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Entry-to-Practice PharmD Program : Interprofessional Education -- Master Plan Min, Jason; Leung, Larry 2018-10

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     Entry-to-Practice PharmD Program Interprofessional Education – Master Plan Version: October 2018    Jason Min, BSc(Pharm), RPh, Interprofessional Education Lead Larry Leung, BSc(Pharm), RPh, Interprofessional Education Lead               Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     2  Acknowledgements  The Interprofessional Education (IPE) Leads, Larry Leung and Jason Min, at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia (UBC) would like to acknowledge with gratitude the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the Musqueam peoples. In respect to the Musqueam peoples, we acknowledge our responsibility to ensure that the IPE Program for Entry-to-Practice PharmD students promotes respect, professionalism, and culturally safe pharmaceutical care.  We would like to thank the many faculty and staff who have contributed to the development of IPE: Kimberly Mascarenas Fong Chan Karen Dahri Lynda Eccott Gilly Lau Janice Moshenko Parkash Ragsdale Jillian Reardon  Tony Seet Judith Soon Janice Yeung     Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     3  Table of Contents  Acknowledgements..................................................................................................................... 2 Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................ 3 Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 4 Section 1 – Strategic Imperatives ................................................................................................ 5 Section 2 – Reporting Structure .................................................................................................. 6 Section 3 – Interprofessional Education Lead .............................................................................. 7 Job Summary ........................................................................................................................... 7 Appointment Details ............................................................................................................... 7 Responsibilities........................................................................................................................ 7 Section 4 – Interprofessional Education Senior Program Assistant .............................................. 9 Summary ................................................................................................................................. 9 Section 5 – Curriculum Development ........................................................................................ 10 5.1 Six Core Competencies .................................................................................................... 10 5.2 IPE Road Map .................................................................................................................. 11 5.3 IPE Student Requirements ............................................................................................... 12 5.4 IPE Activity Professionalism Infraction Tracking ............................................................... 15 5.5 IPE Activity Completion Tracking ...................................................................................... 17 5.6 IPE Yearly Calendar ............................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 5.7 Student - Led IPE Activities Policy .................................................................................... 18         Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     4  Introduction  IPE at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences is under the portfolio of the Office of Experiential Education. Our vision for IPE is to become a global leader in a competency-based program in pharmacy that is integrated and collaborative, to support students in becoming effective interprofessional collaborators in patient care. “As the scope of pharmacist practice continues to expand and healthcare innovations such as team-based care become firmly established, we need to ensure that our graduates are equipped to succeed in and help shape this evolving landscape.” Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Strategic Plan 2017-2022: Catalyst for Change. IPE occurs when students, healthcare workers, or health professionals from two or more disciplines work collaboratively to “learn about, from and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes” World Health Organization, 2010.   The knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes developed through IPE will enable students to become interprofessional collaborative ready in the delivery of patient–centred care. Interprofessional collaboration is a partnership between a healthcare team and a patient using a participatory, collaborative, and coordinated approach to shared decision-making around health and social issues. Training pharmacy students by using this approach will promote future change in the profession of pharmacy and in the overall healthcare system. Patients receive higher quality of care when healthcare professionals collaborate through effective communication and understanding of each other’s role. IPE helps to address and achieve the goals set forth by the:  Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada (AFPC) Educational Outcomes Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP) Accreditation Standards for Canadian First Professional Degree in Pharmacy Programs Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC) National Interprofessional Competency Framework Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) Blueprint for Pharmacy  The current IPE learning builds upon a rich history at UBC and is focused on the development and implementation of core competencies across fourteen health professional programs including: Audiologist Dentist Dental Hygienist Dietitian Genetic Counselor Midwife Nurse Occupational Therapist Pharmacist Pharmacist Technician Physician Physical Therapist Social Worker Speech Language Pathologist     Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     5  Section 1 – Strategic Imperatives  We are committed to providing learning and skill development opportunities that will lead to improved interprofessional care of patients. We have four strategic imperatives, in alignment with the Office of Experiential Education, to guide and focus our efforts:  1. Student Experience: To spiral IPE throughout the Entry-to-Practice PharmD program, ensuring AFPC outcomes, NAPRA competencies, CCAPP accreditation standards, and CIHC Competencies are met.   2. Practice Educator Experience: To ensure practice educators are well-supported in the delivery of IPE-related content and activities for students on experiential practicums.   3. Experiential Education Sites: To expand and enrich student opportunities to experience interprofessional collaboration while on experiential practicums.   4. Program Advancement: To foster meaningful collaboration and partnerships with other health programs and provide leadership in the scholarship of teaching and learning, research and innovation of IPE.            Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     6  Section 2 – Reporting Structure   • The IPE Lead:  o Reports functionally to the Director, Office of Experiential Education, and as a curricular theme, reports to the Executive Director, Entry-to-Practice Education. o Provides updates to the Associate Dean, Academic, as necessary. o Reports on matters of interest to or affecting the Faculty at appropriate Faculty venues as necessary.                         Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     7  Section 3 – Interprofessional Education Lead  Job Summary Under the direction of the Director, Experiential Education (the Director), the Interprofessional Education Lead works directly with Faculty members to build and support an excellent competency-based IPE curricular theme in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. The IPE theme is to be integrated and collaborative within this Faculty and connect with other health programs to support students in becoming effective interprofessional collaborators in patient care.    Note: If co-leads share the role, the responsibilities below are assumed to be split by mutual agreement.  Appointment Details The IPE Lead is hired into a 12-month renewable Lecturer and Lead position through a rigorous and standard hiring process. Renewals are processed through the Office of the Associate Dean, Academic. The IPE Lead reports functionally to the Director. The term of appointment is 12-months, renewable indefinitely. Renewal is subject to a satisfactory review of performance by the Associate Dean, Academic annually.  The role requires a Full Time Equivalency.  Responsibilities The duties and responsibilities of the Interprofessional Education Lead will include the following: • Oversee IPE in the BSc (Pharm) and Entry-to-Practice PharmD programs. • Oversee the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences’ IPE Advisory Committee (see Appendix 1). • Oversee the IPE workload of the appointed Senior Program Assistant(s) and other staff appointed to IPE. • Increase capacity for interprofessional education opportunities and provide leadership among other health disciplines in the pedagogy, scholarship and innovation of IPE.   • Identify IPE implementation considerations related to transitioning from the current BSc (Pharm) program to the E2P PharmD program. • Develop the guiding principles and strategic direction for the IPE program. • Develop the IPE curricular theme in the Entry-to-Practice PharmD program to prepare students to graduate as collaborative practitioners as outlined by the Canadian Council for Accreditation   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     8  of Pharmacy Programs - Accreditation Standards for the First Professional Degree in Pharmacy Programs.  • Provide a positive environment in which students are encouraged to be actively engaged in the interprofessional learning process. • Develop operational policies and procedures for the IPE Advisory Committee related to service delivery, data privacy, data security, use of technology, and other relevant aspects, to be determined. • Carry forward motions pertaining to IPE when IPE Advisory Committee does not come to a consensus. • Support faculty members and IPE Advisory Committee members in the creation, and delivery of content that is consistent with program objectives, support, and capacity for IPE. • Support the development of Faculty development opportunities consistent with enhancing the understanding, support, and capacity for IPE. • Consult with IPE Advisory Committee members, Module Leaders, Integration Activities Leaders, Element Leaders, and/or Course Coordinators regarding pedagogical approach to incorporating interprofessional content into curriculum • Participate in scholarly and research activities and conferences specific to IPE when possible. • Ensure all IPE content is consistent with best-practices in collaborative patient care. • Ensure the IPE curricular theme aligns with Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC) core competencies, and the Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada (AFPC) Educational Outcomes for Entry-to-Practice Pharmacy Programs (see Appendix 2).  • Ensure the IPE curricular theme meets all relevant Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP) accreditation standards. • Facilitate and build collaborative relationships with other health Faculty IPE Leads, health disciplines and health care workers.  • Collaborate with OEE in supporting Practice Educators in guiding IPE-specific content for experiential education. • Collaborate with UBC Continuing Pharmacy Professional Development in guiding IPE-specific content for Practice Educators in the Flexible PharmD program.      Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     9  Section 4 – Office of Experiential Education Senior Program Assistant  Summary The Office of Experiential Education (OEE) Senior Program Assistant is available to work with the Interprofessional Education Lead to provide assistance and administrative support for the IPE program. For details about the appointment, responsibilities, and other details related to that role, please refer to the OEE Program Manager.    Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     10  Section 5 – Curriculum Development  5.1 Six Core Competencies  The IPE Program is embedded in all 4 years of the pharmacy Entry-to-Practice PharmD program and involves an integrative approach with other health disciplines in developing the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values required for collaboration based on 6 core national competencies from the CIHC:     Core Competency Objective  1. Interprofessional Communication  Communicate with each other in a collaborative, responsive and responsible manner.  2. Patient/Client/Family/Community-Centered Care  Seek out, integrate and value, as a partner, the input and the engagement of patient/client/family/community in designing and implementing care/services. 3. Role Clarification  Understand their own role and the roles of those in other professions, and use this knowledge appropriately to establish and meet patient/client/family and community goals.  4. Team Functioning  Understand the principles of team dynamics and group processes to enable effective interprofessional team collaboration.  5. Collaborative Leadership  Work together with all participants including patients/clients/families to formulate, implement and evaluate care/services to enhance health outcomes.  6. Interprofessional Conflict Resolution Actively engage self and others, including the client/ patient/ family, in positively and constructively addressing disagreements as they arise.   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     11  5.2 IPE Road Map  The IPE Road Map is a visual representation of the learning objectives from the 6 core competencies across PY1 to PY4.                             Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     12   5.3 IPE Student Requirements  Definitions Interprofessional Education Occurs when two or more professions learn with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of care. (1) Embedded IPE activities Mandatory activities that are part of the required coursework in the program that have IPE competencies, learning objectives, and assessment. Non-embedded IPE activities Mandatory activities that are not part of a required course, typically conducted outside of scheduled time (e.g. on Program Enrichment Activity Days). These activities have IPE competencies, learning objectives, and assessment. UBC Health Passport The IPE Passport is an online tool that enables students to register for and keep track of optional interprofessional learning at UBC. The Passport provides a comprehensive list of IPE activities available to UBC students. (2) PEADs or Program Enrichment Activity Days  Occur on the same day every week depending on your year (e.g. PY1 students have Friday's as a PEAD but PY2 students have Thursday's). PEADs are used for Faculty activities such as orientations, remedial work, interprofessional education, and community service learning. In general, the October and November PEADs are reserved for IPE work, but there will be exceptions - always refer to the schedule posted on Canvas under your corresponding year. (1) Freeth D, Hammick M, Reeves S, Koppel I, Barr H. (2005) Effective Interprofessional Education: development, Delivery and Evaluation. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. (2) https://passport.health.ubc.ca/             Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     13      Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     14  All students must meet the following IPE requirements of the program according to AP-15: For each individual IPE activity, please see the corresponding Appendix for the description, learning objectives, partner contacts, and deployment methods.   Embedded IPE Activities Non-Embedded IPE Activities PY1  Role Clarification (see Appendix 4) Code of Ethics (see Appendix 5) Communication Styles (see Appendix 6) Patient-Centered Care (see Appendix 7) Integrated Curricula Student Orientation iEthics Q#1 Professionalism UBC 23-24 Indigenous Cultural Safety Q#1 Resiliency Pharmacy Technician Webinar (see Appendix 8) PY2 Conflict Management Pharmacy/Dentistry Case-based Learning Activity (see Appendix 9) Pharmacy/Dentistry/Physical Therapy Case-based Learning Activity (see Appendix 10) UBC 23-24 Indigenous Cultural Safety Q#2 PY3     Contraception Conversation iEthics Q#3 eHealth  Conflict Management UBC 23-24 Indigenous Cultural Safety Q#3 UBC 23-24 Indigenous ultural Safety Capstone Q#4 Medication Reconciliation Activity  PY4 Experiential Education Optional IPE activities  Embedded IPE Activities: If a student is held back a year, confirmed through Student Services, they must re-do embedded activities as part of their course-work. However, if they have passed that course, they do not need to repeat the activity.   Non-Embedded IPE Activities: If a student is held back a year, confirmed through Student Services, they do not need to repeat the non-embedded activities for that year level. Absences Academic concessions for absences will be granted by Students Services for embedded IPE activities and the PEAD lead for non-embedded IPE activities. They will then notify the IPE Senior Program Assistant for academic concession decisions.        Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     15    2018/2019   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     16  5.4 IPE Activity Professionalism Infraction Tracking  Reporting Professionalism Related Incidents: The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences has created a tool that faculty and staff could access to report professionalism infractions of students. This is the Student Progression to Professionalism Competency Tool. The IPE Senior Program Assistant is responsible for keeping record and input in the Student Progression to Professionalism Competency Tool (Professionalism Infraction Tracker) http://pharmsci-track.sites.olt.ubc.ca/. After an IPE activity, the IPE leads are emailed a list of students who were late or did not show up for an activity without cancellation notification: • IPE Passport Activities: Angela Wagner (angela.wagner@ubc.ca) of UBC Health will email this information.  • Embedded IPE Activities: IPE leads, Larry Leung and Jason Min, and other course coordinators will have this information.  • By September 2017, all students who were late or did not show up for an IPE activity and did not provide cancellation notification within 48 hours as per IPE Passport policy will be tracked as professionalism infraction incidents.  The email is forwarded to the Senior Program Assistant. This email contains all the information needed for the professionalism infraction tracker. You will need to input the following:  • Student’s First and Last Name • Student Number (if available) • Date of Occurrence • Professionalism Criteria – There is a Professionalism Criteria Description tab on the webpage if you would like to understand each criteria better. • Detailed account of the incident – Please give the detailed accounts of what occurred (late, missed activity/no show, no cancellation notification), name of the IPE event/activity, date, who were involved, outcome and any follow up done. After entering all information on the Professional Infraction Tracker, confirm and email IPE leads to update them that this has been done. A generic template letter will then be sent to the student with regards to the infraction made.   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     17  5.5 IPE Activity Completion Tracking   The IPE Activity Completion tracking document will track E2P PharmD students and IPE activities they have missed or will miss going forward at every year level i.e. PY1 (G2020) and PY2 (G2019) so far. The IPE Senior Program Assistant to is responsible for updating and maintaining this spreadsheet. This document can be found in Sync using this path: Sync à IPE Activities Folder à IPE Activity Completion Tracking Spreadsheet. This folder can be accessed by the IPE Leads, IPE Senior Program Assistant and Student Services. 1. Different sources will email a list of students who missed these IPE activities to the IPE leads. Sources of Information: • Student Services: If a student has taken leave of absence, dropped/left the program, suspended, or on vacation. Connect with Jennifer Chatterton (jennifer.chatterton@ubc.ca) at Student Services. Student Services will email appropriate course coordinators the student’s identification if such situations arise. • UBC Health: Connect with Angela Wagner (angela.wagner@ubc.ca) of UBC Health. She will email names of students who have missed any activity. • Embedded in the course: Course coordinators will inform IPE leads of student names that need to be marked. 2. The email will be forwarded to the Senior Program Assistant for tracking. 3. Once name of student has been confirmed, track on the spreadsheet with an “X” mark activities the student have missed and will miss going forward. (An example would be if a PY1 (G2020) student took a leave of absence middle of the school year and will be back next year, this student would have done some of the IPE activities earlier in the year, ONLY mark all IPE activities that will be missed for PY1.)     4. Update the spreadsheet as soon as email or information has been received so as not to lose information in the inbox. Email and confirm with IPE leads that tracking has been done.  Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     18   5.7 Student - Led IPE Activities Policy  Student - Led IPE Activities 1. Student is to identify appropriate Faculty Support Contact for the IPE Activity depending on content. 2. The Faculty Support Contact must be an expert on the content of the IPE activity (not necessarily IPE leads). 3. The IPE leads will be involved in content including: • eHealth • ICS • Primary Care 4. It is not mandatory for students to let the IPE leads know of the IPE activities. As long as they have identified the Faculty Contact Support who will review the activity and the IPE Passport Activity Application Form. 5. Students and Faculty Support Contact are encouraged to use the IPE leads as a resource.                  Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     19               Entry-to-Practice PharmD Program Interprofessional Education – Master Plan Version: October 2018    Jason Min, BSc(Pharm), RPh, Interprofessional Education Lead Larry Leung, BSc(Pharm), RPh, Interprofessional Education Lead               Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     2  Acknowledgements  The Interprofessional Education (IPE) Leads, Larry Leung and Jason Min, at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia (UBC) would like to acknowledge with gratitude the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the Musqueam peoples. In respect to the Musqueam peoples, we acknowledge our responsibility to ensure that the IPE Program for Entry-to-Practice PharmD students promotes respect, professionalism, and culturally safe pharmaceutical care.  We would like to thank the many faculty and staff who have contributed to the development of IPE: Kimberly Mascarenas Fong Chan Karen Dahri Lynda Eccott Gilly Lau Janice Moshenko Parkash Ragsdale Jillian Reardon  Tony Seet Judith Soon Janice Yeung     Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     3  Table of Contents  Acknowledgements..................................................................................................................... 2 Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................ 3 Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 4 Section 1 – Strategic Imperatives ................................................................................................ 5 Section 2 – Reporting Structure .................................................................................................. 6 Section 3 – Interprofessional Education Lead .............................................................................. 7 Job Summary ........................................................................................................................... 7 Appointment Details ............................................................................................................... 7 Responsibilities........................................................................................................................ 7 Section 4 – Interprofessional Education Senior Program Assistant .............................................. 9 Summary ................................................................................................................................. 9 Section 5 – Curriculum Development ........................................................................................ 10 5.1 Six Core Competencies .................................................................................................... 10 5.2 IPE Road Map .................................................................................................................. 11 5.3 IPE Student Requirements ............................................................................................... 12 5.4 IPE Activity Professionalism Infraction Tracking ............................................................... 15 5.5 IPE Activity Completion Tracking ...................................................................................... 17 5.6 IPE Yearly Calendar ............................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 5.7 Student - Led IPE Activities Policy .................................................................................... 