Lodge seems like it is mostly for travelers though. The front desk is filled with little maps and travel brochures to outlet malls where you can get discount fleece and those cargo shorts that unzip at the knee. Tevas everywhere. Hell yeah. Lemme see those toes, Oregon! The motel has a swimming pool in the centre which is literally red white and blue. Two men in full hunting gear are hanging out by the pool with their German Shepherds. They seem nice. The dogs. The men seem friendly enough too but they’re in dark camo and must be roasting in this heat. You don’t really trust anyone who won’t dress for the weather. Plus you’ve been listening to a lot of those murder podcasts lately and you’re trying to be less polite for no reason. It’s nice to be nice but when you outweigh me by 150 lbs you need to earn your trust. 230I ’m not sure what exactly happened. Maybe I heard someone mention one at a bar. Maybe I heard an ad on the radio. Maybe my AI brain implant told me that I wanted one. But for some reason. I just l ike. Really wanted a fishbowl sized drink. Normally, I am perfectly content to have 3 normal sized drinks and actually enjoy them. But no. Today, I want an annoyingly large blue drank with propbably more sugar in it than anything else. As much as I wanted a fishbowl drink, I would probably never go anywhere that would serve one. I would actively hate any bar that agreed to serve me one. See right for an image of me, thinking about how much I want something and then refusing myself the possibility of getting that thing.  I’ve worked in restaurants for a long time. And there is a better way to handle a situation like that.  He was just a dick.  231That bartender at the whiskey bar really upset you. You get that he’s just doing his job and if he got busted for having an underage person or someone with a phoney ID the entire business could get slapped with an insane fine and go under but the whole experience leaves you with a bad feeling. There has to be a better way of explaining yourself without staining everything with your xenophobic nonsense. It reminded you of the last time you were in Portland and your friend Jeremy insisted that you go to this terrible strip club even though no one in your group of ten friends wanted to go because we’re a quiet type of crowd but he dragged you there anyway. And at the door the bouncer yells at you for having a Canadian drivers license cause that’s useless to him. He asks how he’s supposed to trust you in his bar “if you’re not a real American”. You snatch your license back from this asshole shoot Jeremy a look of disapproval and storm out of the bar. It was melodromatic but you regret nothing! Why do people have to be so awful sometimes?Oregon’s liquor laws need to calm down. We went to a brewery for some drinks post dinner, had a couple delightful beers around a fire. The atmosphere was exactly like every local brewery in a smallish American town that you’ve ever been to. Dogs, food trucks, fire pits, string lights, that stupid game where people throw bean bags through a board with a hole in it. That part was fine. Then afterwards, we tried to go to a bar that was more in the city, and the bartender was just the worst. This is not the first time this has happened, but the second anyone in Oregon sees a foreign driver’s licence they freak out and start yelling. “I can’t serve anyone without an American id.” “It ’s il legal for you to be in here.” “I don’t think you’re underage, but I can’t verify your ages with Canadian licenses.” “I can’t serve any of you.” “Are you with the OLC?” “Get out.” “But, I ’d like to make some money tonight, so have a seat.” “What can I get you?” It always feels more xenophobic than it does prudent. But that really just describes the entire country doesn’t it?For all its whiteness, it actually seems like a decent town, even though it’s been totally destroyed by Silicon Valley. Kind of sad. It’s nice that the motels have stuck it out through all of this. You wonder if anyone lives here, cause the real estate is probably so insane now that people fly into San Francisco from Bend every morning. If they do it’s got to be way different from the situation in Yakima. The Cascade Lodge seems like it is mostly for travelers though. The front desk is filled with little maps and travel brochures to outlet malls whe e you can get discount fleece and those cargo shorts that unzip at the knee. Tevas everywhere. Hell yeah. Lemme see those toes, Oregon! The motel has a swimming pool in the centre which is literally red white and blue. Two men in full hunting gear are hanging out by the pool with their German Shepherds. They seem nice. The dogs. The men seem friendly enough too but they’re in dark camo and must be roasting in this heat. You don’t really trust anyone who won’t dress for the weather. Plus you’ve been listening to a lot of those murder podcasts lately and you’re trying to be less polite for no reason. It’s nice to be nice but when you outweigh me by 150 lbs you need to earn your trust. I’ve worked in restaurants for a long time. And there is a better way to handle a situation like that.  He was just a dick.  23323223513harvested those at the end of the season; all ready for next year. I outlasted the winter, and when the next mid-summer came and the weather was right, I planted the cabbage. I fought off rats, I watered, I provided shade at just the right time. I was on it. Finally it came time to pick one.  So I did. Bitter dissappointment. It was mediocre at best. Maybe it just wasn't quite ready. I waited two weeks, picked another. Same thing. Meh. I checked my soil, everything was the same. The weather wasn't appreciably different from the year before. The cabbage should be great. I called my old mentor Lauren (for an entirely unrelated reason) who lives on a farm in Northern Colorado, and asked her what the fuck. Cabbage open pollinates. Unless its one of like 6 heirloom varieties, it's almost impossible to prevent one variety of cabbage from cross pollinating with another.  Two heads of cabbage can be literally miles away from each other and still cross pollinate. That cabbage I had and loved would never be seen or tasted again. All because some random bee happened to hit my garden plot right after it finished up at Francine's backyard victory garden in Kits. 2. When I was 19 I had a small breakdown and did a 35 day pilgrimage across Spain. I walked something like 600 miles. While I was there I met a woman named Shayna2. She and I walked together with a quebecois girl named Maika for about 20 days and came to be very close friends. After the walk, we parted ways and didn't really talk to each other much. I went back to Oregon and lived my life for a while. She went back to Grenada to continue being a doctor without borders.Maika works for 2  About a year ago, I was driving home from the Okanagan and listened to podcasts almost the entire way. I binged the shit out of one in particular. The Habitat.  It was an 8 or 9 part series about a group of people who locked themselves inside a large tent on a mountain in Hawai'i for a year to see how a Mars colony could fare when the time comes. Around episode 6 or so, they really dive into the story of one of the women. She sounds familiar, but I can't really place it.  Whatever. In episode 7 they reveal that she's married. To a man named Ben. Thats. Very familiar. IT 'S SHAYNA. This woman who I walked with in Spain for 20 some odd days locked herself in a tent with 5 strangers to see if humans would kill each other on a future Mars mission.2a2a. This woman has appeared in my life maybe 6 other times. Under similarly outlandish circumstances. 234236 237239(or, this Weed sucks)13harvested those at the end of the season; all ready for next year. I outlasted the winter, and when the next mid-summer came and the weather was right, I planted the cabbage. I fought off rats, I watered, I provided shade at just the right time. I was on it. Finally it came time to pick one.  So I did. Bitter dissappointment. It was mediocre at best. Maybe it just wasn't quite ready. I waited two weeks, picked another. Same thing. Meh. I checked my soil, everything was the same. The weather wasn't appreciably different from the year before. The cabbage should be great. I called my old mentor Lauren (for an entirely unrelated reason) who lives on a farm in Northern Colorado, and asked her what the fuck. Cabbage open pollinates. Unless its one of like 6 heirloom varieties, it's almost impossible to prevent one variety of cabbage from cross pollinating with another.  Two heads of cabbage can be literally miles away from each other and still cross pollinate. That cabbage I had and loved would never be seen or ta ted again. All because some random bee happened to hit my garden plot right after it finished up at Francine's backyard victory garden in Kits. 2. When I was 19 I had a small breakdown and did a 35 day pilgrimage across Spain. I walked something like 600 miles. While I was there I met a woman named Shayna2. She and I walked together with a quebecois girl named Maika for about 20 days and came to be very close friends. After the walk, we parted ways and didn't really talk to each other much. I went back to Oregon and lived my life for a while. She went back to Grenada to continue being a doctor without borders.Maika works for 2  About a year ago, I was driving home from the Okanagan and listened to podcasts almost the entire way. I binged the shit out of one in particular. The Habitat.  It was an 8 or 9 part series about a group of people who locked themselves inside a large tent on a mountain in Hawai'i for a year to see how a Mars colony could fare when the time comes. Around episode 6 or so, they really dive into the story of one of the women. She sounds familiar, but I can't really place it.  Whatever. In episode 7 they reveal that she's married. To a man named Ben. Thats. Very familiar. IT 'S SHAYNA. This woman who I walked with in Spain for 20 some odd days locked herself in a tent with 5 strangers to see if humans would kill each other on a future Mars mission.2a2a. This woman has appeared in my life maybe 6 other times. Under similarly outlandish circumstances. 238eco-feminist graffitisomeone used to take care of this lawnmotel signvisible from the highwaycommon room?clear skiesscorched earthexposed structure240motel signvisible from the highwayroom windows, presumablybathroom ventsexposed structurescrubmountains241It’s 8AM. Your brain squeaks and groans like a ball of chewing gum which should have been spat out half an hour ago. You roll over on the bed and see the lamp on the bedside table draped by one of your brother-in-law’s old fishing shirts. Next to you is a crinkled imprint of Michelle, who you shared a bed with last night. She’s a restless sleeper when she’s been drinking (apparently it’s an anxiety thing), and you didn’t sleep much either on account of the aggressive air conditioner jammed into the window near your head. Over the pounding in your skull you can make out water running in the bathroom, figure Michelle is in the shower, and sprawl out for a bit.You prop yourself up with two lumpy pillows. David is also waking up in his bed across the room. You open your mouth to announce how poorly you slept but your throat is scorched. You’re hungover, and your seasonal allergies have finally kicked it into high gear. You say there’s no way you can start off driving today.On your way out of town you grab food at a bakery called The Sparrow. David and Michelle get coffees and tiny snacks but if you don’t eat a full breakfast in the morning you turn into a monster and with your allergies already in full swing you figure you shouldn’t risk it so you get a massive sandwich. Everyone finishes eating, and you get on the road. Over breakfast the group decides to try and make it to Crater Lake today. You’re going to stop at Klamath Falls and Lake of the Woods on the way, because apparently there’s a stone mermaid there worthy of a photo or two.Sometime after lunch in a mermaid-themed cafe, you stop at an abandoned motel on the side of the road in California. The Juniper Lodge.maintenance?13harvested those at the end of the season; all ready for next year. I outlasted the winter, and when the next mid-summer came and the weather was right, I planted the cabbage. I fought off rats, I watered, I provided shade at just the right time. I was on it. Finally it came time to pick one.  So I did. Bitter dissappointment. It was mediocre at best. Maybe it just wasn't quite ready. I waited two weeks, picked another. Same thing. Meh. I checked my soil, everything was the same. The weather wasn't appreciably different from the year before. The cabbage should be great. I called my old mentor Lauren (for an entirely unrelated reason) who lives on a farm in Northern Colorado, and asked her what the fuck. Cabbage open pollinates. Unless its one of like 6 heirloom varieties, it's almost impossible to prevent one variety of cabbage from cross pollinating with another.  Two heads of cabbage can be literally miles away from each other and still cross pollinate. That cabbage I had and loved would never be seen or tasted again. All because some random bee happened to hit my garden plot right after it finished up at Francine's backyard victory garden in Kits. 2. When I was 19 I had a small breakdown and did a 35 day pilgrimage across Spain. I walked something like 600 miles. While I was there I met a woman named Shayna2. She and I walked together with a quebecois girl named Maika for about 20 days and came to be very close friends. After the walk, we parted ways and didn't really talk to each other much. I went back to Oregon and lived my life for a while. She went back to Grenada to continue being a doctor without borders.Maika works for 2  About a year ago, I was driving home from the Okanagan and listened to podcasts almost the entire way. I binged the shit out of one in particular. The Habitat.  It was an 8 or 9 part series about a group of people who locked themselves inside a large tent on a mountain in Hawai'i for a year to see how a Mars colony could fare when the time comes. Around episode 6 or so, they really dive into the story of one of the women. She sounds familiar, but I can't really place it.  Whatever. In episode 7 they reveal that she's married. To a man named Ben. Thats. Very familiar. IT 'S SHAYNA. This woman who I walked with in Spain for 20 some odd days locked herself in a tent with 5 strangers to see if humans would kill each other on a future Mars mission.2a2a. This woman has appeared in my life maybe 6 other times. Under similarly outlandish circumstances. 243covered entry for arrivalsnice diagonalsconcrete padtelephone wiresmaintenance?conifersblue skiesconcerning lack of shinglesinfinite scrubfence shadowcourtyardprobably used o be parking242244 245birdsbirdsbirds birdsbirdsbirdsa shrubberyanother shrubberybirdsbirdsbirds14the Madagascar embassy in Canada for some reason. Maybe a year later, I met a man named Ben. He and I hit it off and became very good friends.3 Eventually I moved back to Colorado and lived my life for like 5 more years. Not suspecting anything. One day, I logged on to Facebook and saw that Ben got married. TO SHAYNA! How the christ did these two people find each other? He lived in Oregon. She lived in Grenada. How? It's too much coincidence for one story. I still can't believe it.3. You ride the 99 everyday. Everyday it's a fresh hell. Who's going to yell at you today? Will it be the quebecois man with the grey hoodie and the beard? Or will it be the tiny woman who refuses to get out of the yellow square? Maybe today you'll get lucky and get on one of the CAG busses. They have more standing room and don't have those god forsaken visual sensors on the doors. Today though, no CAG bus. Today it's the same old articulated from 1995. Today its the same old pickle jar of sweaty people. You've already been passed by 4 busses at the Fraser stop.4 So you fight your way on. You press yourself in, just out of bounds of the yellow square. Door closes. You're standing so close to the woman next to you that you're essentially hugging.  This woman did not wash her hair today. Nor yesterday. It's fine. Her face is in someone else's armpit so you can't be too annoyed. We're all in this one together. As the bus rolls on and people get on and off you get forced into the dead zone in the middle of the bus. You stand there for two stops then try to get off at Arbutus. You have to scramble, climb, sidle, push, "Sorry!  Excuse me", step over someone's luggage or cardboard box full of old socks. The man in the blue jacket is wearing headphones and doesn't  move. People outside start getting on. You're trapped. bing ding dong. You know the sound. Doors close. You're going to Macdonald!3  He was a neurosurgeon studying how to attach robotic body parts to monkeys. 