18         Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     4  Introduction  IPE at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences is under the portfolio of the Office of Experiential Education. Our vision for IPE is to become a global leader in a competency-based program in pharmacy that is integrated and collaborative, to support students in becoming effective interprofessional collaborators in patient care. “As the scope of pharmacist practice continues to expand and healthcare innovations such as team-based care become firmly established, we need to ensure that our graduates are equipped to succeed in and help shape this evolving landscape.” Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Strategic Plan 2017-2022: Catalyst for Change. IPE occurs when students, healthcare workers, or health professionals from two or more disciplines work collaboratively to “learn about, from and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes” World Health Organization, 2010.   The knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes developed through IPE will enable students to become interprofessional collaborative ready in the delivery of patient–centred care. Interprofessional collaboration is a partnership between a healthcare team and a patient using a participatory, collaborative, and coordinated approach to shared decision-making around health and social issues. Training pharmacy students by using this approach will promote future change in the profession of pharmacy and in the overall healthcare system. Patients receive higher quality of care when healthcare professionals collaborate through effective communication and understanding of each other’s role. IPE helps to address and achieve the goals set forth by the:  Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada (AFPC) Educational Outcomes Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP) Accreditation Standards for Canadian First Professional Degree in Pharmacy Programs Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC) National Interprofessional Competency Framework Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) Blueprint for Pharmacy  The current IPE learning builds upon a rich history at UBC and is focused on the development and implementation of core competencies across fourteen health professional programs including: Audiologist Dentist Dental Hygienist Dietitian Genetic Counselor Midwife Nurse Occupational Therapist Pharmacist Pharmacist Technician Physician Physical Therapist Social Worker Speech Language Pathologist     Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     5  Section 1 – Strategic Imperatives  We are committed to providing learning and skill development opportunities that will lead to improved interprofessional care of patients. We have four strategic imperatives, in alignment with the Office of Experiential Education, to guide and focus our efforts:  1. Student Experience: To spiral IPE throughout the Entry-to-Practice PharmD program, ensuring AFPC outcomes, NAPRA competencies, CCAPP accreditation standards, and CIHC Competencies are met.   2. Practice Educator Experience: To ensure practice educators are well-supported in the delivery of IPE-related content and activities for students on experiential practicums.   3. Experiential Education Sites: To expand and enrich student opportunities to experience interprofessional collaboration while on experiential practicums.   4. Program Advancement: To foster meaningful collaboration and partnerships with other health programs and provide leadership in the scholarship of teaching and learning, research and innovation of IPE.            Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     6  Section 2 – Reporting Structure   • The IPE Lead:  o Reports functionally to the Director, Office of Experiential Education, and as a curricular theme, reports to the Executive Director, Entry-to-Practice Education. o Provides updates to the Associate Dean, Academic, as necessary. o Reports on matters of interest to or affecting the Faculty at appropriate Faculty venues as necessary.                         Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     7  Section 3 – Interprofessional Education Lead  Job Summary Under the direction of the Director, Experiential Education (the Director), the Interprofessional Education Lead works directly with Faculty members to build and support an excellent competency-based IPE curricular theme in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. The IPE theme is to be integrated and collaborative within this Faculty and connect with other health programs to support students in becoming effective interprofessional collaborators in patient care.    Note: If co-leads share the role, the responsibilities below are assumed to be split by mutual agreement.  Appointment Details The IPE Lead is hired into a 12-month renewable Lecturer and Lead position through a rigorous and standard hiring process. Renewals are processed through the Office of the Associate Dean, Academic. The IPE Lead reports functionally to the Director. The term of appointment is 12-months, renewable indefinitely. Renewal is subject to a satisfactory review of performance by the Associate Dean, Academic annually.  The role requires a Full Time Equivalency.  Responsibilities The duties and responsibilities of the Interprofessional Education Lead will include the following: • Oversee IPE in the BSc (Pharm) and Entry-to-Practice PharmD programs. • Oversee the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences’ IPE Advisory Committee (see Appendix 1). • Oversee the IPE workload of the appointed Senior Program Assistant(s) and other staff appointed to IPE. • Increase capacity for interprofessional education opportunities and provide leadership among other health disciplines in the pedagogy, scholarship and innovation of IPE.   • Identify IPE implementation considerations related to transitioning from the current BSc (Pharm) program to the E2P PharmD program. • Develop the guiding principles and strategic direction for the IPE program. • Develop the IPE curricular theme in the Entry-to-Practice PharmD program to prepare students to graduate as collaborative practitioners as outlined by the Canadian Council for Accreditation   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     8  of Pharmacy Programs - Accreditation Standards for the First Professional Degree in Pharmacy Programs.  • Provide a positive environment in which students are encouraged to be actively engaged in the interprofessional learning process. • Develop operational policies and procedures for the IPE Advisory Committee related to service delivery, data privacy, data security, use of technology, and other relevant aspects, to be determined. • Carry forward motions pertaining to IPE when IPE Advisory Committee does not come to a consensus. • Support faculty members and IPE Advisory Committee members in the creation, and delivery of content that is consistent with program objectives, support, and capacity for IPE. • Support the development of Faculty development opportunities consistent with enhancing the understanding, support, and capacity for IPE. • Consult with IPE Advisory Committee members, Module Leaders, Integration Activities Leaders, Element Leaders, and/or Course Coordinators regarding pedagogical approach to incorporating interprofessional content into curriculum • Participate in scholarly and research activities and conferences specific to IPE when possible. • Ensure all IPE content is consistent with best-practices in collaborative patient care. • Ensure the IPE curricular theme aligns with Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC) core competencies, and the Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada (AFPC) Educational Outcomes for Entry-to-Practice Pharmacy Programs (see Appendix 2).  • Ensure the IPE curricular theme meets all relevant Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP) accreditation standards. • Facilitate and build collaborative relationships with other health Faculty IPE Leads, health disciplines and health care workers.  • Collaborate with OEE in supporting Practice Educators in guiding IPE-specific content for experiential education. • Collaborate with UBC Continuing Pharmacy Professional Development in guiding IPE-specific content for Practice Educators in the Flexible PharmD program.      Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     9  Section 4 – Office of Experiential Education Senior Program Assistant  Summary The Office of Experiential Education (OEE) Senior Program Assistant is available to work with the Interprofessional Education Lead to provide assistance and administrative support for the IPE program. For details about the appointment, responsibilities, and other details related to that role, please refer to the OEE Program Manager.    Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     10  Section 5 – Curriculum Development  5.1 Six Core Competencies  The IPE Program is embedded in all 4 years of the pharmacy Entry-to-Practice PharmD program and involves an integrative approach with other health disciplines in developing the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values required for collaboration based on 6 core national competencies from the CIHC:     Core Competency Objective  1. Interprofessional Communication  Communicate with each other in a collaborative, responsive and responsible manner.  2. Patient/Client/Family/Community-Centered Care  Seek out, integrate and value, as a partner, the input and the engagement of patient/client/family/community in designing and implementing care/services. 3. Role Clarification  Understand their own role and the roles of those in other professions, and use this knowledge appropriately to establish and meet patient/client/family and community goals.  4. Team Functioning  Understand the principles of team dynamics and group processes to enable effective interprofessional team collaboration.  5. Collaborative Leadership  Work together with all participants including patients/clients/families to formulate, implement and evaluate care/services to enhance health outcomes.  6. Interprofessional Conflict Resolution Actively engage self and others, including the client/ patient/ family, in positively and constructively addressing disagreements as they arise.   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     11  5.2 IPE Road Map  The IPE Road Map is a visual representation of the learning objectives from the 6 core competencies across PY1 to PY4.                             Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     12   5.3 IPE Student Requirements  Definitions Interprofessional Education Occurs when two or more professions learn with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of care. (1) Embedded IPE activities Mandatory activities that are part of the required coursework in the program that have IPE competencies, learning objectives, and assessment. Non-embedded IPE activities Mandatory activities that are not part of a required course, typically conducted outside of scheduled time (e.g. on Program Enrichment Activity Days). These activities have IPE competencies, learning objectives, and assessment. UBC Health Passport The IPE Passport is an online tool that enables students to register for and keep track of optional interprofessional learning at UBC. The Passport provides a comprehensive list of IPE activities available to UBC students. (2) PEADs or Program Enrichment Activity Days  Occur on the same day every week depending on your year (e.g. PY1 students have Friday's as a PEAD but PY2 students have Thursday's). PEADs are used for Faculty activities such as orientations, remedial work, interprofessional education, and community service learning. In general, the October and November PEADs are reserved for IPE work, but there will be exceptions - always refer to the schedule posted on Canvas under your corresponding year. (1) Freeth D, Hammick M, Reeves S, Koppel I, Barr H. (2005) Effective Interprofessional Education: development, Delivery and Evaluation. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. (2) https://passport.health.ubc.ca/             Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     13      Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     14  All students must meet the following IPE requirements of the program according to AP-15: For each individual IPE activity, please see the corresponding Appendix for the description, learning objectives, partner contacts, and deployment methods.   Embedded IPE Activities Non-Embedded IPE Activities PY1  Role Clarification (see Appendix 4) Code of Ethics (see Appendix 5) Communication Styles (see Appendix 6) Patient-Centered Care (see Appendix 7) Integrated Curricula Student Orientation iEthics Q#1 Professionalism UBC 23-24 Indigenous Cultural Safety Q#1 Resiliency Pharmacy Technician Webinar (see Appendix 8) PY2 Conflict Management Pharmacy/Dentistry Case-based Learning Activity (see Appendix 9) Pharmacy/Dentistry/Physical Therapy Case-based Learning Activity (see Appendix 10) UBC 23-24 Indigenous Cultural Safety Q#2 PY3     Contraception Conversation iEthics Q#3 eHealth  Conflict Management UBC 23-24 Indigenous Cultural Safety Q#3 UBC 23-24 Indigenous ultural Safety Capstone Q#4 Medication Reconciliation Activity  PY4 Experiential Education Optional IPE activities  Embedded IPE Activities: If a student is held back a year, confirmed through Student Services, they must re-do embedded activities as part of their course-work. However, if they have passed that course, they do not need to repeat the activity.   Non-Embedded IPE Activities: If a student is held back a year, confirmed through Student Services, they do not need to repeat the non-embedded activities for that year level. Absences Academic concessions for absences will be granted by Students Services for embedded IPE activities and the PEAD lead for non-embedded IPE activities. They will then notify the IPE Senior Program Assistant for academic concession decisions.        Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     15    2018/2019   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     16  5.4 IPE Activity Professionalism Infraction Tracking  Reporting Professionalism Related Incidents: The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences has created a tool that faculty and staff could access to report professionalism infractions of students. This is the Student Progression to Professionalism Competency Tool. The IPE Senior Program Assistant is responsible for keeping record and input in the Student Progression to Professionalism Competency Tool (Professionalism Infraction Tracker) http://pharmsci-track.sites.olt.ubc.ca/. After an IPE activity, the IPE leads are emailed a list of students who were late or did not show up for an activity without cancellation notification: • IPE Passport Activities: Angela Wagner (angela.wagner@ubc.ca) of UBC Health will email this information.  • Embedded IPE Activities: IPE leads, Larry Leung and Jason Min, and other course coordinators will have this information.  • By September 2017, all students who were late or did not show up for an IPE activity and did not provide cancellation notification within 48 hours as per IPE Passport policy will be tracked as professionalism infraction incidents.  The email is forwarded to the Senior Program Assistant. This email contains all the information needed for the professionalism infraction tracker. You will need to input the following:  • Student’s First and Last Name • Student Number (if available) • Date of Occurrence • Professionalism Criteria – There is a Professionalism Criteria Description tab on the webpage if you would like to understand each criteria better. • Detailed account of the incident – Please give the detailed accounts of what occurred (late, missed activity/no show, no cancellation notification), name of the IPE event/activity, date, who were involved, outcome and any follow up done. After entering all information on the Professional Infraction Tracker, confirm and email IPE leads to update them that this has been done. A generic template letter will then be sent to the student with regards to the infraction made.   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     17  5.5 IPE Activity Completion Tracking   The IPE Activity Completion tracking document will track E2P PharmD students and IPE activities they have missed or will miss going forward at every year level i.e. PY1 (G2020) and PY2 (G2019) so far. The IPE Senior Program Assistant to is responsible for updating and maintaining this spreadsheet. This document can be found in Sync using this path: Sync à IPE Activities Folder à IPE Activity Completion Tracking Spreadsheet. This folder can be accessed by the IPE Leads, IPE Senior Program Assistant and Student Services. 1. Different sources will email a list of students who missed these IPE activities to the IPE leads. Sources of Information: • Student Services: If a student has taken leave of absence, dropped/left the program, suspended, or on vacation. Connect with Jennifer Chatterton (jennifer.chatterton@ubc.ca) at Student Services. Student Services will email appropriate course coordinators the student’s identification if such situations arise. • UBC Health: Connect with Angela Wagner (angela.wagner@ubc.ca) of UBC Health. She will email names of students who have missed any activity. • Embedded in the course: Course coordinators will inform IPE leads of student names that need to be marked. 2. The email will be forwarded to the Senior Program Assistant for tracking. 3. Once name of student has been confirmed, track on the spreadsheet with an “X” mark activities the student have missed and will miss going forward. (An example would be if a PY1 (G2020) student took a leave of absence middle of the school year and will be back next year, this student would have done some of the IPE activities earlier in the year, ONLY mark all IPE activities that will be missed for PY1.)     4. Update the spreadsheet as soon as email or information has been received so as not to lose information in the inbox. Email and confirm with IPE leads that tracking has been done.  Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     18   5.7 Student - Led IPE Activities Policy  Student - Led IPE Activities 1. Student is to identify appropriate Faculty Support Contact for the IPE Activity depending on content. 2. The Faculty Support Contact must be an expert on the content of the IPE activity (not necessarily IPE leads). 3. The IPE leads will be involved in content including: • eHealth • ICS • Primary Care 4. It is not mandatory for students to let the IPE leads know of the IPE activities. As long as they have identified the Faculty Contact Support who will review the activity and the IPE Passport Activity Application Form. 5. Students and Faculty Support Contact are encouraged to use the IPE leads as a resource.                  Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.     19          Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.           Appendix 1           UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Interprofessional Education Advisory Committee Terms of Reference   1. Purpose To provide input and guidance to the IPE lead(s) on the continuous development and implementation of IPE activities in the Entry-to-Practice PharmD Program. 2. Chair Chaired by the IPE Lead(s). If there are two IPE Leads, then they will co-chair the committee.  3. Membership The committee will seek representation from each of the following units: -Office of Experiential Education -Pharmacists Clinic -Integrated Activities -Module Lead -Course Coordinator -Curricular Theme Lead -Student representative from year 1, 2, and 3.  Non-voting, external guests can be invited by the Chair(s) to attend committee meetings for specific agenda items.  4. Appointment Process Membership will be open to all interested Faculty.  5. Meetings The IPE Advisory Committee will hold one to two meetings per academic year. Additional ad hoc meetings may occur as needed for urgent issues that may arise. 6. Term Members will be appointed to a 1 year term with the option to renew ongoing. 7. Committee Secretary The Senior Program Assistant for IPE will provide the agenda, record meeting minutes and provide administrative support to the Advisory Committee. 8. Quorum & Decision Making Process Quorum is set at 50% of voting members, plus one (1).  Wherever possible, decisions will be reached by consensus. Where voting is necessary, a two thirds majority will carry a motion.  Chair(s) will normally be non-voting. In the event of a tie, the chair(s) will collaborate to make a decision.   9. Lines of Accountability & Communication  IPE Lead(s): chair the IPE Advisory Committee, oversee IPE in the Entry-to-Practice PharmD program. Will report to the Director of OEE.   IPE Advisory Committee: will report to the Chair(s) for all matters pertaining to IPE    Senior Program Assistant: will report to the IPE Lead(s) for all matters pertaining to IPE.  10. Responsibilities   Be a champion and advocate for IPE in all aspects of the program, including opportunities for faculty development.   Consult with the IPE Lead(s) and other faculty members regarding the pedagogical approach to incorporating interprofessional content into curriculum.   Consult with the IPE Lead(s) and other faculty members in the process for collaborating with UBC Health and other health programs.   Provide advice, insight and guidance on IPE program policies.   Provide guidance on the development and deployment of IPE activities.   Identify administrative and faculty champions of IPE.   Identify and pursue interprofessional opportunities either individually or with the Committee.   Maintain and reinforce content links to CIHC Core Competencies and the AFPC Outcomes & Level of Competence.   Contribute to ongoing QA/QI for IPE activities including identification of improvement opportunities, implementation and evaluation from students and Faculty.    Provide guidance on the creation and development of relevant faculty development material.   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.           Appendix 2            AFPC Educational Outcomes: IPE COMPETENCY CROSSWALK  CIHC Competency Statements CIHC Interprofessional Competency AFPC Educational Outcomes 2017 Role & Key/Enabling Competency Role Clarification: learners understand their own role and the roles of those in other professions and use this knowledge appropriately to establish and achieve patient and/or patient supporter goals.   Describe their own role and that of others Collaborator 1.2 Recognize, respect and negotiate the roles and shared/overlapping responsibilities of team members. Care Provider 1.3, 1.4 1.3 Recognize and respond to the complexity, uncertainty and ambiguity inherent in pharmacy practice. 1.4 Explain the benefits, risks and rationale associated with pharmacist-provided care as an important step in obtaining and documenting consent to pharmacist care. Recognize and respect the diversity of other health and social care roles, responsibilities and competencies Collaborator 1.2, 2.2 1.2 Recognize, respect and negotiate the roles and shared/overlapping responsibilities of team members. 2.2 Recognize, respect and honour the negotiated shared and overlapping responsibilities of patients, pharmacy team members and other health team members when handovers occur. Leader-Manager 1, 3 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. 3 Demonstrate leadership skills. Professional 1.1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Perform their own roles in a culturally respectful way Care Provider 1.2 Integrate AFPC Communicator, Collaborator, Leader-Manager, Health Advocate, Scholar and Professional roles in their practice of pharmacy. Communicator 2.1, 2.2 2.1 Engage in respectful, empathetic, compassionate, non-judgmental, culturally safe, tactful conversations with patients, communities, populations and health team members. 2.2 Demonstrate awareness of the impact of one’s own experience level, professional culture, biases and power and hierarchy within the health team on effective working relationships, communication and conflict resolution with health team members and adapt the approach to the situation appropriately. Professional 1.1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Communicate roles, knowledge, skills and attitudes using appropriate language Communicator 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. Professional 1 Committed to apply best practices and adhere to high ethical standards in the delivery of pharmacy care. Access others' skills and knowledge appropriately through consultation Care Provider 2.4.2, 2.5 2.4.2 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including: making a referral or consulting others 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Collaborator 2.1 Collect, interpret and assess relevant, necessary information about a patient’s health-related care needs. Collaborator 2.1 Collect, interpret and assess relevant, necessary information about a patient’s health-related care needs. Consider the roles of others in determining their own professional and interprofessional roles Care Provider 1.5, 2.3-2.5 1.5 Recognize and take appropriate action when signs, symptoms and risk factors that relate to medical or health problems that fall into the scope of practice of other health professionals are encountered. 2.3 Create and document plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, and make recommendations to prevent, improve or resolve issues. 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.1 obtaining consent      • CP2.4.2 making a referral or consulting others      • CP2.4.3 adapting, initiating, renewing/continuing, discontinuing or administering medication as authorized      • CP2.4.4a dispensing and/or      • CP2.4.4b compounding and/or      • CP2.4.4c delegating/authorizing such tasks to others appropriately      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Integrate IP competencies/roles seamlessly into models of service delivery Care Provider 1.1, 1.2 1.1 Apply knowledge from the foundational sciences to make decisions relevant to the contemporary and evolving scope of pharmacist practice. 1.2 Integrate AFPC Communicator, Collaborator, Leader-Manager, Health Advocate, Scholar and Professional roles in their practice of pharmacy. Patient/Patient Supporter-Centred Care: learners seek out, integrate and value, as a partner, the input and the engagement of all patient/family members in designing and implementing care/services. Support participation of patients/clients and their families, or community representatives as integral partners with those health care personnel providing their care or service planning, implementation and evaluation Care Provider 2.3-2.5 2.3 Create and document plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, and make recommendations to prevent, improve or resolve issues. 