4 Why do they think they can just not stop at Fraser?8. So, I just started this new job at a firm I really love. It's a super tiny place, run out of the home of the two principals. They live upstairs, with their two kids. One of their moms lives next door. Their cat1 wanders in and out of the studio occasionally sits on the models in the main space. There's an old man who walks past the studio every morning at 9:10AM and raps on the front window with the rubberized end of his titanium cane. He stares at us for a few too many seconds, yells HAVE A GOOD DAY, then wanders down the street. He's the only person in the neighbourhood their kids are allowed to accept candy from, my boss says. Sometimes their kids wander into the woodshop where I work and play hide-and-go-seek, or sneak cookies into my stuff for me to find later. I've been there for a couple months, and already I've started to alter the house where I'm working. This started on day one, when I was given the simple task of gluing some cork topography together. They told me to do it out back on the concrete steps, with spray adhesive. The concrete is now stained forever. They didn't mind at all, and I've since continued to make marks and stains all over the place, between the linseed oil I dropped on the patio stones to the shelving unit I've begun to permanently install in their main space. It's weird to think that I'm just passing though, but I'll have made indelible marks in the space where these two people are raising their kids for the rest of their lives. Some days I feel bad about this, but most days I love it.1 "Cinder".Ro con pre voles as et et lab iduntur sam am quam fuga. Et dolupidunt et experion consed quasit, optatese ped que nonectumque sim abo. ????????nestdebrisrats, probably246volcano?no clouds!not even one!woodconcretestone paverswrought ironvery David Lynch-eyconcreteBus ea anditat. Con corrum que nus volut rero idunt es porum eum aut lant, simenient perum sum ea qui dolorporum in cuptae et facessus est quid qui con etur, occae nobis eaquae core nisciae iusda prores qui aperum re nonem quo quati sim faci dolupis mod expel inustiation re, ut ma corum ut volorrum sustio exerumque earis rem nonet, sus doluptae. Ipsam si doluptas sequam faces denimin cienis et hariori ut quodiscillor autem dolliquia nobis acerferum ea nonsectem solecab in conectur, sam lici te sim nimus eationseque ilibus doloreptati optatur? Quiae. Exerum nis quid ut omni beres derchil estiorepedi sitate nonseque consequod et fuga. Itatate cor magnatur, num adit veligen disquia nobiti cor sit quatet eos utat.Piducid quam quid et ut volor magni optas dolor aut alitia perupis consequam, ulla premporit ut officipsusam muscidunt lit pratur, as ne as commo explam core into molorem qui sitionseque exeribus iur accullest am et fugiatur rem dolum rem etur, sunt aut ut et I took latin in College. After the bird motel, you continue to head south towards a town called Weed where you’re hoping to stop for dinner and find a place to sleep. Weed is bad. Sure, you’re pretty out of it, but you swear you don’t see a single person walking around on the streets while you’re there. They have some neat little buildings as well as a lot of inexplicable arches and gates and canals and billiards halls but other than that it’s completely dead. It feels like an abandoned movie set, like something David Lynch would have stumbled upon and added to his reservoir of weird little spots where he’s going to film something someday. Maybe people live here? But you really don’t see how.The group says nope Weed is not the final stop for tonight, and keeps driving south. About thirty minutes down the road you come across a town called Mount Shasta, named after the mountain called... Mount Shasta. Immediately it feels more lived-in, so you decide this is the place to stop for the night. Pretty quickly, you find a motel called the Strawberry Valley Inn. It’s as adorable as the name suggests. A little stone cottage at the front of the property serves as the main office and communal dining space. According to the lady at the front desk, you just missed the nightly wine tasting but a complimentary breakfast will be served at 9. You secure Room #11, which is set at the back of the L-shaped rowhouse of lodging, and head off to find dinner. There are a couple restaurants across the road which feel promising. Also across the road is a house with a greenhouse attached. The greenhouse roof appears to have been built around a massive deciduous tree.247USA prideliterally no one on the streetswhat the hell happens in this townbrixxxwhat seems like the greatest cocktail bar of all time(we didn’t go)blinking martinitelephone polewireswireswiresgrassy hillscorched treeswiresnondescriptbldgs248scorched treesnondescriptbldgsglass greenhousetree growin’ through itinsanityscaffoldingbig ole boatgolden hourhazy blue skybirds249busheslots of bugsbushes bushesbushesbushesroom #10room #12little wreath on the doorrobot carcottage this way251You eat dinner at a Mexican restaurant called Casa Ramos, a couple doors down from your motel. Everyone gets a fishbowl-sized margarita, as per the waitress’ suggestion. She’s right; they’re amazing, and only $6. David is jazzed.You head back to your motel to get some sleep.  Not much happening at the motel tonight it seems, although there is a nice garden around the cottage which has a lot of potential as a place to hang out. You make sure your perishable items are in the room’s mini-fridge, take a flip through the bedside table’s Holy Bible, and fall asleep watching a terrible millenial DIY cooking show on TV. 14the Madagascar embassy in Canada for some reason. Maybe a year later, I met a man named Ben. He and I hit it off and became very good friends.3 Eventually I moved back to Colorado and lived my life for like 5 more years. Not suspecting anything. One day, I logged on to Facebook and saw that Ben got married. TO SHAYNA! How the christ did these two people find each other? He lived in Oregon. She lived in Grenada. How? It's too much coincidence for one story. I still can't believe it.3. You ride the 99 everyday. Everyday it's a fresh hell. Who's going to yell at you today? Will it be the quebecois man with the grey hoodie and the beard? Or will it be the tiny woman who refuses to get out of the yellow square? Maybe today you'll get lucky and get on one of the CAG busses. They have more standing room and don't have those god forsaken visual sensors on the doors. Today though, no CAG bus. Today it's the same old articulated from 1995. Today its the same old pickle jar of sweaty people. You've already been passed by 4 busses at the Fraser stop.4 So you fight your way on. You press yourself in, just out of bounds of the yellow square. Door closes. You're standing so close to the woman next to you that you're essentially hugging.  This woman did not wash her hair today. Nor yesterday. It's fine. Her face is in someone else's armpit so you can't be too annoyed. We're all in this one together. As the bus rolls on and people get on and off you get forced into the dead zone in the middle of the bus. You stand there for two stops then try to get off at Arbutus. You have to scramble, climb, sidle, push, "Sorry!  Excuse me", step over someone's luggage or cardboard box full of old socks. The man in the blue jacket is wearing headphones and doesn't  move. People outside start getting on. You're trapped. bing ding dong. You know the sound. Doors close. You're going to Macdonald!3  He was a neurosurgeon studyi g how to attach robotic body parts to monkeys. 4 Why do they think they can just not stop at Fraser?8. So, I just started this new job at a firm I really love. It's a super tiny place, run out of the home of the two principals. They live upstairs, with their two kids. One of their moms lives next door. Their cat1 wanders in and out of the studio occasionally sits on the models in the main space. There's an old man who walks past the studio every morning at 9:10AM and raps on the front window with the rubberized end of his titanium cane. He stares at us for a few too many seconds, yells HAVE A GOOD DAY, then wanders down the street. He's the only person in the neighbourhood their kids are allowed to accept candy from, my boss says. Sometimes their kids wander into the woodshop where I work and play hide-and-go-seek, or sneak cookies into my stuff for me to find later. I've been there for a couple months, and already I've started to alter the house where I'm working. This started on day one, when I was given the simple task of gluing some cork topography together. They told me to do it out back on the concrete steps, with spray adhesive. The concrete is now stained forever. They didn't mind at all, and I've since continued to make marks and stains all over the place, between the linseed oil I dropped on the patio stones to the shelving unit I've begun to permanently install in their main space. It's weird to think that I'm just passing though, but I'll have made indelible marks in the space where these two people are raising their kids for the rest of their lives. Some days I feel bad about this, but most days I love it.1 "Cinder".250252 25325514the Madagascar embassy in Canada for some reason. Maybe a year later, I met a man named Ben. He and I hit it off and became very good friends.3 Eventually I moved back to Colorado and lived my life for like 5 more years. Not suspecting anything. One day, I logged on to Facebook and saw that Ben got married. TO SHAYNA! How the christ did these two people find each other? He lived in Oregon. She lived in Grenada. How? It's too much coincidence for one story. I still can't believe it.3. You ride the 99 everyday. Everyday it's a fresh hell. Who's going to yell at you today? Will it be the quebecois man with the grey hoodie and the beard? Or will it be the tiny woman who refuses to get out of the yellow square? Maybe today you'll get lucky and get on one of the CAG busses. They have more standing room and don't have those god forsaken visual sensors on the doors. Today though, no CAG bus. Today it's the same old articulated from 1995. Today its the same old pickle jar of sweaty people. You've already been passed by 4 busses at the Fraser stop.4 So you fight your way on. You press yourself in, just out of bounds of the yellow square. Door closes. You're standing so close to the woman next to you that you're essentially hugging.  This woman did not wash her hair today. Nor yesterday. It's fine. Her face is in someone else's armpit so you can't be too annoyed. We're all in this one together. As the bus rolls on and people get on and off you get forced into the dead zone in the middle of the bus. You stand there for two stops then try to get off at Arbutus. You have to scramble, climb, sidle, push, "Sorry!  Excuse me", step over someone's luggage or cardboard box full of old socks. The man in the blue jacket is wearing headphones and doesn't  move. People outside start getting on. You're trapped. bing ding dong. You know the sound. Doors close. You're going to Macdonald!3  He was a neurosurgeon studying how to attach robotic body parts to monkeys. 4 Why do they think they can just not stop at Fraser?8. So, I just started this new job at a firm I really love. It's a super tiny place, run out of the home of the two principals. They live upstairs, with their two kids. One of their moms lives next door. Their cat1 wanders in and out of the studio occasionally sits on the models in the main space. There's an old man who walks past the studio every morning at 9:10AM and raps on the front window with the rubberized end of his titanium cane. He stares at us for a few too many seconds, yells HAVE A GOOD DAY, then wanders down the street. He's the only person in the neighbourhood their kids are allowed to accept candy from, my boss says. Sometimes their kids wander into the woodshop where I work and play hide-and-go-seek, or sneak cookies into my stuff for me to find later. I've been there for a couple months, and already I've started to alter the house where I'm working. This started on day one, when I was given the simple task of gluing some cork topography together. They told me to do it out back on the concrete steps, with spray adhesive. The concrete is now stained forever. They didn't mind at all, and I've since continued to make marks and stains all over the place, between the linseed oil I dropped on the patio stones to the shelving unit I've begun to permanently install in their main space. It's weird to think that I'm just passing though, but I'll have made indelible marks in the space where these two people are raising their kids for the rest of their lives. Some days I feel bad about this, but most days I love it.1 "Cinder".254Travel Route - Day 4I bought myself a li l ol tube of peppermint essential oil in Mt. Shasta for those “I ’ve been sitting in a car for 11 hours and I ’ve had 6 cups of coffe and no water and I drank 3 beers last night and I ’m becoming an old old man.” headaches. Most of what I remember from this day is the sting of the emerging chemical burns on my temples. Not super into this map. Might delete later. Mt. ShastaLake AlmanorOld StationDid you design this?256Jefferson is nutso. David will tell you all about it.                   Oh. I sure will .  15CIRCUS (cir· cus | \‘sԥr-kԥs\)1. A large arena enclosed by tiers of seats on three or all four sides and used especially for sports or spectacles (such as athletic contests, exhibitions of horsemanship, or in ancient times chariot racing).2. Something suggestive of a circus (as in frenzied activities, sensationalism, theatricality, or razzle-dazzle).3. Donald Trump on Twitter.4. Overall, disgusting.COLLAGE (col· lage | \ kԥ-’läzh, kܞ-, kǀ-\)1. An artistic composition made of various materials (such as paper, cloth, or wood) glued onto a surface.2. A work (such as a film) having disparate scenes in rapid succession without transitions.DWELL (\’dwel\)1. To exist for a foreseeable period of time, in a particular way.EDITORIAL (ed· i· to· ri· al | \’e-dԥ-’tor-Ɲ-ԥl)1. A change of hands, paired with a lack of preciousness.2. Loving something, letting it go.GOTHIC (Goth· ic | \’gä-thik\)1. Embraces time and event, combines order and absurdity.2. Not completed in full compliance with an original plan.257This leg of the route marks the shortest distance we travelled in any one day. But it still took us forever to do it. Did you know that it snows in California? We never actually saw any, but the volcanic legacy scenic byway was closed due to impassable amounts of snow. I blame Saruman. Evil wizard. Whispering spells on the wind. We tried to stay on the byway proper, but were turned away by a very nice ranger in a hut. So we back tracked for an hour or so and went the other way down Highway 44 to make it to Lake Almanor. I strangely don’t seem to remember much of the landscape on this leg of the journey. For every other leg, I can call up specific images of plants and hills and water, but for this one, we may as well have been driving in a white void. Its probably Saruman’s doing again. All I really remember are pro gun signs, american flags and dust.  (More on that later)259258260 261Old Station California. We trepidaciously stopped here for lunch. This place seemed tasty from the outside, but it was also immediately next door to the place with that god damned sign that makes me a little ashamed to be American. I don’t think anyone took a photo of it , cuz we were a little afraid to get shot while we were at this gas station. But it said something along the lines of “if you can read this sign, thank a teacher. If you can read it in English, thank a soldier!” Just the kind of sign you’d see in every basement man-cave in middle America. (It seems pertinant to point out that the United States has never been under serious foreign threat. The country has never been invaded. It has never been under foreign occupation. It has never lost territory to a foreign government, except through calm AF treaty negotiations with Canada and Mexico.) Anyway. Old town station. The waitress was a delight. It was full of people walking the Pacific Crest trail , and the food was great. I had a grilled pastrami on marbled rye with chips and a dark beer. It was one of the better pastramis I ’ve ever had. The waitress’s daughter was there and she told every table she had that her baby girl was over at that table with her grandpa. Isn’t she just the cutest thing? Love her.Edit: Ugggghhhhhh.  I thought (hoped) no one took a photo. But here. Look at it. Look at it with your eyes. Edit 2: The original photo has disappeared.  