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.1 obtaining consent      • CP2.4.2 making a referral or consulting others      • CP2.4.3 adapting, initiating, renewing/continuing, discontinuing or administering medication as authorized      • CP2.4.4a dispensing and/or      • CP2.4.4b compounding and/or      • CP2.4.4c delegating/authorizing such tasks to others appropriately      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Leader-Manager 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. Health Advocate 1, 2 1 “Respond to an individual patient’s health needs by advocating with the patient within and beyond the patient care environment.” (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) 2 “Respond to the needs of communities or populations they serve by advocating with them for system-level change in a socially accountable manner.“ (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) Scholar 1 Apply medication therapy expertise to optimize pharmacy care, pharmacy services and health care delivery. Share information with patients/clients (or family and community) in a respectful manner and in such a way that it is understandable, encourages Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. discussion and enhances participation in decision-making Health Advocate 1, 2 1 “Respond to an individual patient’s health needs by advocating with the patient within and beyond the patient care environment.” (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) 2 “Respond to the needs of communities or populations they serve by advocating with them for system-level change in a socially accountable manner.“ (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) Scholar 1 Apply medication therapy expertise to optimize pharmacy care, pharmacy services and health care delivery. Professional 1. 1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Ensure that appropriate education and support is provided by learners/practitioners to patients/clients, family members and others involved with their care or service Care Provider 2.4.5 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and    Health Advocate 1, 2 1 “Respond to an individual patient’s health needs by advocating with the patient within and beyond the patient care environment.” (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) 2 “Respond to the needs of communities or populations they serve by advocating with them for system-level change in a socially accountable manner.“ (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) Scholar 4 Teach other pharmacy team members, the public and other health care professionals including students. Professional 1.1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Listen respectfully to the expressed needs of all parties in shaping and delivering care or services Communicator 1.4, 1.6, 2.1 1.4 Listen, actively solicit and respond appropriately to ideas, opinions and feedback from others. 1.6 Seek and synthesize relevant information from others in a manner that ensures common understanding and where applicable, clarifies and secures agreement and/or consent 2.1 Engage in respectful, empathetic, compassionate, non-judgmental, culturally safe, tactful conversations with patients, communities, populations and health team members. Collaborator 2.1-2.3 2.1 Determine when and how care should be handed over to another team member. 2.2 Recognize, respect and honour the negotiated shared and overlapping responsibilities of patients, pharmacy team members and other health team members when handovers occur. 2.3 Demonstrate safe handover of care, using oral, written and electronic communication, during a patient transition to a different care provider or setting. Leader-Manager 1 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. Health Advocate 1, 2 1 “Respond to an individual patient’s health needs by advocating with the patient within and beyond the patient care environment.” (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) 2 “Respond to the needs of communities or populations they serve by advocating with them for system-level change in a socially accountable manner.“ (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) Professional 1.1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Team Functioning: learners apply the principles of team work dynamics and group/team processes to enable effective health professional collaboration. Understand the process of team development Leader-Manager 1.1, 4.1 1.1 Work with others to apply quality improvement strategies and techniques to optimize pharmacy care. 4.1 Work with others to apply the principles of effective management and supervision of health human resources and medication use systems. Develop a set of principles for working together that respects the ethical values of members Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Scholar 1.3 Use established decision-making frameworks and apply learning required to manage new situations and problems. Professional 1.3, 2.6 1.3 Recognize and respond to situations presenting ethical dilemmas, including conflicts of interest. 2.6 Identify and respond to unprofessional, unethical and illegal behaviours in pharmacists, other pharmacy team members and other health professionals. Effectively facilitate discussion and interactions among team members Care Provider 2.3-2.5 2.3 Create and document plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, and make recommendations to prevent, improve or resolve issues. 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.1 obtaining consent      • CP2.4.2 making a referral or consulting others      • CP2.4.3 adapting, initiating, renewing/continuing, discontinuing or administering medication as authorized      • CP2.4.4a dispensing and/or      • CP2.4.4b compounding and/or      • CP2.4.4c delegating/authorizing such tasks to others appropriately      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Communicator 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. Leader-Manager 1.1, 4.1 1.1 Work with others to apply quality improvement strategies and techniques to optimize pharmacy care. 4.1 Work with others to apply the principles of effective management and supervision of health human resources and medication use systems. Scholar 4 Teach other pharmacy team members, the public and other health care professionals including students. Participate and be respectful of all members' participation in collaborative decision-making Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Scholar 1, 2 1 Apply medication therapy expertise to optimize pharmacy care, pharmacy services and health care delivery. 2 Integrate best available evidence into pharmacy practice. Regularly reflect on their functioning with team learners/practitioners and patients/clients/families Leader-Manager 4.2 Use effective strategies to manage and improve their own practice of pharmacy. Professional 2.5, 3 2.5 Demonstrate an ability to maintain competence to practise through evaluating areas for improvement and planning, undertaking learning activities to address limitations in competence and/or performance and incorporating learning into practice. 3 Committed to self-awareness in the management of personal and professional well being. Establish and maintain effective and healthy working relationships with learners/practitioners, patients/clients and families, whether or not a formalized team exists Communicator 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. Respect team ethics, including confidentiality, resource allocation and professionalism Collaborator 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. Communicator 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Scholar 1.3 Use established decision-making frameworks and apply learning required to manage new situations and problems. Professional 1 Committed to apply best practices and adhere to high ethical standards in the delivery of pharmacy care. Collaborative Leadership:  learners understand and apply leadership principles that support a collaborative practice model. This domain supports shared-decision making as well as leadership. Work with others to enable effective patient/client outcomes Care Provider 2.3-2.5 2.3 Create and document plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, and make recommendations to prevent, improve or resolve issues. 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.1 obtaining consent      • CP2.4.2 making a referral or consulting others      • CP2.4.3 adapting, initiating, renewing/continuing, discontinuing or administering medication as authorized      • CP2.4.4a dispensing and/or      • CP2.4.4b compounding and/or      • CP2.4.4c delegating/authorizing such tasks to others appropriately      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Leader-Manager 1 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. Health Advocate 1, 2 1 “Respond to an individual patient’s health needs by advocating with the patient within and beyond the patient care environment.” (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) 2 “Respond to the needs of communities or populations they serve by advocating with them for system-level change in a socially accountable manner.“ (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) Scholar 4 Teach other pharmacy team members, the public and other health care professionals including students. Professional 1.1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Advance interdependent working relationships among all participants Care Provider 2.3-2.5 2.3 Create and document plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, and make recommendations to prevent, improve or resolve issues. 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.1 obtaining consent      • CP2.4.2 making a referral or consulting others      • CP2.4.3 adapting, initiating, renewing/continuing, discontinuing or administering medication as authorized      • CP2.4.4a dispensing and/or      • CP2.4.4b compounding and/or      • CP2.4.4c delegating/authorizing such tasks to others appropriately      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Leader-Manager 1 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. Health Advocate 1, 2 1 “Respond to an individual patient’s health needs by advocating with the patient within and beyond the patient care environment.” (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) 2 “Respond to the needs of communities or populations they serve by advocating with them for system-level change in a socially accountable manner.“ (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) Scholar 4 Teach other pharmacy team members, the public and other health care professionals including students. Professional 1.1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Facilitate effective team processes Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Leader-Manager 1-4 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. 2 Contribute to the stewardship of resources in health care systems. 3 Demonstrate leadership skills. 4 Demonstrate management skills. Facilitate effective decision-making Care Provider 2 Provide patient-centred care. Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Leader-Manager 1-4 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. 2 Contribute to the stewardship of resources in health care systems. 3 Demonstrate leadership skills. 4 Demonstrate management skills. Establish a climate for collaborative practice among all participants Communicator 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. Professional 1 Committed to apply best practices and adhere to high ethical standards in the delivery of pharmacy care. Co-create a climate for shared leadership and collaborative practice Care Provider 2.3-2.5 2.3 Create and document plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, and make recommendations to prevent, improve or resolve issues. 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.1 obtaining consent      • CP2.4.2 making a referral or consulting others      • CP2.4.3 adapting, initiating, renewing/continuing, discontinuing or administering medication as authorized      • CP2.4.4a dispensing and/or      • CP2.4.4b compounding and/or      • CP2.4.4c delegating/authorizing such tasks to others appropriately      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Apply collaborative decision-making principles Care Provider 2.3-2.5 2.3 Create and document plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, and make recommendations to prevent, improve or resolve issues. 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.1 obtaining consent      • CP2.4.2 making a referral or consulting others      • CP2.4.3 adapting, initiating, renewing/continuing, discontinuing or administering medication as authorized      • CP2.4.4a dispensing and/or      • CP2.4.4b compounding and/or      • CP2.4.4c delegating/authorizing such tasks to others appropriately      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Health Advocate 1, 2 1 “Respond to an individual patient’s health needs by advocating with the patient within and beyond the patient care environment.” (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) 2 “Respond to the needs of communities or populations they serve by advocating with them for system-level change in a socially accountable manner.“ (Sherbino J, et al. Health Advocate. In: Frank JR, Snell L, Sherbino J (Eds). CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework. Ottawa, ON: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, 2015.) Scholar 1 Apply medication therapy expertise to optimize pharmacy care, pharmacy services and health care delivery. Integrate the principles of continuous quality improvement to work processes and outcomes Care Provider 3 Actively contribute, as an individual and as a member of a team providing care, to the continuous improvement of health care quality and patient safety. Leader-Manager 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. Professional 2.1 Take responsibility and accountability for actions and inactions. Inter and Intraprofessional Communication: learners communicate with other pharmacy colleagues and other health professionals in a collaborative, responsive and responsible manner. Establish team work communication principles Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Scholar 4 Teach other pharmacy team members, the public and other health care professionals including students. Professional 1. 1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Actively listen to other team members including patients/clients/families Communicator 1.4 Listen, actively solicit and respond appropriately to ideas, opinions and feedback from others. Communicate to ensure common understanding of care decisions Care Provider 2.3-2.5 2.3 Create and document plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, and make recommendations to prevent, improve or resolve issues. 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.1 obtaining consent      • CP2.4.2 making a referral or consulting others      • CP2.4.3 adapting, initiating, renewing/continuing, discontinuing or administering medication as authorized      • CP2.4.4a dispensing and/or      • CP2.4.4b compounding and/or      • CP2.4.4c delegating/authorizing such tasks to others appropriately      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Communicator 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. Collaborator 2.3 Demonstrate safe handover of care, using oral, written and electronic communication, during a patient transition to a different care provider or setting. Develop trusting relationships with patients/clients/families and other team members Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Effectively use information and communication technology to improve Communicator 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. interprofessional patient/client/community-centred care, assisting team members in: setting shared goals; collaboratively setting shared plans of care; supporting shared decision-making; sharing responsibilities for care across team members; demonstrating respect for all team members including patients/clients/families Leader-Manager 1.4 Use health informatics to improve the quality of care, manage resources and optimize patient safety. Professional 1.1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Conflict Resolution: learners actively engage self and others, including the patient, in preventing, negotiating and resolving intra and interprofessional conflict. Value the potential positive nature of conflict Communicator 2.2 Demonstrate awareness of the impact of one’s own experience level, professional culture, biases and power and hierarchy within the health team on effective working relationships, communication and conflict resolution with health team members and adapt the approach to the situation appropriately. Recognize the potential for conflict to occur and take constructive steps to address it Care Provider 2.4.6 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. Professional 1.3 Recognize and respond to situations presenting ethical dilemmas, including conflicts of interest. Identify common situations that are likely to lead to disagreements or conflicts, including role ambiguity, power gradients and differences in goals Care Provider 1.3 Recognize and respond to the complexity, uncertainty and ambiguity inherent in pharmacy practice. Communicator 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Know and understand strategies to deal with conflict Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Set guidelines for addressing disagreements Communicator 2.2 Demonstrate awareness of the impact of one’s own experience level, professional culture, biases and power and hierarchy within the health team on effective working relationships, communication and conflict resolution with health team members and adapt the approach to the situation appropriately. Effectively work to address and resolve disagreements, including analyzing the causes of conflict and working to reach an acceptable solution Communicator 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Establish a safe environment in which to express diverse opinions Communicator 1, 2 1 Communicate in a responsible and responsive manner that encourages trust and confidence. 2 Communicate in a manner that supports a team approach to health promotion and health care. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Leader-Manager 1-4 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. 2 Contribute to the stewardship of resources in health care systems. 3 Demonstrate leadership skills. 4 Demonstrate management skills. Scholar 4 Teach other pharmacy team members, the public and other health care professionals including students. Professional 1.1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality. Develop a level of consensus among those with differing views; allow all members to feel their viewpoints have been heard no matter what the outcome Care Provider 2.3-2.5 2.3 Create and document plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, and make recommendations to prevent, improve or resolve issues. 2.4 Implement plans in collaboration with the patient and other health team members as appropriate, including:      • CP2.4.1 obtaining consent      • CP2.4.2 making a referral or consulting others      • CP2.4.3 adapting, initiating, renewing/continuing, discontinuing or administering medication as authorized      • CP2.4.4a dispensing and/or      • CP2.4.4b compounding and/or      • CP2.4.4c delegating/authorizing such tasks to others appropriately      • CP2.4.5 engaging the patient or care-giver through education, empowerment and self-management, and      • CP2.4.6 negotiating the role of pharmacy and non-pharmacy team members in continuity and transitions of care. 2.5 Follow-up by monitoring, evaluating progress toward achievement of the patient’s goals of therapy, adjusting plans in collaboration with the patient and health team members across the care continuum. Collaborator 1, 2 1 Work effectively with members of the health team including patients, pharmacy colleagues and individuals from other professions. 2 Hand over the care of a patient to other pharmacy team members and non-pharmacy team members to facilitate continuity of safe patient care. Leader-Manager 1-4 1 Contribute to optimizing health care delivery and pharmacy services. 2 Contribute to the stewardship of resources in health care systems. 3 Demonstrate leadership skills. 4 Demonstrate management skills. Professional 1.1 Exhibit professional behaviour whether face-to-face, in writing or via technology-enabled communication. Professional behaviour includes but is not limited to: a) demonstrating honesty, integrity, humility, commitment, altruism, compassion, respect and respect for diversity and patient autonomy; b) being accessible, diligent, timely and reliable in service to others; c) abiding by the principle of non-abandonment; d) maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries; e) maintaining professional composure, demeanour and language even in difficult situations; and f) maintaining privacy and confidentiality.    Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.           Appendix 3              ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO POLICY & PROCEDURES Policy Title: Interprofessional Education (IPE) Policy Number: AP-15 Responsible Committee: E2P Programs Committee Approval Date: 9 August 2017 Date of Next Policy Review: This policy shall be reviewed two (2) years after approval and thereafter as deemed necessary by the responsible committee.  Effective Date: Same as approval Applicability: This policy applies to the Entry-to-Practice Doctor of Pharmacy (E2P PharmD) program of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Purpose: To set clear expectations of students with regards to mandatory embedded and non-embedded interprofessional activities in the E2P PharmD program.  Exclusions: This policy does not apply to any Academic Portfolio program other than the E2P PharmD.   Related Policies: AP-3 Attendance, Punctuality and Academic Concession AP-7 Community Outreach for Student Pharmacists Calendar Statement:  http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/vancouver/index.cfm?tree=12,213,956,1567#22048  History: This is the first version of this policy. Contact: IPE Lead(s)     2 PREAMBLE The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of British Columbia values the interactions between UBC Health programs in shaping “healthcare providers who are good interprofessional, collaborative practitioners [that] understand the importance of working together with colleagues and the patient/family to achieve the best health outcomes.”1 Given the complexities of delivering interprofessional content, it is necessary to ensure that students and faculty members have clarity on expectations of IPE activities. In addition, the process for student appeals and remediation for IPE activities must also be clear and consistent with existing policy.  DEFINITIONS Interprofessional Education Occurs when two or more professions learn with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of care.2 Embedded IPE activities Mandatory activities that are part of the required coursework in the program that have IPE competencies, learning objectives, and assessment.  Non-embedded IPE activities Mandatory activities that are not part of a required course, typically conducted outside of scheduled time (e.g. on Program Enrichment Activity Days). These activities have IPE competencies, learning objectives, and assessment.  Interprofessional Education Lead(s) Faculty member(s) responsible for the ongoing development, operationalization, and evaluation of interprofessional education as a curricular theme. The Lead(s) report to the Director of the Office of Experiential Education and will be advised by the Interprofessional Education Advisory Committee.   Community Outreach Activity See policy AP-7 Community Outreach for Student Pharmacists.  INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION POLICY By the end of their program, students are expected to meet IPE outcomes as articulated by Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada (AFPC). The IPE Lead(s) will provide opportunities for students to gain knowledge and practice skills related to IPE through embedded and non-embedded mandatory activities in all years of the program. These activities are competency-based and follow the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC). Students will be given advance notice of IPE activities and will be expected to follow relevant academic policies on attendance and punctuality (AP-3).                                                       1 CIHC IPE Factsheet 2010: http://www.cihc.ca/files/CIHC_Factsheets_IPE-2010.pdf  2 Freeth D, Hammick M, Reeves S, Koppel I, Barr H. (2005) Effective Interprofessional Education: development, Delivery and Evaluation. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.  3 IPE activities will include:  1. Embedded IPE Activities:  a. Students will be engaged in mandatory IPE activities as part of regularly scheduled courses.  b. IPE competencies will be assessed in the program through the regular assessments of the course, and marks will contribute to the overall course grade. 2. Non-Embedded IPE Activities: a. Students will be engaged in mandatory IPE activities occurring outside the regularly scheduled course time, such as Program Enrichment Activity Days (PEADs). These activities can be organized through different faculties and units including UBC Health. b. IPE competencies may be assessed as part of the activity. Assessment for these activities will be on a case-by-case basis.  3. Optional IPE Activities: a. Students will have the opportunity to engage in optional IPE activities occurring outside the regularly scheduled course time. These activities can be organized through different faculties and units including UBC Health.   b.  Assessments will be at the discretion of the IPE host and will not be tracked by the IPE Leads.  INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROCEDURES Given the interdependencies of interprofessional activities, activities are not guaranteed to be available every year with the same objectives and participation from other health faculties.  Students will be made aware of the expectations and how to access related material in advance of each activity.  Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.            Appendix 4         Role Clarification Description of the Activity  Role clarification is one of the first interprofessional activities for entry-to-practice PharmD students. This is a uniprofessional activity that does not involve any other health professional student. The purpose of the activity Is for students to recognize the diversity of other health professional roles, responsibilities and competencies. Prior to the activity, students are placed into groups of 6 where each team member is assigned a different health discipline: physiotherapist, occupational therapist, social worker, pharmacist, nurse/nurse practitioner, naturopathic physician, dietician. Students will review their assigned health discipline prior to class and “represent” this discipline during the group discussion.   Length of Activity: 1 hour  Where is it embedded: PHRM 141 – generally occurs in September/October during the “Health Human Resources” seminar series.  Assessment: online discussion forum pre-class and an in-class group assignment to be submitted by the end of class (50min) Learning Objectives • Describe the role of the pharmacist and other healthcare professionals. • Recognize the diversity of other health and social care roles, responsibilities and competencies.  • Use appropriate language to communicate roles, knowledge, skills and attitudes of different healthcare professionals.   Contacts Name Role Email Larry Leung, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead larry.leung@ubc.ca Jason Min, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead jason.min@ubc.ca Kim Mascarenas Senior Program Assistant, IPE kim.mascarenas@ubc.ca   Students Involved in the Activity   Total number of students: 224  Number of groups: 37  Year level: PY1 Room Bookings N/A – activity occurs in rm. 1101, which is already scheduled for PHRM 141  Platform for Deployment: Pre-readings, discussion board forum and group assignments are deployed on Connect.    Pre-Activity:  Task When  1. Deploy pre-activity readings on Connect.  1 week prior to activity  2. Assign pre-activity to students at the end of lecture one week prior to activity. Assign a health profession to each student in a group. 1 week prior to activity  3. Review discussion board postings. 1 day prior to activity    Day of Activity:  3. Deploy group assignment on Connect  Day of  4. Deploy activity evaluation survey on Connect Day of    Post Activity:  10. Create and summarize activity evaluation from Connect  1 week after activity  12. Confirm attendance and address any absences  1 day after activity     Feedback from Activity Evaluation of Students:  Activity is too long – students do not like it on a PEAD  Would like to include the other health disciplines Changes done/Actions taken for this activity:  Activity piloted on PEAD – is now embedded in core curriculum. Lessen workload on students Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.             Appendix 5         Code of Ethics Description of the Activity  The Code of Ethics activity is a uniprofessional pre-session to the interprofessional face-to-face iEthics Quartile 1. This activity ensures that pharmacy students are well-versed in the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia’s Code of Ethics. Specifically, the focus is on Standard 9 – business ethics. This is something unique to the pharmacy profession and is important for students to review, in order for them to share with other health disciplines.   Length of Activity: 1.5 hours  Approximate date for ideal deployment and why:  Oct 2018 before the integrated curricula on iEthics, which often occurs in November  Where is it embedded: PHRM 141   Assessment: online pre-readings and CBC Marketplace video on Dispensing Danger, with an in-class group assignment.  Learning Objectives • Reflect on the portrayal of pharmacists in the media • Describe the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia’s Code of Ethics – Standard 9 • Discuss how Code of Ethics – Standard 9 can be violated • Discuss contributing factors for pharmacist violation of Code of Ethics – Standard 9  Contacts Name Role Email Larry Leung, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead larry.leung@ubc.ca Jason Min, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead jason.min@ubc.ca  Students Involved in the Activity  • Total number of students: 224 • Number of groups: 37 • Year level: PY1 Room Bookings N/A – activity occurs in LSC 2, which is already scheduled for PHRM 141  Platform for Deployment: Pre-readings, video and group assignment are deployed on Canvas.    Pre-Activity:  Task When  1. Deploy Pre-Activity: • CBC Marketplace Video – Pharmacy Error: Dispensing Danger • Code of Ethics – Standard 9 • CBC News 2015:  – “Pharmacists say corporate pressure can lead to prescription mistakes” – “Are pharmacists turning into salespeople?”   1 week    Day of Activity:  2. Deploy Group Assignment.  Day of    Post Activity:  10. Create and summarize activity evaluation from Canvas  1 week after activity  12. Confirm attendance and address any absences • Students with excused absences can be asked to complete the group assignment individually • Students with unexcused absences should follow existing policy on attendance and IPE participation  1 day after activity     Feedback from Activity Evaluation of Students October 30, 2015: Time: • around 85% of the responses mentioned a lack of time to complete the questions and find an article • Some said the video should have been made available ahead of time • Many thought the activity should have been longer than two hours – suggestions were to have it open for the whole day or even the whole weekend Assignment: • Provide more guidance on how to answer the questions (some students mentioned they weren’t sure how much to write, whether to write in essay-style or point form, etc.) • Some thought the questions weren’t specific enough or were redundant • Reorder the questions, eg. put the last question at the beginning as it took the most time • Some would have liked having the questions available to read before they watched the video. Content: • Have more discussion of media bias. Have facts and figures be made available to either challenge or confirm what was being said in the Marketplace video. • Include information about how things could be made better, eg. what could a pharmacist do if they are feeling pressured by the business managers? What is the College doing to improve things? • Have something uplifting included – a positive portrayal of the profession showing things being done right. Survey: • One person said they would have liked the feedback survey available directly after the activity so they could respond when it was fresh in their mind  Changes done/Actions taken for this activity:  2016-2018 iteration: • Remove the individual assignment – allow students to review documents and videos without interruption. • Created a shortened group assignment instead. More clear instructions provided on how to answer questions • Increase activity length from 1 hour to 2 hours • Included a new activity that focuses on the positive portrayal of the profession, showing things being done right – Pharmacist Spotlight series.    Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.             Appendix 6         Communication Styles Description of the Activity  The Communication Styles activity allows students to self-reflect on their own communication style and those of others to improve collaboration. At the end of the session, students will be able to understand their own communication style and those of others and strategies on adapting/flexing their style to meet interpersonal needs of another person.    Length of Activity: 1 hour  Approximate date for ideal deployment and why: Mid-October or end of November – students should ideally have worked with their groups for at least one month, as this will lead to more fruitful dialogue around communication styles and team functioning.  Where is it embedded: PHRM 141 – November  Assessment: online pre-readings and quiz pre-class and an in-class group assignment to be submitted by the end of class (50min) Learning Objectives • Describe the importance of communication for effective collaboration  • Describe the concept of communication style and its impact/influence on interprofessional relationships • Reflect on the characteristics of your preferred communication style  • Listen respectfully to others’ expressed communication styles and preferences. • Utilize techniques to “flex” or adapt your approach to others, based on their preferred communication style, to achieve a more positive outcome • Establish team work communication principles   Contacts Name Role Email Janice Moshenko Communications Lead janicem@mail.ubc.ca Larry Leung, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead larry.leung@ubc.ca Jason Min, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead jason.min@ubc.ca  Students Involved in the Activity  • Total number of students: 224 • Number of groups: 37 • Year level: PY1 Room Bookings N/A – activity occurs in LSC2, which is already scheduled for PHRM 141  Platform for Deployment: Pre-readings, online quiz and group assignment are deployed on Canvas.    Pre-Activity:  Task When  1. Connect with Communications Lead to review activity and make any necessary changes.   1 month prior to activity  2. Assign pre-activity to students at the end of lecture one week prior to activity. Students to complete online quiz to detail their communication style. 1 week prior to activity  3. Review quiz submissions to determine distribution of communication styles in the class. Send results to Communications Lead to add to the lecture PowerPoint. 1 day prior to activity    Day of Activity:  4. Introduce Communications Lead who will be facilitating the activity.  Day of  4. Release group activity worksheet on Connect after short lecture is completed. Day of    Post Activity:  10. Create and summarize activity evaluation from Connect  1 week after activity  12. Confirm attendance and address any absences • No supplementals can be offered for this activity, given that it must be done in a group setting  1 day after activity     Feedback from Activity Evaluation of Students: • Activity should be more robust – students want more in-depth analysis on their communication styles. Felt the 4 main styles were too simple. • Activity should not be on PEAD – students already feeling overworked.  Changes done/Actions taken for this activity: • Activity piloted on PEAD – is now embedded in core curriculum. Lessen workload on students  Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.             Appendix 7         Patient Centred-Care Description of the Activity  Uniprofessional activity for pharmacy students highlighting the importance of patient-centred care in interprofessional collaboration. Two patients with arthritis share their story and experience with a pharmacist at diagnosis, during maintenance and at relapse.  Length of Activity: 1 hour  Approximate date for ideal deployment and why: (Type here)  Where is it embedded: PHRM 141 – November  Assessment: online pre-readings, video, and quiz pre-class and an in-class group assignment to be submitted by the end of class (50min) Learning Objectives • Discuss the importance of patient-centred care in interprofessional collaboration • Discuss strategies in supporting patient-centred care in practice • Listen respectfully to the expressed needs of patients in shaping and delivering care or services • Support participation of patients as integral partners with those health care personnel providing their care or service planning, implementation, and evaluation • Reflect on patient stories on their experiences through the healthcare system  Contacts Name Role Email Parkash Ragsdale Facilitator Parkash.ragsdale@ubc.ca Larry Leung, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead larry.leung@ubc.ca Jason Min, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead jason.min@ubc.ca Kim Mascarenas Senior Program Assistant, IPE kim.mascarenas@ubc.ca  Students Involved in the Activity   Total number of students: 224  Number of groups: 37  Year level: PY1 Room Bookings N/A – activity occurs in rm. 1101, which is already scheduled for PHRM 141  Platform for Deployment: Pre-readings, online quiz and group assignment are deployed on Connect.    Pre-Activity:  Task When  1. Deploy pre-activity: • Pre-Readings: – Patient-centred care Framework – Pre-activity Video • Optional Pre-Reading: – Connect and CARE Interactive Toolkit • Individual #7 – Connect Quiz  1 week prior to activity    Day of Activity:  2. Introduce Parkash and two patients who will be leading the activity  Day of  3. Release group activity worksheet on Connect after short lecture is completed. Day of    Post Activity:  4. Create and summarize activity evaluation from Connect  1 week after activity  5. Confirm attendance and address any absences  1 day after activity  6. Organize honorariums for the guest speakers 1 day after activity     Feedback from Activity Evaluation of Students   More time for the activity  Better scheduled to suit the student’s exams  Hear more from the patients Changes done/Actions taken for this activity: Please add here  Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.             Appendix 8         Pharmacy Technician Webinar Activity Checklist Description of the Activity Mandatory, online and interactive webinar on role clarification for pharmacist and pharmacy technicians.  Length of Activity: 1 hour and 15 minutes (2-3:15pm)  Approximate date for ideal deployment and why: End of PY1 in preparation for PY1 OEE clerkships  Where it is embedded: PEAD activity  Assessment: Online Connect quiz consisting of 5 questions completed individually at the end of the activity. See document in Evaluation folder.  Learning Objectives: 1. List the benefits of working in a team with a pharmacy technician. 2. List the different licensure requirements in British Columbia for a pharmacy technician and pharmacist. 3. Describe the responsibilities and role of the pharmacy tech in comparison to an unregulated pharmacy assistant and a pharmacist. 4. Describe the overlapping role of the pharmacy technician and pharmacist in different case examples.   Contacts Name Role Email Larry Leung, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead larry.leung@ubc.ca  Jason Min, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead, moderator and co-presenter Jason.Min@ubc.ca  Rapinder Chahal, Registered Pharmacy Technician, Lower Mainland Pharmacy Services Co-presenter rapinderchahal@yahoo.ca  Dana Elliott, RPhT, Pharmacy Technician Program Coordinator/Instructor, Kamloops campus, Stenberg College Contributor 774 Victoria Street Kamloops, BC V2C2B6 Cell 250-320-6513 Fax 604-634-2525 delliott@stenbergcollege.com Waeel Ameen, RPh, Pharmacy Technician Program Director, CDI College, Burnaby Campus  Debra Blasco, RPhT, Instructor, CDI College Contributor Waeel.Ameen@cdicollege.ca  Debra.Blasco@cdicollege.ca  Sue Aro, RPh  Wayne Rubner, RPh Instructors VCC Contributor Sue Aro saro@vcc.ca Wayne J. Rubner wrubner@vcc.ca  Fariba Arjomandi, RPh Chair, Pharmacy Tech Program, Okanagan College Contributor Okanagan College Ph: 250-762-5445  Loc 4832 Cell: 250-863-3938 farjomandi@okanagan.bc.ca Kelly Vaykovich, RPhT Coordinator/Instructor, Selkirk College, Castlegar  Cheryl Morassut, RPhT Instructor  Teresa Petrick Health and Human Services Chair  Contributor Selkirk College 250-492-6510 kvaykovcih@selkirk.ca  250-365-7292 ext. 21467 Toll-free. 1-888-953-1133 cmorassut@selkirk.ca  Teresa Petrick tpetrick@selkirk.ca   Students Involved in the Activity  • Total number of students: 224 pharmacy students + ___ pharmacy technician students • Number of groups: None – all online • Year level: 1st year pharmacy  Room Bookings Pharmacy AV Recording room  Room Booking Contact: JP Marchand jmarchan@mail.ubc.ca   Platform for Deployment: Blackboard Collaborate • Contact Joe Zerdin, joe.zerdin@ubc.ca or other member from the Educational Technology team to set up and learn how to use.  Connect/ Canvas for posting recorded webinar for students to view again  Sync for sharing of files  Pre-Activity:  Task When  1. Contact Partners • See Contacts above • Set initial meeting to discuss: o Role of each individual member o Webinar content modifications based on student feedback from prior year, practice changes, etc o Year level of student o Where it will be embedded  o Changes in assessment strategy • Create and/ or invite contacts to SYNC shared folder  6 months prior to activity  2. Confirm date and where activity is embedded and room bookings • Contact Educational Technology group to confirm booking of AV room • Review PEAD schedule to determine appropriate date, ensure no overlap with other PEAD activities (e.g. CSL or other activities) 6 months  • Confirm with partners what dates will work the best • Update Connect/ Canvas calendar for students • Inform Year Level coordinator and Ed Tech group of date/ time to update relevant calendars  3. Create platform and enroll students • Create Blackboard Collaborate webinar and provide shared link for sharing with students. Set preferences for student access and permissions.  • Create shared platform on SYNC and enroll facilitators o Upload previous documents for editing   3 months  4. Confirm any case and learning objectives modifications • Every activity should have: o learning objective linked to a CIHC competency, pre-readings, schedule, student and facilitator guide, post case survey  1 month  5. Organize Wayfinding and other logistics (facilitators) • Students will access the webinar online and the post-activity evaluation online. Provide Blackboard Collaborate link for students to access.   1 month  6. Deploy pre-activity • Learning objectives • Pre-readings  • Schedule for activity • Link for activity • Link for evaluation survey post-activity • Important notes for high-speed internet access • Important notes about webinar etiquette   2 weeks  7. Upload materials for Day of Activity and Post Activity • Post-activity quiz on Connect/ Canvas • Upload webinar materials on to Blackboard Collaborate (e.g. powerpoint slides)  2 weeks (ensure you set time-release)    Day of Activity:  8. Run the activity according to schedule  • See schedule in Sync folder    9. See facilitator notes in the PowerPoint slide deck       Post Activity:  10. Create and summarize activity student evaluation from Connect/ Canvas, upload to Sync folder  1 week post activity  11. Debrief with partners • Summarize key themes, areas to improve, upload findings to Sync folder  Ideally 1 week post activity  12. Confirm attendance and address any absences • Students with excused absences can be asked to review the recorded webinar and still complete the activity evaluation • Students with unexcused absences should follow existing policy on attendance and IPE participation  1 week post activity     Feedback from Pharm Tech Webinar Activity Evaluation of Students January 27, 2017: • Have a moderator for monitoring chats, comments and questions • Restrict chat feature to only certain times of the webinar • Allow more time for questions • Email ahead of time that the chat function is for professional purposes only, such as asking questions or notifying about technical issues to help decrease the problems.  Changes done/Actions taken for this activity:  2017/2018 iteration: • Reach out to new partners with connections to Pharmacy Technician students in attempts to have pharm tech student involvement: o VCC – Sue Aro and Wayne Rubner (to be connected with again Sept 2017) o Sternberg College – Deverell and Dana Elliott o BC College of Pharmacists Sorell Wellon o Society of Pharmacy Technicians of BC • Increase planned time for activity from 1 hour to 1 hour and 15 minutes to allow more questions  Feedback from 2018: -the content was overall reinforcing with what is already taught in their program, there was a degree of redundancy that was not as helpful -more case scenario on how the pharmacist and technician could work together in more depth -the content was redundant -more hospital cases may have been helpful, as many of their students work in community -the expectation was to be more interactive – more Qs online, breakout groups, more chat feature -there were some difficulties in the volume and clarity of the presentation, including not seeing us very clearly -more case scenarios that go in further depth, specifics  -more interaction would be beneficial -we look like little dots on the screen – too far away -the target audience seemed to be too much pharmacy-focused   Changes done/Actions taken for this activity in 2019:  • 2018/2019 iteration: • Trial of new platform, Mattermost to enable greater student interactivity and to enable better small group activities • Trial of using shared netiquette guidelines, group guidelines • Trial of using more interactive cases, in small-groups online in Mattermost as donated and edited by each of the stakeholders Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.             Appendix 9         IPE Cardiovascular Activity Checklist Description of the Activity Mandatory, self-directed, case-based learning activity on cardiovascular health for pharmacy and dental students.   Length of Activity: 3 hours (1-4pm)  Where it is embedded: Integrated Activity (IA) in the Cardiovascular module for pharmacy PY2 students; DENT  Assessment:  Online Connect quiz consisting of 5 questions completed individually at the end of the activity. See document in Evaluation folder.  Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the role of the pharmacist and dentist in the care of patients.  2. Communicate to ensure common understanding of care decisions by actively listening to other team members. 3. Participate, and be respectful of all members’ participation, in collaborative decision-making. 4. Reflect on team functioning and determine areas of strength and areas for improvement. 5. Describe the pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, causes, classifications, risk factors, laboratory values and goals of therapy for the following cardiovascular medical conditions: a. Venous thrombosis b. Hypertension c. Congestive heart failure d. Stroke prevention e. Hyperlipidemia f. Diabetes Mellitus 6. Discuss the pharmacological interventions for the management of the above cardiovascular medical conditions. For each explain the following: a. Indication b. Mechanism of Action c. Onset of Action d. Appropriate use of product (i.e. Frequency/duration/dose) e. Adverse effects f. Drug Interactions g. Monitoring Parameters h. Benefits vs. risks 7. Apply the following tools in your clinical decision making: a. CSHA Clinical Frailty Scale Score b. Framingham Risk Score c. QRISK 2-2014  d. ACC/AHA ASCVD 8. Discuss the implications of INR values on regular dental treatment and minor oral surgery procedures. 9. Identify the common medications that can affect saliva production.  10. Discuss the common treatment options for xerostomia.  Contacts Name Role Email Larry Leung, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead Larry Leung larry.leung@ubc.ca  Jason Min, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead Min, Jason Jason.Min@ubc.ca  Dr. Leandra Best, D.M.D., Clinical Professor, Associate Dean (Academic Affairs) Dentistry IPE Lead Best, Leandra drlbest@dentistry.ubc.ca  Dr. Clifford Pau, B.Sc., M.Sc., D.M.D. Instructor Pau, Clifford clifford.pau@dentistry.ubc.ca  Dr. Ian Matthew, PhD, MDentSc, BDS, FDSRCS(Eng), FDSRCS(Ed) Instructor Matthew, Ian imatthew@dentistry.ubc.ca  Dr. Eli Whitney, BSc, DDS, FRCD(C)  Instructor Whitney, Eli eli.whitney@dentistry.ubc.ca  Tamiz Kanji, BSc(Pharm), RPh  IA Lead Kanji, Tamiz Jamal tamiz.kanji@ubc.ca  Dr. Arun Verma, PhD  IA Lead Verma, Arun arun.verma@ubc.ca  Dr. Peter Zed, B.Sc., B.Sc.(Pharm), ACPR, PharmD, FCSHP CV Module Lead Zed, Peter peter.zed@ubc.ca  Dr. Arden Barry, BSc, BSc(Pharm), PharmD, ACPR CV Module Lead Barry, Arden arden.barry@ubc.ca   Students Involved in the Activity • Total number of students: 251 students (generally should be 224 pharmacy and 47 dental) • Number of groups: 37 groups (6-7 students per group) • Year level: 2nd year pharmacy; 1st year dentistry  Room Bookings J.B. Macdonald – 10 rooms: UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 131 UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270A UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270B UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270D UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270F UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270G UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270E UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 260H UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 347 UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 379   Life Sciences Centre – 17 rooms and 1 lecture hall: LSC 1421 LSC 1422 LSC 1423 LSC 1424 LSC 1425 LSC 1426 LSC 1427 LSC 1428 LSC 1441 LSC 1442 LSC 1444 LSC 1445 LSC 1446 LSC 1447 LSC 1448 LSC 1525 LSC 1526 LSC 1527 LSC 1528 LSC 1529 LSC 1530 LSC 1531 LSC 1532 LSC 1533 LSC 1534 LSC 1535   Pharmaceutical Sciences Building – 10 rooms: 3112 3114 3116 3118    Room Booking Contacts: Pharmacy: Jonathan Drunen, jon.vandrunen@ubc.ca -- Facilities Coordinator LSC: Dennis Golinski, roombooking.fom@ubc.ca -- Facilities Coordinator Dentistry: Leandra Best, drlbest@dentistry.ubc.ca -- IPE Lead  Platform for Deployment: Blackboard Connect – Dentistry and Pharmacy students enrolled into an “IPE Pharm/Dent Connect Site” Contact Joe Zerdin, joe.zerdin@ubc.ca or other member from the Educational Technology team to set up.  Sync – sharing platform for instructors to work on material.   