You will not be able to see it after all. . . Its for the best. We need to talk about the potential state of Jefferson. Day 4 was when we really realized that it is very much its own thing and that we were not driving through the west coast we thought we were. It is not California, nor Oregon, but Jefferson. A handful of VERY rural counties straddeling the California-Oregon border, many of which have formally voted to cede from the state of California. Imagine, if you will , Texas. But full of disenfranchised people with no legitamate representation either in their own states, nor on the national level. People who LOVE guns, but find themselves living in two of the most restrictive states for gun ownership. People who seem to have genuine needs for big fuggin trucks, but live in states that are pushing small electric vehicles so hard, its hard to believe that Elon Musk isn’t secretly governor of both states. Despite the fact that I disagree with their political stance on probably every issue, I do support their claim to statehood. I got to be a little bit obsessed with this issue while we were driving through it, and they have some sincere concerns about their availability of political representation. In short, they really don’t have any. In the 40’s the state was all but approved. The governors of California and Oregon had signed papers recognizing the state. Jefferson elected a governor. They had formal borders. And then Pearl Harbor was attacked and everyone felt like the issue of statehood should probably go on the back burner while they fought nazis. Then, post war, the issue never really came up again. Until now. Now there is one hell of a resurgence of interest in forming a new state. I give the United States like. 11 more years before it rips itself apart. what does this map mean?What does any map mean?262 263Was this a roadtrip to find a site for our thesis project?  That’s what we told everyone. In reality though, It was a ghost hunting trip.  We’re actually three paranormal investigators who heard about some very spooky sites in Northern California that we just had to check out. The polaroids shown here are just two of the incredibly spooky photos that Michelle took during the trip. Each polaroid she snapped is spookier than the last. Let the record show that Michelle Gagnon-Creeley is way mor haunted than she lets onI like to think I’m a total Karen, but doesnt everyone?Also seems worth noting that seveal episdoes of My Favourite Murder we listened to on the trip were set in the areas we were passing through, in real time.Nevermind. I went to the Official State of Jefferson website and their primary gripe was about immigrants. I no longer support their claim to statehood. They’re all just racist piles of poo.Jefferson is my “problematic fave”, as tumblr would say.This statue is definitely Haunted. 265264266felt evil, might delete later Wow! Get a load of those rocks. 267Very haunted. felt evil, might delete later269268270 271hair on the scanner.I spilled a bit of tea.  Tiny little rocket stove. Why don’t bathrooms ever have windows?LodgingDay 4The Quail Lodge29615 CA-89, Canyondam, CA 95923, USAImagine a motel being run by your mother. That’s the Quail Lodge.272 27327515CIRCUS (cir· cus | \‘sԥr-kԥs\)1. A large arena enclosed by tiers of seats on three or all four sides and used especially for sports or spectacles (such as athletic contests, exhibitions of horsemanship, or in ancient times chariot racing).2. Something suggestive of a circus (as in frenzied activities, sensationalism, theatricality, or razzle-dazzle).3. Donald Trump on Twitter.4. Overall, disgusting.COLLAGE (col· lage | \ kԥ-’läzh, kܞ-, kǀ-\)1. An artistic composition made of various materials (such as paper, cloth, or wood) glued onto a surface.2. A work (such as a film) having disparate scenes in rapid succession without transitions.DWELL (\’dwel\)1. To exist for a foreseeable period of time, in a particular way.EDITORIAL (ed· i· to· ri· al | \’e-dԥ-’tor-Ɲ-ԥl)1. A change of hands, paired with a lack of preciousness.2. Loving something, letting it go.GOTHIC (Goth· ic | \’gä-thik\)1. Embraces time and event, combines order and absurdity.2. Not completed in full compliance with an original plan.274coastal Californiathe oceansound buffer276transport trucksomewhere in between two tiny CA townssound buffer277279Breakfast at a place you spotted on the drive to the beach last night, called Carol’s Pratville Cafe. You order varying amounts of food, everyone gets a lot of coffee. When David tells the waitress how good the coffee is, she tells him she knows, and “they’ve got the good beans!” Yeaaaaaaah, you do. Anyway, you realize you really need allergy meds cause every time the waitress wipes down a table around yours on the patio, her dishrag is stained solid yellow from the pollen. You need to get to the coast. Someone needs to throw you in the water and leave you there for a bit if you want any chance of breathing in the next week.Michelle steps away from breakfast for a bit to take a phone call from Stew. Apparently someone fucked up their immigration paperwork way long ago and there’s a good chance they could be deported soon. Michelle seems surprisingly relaxed about the whole thing but I guess in fairness there’s really nothing she can do about it, so you all finish your drinks and leave.The plan is to take the rest of Highway 89 south, and make it to Sea Ranch tonight. You figure as architecture students you should probably go to Sea Ranch, right? You’re in the neighbourhood, kind of. So you drive the 89 for a while, stopping in Chico and get massive coffees at Dutch Bros. So far the accents in this part of the country are the heaviest. The girl working at Dutch Bros immediately knows you’re Canadian. And you finally get allergy meds from a nearby gas station. Those single-In Chico, you realize you’ve gone in the entirely wrong direction there’s no way you’re making it to Sea Ranch today if you want to make it back to Vancouver on time to show up to work on Monday. You re-set course to take the I-5 to Red Bluff, hop on Highway 36 to get further west, and then take the 101 up the California coast. Sorry, Sea Ranch. Maybe some other time. But you’re at least happy that you can plunge into the ocean tonight.Within a few hours, you make it to Eureka. The city that was supposed to be capital of Jefferson. It’s not a great place to stop since it’s a half-empty college town during the summer and most of the restaurants seem to be $40/plate, but you find a brewery that looks cheap and has food. You get a salad which should have been marketed as a platter of cold over-seasoned chicken. There’s a lady in the brewery who is dressed like Carmen San Diego. Head-to-toe red pleather. You happen to be in the bathroom at the same time as her. When you walk out of your stall, you see her looking in the mirror, sunglasses on and sitting crooked on her face, tending to a small nosebleed. More red! Gotta stay on theme, Carmen.You’re not going to stay in Eureka tonight, and not really sure where you’ll end up. You decide to keep driving north up the 101 and see what happens. Just north of Eureka is Arcata, where you stop for snacks. While in the car, you find a little place in a town about an hour north of you, called the Sea Cliff Motel. Knowing a lot of front desks will close soon in the rural part of California where you’r headed, you give Sea Cliff a call, and secure  phone. Over the phone, Bob, the ownr, says he’ll make sure he’s awake for your arrival. You think that sounds sensible.When you make it to Sea Cliff, you recive 16LODGEMODERNMOTELNON SEQUITUR(\’läj\)(\’mädԥrn\)(mo· tel | \ mǀ-’tel)(non se· qui· tur | \nän-’se-kwԥ-tԥr\)1. To occupy a space for an unknown period of time (a moment, a minute, year...)1. Carefully planned, without room for chance or coincidence.2. Fundamentally adhered to a strict logic.3. Favouring innovation over resourcefulness.4. (Often) partial to the disappearance of that which came before.1. An accomodation, built for lodging and not dwelling. An anonymous setting which embraces spontaneity and coincidence over long stretches of time.1. Lit. "it does not follow".2. A statement (such as a response) that does not follow logically from or is not clearly related to anything previously said.3. Conversations with Alena's mom.4. Conversations with David's mom.3. Relating to the Goths; doesn't necessarily mean you worship Satan.4. Panuh qaþ aftra du im lesus: ik galeiþa,- jah sokeiþ mik, jah in frawaürhtai izwarai gadauþniþ. Padei ik gagga, jus - ni maguþ qiman.5. Not just a phase, Mom.278In hindsight, getting a full time job this summer was a really stupid decision. I made some money, but god. At what cost?  Who. Who in that town could afford a 40$ a plate meal?  Everyone we saw was either on meth or had holes in every article of clothing they owned. pill ones, with like seven layers of packaging. They don’t have any real packages of meds, so you have to get five single-pill packages. The girl working the cash offers her sympathies to your sinuses.In Chico, you realize you’ve gone in the entirely wrong direction there’s no way you’re making it to Sea Ranch today if you want to make it back to Vancouver on time to show up to work on Monday. You re-set course to take the I-5 to Red Bluff, hop on Highway 36 to get further west, and then take the 101 up the California coast. Sorry, Sea Ranch. Maybe some other time. But you’re at least happy that you can plunge into the ocean tonight.Within a few hours, you make it to Eureka. The city that was supposed to be capital of Jefferson. It’s not a great place to stop since it’s a half-empty college town during the summer and most of the restaurants seem to be $40/plate, but you find a brewery that looks cheap and has food. You get a salad which should have been marketed as a platter of cold over-seasoned chicken. There’s a lady in the brewery who is dressed like Carmen San Diego. Head-to-toe red pleather. You happen to be in the bathroom at the same time as her. When you walk out of your stall, you see her looking in the mirror, sunglasses on and sitting crooked on her face, tending to a small nosebleed. More red! Gotta stay on theme, Carmen.You’re not going to stay in Eureka tonight, and not really sure where you’ll end up. You decide to keep driving north up the 101 and see what happens. Just north of Eureka is Arcata, where you stop for snacks. While in the car, you find a little place in a town about an hour north of you, called the Sea Cliff Motel. Knowing a lot of front desks will close soon in the rural part of In Chico, you realize you’ve gone in the entirely wrong direction there’s no way you’re making it to Sea Ranch today if you want to make it back to Vancouver on time to show up to work on Monday. You re-set course to take the I-5 to Red Bluff, hop on Highway 36 to get further west, and then take the 101 up the California coast. Sorry, Sea Ranch. Maybe some other time. But you’re at least happy that you can plunge into the ocean tonight.Within a few hours, you make it to Eureka. The city that was supposed to be capital of Jefferson. It’s not a great place to stop since it’s a half-empty college town during the summer and most of the restaurants seem to be $40/plate, but you find a brewery that looks cheap and has food. You get a salad which should have been marketed as a platter of cold over-seasoned chicken. There’s a lady in the brewery who is dressed like Carmen San Diego. Head-to-toe red pleather. You happen to be in the bathroom at the same time as her. When you walk out of your stall, you see her looking in the mirror, sunglasses on and sitting crooked on her face, tending to a small nosebleed. More red! Gotta stay on theme, Carmen.You’re not going to stay in Eureka tonight, and not really sure where you’ll end up. You decide to keep driving north up the 101 and see what happens. Just north of Eureka is Arcata, where you stop for snacks. While in the car, you find a little place in a town about an hour north of you, called the Sea Cliff Motel. Knowing a lot of front desks will close soon in the rural part of California where you’re headed, you give Sea Cliff a call, and secure a phone. Over the phone, Bob, the owner, says he’ll make sure he’s awake for your arrival. You think that sounds sensible.When you make it to Sea Cliff, you receive or, they were insanely rich.saw a lot of people there who looked like my well-meaning but suuuuuuuper racist auntie lynn.single car garageour room, past the firepitorchardBreakfast at a place you spotted on the drive to the beach last night, called Carol’s Pratville Cafe. You order varying amounts of food, everyone gets a lot of coffee. When David tells the waitress how good the coffee is, she tells him she knows, and “they’ve got the good beans!” Yeaaaaaaah, you do. Anyway, you realize you really need allergy meds cause every time the waitress wipes down a table around yours on the patio, her dishrag is stained solid yellow from the pollen. You need to get to the coast. Someone needs to throw you in the water and leave you there for a bit if you want any chance of breathing in the next week.Michelle steps away from breakfast for a bit to take a phone call from Stew. Apparently someone fucked up their immigration paperwork way long ago and there’s a good chance they could be deported soon. Michelle seems surprisingly relaxed about the whole thing but I guess in fairness there’s really nothing she can do about it, so you all finish your drinks and leave.The plan is to take the rest of Highway 89 south, and make it to Sea Ranch tonight. You figure as architecture students you should probably go to Sea Ranch, right? You’re in the neighbourhood, kind of. So you drive the 89 for a while, stopping in Chico and get massive coffees at Dutch Bros. So far the accents in this part of the country are the heaviest. The girl working at Dutch Bros immediately knows you’re Canadian. And you finally get allergy meds from a nearby gas station. Those single-pill ones, with like seven layers of packaging. They don’t have any real packages of meds, so you have to get five single-pill packages. The girl working the cash offers her sympathies to your sinuses.280California where you’re headed, you give Sea Cliff a call, and secure a phone. Over the phone, Bob, the owner, says he’ll make sure he’s awake for your arrival. You think that sounds sensible.When you make it to Sea Cliff, you receive an unparalleled greeting. A sturdy older dog named Coconut waddles up to the car, and gives you a bear hug. You and David are both deeply distracted by Coconut, but while it’s HugFest 2019, a polite older man in a plaid flannel comes out and introduces himself as Bob. Michelle is on it, and goes to pay for the room. Bob is a sweetheart, shows you the grounds, gives you permission to hang out with Coconut for the duration of your stay, and tells you which beach you should head to tonight.You load your things in the room, pausing to appreciate how lovely Bob’s motel is. It’s adorable, and probably the exact type of thing that would get critiqued in architecture school for being “too nice”, “too country-cottage”, or “shabby chic”. It’s none of those things. You can tell Bob and whoever took care of this place before him really cared about it. The structure was well maintained, as well as the grounds. Nothing was too manicured, or left to grow too wild in the direction that it was uninhabitable for both humans or other living things. It was no Juniper Lodge bird motel. Bob stepped in when he had to, but the land and the building sitting on it were both free to do as they pleased. And so were you. You all felt safe here, to do whatever you needed.As per Bob’s recommendation, you drive south a little, back towards the town of Trinidad. The beach he’s told you about is on the edge of the town. Driving through Trinidad, you pass a small charter school across from a volunteer firefighter’s station attached to an organic food co-op, confirming that you’ve certainly made it to California.When I took this photo, we had known this dog for all of 4 minutes. I obviously sent this photo to Alena’s then roommate / platonic wife who responded with,   “God she looks like a fucking    Hilfiger model. I would buy    l iterally anything she told me    to.”281282 283100% would live there. microwave ovenfresh flowerschiffon curtainspantryflower bush outsidetowel drying armscarvedwooden spoonsbeachwarningsignsblack skysmallest slice of sunsetrocks284smallest slice of sunset70s muscle carrobot carthe ocean285286CoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconuttreesflower bushesrobot carCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutCoconutorchardfirepitanother room(unoccupied)287CoconutCoconut28816LODGEMODERNMOTELNON SEQUITUR(\’läj\)(\’mädԥrn\)(mo· tel | \ mǀ-’tel)(non se· qui· tur | \nän-’se-kwԥ-tԥr\)1. To occupy a space for an unknown period of time (a moment, a minute, year...)1. Carefully planned, without room for chance or coincidence.2. Fundamentally adhered to a strict logic.3. Favouring innovation over resourcefulness.4. (Often) partial to the disappearance of that which came before.1. An accomodation, built for lodging and not dwelling. An anonymous setting which embraces spontaneity and coincidence over long stretches of time.1. Lit. "it does not follow".2. A statement (such as a response) that does not follow logically from or is not clearly related to anything previously said.3. Conversations with Alena's mom.4. Conversations with David's mom.3. Relating to the Goths; doesn't necessarily mean you worship Satan.4. Panuh qaþ aftra du im lesus: ik galeiþa,- jah sokeiþ mik, jah in frawaürhtai izwarai gadauþniþ. Padei ik gagga, jus - ni maguþ qiman.5. Not just a phase, Mom.289Mother’s brand circus animal cookies.  So sweet. So so so so sweet. But so so so so good.  