Pre-Activity:  Task When  1. Contact Partners and invite to shared platform • See Contacts above • Set initial meeting to discuss: o Role of each individual member o Case content modifications o Year level of student o Where it will be embedded in respective programs • Invite to SYNC shared folder  At least 6 months prior to activity  2. Confirm date/time, where activity is embedded in the curriculum, and room bookings • Connect with appropriate facilities coordinators to confirm breakout and debrief rooms  6 months   3a. Create shared platform and enroll students • Contact necessary partners to get courses linked to the shared IPE Connect site • Have Senior Program Assistant or IT create student groups in Connect  3b. Create shared platform and enroll facilitators • Contact partners to invite to SYNC shared folder  3 months  4. Confirm any case and learning objectives modifications • Create pre-activity/introduction video 1 month  • Every activity should have learning objectives, pre-readings, schedule, student and facilitator guide (if applicable), post case survey • Update materials on SYNC  5. Organize Wayfinding and other logistics (facilitators) • Whiteboards, maps, key-card access individuals, etc for each building  1 month  6. Deploy pre-activity on Connect • Introduction Video • Learning Objectives • Pre-readings for case • Patient Profile • Schedule for Activity • Groups • Room Allocations • Wayfinding information  2 weeks  7. Upload materials on Connect for Day of Activity and Post Activity • Icebreaker and Ground Rules Activity • Attendance Sheet (create as a quiz on Connect)  • Case part 1, 2, 3 • Student Evaluation of Activity  2 weeks (time release to open on day of)    Day of Activity:  8. Run the activity according to schedule  • See Schedule in Sync folder   9. See facilitator guide  • Not necessary for this particular activity as activity is self-run by students.        Post Activity:  10. Create and summarize activity evaluation from Connect, upload to SYNC.  1 week  11. Debrief with partners • Summarize things to improve for next time, upload in SYNC  1 week  12. Confirm attendance and address any absences • Students with excused absences will have marks readjusted rather than have a remedial offered.  1 week   Feedback from Activity Evaluation of Students: • No time release • Time management: some parts needed more or less time • Ratio of dentistry students to pharmacy students in group not balanced • More faculties involved in the activity • More questions for dentistry students  Changes done/Actions taken for this activity:  • 2018/2019 iteration: o Ratio of dentistry students to pharmacy students increased from 1 to 2 dental students per group. Total number of student groups decreased from 37 to 30 to accommodate this • More questions for dentistry students included • More integrated questions added • Different pre-readings provided to pharmacy and dentistry students – increase sharing of information • Questions shortened to ensure students had enough time to go through activity • Created new case-based learning activity with dentistry, pharmacy and physical therapy students to increase health discipline involvement. Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.             Appendix 10         IPE Neurology Activity Checklist Description of the Activity Mandatory self-directed, case-based learning activity (chronic pain) for pharmacy, dentistry and physical therapy students.  Length of Activity: 4 hours (1-5pm)  Where it is embedded: Integrated into Neurology module for pharmacy; integrated in RHSC 420 for dentistry and physical therapy  Assessment:  All: students complete an online Connect survey evaluation of the activity. Must complete to confirm attendance. Pharmacy: Questions based on the pharmacy-specific learning objectives will be on Quiz #3 and the end-of-block Neurology exam Dentistry: There will be questions related to this case in the pharmacology section of the neuroscience block exam and RHSC 420 final exam. Professionalism – P/F based on completion of student evaluation of IPE activity. Physical therapy students: There will be question(s) related to this case on the RHSC 420 final exam.   Learning Objectives Upon completion of this activity, students will be able to: 1. Describe the role of the pharmacist, dentist, and physical therapist in patient-centred care and the collaborative management of a patient with chronic pain.  2. Communicate to ensure common understanding of care decisions by actively listening to other team members. 3. Participate, and be respectful of all members’ participation, in collaborative decision-making. 4. Develop a set of principles for working together that respects the ethical values of team members. 5. Identify common situations in chronic pain management that are likely to lead to disagreements or conflicts, including role ambiguity, power gradients, and differences in goals. 6. Describe the pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, causes, classifications, risk factors, goals of therapy, pharmacological interventions/evidence, and physical therapy exercises for the following conditions: a. Tension-type headaches b. Medication-overuse headaches c. Migraines d. Musculoskeletal pain e. Neuropathic pain f. Facial pain and chewing muscle myalgia  g. Insomnia 7. Identify the scope of practice, professional obligations, and current guidelines/resources for each discipline with regards to the opioid crisis and the use of naloxone.     Contacts Name Role Email Larry Leung, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead  larry.leung@ubc.ca Jason Min, BSc(Pharm), RPh Pharmacy IPE Lead jason.min@ubc.ca Dr. Leandra Best, D.M.D., Clinical Professor, Associate Dean (Academic Affairs) Dentistry IPE Lead drlbest@dentistry.ubc.ca Dr. Clifford Pau, B.Sc., M.Sc., D.M.D. Dentistry clifford.pau@dentistry.ubc.ca Dr. Eli Whitney, BSc, DDS, FRCD(C) Dentistry eli.whitney@dentistry.ubc.ca Dr. Arun Verma, PhD IA Lead arun.verma@ubc.ca Tessa Nicholl,BSc, BSc(Pharm), MSc(Pharm), ACPR, RPh Neurology Module Lead tessa.nicholl@ubc.ca Tara Klassen, BSc(PT), MSc Physical Therapy (Main Liaison) tarak@mail.ubc.ca Dr. Claudia Krebs, MD, PhD Physical Therapy claudia.krebs@ubc.ca Karen Sauve, BSc (PT), MS Physical Therapy Karen.sauve@ubc.ca Dr. Peter Murphy, DDS Dentistry Peter.murphy@ubc.ca  Support: Alireza Meghji, BSc(Pharm), RPh  Case developer ali.meghji@ubc.ca Vaughn Chauvin, BSc(Pharm), BCGP, RPh  Case developer vaughn.chauvin@ubc.ca   Students Involved in the Activity  Total number of students: 365 students (224 pharmacy; 60 dental; 81 physical therapy)  Number of groups: 37 groups  40 groups  Year level: 2nd year pharmacy; 2nd year dentistry; 1st year physical therapy  Room Bookings J.B. Macdonald – 10 rooms: UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 131, UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270A, UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270B, UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270D, UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270F, UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270G, UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 270E, UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 379, UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 260H, UBC-DENT R-RM MCDN 347  Life Sciences Centre – 17 rooms and 1 lecture hall: LSC 1421, LSC 1422, LSC 1423, LSC 1424, LSC 1425, LSC 1426, LSC 1427, LSC 1428, LSC 1445, LSC 1446, LSC 1447, LSC 1525, LSC 1526, LSC 1527, LSC 1528, LSC 1529, LSC 1530, LSC 1001 LT1  Physical Therapy Friedman Building – 7 breakout rooms PT Breakout room 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 138, 139  Room Booking Contact: LSC: Dennis Golinski, roombooking.fom@ubc.ca -- Facilities Coordinator Dent: Leandra Best, drlbest@dentistry.ubc.ca -- IPE Lead PT Friedman Building: Tara Klassen, tarak@mail.ubc.ca - physical therapy liaison  Platform for Deployment: Blackboard Connect – Dentistry and Pharmacy students enrolled into an “IPE Pharm/Dent Connect Site” Contact Zerdin, Joe joe.zerdin@ubc.ca to set up. Sync – sharing platform for instructors to work on material. Socrative – student submissions   Pre-Activity:  Task When  1. Contact Partners  See Contacts above  Set initial meeting to discuss: o Case content o Year level of student o Where it will be embedded in respective programs  At least 6 months prior to activity  2. Confirm date and where activity is embedded and room bookings  Connect with appropriate facilities coordinators to confirm breakout and debrief rooms  6 months   3. Create platform and enroll students  Contact necessary partners to get courses linked to the shared IPE Connect site  Have Senior Program Assistant or IT create student groups in Connect  3 months  4. Confirm any case and learning objectives modifications  Create pre-activity/introduction video  Every activity should have learning objectives, pre-readings, schedule, student and facilitator guide (if applicable), post case survey  1 month  5. Organize Wayfinding and other logistics (facilitators)  1 month  6. Deploy pre-activity on Connect  Introduction Video  Learning Objectives  Patient Profile  Discipline-specific assessments and pre-activity assignments  Discipline-specific pre-readings  Schedule for Activity  Groups  Room Allocations  Wayfinding information  2 weeks  7. Upload materials for Day of Activity and Post Activity  Icebreaker and Ground Rules Activity  Attendance Sheet (create as a quiz on Connect)   Case part 1 and 2  Student Evaluation of Activity 2 weeks (time release to open on day of)    Day of Activity:  8. Run the activity according to schedule   See Schedule in Sync folder   9. Meet with IPE leads to create debrief session materials while the activity is being run.      Post Activity:  10. Create and summarize activity evaluation from Connect  1 week  11. Debrief with partners  1 week  12. Confirm attendance and address any absences  1 week     Feedback from March 23 2017 Activity: Responses tended to fit into one or more of the following:  More health professions involved in the activity  More questions for dentistry students  Questions and case simplified  More interdisciplinary questions Additional evaluation of the activity from Dent:  The class specifically noted a few reasons for this experience being more rewarding than the Fall IPE case:  More dental specific questions to increase their involvement/participation  Better group mix- in the Fall the dental students were significantly outnumbered by the Pharm students, with there often being only one dental student/group. Adding PT really helped balance the ratio  Better pacing of the case   Interprofessional Education Copyright © 2018 UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Experiential Education. All Rights Reserved.             Appendix 11            UBC Health  Interprofessional Education Mapping Pharmacy 2017/2018       2 Version: 5/15/2018 Contents Project Overview .................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Project Outcomes ............................................................................................................................................................... 5 Background ............................................................................................................................................................................. 5 Methodology .......................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Inclusion Criteria ................................................................................................................................................................. 6 The National Interprofessional Competency Framework ................................................................................................... 7 Exposure vs. Immersion ...................................................................................................................................................... 7 Timeline ............................................................................................................................................................................... 7 The Survey ........................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Survey Respondents ............................................................................................................................................................ 8 Results ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 I. UBC Health .................................................................................................................................................................. 9 Competencies Addressed................................................................................................................................................ 9 Instructional Methods Used.......................................................................................................................................... 10 Assessment Methods Used ........................................................................................................................................... 11 II. Integrated Curricula .................................................................................................................................................. 12 Competencies Addressed.............................................................................................................................................. 13 Instructional Methods Used.......................................................................................................................................... 13 Assessment Methods Used ........................................................................................................................................... 13 III. Passport Activities..................................................................................................................................................... 14 Competencies Addressed.............................................................................................................................................. 14 Instructional Methods Used.......................................................................................................................................... 15 Assessment Methods Used ........................................................................................................................................... 16 IV. Pharmacy ................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Competencies Addressed.............................................................................................................................................. 19 Instructional Methods Used.......................................................................................................................................... 20 Assessment Methods Used ........................................................................................................................................... 21 Discussion ............................................................................................................................................................................. 22 Strengths ........................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Weaknesses ...................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Opportunities .................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Threats .............................................................................................................................................................................. 23   3 Version: 5/15/2018 Project Limitations ................................................................................................................................................................ 24 References ............................................................................................................................................................................ 25 Appendices ........................................................................................................................................................................... 26 Appendix A – Mapping Details by Discipline ..................................................................................................................... 26 Appendix B – Integrated Curricula Mapping Data ............................................................................................................ 95 Appendix C – IPE Passport Activity Mapping Data ............................................................................................................ 97                           4 Version: 5/15/2018 Appreciation and Thanks This project was completed on behalf of and with the support of the UBC Health Curriculum Committee (HCC). Thank you to our HCC members for providing direction for the project and identifying the IPE activities and individuals responsible for each within your program. Thank you to the hosts of each activity for taking the time to complete the survey. We would also like to thank Roselynn Verwood, Learning Design & Curriculum Consultant from CTLT, for her support throughout the project in developing the methodology and survey. Finally, we would like to give huge thanks to Sean Paredes, Research Assistant, for managing the project.     5 Version: 5/15/2018 Project Overview In February 2017, the Office of UBC Health began a mapping exercise on behalf of the health professional programs to capture the quantity, level, and quality of interprofessional learning taking place at UBC. The objective of the UBC Health IPE Curriculum Mapping Project is to determine whether current approaches to interprofessional learning at UBC are comprehensively and meaningfully addressing the competencies for collaborative practice identified in the National Interprofessional Competency Framework (www.cihi.ca); and to assess how interprofessional education (IPE) accreditation standards are being met. The hope is that this will enable the UBC Health Curriculum Committee (HCC) to strategically plan future directions in relation to IPE.    Project Outcomes The UBC Health Curriculum IPE Mapping Project:  1. Created a comprehensive list of the interprofessional education activities occurring at UBC. 2. Ascertained which competencies for collaborative practice, as identified in the National Interprofessional Competency Framework, are being addressed within each program. 3. Identifies strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in relation to the current status of IPE at UBC to inform strategic planning around the future of IPE. 4. Will inform the development of strategies and interprofessional learning opportunities to address identified weaknesses and threats.  Background Policy makers and healthcare providers now widely recognize the need to change the way we deliver care in response to the challenges we are currently facing across healthcare. Patients with multiple chronic illnesses; an aging population; and high patient and provider expectations are all influencing the way we provide care. Integrated team-based care is a vision for the future of healthcare in British Columbia as a way to deliver better patient-centred care and achieve better health outcomes.  The rationale for Interprofessional Education (IPE) is that learning together will encourage and enhance future working together (Thistlethwaite, 2012).  National organizations have positioned IPE as fundamental to practice improvement and have created core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice (Orchard et al., 2010). According to the literature, IPE enables students and practitioners to learn the knowledge and skills necessary to work collaboratively.  According to Gilbert et al. (2010), this should be viewed along a continuum of learning that includes pre-licensure and post-licensure education and extends into continuing education. Over the past decade, UBC has made significant progress toward the integration of IPE as a meaningful component of student learning. In addition to extra-curricular activities managed through the IPE Passport and learning that happens at the program level, the Integrated Curricula that have been implemented across programs are creating relevant opportunities for interprofessional learning in complex areas of healthcare such as ethics, indigenous cultural safety, health informatics, resiliency, and professionalism.  While this is enabling programs to meet new IPE accreditation standards, HCC recognized the need to assess whether current approaches to interprofessional learning at UBC are comprehensively and meaningfully addressing the competencies for collaborative practice identified in the National Interprofessional Competency Framework (www.cihi.ca) in order to strategically plan future directions in relation to IPE.     6 Version: 5/15/2018 Methodology This project was conducted by the Office of UBC Health on behalf of, and under the direction of, the UBC Health Curriculum Committee (HCC). A detailed project plan was developed in collaboration with the Centre for Teaching and Learning Technology (CTLT), who brought expertise in curriculum mapping. The Office of UBC Health: 1. Gathered details about all the interprofessional learning students engage in or have the opportunity to engage in throughout the course of their program from each health professional program at UBC - including extracurricular IPE; IPE for points; required IPE; and integrated IPE. In order to gain an accurate scope of the interprofessional learning occurring within each program, we worked closely with the UBC Health Curriculum Committee (HCC) to collect a list of all prospective and ongoing IPE activities in each program, along with the contact information for the activity ‘host’. Activity hosts were emailed an online survey to provide details about each learning opportunity.  2. Mapped all interprofessional learning activities across programs to the National Interprofessional Competency Framework to identify which competencies are addressed and where there are gaps. Activities were mapped at the learning objective level to the National Competencies and in terms of level of learning (exposure or immersion). Data was mapped by three project team members and then compared to reach consensus. This was then compared to the competencies and level of learning identified by survey respondents. Discrepancies were addressed in consultation with respondents.   3. Conducted a SWOT analysis of findings to help inform recommendations.  4. Generated a report for each program with an overview of which competencies are being addressed, instructional and assessment methods used, and opportunities for improvement.   Inclusion Criteria To be recognized as an interprofessional learning activity, and thereby included in this mapping project, activities had to fall within the definition of interprofessional education (IPE):  “Occurs when students from two or more professions learn about, from and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes.” (Freeth et al., 2005, p. xv) And, meet the following inclusion criteria:  Involve 2 or more professions  Make interprofessional learning explicit (e.g. learning objectives communicated to students)  Include interactivity among students (e.g. case-based learning; debate; team meeting) Activities with students from one profession but that are facilitated by another profession or bring in other disciplinary perspectives were included at the request of programs, thereby capturing all activities recognized by accreditors. Due to current limitations around our ability to identify details pertaining to the interprofessional learning that takes place in the practice setting, practice-based activities were not captured in this mapping.   7 Version: 5/15/2018 The National Interprofessional Competency Framework The National Interprofessional Competency Framework developed by the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC) was used as a foundation for this mapping exercise. It identifies six competency domains that describe the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values required for successful interprofessional collaborative practice: 1. Interprofessional Communication 2. Patient-Centered Care  3. Role Clarification 4. Team Functioning  5. Collaborative Leadership 6. Interprofessional Conflict Resolution  Exposure vs. Immersion As part of this project, the depth of interprofessional learning within each activity was categorized as either exposure or immersion, based on the UBC Model for IPE (Charles et. al, 2010):   Exposure Level Activities - Provide students with opportunities to participate in parallel learning experiences with peers from other professions. This is an introductory stage that takes into account that one has to learn about one's own profession before one can truly begin to learn about other disciplines.   Immersion Level Activities - Give students the opportunity to learn about, with and from students from other professions. At this stage students have a more advanced knowledge of their profession gained through classroom and practice experiences. Students are provided with opportunities to learn about the strengths and limitations of their profession and challenge their ways of thinking and interacting with others.  Mastery Level Activities - The third stage of the UBC model involves mastering interprofessional concepts in such a way that they are incorporated in one’s daily professional practice. It requires advanced level learning experiences of the kind open to graduate students or experienced practitioners. As such, this level was excluded from the mapping exercise.  