Alena will disagree. Van Holten’s Dill pickles in a bag. So good. My favourite thing about this is the “contents: one pickle” on the bottom right corner. I love capri suns. I never buy them because the packaging is 100% unrecyclable. But I love them. *This does deserve an entire page. Coconut290 291Coconut292 293Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. There’s really nothing to say about how beautiful the Oregon coast is. It’s just beautiful rockafter  beautiful rockafter  gorgeous beachafter  cloudless sky after  elegant bird after charming inn.          It’s a bit much, really.It’s just beautiful rockafter  beautiful rockafter  gorgeous beachafter  cloudless sky after  elegant bird after charming inn.It’s just beautiful rockafter  beautiful rockafter  gorgeous beachafter  cloudless sky after  elegant bird after charming inn.It’s just beautiful rockafter  beautiful rockafter  gorgeous beachafter  cloudless sky after  elegant bird after charming inn.It’s just beautiful rockafter  beautiful rockafter  gorgeous beachafter  cloudless sky after  elegant bird after charming inn.It’s just beautiful rockafter  beautiful rockafter  gorgeous beachafter  cloudless sky after  elegant bird after charming inn.Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. W  get it. Your  beautiful AF. You don’t have to br g about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oreg n. We get t. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Or gon. We get it. Youre beautif l AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time. Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beautiful AF. You don’t have to brag about it all the time.          It’s a bit much, really.         It’s a bit much, really.         It’s a bit much, really.Travel Route - Day 6Oregon. We get it. Youre beau iful AF. You don’t have t  brag about it all the time. 294 295It’s just beautiful rockafter  beautiful rockafter  gorgeous beachafter  cloudless sky after  elegant bird after charming inn.Wait. Nope. I completely forgot about Eureka, California. That town was unpleasant. it was a stagant little town on a stagnant little spit of sand sticking out into a stagnant little harbour. Don’t go there. But do go to the redwoods! We misread the map and didn’t see the reeeeally big ones, but honestly who could notice? Once a tree is more than 250 feet tall , its a giant. I was so entralled by the trees that I didnt take any photos. I just sat and marvelled at them. And then got sad about climate change. And then marvelled at them some more.    No wait. Eureka was day 5? Is it before or after Trinidad?Where are we?297Here’s a picture of the sunset. I just wanna throw up. 16LODGEMODERNMOTELNON SEQUITUR(\’läj\)(\’mädԥrn\)(mo· tel | \ mǀ-’tel)(non se· qui· tur | \nän-’se-kwԥ-tԥr\)1. To occupy a space for an unknown period of time (a moment, a minute, year...)1. Carefully planned, without room for chance or coincidence.2. Fundamentally adhered to a strict logic.3. Favouring innovation over resourcefulness.4. (Often) partial to the disappearance of that which came before.1. An accomodation, built for lodging and not dwelling. An anonymous setting which embraces spontaneity and coincidence over long stretches of time.1. Lit. "it does not follow".2. A statement (such as a response) that does not follow logically from or is not clearly related to anything previously said.3. Conversations with Alena's mom.4. Conversations with David's mom.3. Relating to the Goths; doesn't necessarily mean you worship Satan.4. Panuh qaþ aftra du im lesus: ik galeiþa,- jah sokeiþ mik, jah in frawaürhtai izwarai gadauþniþ. Padei ik gagga, jus - ni maguþ qiman.5. Not just a phase, Mom.296This was perhaps the most fortuitous place of lodging we encountered on this trip. Everywhere else we didn’t really have any problems picking a motel and getting a room. Early in the week, I threw out the idea of camping one night, and this night really felt like the night. Mostly cuz no one wants to stay in Florence. While we were drinking a beer and eating sandwiches at that brewery in that one town, I remembered about Oregon’s yurts, but forgot the part where most people reserve them a month in advance. I searched for some campgrounds that have yurts and we took off. Because the United states is generally really bad at things, and refuses to fund things that people actually like, the mobile website for the national parks is garbage. And I could not actually tell if any given park had any availability. We took fate’s lead and drove to the first park on the coast. We drive in, no yurts. Can we just pull in and turn around? Yeah. Perfect. Thanks. Let’s try the next one. Hi! are there any yurts available tonight? Yeah. just pick whichever one.  One of them is reserved, but the other is free. Take your pick. Sick. We did it. We got one the fabled first come first served yurt “so close to the ocean that you can hear the pound of the surf from your tent.”  We found out a bit later that the only reason we got it was because the people who were there before us left a day early. The order of events after that gets a little muddled. We drove back to town, then to the yurt. Then back to town? Then to the beach? Then to town? Then to the yurt?  I don’t remember but I remember passing Heceta head lighthouse 12 times. Anyways. Here’s a photo of me impossibly bundled up in my Schlafsack. It was not cold when this photo was taken.  I don’t even remember where that was.It was so goddamn hot on the top bunkso siqqwhich?You know, That one town. 298a really smart treedid i pass?299Night 7Yurt #2Carl G. Washburne State parkYurts are my favourite thing. I will never stop loving them. I am shocked that other state parks haven’t caught on. Buckle up for Latin class with David!I spilled a lot of tea. (Ego effuderit multum tea)Oculus above. Cedrus altlanticaThat hair again(Quod iterum caput)Acer douglasiiRubus parvifloraCornus nuttalliiI think this is like when a cedar is from the atlantic oceana really smart t ecorn nutmost underratedHogwarts prof, imo.did i pass?like a big eyeball100%300 301Chapter 6.5: David gets nostalgicEverytime I go back to Oregon, I always regret leaving. Even though I really didn’t have any say in the matter. It was peak recession 2008 and while I was looking for a job, I remember going to hiring fairs at fast food places and competing against 34 middle aged people trying to feed their kids. No one is going to give the job to the 19 year old college kid in that situation. Day 6 was when that regret came in full swing. Maybe I was just charmed by the beach. I woke up mega early, (again. No say in the matter) and went to the beach, where I was truly the only person there. I could see maybe 3 miles in either direction and there was no one but me, some birds and a dead jellyfish. #Clicheoregoncoastphoto302 303“On my way to Rotterdam, I have to stop in Zurich and pick up my bike.”this quote still makes me upsetthis too30417RIGHT NOWSPECTACLE(non se· qui· tur | \nän-’se-kwԥ-tԥr\)(spec· ta· cle | \’spek-ti-kԥl)1. A mode of time which results in a flattened experience.1. Something exhibited to view as unusual, notable, or entertaining. Especially: an eye-catching or dramatic public display.2. The inverted image of society in which relationships between commodities have supplanted relations between people, where "passive identification with the spectacle supplants genuine activity".3. Something which obfuscates the past, imploding it with the future into an undifferentiated mass, a type of never-ending present.4. The opposite of Carnival.305307Portland convention centre  (Haunted)night sky306You slept so well last night. You scream-yawn I SLEPT SO WELL on the top bunk of the yurt bed and then look down and see that the room is empty. You clamber down from your bed, throw on a sweater and see David and Michelle sitting at the picnic table outside. They look exhausted, and tell you they slep terribly. Rain came down hard on the yurt roof last night, sending a confetti of acorns and other tree stuff down with it. You, used to falling asleep at your parents’ place with a tin roof in thunderstorms, slept like a baby in the rainstorm. Apparently this doesn’t have the same effect for your traveling companions.You’re the one who had the incredible sleep, so you’re the one who’s driving today. Everyone loads up into the car, and you continue to make your way north into Oregon. You made a plan with a couple friends back in Vancouver last night for them to meet you in Portland. So you have to be in Portland for 6PM tonight. All three of you in the car are excited to see other people tonight. You’ve all gone a little car-crazy.After a short breakfast