Timeline February – April   Developed project plan   Drafted survey questions for input from HCC  Tested survey and updated accordingly May – June   Collected a list of all IPE activities within each program and the host contact information for each of the activities  July – September  Administered survey to activity hosts October – December  Mapped activities to the National Framework December – January  Conducted a SWOT analysis        8 Version: 5/15/2018 February  Discuss strategies for the future delivery of IPE and use of the IPE Passport at January HCC Meeting to be implemented in September 2018 March  Collected missing information from programs April  Prepared discipline-specific reports  The Survey Fluid Survey was the chosen platform used to create the UBC IPE Mapping Survey. The survey consisted of 31 questions spread over nine pages. The questions were a mixture of multiple-choice, text response, and checkbox grids. Each activity host was asked to provide a general description of their activity, how their activity was offered (e.g. as part of a course, required, extra-curricular), when their activity took place, which health programs participated, and how many students had previously been involved. Hosts were then asked to provide a maximum of six learning objectives for their activity, identify the instructional methods and assessment methods used, and list course learning objectives if applicable. Through the use of branching, certain pages of the survey were skipped according to the host’s previous answers. The last part of the survey aimed to identify how each of the learning objectives were being taught and assessed according to the instructional and assessment methods that had been listed, as well as which of the six competencies from the CIHC National Interprofessional Competency Framework were being captured. Hosts were also given the option to speak with a research assistant by phone to provide this information. Survey Respondents The Survey was sent by email individually to each activity host. Hosts were individuals identified as responsible for an IPE activity or course. They were predominantly staff or faculty from one of the 13 health programs at UBC. A dedicated email account was created to dispatch each of the survey invitations, as well as manage any questions or concerns from the responding hosts. Hosts were contacted every 2-3 weeks between July 2017 and September 2017, in order to urge and remind them to complete the survey. The Health Curriculum Committee also played a key role in following-up with the hosts from their program to help bolster response rates. The Research Assistant followed-up with survey respondents when clarification was needed regarding specific data. Results The following sections provide a summary of the results for: I. UBC Health – a summary of all 13 programs that participated in the mapping  II. Integrated Curricula – UBC Health Connect; iEthics; Indigenous Cultural Safety; eHealth  III. IPE Passport Activities – IPE activities available to students through the Interprofessional Education Passport  IV. Pharmacy – activities specific to your students (See the Appendix A for a summary of the data for each program)      9 Version: 5/15/2018 I. UBC Health Survey data was collected for a total of 117 activities. 95 activities were discipline-specific and 22 activities were from the IPE Passport. The following tables highlight the competencies addressed, instructional methods used, and assessment methods used across all IPE activities at UBC.  Appendix A breaks down this data by discipline and shows the competency mapping for each activity. Mapping was done at the learning objective level and categorized by competency and level of learning (exposure vs. immersion). Competencies Addressed  01234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829303132333435363738394041424344454647484950515253545556575859606162636465666768Communication Patient-centred care Role Clarification Team Functioning Conflict Resolution CollaborativeLeadershipIPE ActivitiesCompetencies from the National Interprofessional Competency FrameworkCompetencies Captured by IPE Activities OverallExposure/Dark Bar Immersion/Light Bar  10 Version: 5/15/2018 Instructional Methods Used  01234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829303132333435363738394041424344454647484950515253545556575859606162636465666768697071727374IPE ActivitiesInstructional MethodsInstructional Methods used by IPE Activities Overall  11 Version: 5/15/2018 Assessment Methods Used  0123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839404142434445464748495051525354555657585960616263646566676869707172737475IPE ActivitiesAssessment MethodsAssessment Methods used by IPE Activities Overall  12 Version: 5/15/2018 II. Integrated Curricula In the fall of 2017, there were three integrated curricula that provided 4 interprofessional learning opportunities for students as a required component of their program – Ethics (2), Indigenous Cultural Safety (1), and Health Informatics (1). Only the interprofessional workshops delivered during protected time were included in this mapping, as the online modules did not meet the inclusion criteria.  The Health Informatics curriculum is being revised for delivery in the fall of 2019; therefore the learning objectives, and thereby the competencies addressed, may change. Further, this mapping does not include integrated activities currently under development – Indigenous Cultural Safety Q#4, Professionalism, Resiliency.  Appendix B outlines the competency mapping for each activity. Mapping was done at the learning objective level and categorized each by competency and level of learning (exposure vs. immersion).  IPE Activity in the Integrated Curriculum Description UBC Health Connect: Social Determinants of Health First interprofessional learning opportunity for all incoming health professional students at UBC. The event gives students the chance to meet with their peers from 15 health professional programs and learn about the importance of collaboration across professions while discussing a case around the social determinants of health. Q1 iEthics: Foundations of Ethical Practice Students consider non-complex ethical situations in everyday life, explore your personal and professional values, and be exposed to the role of professional codes of ethics and ethical decision-making frameworks. Students learn about the principles of health care ethics and the importance of ethical practice. Q3 iEthics: Interprofessional Ethical Decision-Making- Important Concepts Case-based session during which you work with an interprofessional group to discuss a complex ethical care. Students act as a member of an interprofessional ethics committee and discuss a complex ethical case that centers on quality of life and end of life options for care. Q1 eHealth: Foundations of Health Informatics Prepares students to use information and communication technology (ICT) in a way that supports safe, effective, person-centered care. Q1 Indigenous Cultural Safety: ICS Cultural Humility and Allyship Workshop Covers topics of Aboriginal history in Canada, colonization and the impacts on the health and wellbeing of Indigenous populations, Aboriginal health governance, racism and discrimination in healthcare, Indigenous perspectives on health, and the strength and resiliency of the Indigenous peoples of Canada.    13 Version: 5/15/2018 Competencies Addressed  Instructional Methods Used  Assessment Methods Used Assessment of the integrated curricula is the responsibility of each program. Assessment is not integrated at the activity level.  012345Communication Patient-centredcareRole Clarification TeamFunctioningConflictResolutionCollaborativeLeadershipIPE ActivitiesCompetencies from the National Interprofessional Competency FrameworkCompetencies Captured by the Integrated CurriculaExposure/Dark Bar Immersion/Light Bar01234IPE ActivitiesInstructional MethodsInstructional Methods used by the Integrated Curricula  14 Version: 5/15/2018 III. Passport Activities These are activities that do not fall within the definition of ‘Integrated Curricula’ and are not the responsibility of any one program. They are managed through the IPE Passport and often extra-curricular. There are 22 IPE passport activities. Appendix C outlines the competency mapping for each activity. Mapping was done at the learning objective level and categorized each by competency and level of learning (exposure vs. immersion). Competencies Addressed      01234567891011121314Communication Patient-centredcareRole Clarification Team Functioning Conflict Resolution CollaborativeLeadershipIPE ActivitiesCompetencies from the National Interprofessional Competency FrameworkCompetencies Captured by Passport ActivitiesExposure/Dark Bar Immersion/Light Bar  15 Version: 5/15/2018 Instructional Methods Used   0123456789101112131415161718IPE ActivitiesInstructional MethodsInstructional Methods used by IPE Passport Activities  16 Version: 5/15/2018 Assessment Methods Used    012345678910111213141516IPE ActiviitesAssessment MethodsAssessment Methods used by IPE Passport Activities  17 Version: 5/15/2018 IV. Pharmacy Number of IPE Activities Identified: 8 This section includes required activities outside of the integrated curricula that are discipline-specific activities and required. See the Appendix A below.  Some students may also participate in extracurricular IPE in addition to the activities listed below.  See the Appendix C for a list of additional activities that some students in your program may participate in. IPE Activities  Description  Survey Respondent (Host) DentPharm Case-based Learning (Cardiovascular Case) Mandatory, self-directed, case-based learning activity on cardiovascular health for pharmacy and dental students. Larry Leung, Jason Min, Kim Mascarenas DentPharmPhysio Case-based Learning (Neurology Case) Mandatory self-directed, case-based learning activity (chronic pain) for pharmacy, dentistry and physical therapy students. Larry Leung, Jason Min, Kim Mascarenas Health Connect The first interprofessional learning experience for all incoming health professional students at UBC, which will give students the opportunity to meet their peers from other programs and learn about the importance of collaboration across professions. Angela Wagner Living with Schizophrenia Interprofessional Panel and Case Activity Three or more allied healthcare professionals are invited to provide discussion and input with regards to interprofessional collaboration in real life practice. A case surrounding the area of schizophrenia will be provided to each of the healthcare professionals participating in the panel discussion. Larry Leung, Jason Min, Kim Mascarenas Medication Reconciliation through the Interprofessional Collaboration Groups of eight pharmacy-medicine-nursing undergraduate participants and practicing pharmacists will collaborate in an engaging problem-solving session involving admission and discharge medication reconciliation. Participants will Judith Soon, Arun Verma   18 Version: 5/15/2018 evaluate a complex patient case, document medication discrepancies, and propose recommendations to ensure accurate and complete medication information at admission and transfer at discharge. Pharmacy - Pharmacy Technician Interactive Webinar A large group discussion between pharmacists and pharmacy technicians discussing their roles and responsibilities. Larry Leung, Jason Min, Kim Mascarenas The Contraceptive Conversation Interactive interprofessional presentation workshop on enhancing competencies around counseling skill development in the sensitive area of birth control and family planning. Judith Soon The Physician-Pharmacist Relationship A joint presentation, discussion, and interprofessional brainstorming activity led by pharmacy and medical students alongside two pharmacist with different backgrounds and the lead physician for medical IPE. David Massaro    19 Version: 5/15/2018 Competencies Addressed  01234567Communication Patient-centredcareRole Clarification Team Functioning ConflictResolutionCollaborativeLeadershipIPE ActivitiesCompetencies from the National Interprofessional Competency FrameworkCompetencies Captured by IPE Activities in PharmacyExposure/Dark Bar Immersion/Light Bar  20 Version: 5/15/2018 Instructional Methods Used   0123456IPE ActivitiesInstructional MethodsInstructional Methods used by IPE Activities in Pharmacy  21 Version: 5/15/2018 Assessment Methods Used   012345678IPE ActivitiesAssessment MethodsAssessment Methods used by IPE Activities in Pharmacy  22 Version: 5/15/2018 Discussion A SWOT analysis was conducted to assess the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats within the current approach to IPE at UBC. In addition to the IPE Mapping exercise, this analysis was informed by integrated curricula evaluations from students and facilitators and feedback from programs over the years. We will build on this section of the report based on input from the UBC Health Curriculum Committee. Strengths   Competencies that are comprehensively addressed o Interprofessional Communication o Role Clarification o Team Functioning  Interactivity o Use of small group discussions o Case-based discussions Weaknesses   Competencies that are less well addressed o Patient-Centred Care  o Conflict Management o Collaborative Leadership   Depth of learning o Number of exposure activities compared to immersion activities  Diversity of activities o Reliance on small group discussions and large group discussions  Accountability  o Focus on attendance  Assessment o Activities often not assessed Opportunities  Integrated Curricula - Additional activities under development – Indigenous Cultural Safety Q#4; Revised Health Informatics; Professionalism; Resiliency.   Protected Time - One timeslot does not currently have anything scheduled.   Practice Education – Could provide an opportunity to address competencies at an Immersion Level.   IPE Passport and Extra-Curricular Activities – Develop a new strategy for the use of the Passport and how to recognize participation in extra-curricular activities (i.e. other than the current points system).   Partnership with the Patient and Community Partnership for Education (PCPE) - May allow us to better address the Patient-Centred Care competency.   Activities Interested in having more Programs Participate - Through the survey we were able to compile a list of activities interested in having students from more programs participate.    23 Version: 5/15/2018 Passport Activities Health care Travelling Roadshow - Sean Maurice Health Mentors - Jen Macdonald Patient and Community Voice Workshop - Jen Macdonald Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp - Eavan Sinden Aboriginal Community as Teacher Cultural Camps - Cathy Kline BC Special Olympics Healthy Athlete Program  - Ashten Black Eating, Feeding and Swallowing - Diana Lin SOWK 451 - Health Care Team Development - Marcia Choi The Contraceptive Conversation - Judith Soon Audiology Hearing and Aging Physician Round Table (AUDI 569) - Lorienne Jenstad Dental Hygiene               Motivational Interviewing Workshop – Carrie Krekoski Dentistry DENT 410 PEP I (Principles of Ethical Practice I) - Komkham Pattanaporn DENT 420 FMS II - PJ (Peter) Murphy Medicine MEDD 411 Interprofessional Teamwork Case-based Workshop - Christie Newton PMP Standardized Patient Group Sessions - Linlea Armstrong Midwifery MIDW 360 Global Midwifery - Cathy Ellis Pharmacy DentPharm Case-based Learning (Cardiovascular Case) - Larry Leung DentPharmPhysio Case-based Learning (Neurology Case) - Larry Leung Communication Styles Part 1 and Part 2 - Janice Moshenko Patient-Centred Care - Larry Leung PHRM 171 Interprofessional Education Reflection Assignment PHRM 271 Interprofessional Education Reflection Assignment PHRM 272 Interprofessional Education Reflection Assignment - Jason Min Role Clarification Part 1 and Part 2 - Larry Leung Living with Schizophrenia Interprofessional Panel and Case Activity - Jason Min Medication Reconciliation through the Interprofessional Collaboration - Judith Soon Physical Therapy DentPharmPhysio Case-based Learning (Neurology Case) - Karen Sauve  Threats  Limited time for more IPE   No points for extra-curricular IPE may limit participation   Uneven participation from different programs may reinforce stereotypes   Lack of understanding about how to teach Collaborative Leadership  Consistency of IPE experiences for different students   24 Version: 5/15/2018 Project Limitations Exclusion of practice education activities. Learning that is currently happening at the practice education level was not captured through this mapping project. Work currently underway by the UBC Health Practice Education Committee will enable us to do so in the future.  Evolving nature of IPE. This mapping activity captures IPE at a specific point in time. New IPE activities are emerging all the time. Other activities may change or stop being delivered. Activities that did not meet minimum criteria. Some activities submitted by programs as IPE activities did not fall within the definition of IPE or meet the minimum inclusion criteria. While these activities may address interprofessional competencies, they were excluded from the mapping exercise.  Student-led activities. Some faculty/staff hosts did not have enough knowledge about the activity to complete the survey because the activities were student led; therefore, students were contacted by hosts in order to complete the survey. There are some concerns about the quality of student-led activities, even when there is a faculty lead, that requires further discussion in terms of how these are positioned within the broader context of IPE at UBC. Perceived depth of learning. Some activity hosts identified competencies addressed and depth of learning (exposure or immersion) that did not align with the results of the mapping completed by the project team. These hosts were contacted with the mapping results for input from their perspective. There were no objections to the outcomes of the mapping. No learning objectives defined. There were a few activities that did not define concrete learning objectives. Hosts were encouraged to do so for future delivery of the activity in order to meet the inclusion criteria.    New integrated curricula activities. This mapping exercise did not include IPE components of the integrated curricula still under development – Indigenous Cultural Safety Q#4; revised Health Informatics; Professionalism; and Resiliency.     25 Version: 5/15/2018 References Charles, G., Bainbridge, L., & Gilbert, J. (2010). The University of British Columbia model of interprofessional education. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 24(1), 9-18. Freeth, D., Hammick, M., Reeves, S., Koppel, I., & Barr, H. (2005). Effective Interprofessional Education: Development, Delivery and Evaluation. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing  Gilbert, J. H. V., Yan, J., & Hoffman, S. J. (2010). A WHO report: Framework for action on interprofessional education and collaborative practice. Journal of Allied Health, 39(3), 196. Orchard, C., Bainbridge, L., Bassendowski, S., Casimiro, L., Stevenson, K., Wagner, S., Weinberg, S. J., Curran, V., Di Loreto, L., & Sawatzky-Girling, B. (2010). A National Interprofessional Competency Framework. Retrieved from: http://www.cihc.ca/files/CIHC_IPCompetencies_Feb1210.pdf  Thistlethwaite, J. (2012). Interprofessional education: A review of context, learning and the research agenda. Medical Education, 46(1), 58-70.      26 Version: 5/15/2018 Appendices Appendix A – Mapping Details by Discipline  The following table summarizes the leaning objective mapping across all activities in all programs. Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Advanced communication skills (RSOT 549 or PHTH 549) Term 1 Passport and Program level requirement Demonstrate appropriate therapeutic and interpersonal skills with the standard patients and other members of the healthcare team.  Communication I Demonstrate appropriate therapeutic and interpersonal skills with the standard patients and other members of the healthcare team.  Team Functioning  I Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Hearing and Aging Physician Round Table (AUDI 569) Year ? - Term 1 Required Share info and knowledge from each perspective on best serving elderly hearing-impaired individuals Communication E Understand the roles played by each profession in meeting the patient's needs Patient-centred E Understand the roles played by each profession in meeting the patient's needs Role Clarification E Share info and knowledge from each perspective on best serving elderly hearing-impaired individuals Role Clarification E   27 Version: 5/15/2018 Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Motivational Interviewing Workshop – (DHYG 210) Term 1 - Required Formulate appropriate interview questions to form a positive therapeutic relationship; validate observations with data obtained by written and verbal communication; and provide an opportunity for the client [simulation] to gain information and set their own goals Communication E Formulate appropriate interview questions to form a positive therapeutic relationship; validate observations with data obtained by written and verbal communication; and provide an opportunity for the client [simulation] to gain information and set their own goals Patient-centred E   28 Version: 5/15/2018 Discuss the spirit, principles and skills of motivational interviewing Patient-centred E Gain confidence to use MI to empower your clients to change their lifestyle and behaviours related to oral health Patient-centred E Demonstrate a modicum of skill using a general approach to MI consisting of three main tools: the Ruler, the Box, and the Circle Patient-centred E Learn about, from and with students from other disciplines (e.g. SLP, Audiology and Occupational therapy) Role Clarification E     29 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Dental Hygiene DHYG 210 - DMD Clinical Examination Session Year 2 Dental Hygiene Students, Year 1 Dentistry Students –Term 1 Required Demonstrate clinical assessment abilities on a first year dental student. Leadership I Educate a dental student on the role and scope of practice of a dental hygienist. Role Clarification I Dental Hygiene DHYG 310 - Oral self-care for first-year DMD students Year 3 Dental Hygiene, Dental Students – Term 1 Required Dental hygiene and DMD students will discuss and review various indications for these products. Leadership I Dental hygiene students will demonstrate and guide DMD students through the correct use of various oral self-care products. Leadership I Dental hygiene students will demonstrate and guide DMD students though procedures such as plaque disclosing and charting of plaque index scores. Leadership I Dental Hygiene  DHYG 310 - Bringing Indigenous content to oral care practice Term 1 Required Explore and develop an understanding for the history, culture, traditional values, contemporary lifestyles and traditional knowledge of the Indigenous people and its relation to oral health care practice. Patient-centred E   30 Version: 5/15/2018 Dental Hygiene Clinical Client Care (DHYG 310/DHYG 410) Year 3, Year 4 Dental Hygiene Students - Term 1 Required To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Communication I To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Patient-centred I To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Role Clarification I  To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Team Functioning  I To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Conflict I To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Leadership I Dental Hygiene DENT 410 PEP I (Principles of Ethical Practice I): Introduction to Indigenous Health – (DENT 410) Year ? - Term 1 Required Understand the complexity of the historical and social determinants of health in Indigenous population and how it relates to their oral health Patient-centred E   31 Version: 5/15/2018 Dental Hygiene Eating, Feeding and Swallowing (DHYG 310)  Year ? - Term 1 Passport and Program level requirement Discuss the interprofessional role of dental hygienist on a provided health scenario with other health professions Role Clarification E Gain awareness of roles and responsibilities of other health care professionals Role Clarification E Dental Hygiene Gross Anatomy Human Cadaver Lab (DHYG 206)  Required - Delivered over 5 sessions (2.5 hours each) Dental hygiene and dental students must work as an effective and efficient team in order to define, describe and identify different compartments of the head, bones and muscles of this region. Team Functioning  I Working in small interprofessional teams, dental hygiene and dental students work together in this human cadaver simulation lab as they dissect tissues of the head and neck region.  