at a diner on the 101, you map out the plan for the day. You’re going to go Tillamook to grab some cheese curds. And you’re going to go to Cannon Beach because it’s beautiful and also you want to go swimming and maybe take a stealthy bath in the ocean. This is the first day that’s gone even relatively according to plan. You make it to Tillamook in time. You get the cheese curds. You even get fudge. And you make it to Cannon Beach. The only hiccup of the day, really, is the largest sandcastle building competition in the world is taking place on the beach that day, so the 308 309310entry from halldifferent roomdowntown Portlandno-access balcony311312 313Also, while you’re out, you and David pop into one of those fotomats in one of the bars you visit. There, some ladies start filming you. You don’t notice until David understandably gets really mad. The women don’t stop filming you until David forcibly pushes their camera down and tells them to stop. They keep laughing and don’t make eye contact. The whole interaction leaves you feeling very uncomfortable.You get back to the motel room, everyone too drunk and needing to sleep. You get in a car with your two friends from Vancouver, and David and Michelle get a different car together. David and Michelle get back first, and tell you as you enter the room that Michelle says she’s too drunk and insists on sleeping in her car. You can’t even process the information, but one of your friends says no she’s not, and heads down to the parking garage to talk some sense into Michelle. Your other friend decides he’s sleeping on the floor, even though there is plenty of space in the beds. Sure. You don’t really remember what happens after this. You half-fall asleep, tossing and turning all night, not used to the new person sleeping beside you.You go out that night. You all had too many beers in the motel room, and continue to have too many when you’re out.You have a bad habit of stealing thigns when you’ve had too much to drink. Nothing pictured here is stolen. But you did take a lot of matches.another roomThey both came back to the room, and thankfully no one was murdered that night.  I assume that the two of them are now best friends. I have never hated an interaction more in my life.  314 315We  have  n eve r  made  a  good  d e c i s i o n  i n  Po r t l a nd . C h a p t e r  8Why do we keep going there?316 317Travel Route - Day 8In which we just booked it to get to Vancouver. as quickly as possible. I-5 it. Just. Let’s go. 318 319When we crossed the border back into Canada, Alena was driving. Everything was fine, except a person who doesn’t have status in the United States (Alena) is not allowed to drive a car with American plates within the nation of Canada. So Alena and Michelle had to switch places. Now we know. We were hungover. We were tired of driving. We were sleepy. We ate at a really good vegan restaurant in Olympia. Alena got a coffee. I ’m a little sleepy writing this. Fits the mood. I shouldn’t have put on my ”lowkey nighttime jamz” playlist. What a fool I am. What fools we were. What business did we have drinking that much? Why did that woman film us at the bar? Why wasn’t SkateBÅrt djing?  Will we ever make it back to Vancouver?  Do we even want to?320 321323E N DM AT T E RFootnotes, Bibliography:  Footnotes must be numbered consecutively throughout the report. They may appear at the bottom of pages, at the end of sections, or at the end of the main body of the text immediately preceding the bibliography. A consistent and established style must be followed in the footnotes and bibliography (see Consistent Established Style).322324 325B I B L I OG RA P H YAdjaye, David, Nikolaus Hirsch, and Jorge Otero-Pailos, “On Architecture and Authorship: A Conversation,” Places Journal, October 2011. Accessed 14 Jan 2019. https://doi.org/10.22269/111024Bakhtin, M. M. 1984. Rabelais and his world. 1st Midland book ed. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Bucci, Angelo, Kenneth Frampton, and Columbia University. Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation. 2015. The Dissolution of Buildings. New York, NY: GSAPP TranscriptsCronan, Todd, “Why architecture matters as art as never before: Le Corbusier, Tony Smith and the problem of use,” NONSITE,  Issue #21 (July 2017) https://nonsite.org/article/why-architecture-maters-as-art-as-never-before#. [“ The real problem here is  not the gap between intent and reaction or response, but rather with the simple fact that whether or not a building is  actually used in the   way the architect wishes, it  is  always made for a user.  One could of course build structures exclusively for f riends or for oneself  but that feels more l ike an exemplif ication of the problem than a solution to it.”]Davidson, Cynthia C., and Anyone Corporation. 1999. Anymore. London;New York;Cambridge, Mass;: Anyone Corporation.Davidson, Cynthia C., and Anyone Corporation. 1999. Anytime. London;New York;Cambridge, Mass;: Anyone Corporation.Debord, Guy. 1994. The society of the spectacle.  New York: Zone Books.Debord, Guy. 1990. Comments on the Society of the Spectacle.  New York: Verso Books.DeSilvey, Caitlin. 2017. Curated decay: Heritage Beyond Saving. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Didion, Joan. South and West: From a Notebook. London: 4th Estate, 2018.Dunne, Anthony, Fiona Raby, and Project Muse University Press eBooks. 2013. Speculative everything: Design, f iction, and social dreaming.  London;Cambridge, Massachusetts;: The MIT Press. Dyckhoff, Tom. 2017. The Age of Spectacle: Adventures in Architecture and the 21st-Century City. London: Random House Books.Ebersberger, Eva, Daniela Zyman, and Daniel Birnbaum. Jorge Otero-Pailos: The Ethics of Dust. Köln: Verlag Der        Buchhandlung Walther König, 2009.The Florida P roject.  Directed by Sean Baker. United States: A24, 2017.Grand Hotel.  Directed by Edmund Goulding. United States: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1932.Hartoonian, Gevork. 2012;2016;.  Architecture and Spectacle: A Critique. Burlington, VT;Farnham, Surrey;: Ashgate.326 327Koolhaas, Rem. “Junkspace.” October Vol. 100 (Spring 2002): 175-190Latour, Bruno. 1993. We have never been modern. New york;Cambridge, Mass;: Harvester Wheatsheaf.Le Ricolais, Robert. “Things Themselves are Lying, and so are Their Images.” In Dirt, edited by Megan Born, Helene Furján and Lily Jencks, 64-73. MIT University Press, 2012.Matta-Clark, Gordon, Antonio Sergio Bessa, and Jessamyn Fiore. Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect. New        Haven: Bronx Museum of Art in Association with Yale University Press, 2017.Mumford, Lewis. 1963. Technics and Civilization. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World.Pezo, Mauricio, Sofía von Ellrichshausen, and Pezo von Ellrichshausen (Firm). 2018. Naïve intention.  New York; Chicago, Il l inois;: I ITAC Press, College of Architecture.P yscho.  Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. United States: Paramount Pictures, 1960.Sample, Hilary. 2016.  Maintenance architecture. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.Scalbert, Irénée, Tom Emerson, and Stephanie Macdonald. Never Modern: On Bricolage and the Works of 6a        Architects. Zürich: Park Books, 2013.Stein, Amelia. “Does architecture need to be original?”.  The Guardian.  November 23, 2015. https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/nov/23/architecture-copyright-law-symposiumStoner, J i l l.  2012. Toward a Minor Architecture. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.Sze, Sarah, and Melissa Chiu. 2011. Sarah Sze: Inf inite Line.  New York: Asia Society Museum.Treadwell, Sarah. “The Motel: An Image of Elsewhere.” Space and Culture 8, no. 2 (May 2005): 214-24.      Accessed March 31, 2019. doi:10.1177/1206331205275006.Till,  Jeremy. 2009.  Architecture Depends. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.Van den Akker, Robin, Alison Gibbons, and Timotheus Vermeulen. 2017. Metamodernism: Historicity, affect, and depth after postmodernism. London;New York;: Rowman & Littlefield International.Venturi, Robert. Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture. New York, NY: Architectural Press/Museum of    Modern Art, 1977.Vidler, Anthony. 2008. Architecture between spectacle and use.Wood, Andrew. “‘The Best Surprise Is No Surprise’: Architecture, Imagery, and Omnitopia Among AmericanMom-and-Pop Motels.” Space and Culture 8, no. 4 (November 2005): 399-415. Accessed March 31, 2019.doi:10.1177/1206331205279356.

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