Team Functioning  I Dental Hygiene Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E   32 Version: 5/15/2018 Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E Dental Hygiene Motivational Interviewing Workshop – (DHYG 210) Term 1 - Required Formulate appropriate interview questions to form a positive therapeutic relationship; validate observations with data obtained by written and verbal communication; and provide an opportunity for the client [simulation] to gain information and set their own goals Communication E Formulate appropriate interview questions to form a positive therapeutic relationship; validate observations with data obtained by written and verbal communication; and provide an opportunity for the client [simulation] to gain information and set their own goals Patient-centred E Discuss the spirit, principles and skills of motivational interviewing Patient-centred E Gain confidence to use MI to empower your clients to change their lifestyle and behaviours related to oral health Patient-centred E Demonstrate a modicum of skill using a general approach to MI consisting of three main tools: the Ruler, the Box, and the Patient-centred E   33 Version: 5/15/2018 Circle Learn about, from and with students from other disciplines (e.g. SLP, Audiology and Occupational therapy) Role Clarification E Dental Hygiene Nutrition and Oral Health Related Resource Development – (DHYG 410 ) Year 4 Dental Hygiene - Extracurricular Recognize other communication styles and how to modify your behaviour in a way that ensures more effective communication across professions Communication E Analyze strategies that support interprofessional groups of health care providers to communicate with patients and families effectively and collaboratively Communication E Identify and practice conflict management strategies to deal with interprofessional conflicts effectively Conflict E Strategize ways to bring collaborative leadership into health systems within your sphere of influence - in both formal and informal ways Leadership E   34 Version: 5/15/2018 Analyze strategies that support interprofessional groups of health care providers to communicate with patients and families effectively and collaboratively Patient-centred E Consider the roles of others in determining your own professional and interprofessional roles Role Clarification E Collaborate with other professions to set common, patient-centred goals and share decision-making. Team Functioning  E     35 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Dentistry DHYG 210 - DMD Clinical Examination Session Year 2 Dental Hygiene Students, Year 1 Dentistry Students –Term 1 Required Demonstrate clinical assessment abilities on a first year dental student. Leadership I Educate a dental student on the role and scope of practice of a dental hygienist. Role Clarification I Dentistry DHYG 310 - Oral self-care for first-year DMD students Year 3 Dental Hygiene, Dental Students – Term 1 Required Dental hygiene and DMD students will discuss and review various indications for these products. Leadership I Dental hygiene students will demonstrate and guide DMD students through the correct use of various oral self-care products. Leadership I Dental hygiene students will demonstrate and guide DMD students though procedures such as plaque disclosing and charting of plaque index scores. Leadership I Dentistry  DHYG 310 - Bringing Indigenous content to oral care practice Term 1 Required Explore and develop an understanding for the history, culture, traditional values, contemporary lifestyles and traditional knowledge of the Indigenous people and its relation to oral health care practice Patient-centred E   36 Version: 5/15/2018 Dentistry Clinical Client Care (DENT 420) Year 2 Dental Students - Term 1 Required To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Communication I To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Patient-centred I To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Role Clarification I To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Team Functioning  I To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Conflict I To provide dental and dental hygiene services to clients from the public while working on an interprofessional team. Leadership I Dentistry DENT 410 PEP I (Principles of Ethical Practice I): Introduction to Indigenous Health – (DENT 410) Year ? - Term 1 Required Understand the complexity of the historical and social determinants of health in Indigenous population and how it relates to their oral health Patient-centred E Dentistry DENT 420 FMS II: IPE Cardiovascular Year 2 Dentistry Establish team work Communication E   37 Version: 5/15/2018 + Neurology (Pain) PBL Cases (DENT 420 FMS II) Students, Year 1 Pharmacy Students,  Term 2 Required communication principles. Communicate to ensure common understanding of care decisions by actively listening to other team members. Communication E Participate, and be respectful of all members’ participation, in collaborative decision-making. Conflict E Describe the role of the pharmacist and dentist in the care of patients Role Clarification E Establish team work communication principles. Team Functioning  E Communicate to ensure common understanding of care decisions by actively listening to other team members. Team Functioning  E Participate, and be respectful of all members’ participation, in collaborative decision-making. Team Functioning  E Reflect on team functioning and determine areas of strength and areas for improvement Team Functioning  E Dentistry Eating, Feeding and Swallowing (DHYG 310)  Year ? - Term 1 Required for Dentistry Students Discuss the interprofessional role of dental hygienist on a provided health scenario with other health professions Role Clarification E   38 Version: 5/15/2018 Gain awareness of roles and responsibilities of other health care professionals Role Clarification E Dentistry Gross Anatomy Human Cadaver Lab (DENT 410)  Required - Delivered over 5 sessions (2.5 hours each) Dental hygiene and dental students must work as an effective and efficient team in order to define, describe and identify different compartments of the head, bones and muscles of this region. Team Functioning  I Working in small interprofessional teams, dental hygiene and dental students work together in this human cadaver simulation lab as they dissect tissues of the head and neck region.  Team Functioning  I Dentistry Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team E Dentistry MEDD 411 Half Class: Interprofessional Team Work Year 1 Dentistry, Year 1 Medicine Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration Communication E   39 Version: 5/15/2018 Students - Term 1 Required Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies Communication E Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration Conflict E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies Conflict E Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration Leadership E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies Leadership E Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration Patient-centred E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies Patient-centred E Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration Role Clarification E   40 Version: 5/15/2018 Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies Role Clarification E Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies Team Functioning  E Dentistry MEDD 411 Half Class: Avoiding Mistreatment / Anti-harassment workshop Year 1 Dentistry and Medicine Students - Term 1, Required  Diagnose and manage a patient’s illness or other health-related needs in the context of a health care team, by respecting his/her own professional boundaries as well as the expertise of physician colleagues (generalist and specialist) and non-physician health care professionals. Role Clarification E Communicate with physicians and other health care professionals in a collaborative, responsive and responsible manner  Communication E Prevent, negotiate and resolve conflict by working respectfully and diplomatically with the patient, family, and other health care professionals  Conflict E     41 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Dietetics Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E     42 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Genetic Counselling Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E     43 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Medicine MEDD 411: The Good Doctor - CanMEDS and You Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Co-construct the attributes of what good doctors do. Role Clarification E Consider a framework that represents acceptance. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 411: Professionalism in Medical School and Professional Identity Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Describe the expectations of entering a professional program. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 411: Social Accountability Mandate of the MDUP - Mission, Goals and Exit Competencies Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Discuss how a medical student can be socially responsible and accountable in practice. Patient-centred E Medicine Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration. Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs. Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration. Team Functioning  E Medicine MEDD 411: Introduction to Clinical Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, List what medical students can and cannot do in a clinic setting. Role Clarification E   44 Version: 5/15/2018 Experiences (CE) Required Medicine MEDD 411 Half Class: Interprofessional Team Work Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration. Communication E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies. Communication E Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration. Conflict E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies. Conflict E Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration. Leadership E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies. Leadership E Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration. Patient-centred E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice Patient-centred E   45 Version: 5/15/2018 competencies Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration. Role Clarification E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies. Role Clarification E Describe the Canadian competency framework for interprofessional collaboration. Team Functioning  E Describe the importance of interprofessional education in developing collaborative practice competencies. Team Functioning  E Medicine Hearing and Aging Physician Round Table (AUDI 569) Year 3 -  Required Share info and knowledge from each perspective on best serving elderly hearing-impaired individuals. Communication E Understand the roles played by each profession in meeting the patient's needs. Patient-centred E Understand the roles played by each profession in meeting the patient's needs. Role Clarification E Share info and knowledge from each perspective on best serving elderly hearing-impaired Role Clarification E   46 Version: 5/15/2018 individuals Medicine MEDD 411 Half Class: Avoiding Mistreatment / Anti-harassment workshop Year 1 Dentistry and Medicine Students - Term 1, Required  Diagnose and manage a patient’s illness or other health-related needs in the context of a health care team, by respecting his/her own professional boundaries as well as the expertise of physician colleagues (generalist and specialist) and non-physician health care professionals. Role Clarification E Communicate with physicians and other health care professionals in a collaborative, responsive and responsible manner. Communication E Prevent, negotiate and resolve conflict by working respectfully and diplomatically with the patient, family, and other health care professionals. Conflict E Medicine MEDD 411 Large Group Discussion: Management of Congenital Heart Disease Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Discuss the multidisciplinary nature employed in the management of congenital heart disease patients. Patient-centred E Describe the wide spectrum of patients with congenital heart disease and the many different roles that various healthcare providers and advocates play in the management of congenital Patient-centred E   47 Version: 5/15/2018 heart disease patients. Discuss and demonstrate sensitivity to the many challenges patients and families face, from a medical, social and economical perspective. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 411 Week 6: Heart Murmur Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Diagnose and manage a patient’s illness or other health-related needs in the context of a health care team, by respecting his/her own professional boundaries as well as the expertise of physician colleagues (generalist and specialist) and non-physician health care professionals.  Role Clarification E Communicate with physicians and other health care professionals in a collaborative, responsive and responsible manner. Communication E Medicine MEDD 411: Patient Safety -  Basic Concepts and Building a Culture Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Explain "shared leadership" with examples using the causal framework. Leadership E Describe factors that contribute to adverse events in the human factors causal framework. None  Medicine MEDD 411 Large Group Discussion: Management of Acute Kidney Injury Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Describe the potential effects of a sudden illness on family, friends and support systems. Patient-centred E   48 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 411: Patient Safety - Shared Leadership Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required  Work effectively as part of a health care team. Team Functioning  E Work effectively as part of a health care team. Leadership E Seek the input of all team members, including the patient, family, other health care professionals, and, where appropriate, members of the community, in designing and implementing health care delivery. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 411: Normal Delivery Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Discuss the role of the obstetrical care provider in the context of normal labour. None  Discuss the role of the obstetrical care provider and the opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and care. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 411 Large Group Discussion: Health Care Providers for Pregnant Women Year 1 Medicine Students  - Term 1 Required Outline routine prenatal care standards and schedules. None   Identify resources and health care systems that support evidenced based maternity care. None   Identify an appropriate care provider based on individual patient profiles. Patient-centred E Explain the roles and responsibilities of various maternity care providers. Role Clarification E   49 Version: 5/15/2018 Describe the roles of physicians in leadership, collaboration, advocacy and interprofessionalism. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 411 Week 16: Pregnancy Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Identify barriers to access to care and consider the physicians role in leadership, health advocacy and health systems improvement. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 411: Breastfeeding [Online Module] Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Identify and know how to locate resources and when to refer patients with breast feeding difficulties. None  Medicine MEDD 411: Standardized Patient Interviewing (Students) - Part 1) Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Demonstrate the skills of partnership, empathy, apology, respect, legitimization and support during a patient interview. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 411: Volunteer Patient Interviewing (Students) - Part 2) Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Demonstrate the skills of partnership, empathy, apology, respect, legitimization and support during a patient interview. Patient-centred E   50 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 411: Introduction to Geriatrics - Part 1 Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 1, Required Create a framework for developing Goals of Care for managing problems for frail elderly people. None  Describe how interdisciplinary teams, the health care system and community services are organized to support frail people. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 412: Spinal Cord Injury  Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Diagnose and manage a patient’s illness or other health-related needs in the context of a health care team, by respecting his/her own professional boundaries as well as the expertise of physician colleagues (generalist and specialist) and non-physician health care professionals. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 412: Introduction to Rehabilitation of Spinal Cord Injury Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Distinguish between roles of the health care team. Role Clarification E   51 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 412: Multiple Sclerosis  Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Diagnose and manage a patient’s illness or other health-related needs in the context of a health care team, by respecting his/her own professional boundaries as well as the expertise of physician colleagues (generalist and specialist) and non-physician health care professionals. Role Clarification E Outline a collaborative management plan for MS, taking into consideration the course and prognosis. Leadership E Medicine MEDD 412: Head Injury Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Develop a rehabilitation plan for patients with a head injury with or without periods of unconsciousness. None  Discuss factors that might lead to misunderstandings or conflict when interprofessional care plans are being developed. Conflict E Describe tools that can be used to help facilitate clear and effective communication between health professionals (e.g., ISBAR). Communication E Discuss caregiver communication patterns in face of rapid clinical deterioration (MRP with ISBAR). Communication E   52 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 412: Bleeding Disorders and Hematological Malignancy Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe the management and prognosis for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, including the importance of breaking bad news to the parents of the child. Patient-centred E List potential barriers to accessing health care and strategies to optimize safe / efficient transfer of care from the community to tertiary care centres. None  Medicine MEDD 412: Delivering Bad News: Physician-Patient Communications with Guest Patient Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Recognize the importance of breaking bad news to the patient and their parents. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 412: Patient Safety - Heatlh Improvement Systems Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Discuss shared leadership and quality improvement initiatives in surgery. Leadership E   53 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 412: Online link - genetics PKU module Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe the interprofessional management of PKU as an example of a Mendelian condition. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 412: Depression  Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Diagnose and manage a patient’s illness or other health-related needs in the context of a health care team, by respecting his/her own professional boundaries as well as the expertise of physician colleagues (generalist and specialist) and non-physician health care professionals. Role Clarification E Describe general principles of collaborative decision making in the setting of shared care. Leadership E Explain how team leadership may vary depending on the context of care and the patient/population needs. Team Functioning  E   54 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 412: Online link - Genetics bipolar module -  Mandatory Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe the interprofessional management of Bipolar disorder as an example of a Multifactorial condition. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 412: Psychosis  Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required  Describe an approach to addiction management considering the benefits and risks of interprofessional collaborative team based care. Leadership E Medicine MEDD 412: Headache and Pain Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic options to manage and prevent recurrence of headache disorders and chronic pain disorders, based on underlying neuropathology and phrmacological mechanisms of action. Patient-centred E Discuss the key features of an integrated, interprofessional approach to chronic pain Patient-centred E   55 Version: 5/15/2018 management. Describe the integrative treatment approach for headache based on the type of headache including pharmacological and non-pharmacological options. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 412: Asthma and Adverse Drug Reaction Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe the influence of context on collaborative care processes and team composition and function. Team Functioning E Describe the influence of context on collaborative care processes and team composition and function. Leadership E Medicine MEDD 412: Symposium on the Health and Social Issues Related to IV Drug Use Year 1 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Discuss the challenges of people living with HIV face including stigma, medication side effects, and adherence challenges. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 421 Part B: Local Physician/Patient Presentation Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Consider the perspective of a medical team that includes physicians and allied health providers taking care of a pediatric patient with chronic/complex medical issues. Team Functioning E Medicine MEDD 421: Adolescent Health and Development Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Describe effective collaborations in adolescent care based on roles and responsibilities of specialties, health professions, the adolescent, and the family.  Leadership E Describe effective collaborations in adolescent care based on Team Functioning E   56 Version: 5/15/2018 roles and responsibilities of specialties, health professions, the adolescent, and the family. Describe the difference between a family-based and an autonomous health care model and explain how a safe transition from pediatric to adult care services can be achieved.  None  Medicine MEDD 421: Youth Transition to Adult Health Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Describe effective collaborations in adolescent care based on roles and responsibilities of specialties and health professions and how technology may be used to facilitate these collaborations. Leadership E Describe effective collaborations in adolescent care based on roles and responsibilities of specialties and health professions and how technology may be used to facilitate these collaborations. Team Functioning E Describe the difference between a family-based and an autonomous health care model and explain how a safe transition from pediatric to adult care services can be achieved. None    57 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 421 Fracture – Child maltreatment  Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Describe the importance of relationship-centered care and respectful communication in cases of suspected or actual child maltreatment. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 421: Joint Injury Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Discuss the components of a rehabilitation plan for an acute knee injury on an interprofessional team. Patient-centred E Outline an approach to deciding whether surgical versus conservative (non-surgical) management is preferred in an acute knee injury. None  Discuss the types of exercises involved in both knee rehabilitation and how they maintain knee function. None  Medicine MEDD 421: Inter-professional Collaboration and Rehabilitation of Ligamentous Knee Injury Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Explain what is meant by an interdisciplinary health care team. Leadership E Medicine MEDD 421 Chronic Kidney Disease  Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Discuss the role of a multidisciplinary team in the management of chronic kidney disease. Describe how these roles (and the multidisciplinary team) may change based on the stage of disease. Leadership E   58 Version: 5/15/2018 Discuss the role of the multidisciplinary team (including patient and family) in management of CKD and strategies for collaborative decision-making regarding renal replacement therapy. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 421: Dietary Requirements for a Patient with CKD - Lecture and Discussion Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Describe provincial programs and patient-focused tools currently available for individuals with chronic kidney disease. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 421 Osteoporosis  Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Discuss community resources available to support the frail elderly and health professionals who could be involved in the team management of the osteoporosis patient. Patient-centred  E Describe the roles and responsibilities of different care team members in the management of frail elderly patients with osteoporosis and their transition to community care resources. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 421 DVT/PE  Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Describe the role(s) of physicians and pharmacists in team-based care of patients receiving anticoagulation therapy, including communication strategies that may help to reduce likelihood of mismanagement. Role Clarification E   59 Version: 5/15/2018 Describe the role(s) of physicians and pharmacists in team-based care of patients receiving anticoagulation therapy, including communication strategies that may help to reduce likelihood of mismanagement. Team Functioning E Medicine MEDD 421: Anticoagulation therapy: Physician and Pharmacist Collaboration Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Describe the role(s) of physicians and pharmacists in team-based care of patients receiving anticoagulation therapy, including communication strategies that may help to reduce likelihood of mismanagement. Role Clarification I Describe the role(s) of physicians and pharmacists in team-based care of patients receiving anticoagulation therapy, including communication strategies that may help to reduce likelihood of mismanagement. Team Functioning I List, from a community-based or hospital-based pharmacist's perspective, some of the characteristics of good MD-pharmacist communication. Communication I Discuss some of the challenges faced by community-based or hospital-based pharmacists when working with MD's. Conflict  I   60 Version: 5/15/2018 Discuss some of the challenges faced by community-based or hospital-based pharmacists in dealing with their patients. Conflict I Medicine MEDD 421: Ataxia / Movement Disorder / Tremor Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Identify the role of each team member (professions and family) who would be involved in the ongoing management of a patient with Parkinson's disease and describe how technology can support the timely diagnosis, effective intra- professional collaboration, and longitudinal patient support in their journey with Parkinson's Disease. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 421: Physician/Patient Session: Parkinson's Disease in Real Life-Patient/Caregiver Perspective Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Recognize the importance of multidisciplinary care for patients with progressive, chronic disorders. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 421: Stroke  Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Explain the role of the Family Physician and nursing home staff in the care of patients in nursing homes and how they engage with and form part of the multidisciplinary teams (Clinical Experiences WO). Role Clarification E   61 Version: 5/15/2018 List members of the interdisciplinary team and community supports available for people with stroke-related disability. Role Clarification E Consider how location (urban vs rural) and technology can aid in the timely diagnosis, treatment, and intra and inter-professional collaboration in a patient with a stroke. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 421: Palliative Care and Stroke Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Discuss the procedures that should be followed around a hospital death on an interprofessional team. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 421: Rehabilitation After Stroke Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required List the basic elements of stroke rehabilitation. None  Describe at least two strategies to enhance motor recovery after stroke. None  Define aphasia and describe at least two strategies to facilitate communication with an aphasic patient. Communication E Medicine MEDD 421: Facility Care Experience Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Acquire an understanding of the overall administrative structures within facility care, the process of adaptation to facility life by residents, and the role of the doctor in the care of facility patients. None    62 Version: 5/15/2018 Describe the facility as a place of residence for the particular resident involved and understand that this is a place to live, not just to be taken care of (Administrative Talk/Tour). None  Describe program activities apart from care activities which are offered to residents in this facility (Administrative Talk/Tour). None  Describe practice management of facility patients, including the role of house doctors and medical directors within facilities as well as the role of an individual family physician caring for a patient (Discussion with Physician). Role Clarification I Discuss the role of the physician within the care team, including how the physician can best communicate with the staff in order to provide high quality health care (Administrative Talk/Tour). Communication I Describe how, why and when medication reviews are conducted (Discussion with Physician). None  Discuss the composition of the staff at the facility. What disciplines are represented? What are the staff numbers in comparison to an acute care hospital? What are Role Clarification I   63 Version: 5/15/2018 the implications of staffing on care provision? (Administrative Talk/Tour). Medicine MEDD 421: Clinical Skills Integration 1 Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Accurately and succinctly report the chief complaint for the patient encounter within a team. Communication I Medicine MEDD 421: Musculoskeletal – Spine Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Explain how spinal fractures may involve the spinal cord and how its management should be referred to the subspecialist. Communication E Medicine MEDD 421: Half Class Lecture: Trauma Informed Care Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 1 Required Advise patients of their options, the resources available and the other professionals that may be involved to support a case of sexual assault. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 422: Osteoarthritis  Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe points of transition in the care of chronic conditions and their impact on effective collaborations amongst different professionals. Team Functioning  E Describe the benefits of physical activity and exercise therapy in the management and prevention of osteoarthritis and develop a Physical Activity program for a patient with early osteoarthritis. None  Medicine Non-Pharmacological Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Spine and Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Define the role of the health care team including allied health professionals in treating musculoskeletal disorders in general, and Role Clarification E   64 Version: 5/15/2018 Extremities Required specifically osteoarthritis. Recognize the role of patient education in cases of osteoarthritis of the lower limb joints and mechanical disorders of the spine. Patient-centred E Medicine Management of Heart Failure II - Introduction to the role of Electrophysiology and Devices in Heart Failure. Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Outline the general principles of palliative care: a. Pain and symptom management b. Psychological and social dimensions c. Ethical issues d. Spiritual and existential issues e. Grief, loss and bereavement. Patient-centred E Medicine Why Mothers Die Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe effective provincial perinatal and maternity care collaborations. Outline strategies that positively contribute to effective team function in perinatal care including low resource communities. Team Functioning E Medicine MEDD 422: Inflammatory Joint Pain  Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe effective collaborations (e.g., referral patterns) across specialties and health professions including long term follow up care from a distance and the use of telehealth and eHealth. Role Clarification E   65 Version: 5/15/2018 Identify health, social service, as well as community resources and supports available to people living with a disability, particularly in a rural context. Patient-centred E Describe the roles and responsibilities of each health professional in the establishment of an effective rehabilitation plan (including exercise, splinting, joint protection, and energy conservation). Role Clarification E Recognize the role of the Health Care Team, including that of the Physician, Nurse, Physiotherapist, and Occupational Therapist, in treating the "whole" patient. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 422: Pharmacologic and other Approaches to Treatment of Inflammatory Arthritis – Case Study Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Identify the non-pharmacological therapies used for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the role of a "team approach" that includes allied health professionals, with awareness of the psychosocial aspects associated with having a chronic, painful disease. Team Functioning E Medicine MEDD 422: Hypotension/Shock  Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe points of transition in healthcare and their impact on collaboration. Team Functioning  E   66 Version: 5/15/2018 Describe an approach to breaking bad news to patients and families, including prognosis. None  Medicine MEDD 422: Dementia  Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe the impact of neurocognitive disorders on patients, their families, and care providers. Patient-centred E Discuss and explain the role of community and social resources for patients and caregivers. Role Clarification E Describe ways to assess function over the course of Dementia. None  Describe preventative strategies to consider in long-term care (including influenza and pneumococcal immunization, infection control, and fall prevention). None  Medicine MEDD 422: Non-Pharmacological Treatment for Dementia Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe non-pharamacological strategies in a team for behavioral symptoms in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 422: Interprofessional Session on Dementia Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Recognize the different types of expertise required to assess geriatric population. Role Clarification E   67 Version: 5/15/2018 Management (Panel Discussion) Required Describe the scope of practice of different professions in the field of geriatrics Role Clarification E Medicine MEDD 422: Dementia in Real Life-Patient and Caregiver Perspective Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe the impact of neurocognitive disorders on patients, their families, and care providers. Patient-centred E Recognize the patient's perspective of living with dementia. None  Recognize the caregiver's perspective of caring for a person with dementia. None  List and discuss community resources available to patients and families who are living with dementia None  Medicine MEDD 422: Long Term Care and Health Promotion Strategies Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe a basic management plan for neurocognitive disorders, including the identification of allied health care providers for rehabilitative care. Role Clarification E Discuss the indications and implications for long-term care. None  Discuss why care facility staff should be immunized for influenza to protect patients. None  Medicine MEDD 422: Dementia - Week Wrap-Up Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Discuss the role of community and social resources for patients and caregivers. Patient-centred E   68 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 422: Medication Reconciliation   Year 2 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Identify evidence-based information and employ communication technology effectively to optimize patient health outcomes. Communication E Demonstrate collaborative, responsive and responsible communication with other healthcare practitioners. Communication E Apply the knowledge and clinical skills necessary to recognize, evaluate and resolve medication discrepancies at transitions of care to enhance patient safety. Patient-centred E Demonstrate knowledge of roles and respect for the diversity of perspectives and responsibilities among health care professionals. Describe how this diversity supports safety and quality in care plans. Role Clarification E Demonstrate proficiency in active team-based care including determining when care should be transferred to another physician or health care provider, safe handover of care and structured approaches to both transitions in care and ongoing shared care. Role Clarification E   69 Version: 5/15/2018 Demonstrate proficiency in active team-based care including determining when care should be transferred to another physician or health care provider, safe handover of care and structured approaches to both transitions in care and ongoing shared care. Team Functioning  E Apply strategies to integrate and engage physicians and other health care professional colleagues in respectful shared decision making.  Team Functioning  E Medicine MEDD 422: Consolidation of Clinical Transition 1 Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Communicate pertinent patient information clearly and assist in setting shared care plan with other health care professionals. Communication E Explain the role of clinicians and different members of a health care team in the diagnosis and management for patients with chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Role Clarification E Manage a patient with type 2 diabetes in the ambulatory setting. None  Medicine MEDD 422: Consolidation of Clinical Transition 2 Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Demonstrate strategies of collaborative decision-making and identify how all team members (including patient/family) contribute. Leadership E   70 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 422:Admitting The Patient Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe the handover of patient care using a structured communication tool - I-PASS. Communication E List the elements of a discharge summary. None  Perform the tasks required for rounding on a patient including writing a progess note. None  Medicine MEDD 422: Office Visits (1-8) Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Explain the role of family physicians and the primary health care team in the longitudinal and comprehensive care of their patients. Role Clarification E Demonstrate key components of professionalism including informed consent; respect of patient's confidentiality, privacy, and autonomy; appropriate boundaries in patient-physician relationships; respectful attitude toward colleagues and office staff. Patient-centred E Demonstrate key components of professionalism including informed consent; respect of patient's confidentiality, privacy, and autonomy; appropriate boundaries in patient-physician relationships; respectful attitude toward colleagues and office staff. Team Functioning E   71 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine MEDD 422: Clinical Skills Integration 4 Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Write a set of admission orders for this patient and  as if they were being admitted to hospital today. Patient-centred E Medicine MEDD 422: Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Discuss the role of the long-term doctor patient relationship and patient self-management as it applies to CHF. Patient-centred E Medicine Beyond the Clinic - Community Engagement as Scholarship Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Discuss interactions with community agencies. Communication E Medicine Beyond the Clinic - Cultural Safety and Scholarship Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Describe the challenges for participants, researchers and other stakeholders participating in community-based experiential learning projects. Conflict E Medicine FoS Journal Club Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required Explore challenges that might occur in organizing an experiential learning or community-service-scholarship activity. Conflict E Describe differences and similarities between experiential learning, volunteering, and community-service-scholarship. None    72 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine PMP Standardized Patient Group Sessions Year 4 Medicine Students - Term 2 Required To become more competent and comfortable in establishing relationships and engaging in care planning in a culturally safe manner with FN people. Communication E To feel more competent in, comfortable with, conversations about team-based practice. Communication E To become more competent and comfortable in establishing relationships and engaging in care planning in a culturally safe manner with FN people. Patient-centred E To become more competent and comfortable in establishing relationships and engaging in care planning in a culturally safe manner with FN people. Team Functioning  E To feel more competent in, comfortable with, conversations about team-based practice. Team Functioning  E Medicine The Physician-Pharmacist Relationship  Year 4 - Term 2 Optional Evening Session for Pharmacy and Medicine Students Summarize potential solutions to the challenges discussed in justifying the challenges and benefit of interdisciplinary practice in various environment and teams. Communication E   73 Version: 5/15/2018 Recognize the practical challenges of working in interdisciplinary teams. Conflict E Create a synergistic relationship with other healthcare professionals in your team to resolve a complex clinical problem. Leadership E Summarize potential solutions to the challenges discussed in justifying the challenges and benefit of interdisciplinary practice in various environment and teams. Team Functioning  E Recognize the practical challenges of working in interdisciplinary teams. Team Functioning  E  Create a synergistic relationship with other healthcare professionals in your team to resolve a complex clinical problem. Team Functioning  E Justify the challenges and benefits of interdisciplinary practice in various environments and teams. Team Functioning  E     74 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Midwifery ALARM – (MIDW 305)  Year 3 - Term 1 Evaluate, update and maintain competencies in primary maternity care None   Gain an understanding of best practice in obstetrics care Patient-centred E Participate in interprofessional management of obstetric emergencies Team Functioning  E Collaborate within the interprofessional team to support best practice and outcomes Team Functioning  E Midwifery Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E Midwifery Dialogue and Shared Decisions TLEF Year 3 - Term 2 or 3 Facilitate partnerships with persons who seek to design and implement Patient-centred I   75 Version: 5/15/2018 their own care plans. Describe the respective roles of relevant health professions, and use this knowledge appropriately to achieve patient/family and community goals. Role Clarification I Describe the respective roles of relevant health professions, and use this knowledge appropriately to achieve patient/family and community goals. Team Functioning  I Demonstrate effective communication with other health professionals and patients/clients in a collaborative, respectful, responsive, and responsible manner. Communication I Discuss the principles of teamwork dynamics and group processes that enable effective interprofessional collaboration. Team Functioning  I Describe how the patient/client, family, and community are affected by inequitable access to options for care, including choice of birth place, and/or availability of providers and facilities. Patient-centred I   76 Version: 5/15/2018 Describe how the patient/client, family, and community are affected by inequitable access to options for care, including choice of birth place, and/or availability of providers and facilities. Role Clarification I Demonstrate positive, constructive techniques and skills to address disagreements or divergence in opinion among providers and patients as they arise during health care decision making. Communication I Demonstrate positive, constructive techniques and skills to address disagreements or divergence in opinion among providers and patients as they arise during health care decision making. Conflict I Model best practices for communication and teamwork that support collaborating with patients/clients, families, and colleagues to make decisions, while accepting individual accountability for their own actions and professional responsibilities. Leadership I   77 Version: 5/15/2018 Midwifery MIDW 360 Global Maternal Infant Care Theory Year 3 - Term 2 Apply the broad social and economic determinants of health to concepts of reproductive health care in Canada and other countries. None   Analyze the causes of maternal, newborn and infant mortality and morbidity worldwide. None   Synthesize knowledge of broad public health measures to improve health in women of childbearing age both in Canada and in resource poor countries. None   Demonstrate knowledge of approaches that have used for prevention, identification and treatment of diseases and conditions relating to maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality.  Role Clarification E Midwifery MIDW 370 Global Maternal Infant Care Practicum Year 3 - Term 2 To learn about maternal and infant mortality/morbidity globally and in a low-income country; None   To participate in antenatal clinic, deliveries and postpartum care in a low-income country; None     78 Version: 5/15/2018 To be able to discuss reproductive health successes and challenges in another social-cultural context to different healthcare professionals and patients; Role Clarification  I To participate in teaching about birth using various methods and locally available technology; None   To participate in maternal infant care in rural and remote settings in a low-income country; None   To investigate global maternity care initiatives and be able to discuss both positive and less useful initiatives; None       79 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Nursing Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E Nursing MEDD 411/N303 Patient Safety – Shared Leadership, Partnered Activity Year 3 - Term 1 Engagement Communicate the essential elements of a case using the ISBAR communication tool Communication E Describe factors that contribute to adverse events in the Human Factors causal framework Leadership E Function effectively in nursing and inter-professional teams, fostering open communication, mutual respect, and shared decision-making to achieve quality patient care. Leadership E   80 Version: 5/15/2018 Explain "shared leadership" with examples using the causal framework Team Functioning  E Function effectively in nursing and inter-professional teams, fostering open communication, mutual respect, and shared decision-making to achieve quality patient care. Team Functioning  E Nursing Medication Reconciliation (Partnered Activity)  Term 2 Required Identify evidence-based information and employ communication technology effectively to optimize patient health outcomes Communication E Demonstrate collaborative, responsive and responsible communication with other healthcare practitioners Communication E Apply the knowledge and clinical skills necessary to recognize, evaluate and resolve medication discrepancies at transitions of care to enhance patient safety. Role Clarification E Demonstrate knowledge of roles and respect for the diversity of perspectives and responsibilities among health care professionals. Describe how this diversity supports safety and quality in care plans. Role Clarification E   81 Version: 5/15/2018 Demonstrate proficiency in active team-based care including determining when care should be transferred to another physician or health care provider, safe handover of care and structured approaches to both transitions in care and ongoing shared care. Role Clarification E Negotiate role overlap and responsibilities in a complex care case Role Clarification E Demonstrate proficiency in active team-based care including determining when care should be transferred to another physician or health care provider, safe handover of care and structured approaches to both transitions in care and ongoing shared care. Team Functioning  E Apply strategies to integrate and engage physicians and other health care professional colleagues in respectful shared decision making.  Team Functioning  E     82 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Occupational Therapy Advanced communication skills (RSOT 549 or PHTH 549) Term 1 Passport and Program level requirement Demonstrate appropriate therapeutic and interpersonal skills with the standard patients and other members of the healthcare team.  Communication I Demonstrate appropriate therapeutic and interpersonal skills with the standard patients and other members of the healthcare team.  Team Functioning  I Occupational Therapy Client-Centred Practice, ICF and Social Determinants of Health – (OSOT513)  Year ? - Full Year, Passport and Program level Requirement Describe purpose of International Classification of Functioning (ICF) Communication E Define client-centred practice (CCP) Patient-centred E List at least five concepts contributing to a client-centred philosophy Patient-centred E Discuss major barriers to client-centred practice and possible solutions to address them Patient-centred E Occupational Therapy Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None     83 Version: 5/15/2018 Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E Occupational Therapy PHTH 514 Ambulation Session – (RSOT 515 or PHTH 514)  Year ? - Term 1 Passport and Program level requirement Instruct a client in the use of ambulation aids Communication E Appropriately select and measure an aid for a client Patient-centred E Instruct a client in the use of ambulation aids Patient-centred E Identify the most common types of ambulatory aids Role Clarification E Identify and demonstrate different weight-bearing categories and gait patterns used with ambulatory aids Role Clarification E Identify major safety concerns when using aids Team Functioning  E     84 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Pharmacy DentPharm Case-based Learning (Cardiovascular Case)  Year 2 - Term 1 Required Reflect on team functioning and determine areas of strength and areas for improvement Team Functioning  E Describe the role of the pharmacist and dentist in the care of patients. Patient-centred E Describe the role of the pharmacist and dentist in the care of patients. Role Clarification E Communicate to ensure common understanding of care decisions by actively listening to other team members. Communication E Participate, and be respectful of all members’ participation, in collaborative decision making. Team Functioning  E  Pharmacy DentPharmPhysio Case-based Learning (Neurology Case)  Year? - Term 2 Required Communicate to ensure common understanding of care decisions by actively listening to other team members Communication E Identify common situations in chronic pain management that are likely to lead to disagreements or conflicts, including role ambiguity, power gradients, and differences in goals. Conflict E   85 Version: 5/15/2018 Describe the role of the pharmacist, dentist, and physical therapist in patient-centred care and the collaborative management of a patient with chronic pain. Patient-centred E Describe the role of the pharmacist, dentist, and physical therapist in patient-centred care and the collaborative management of a patient with chronic pain. Role Clarification E Communicate to ensure common understanding of care decisions by actively listening to other team members Team Functioning  E Participate, and be respectful of all members’ participation, in collaborative decision-making. Team Functioning  E Develop a set of principles for working together that respects the ethical values of team members Team Functioning  E Pharmacy Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E   86 Version: 5/15/2018 Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E Pharmacy Living with Schizophrenia Interprofessional Panel and Case Activity  Year? - Term 2 Required Learn how to facilitate forming interprofessional relationships in future practice. Leadership E Understand the importance of the interprofessional collaboration in patient-centered care. Patient-centred E Further understand the role of other healthcare professionals. Role Clarification E Gain further insight about interprofessional collaboration in real life practice. Team Functioning  E Learn how to facilitate forming interprofessional relationships in future practice. Team Functioning  E Pharmacy Medication Reconciliation through the Interprofessional Collaboration  Year? - Term 2 Required Identify evidence-based information and employ communication technology effectively to optimize patient health outcomes Communication E Demonstrate collaborative, responsive and responsible communication with other healthcare practitioners Communication E   87 Version: 5/15/2018 Apply the knowledge and clinical skills necessary to recognize, evaluate and resolve medication discrepancies at transitions of care to enhance patient safety. Role Clarification E Demonstrate knowledge of roles and respect for the diversity of perspectives and responsibilities among health care professionals. Describe how this diversity supports safety and quality in care plans. Role Clarification E Demonstrate proficiency in active team-based care including determining when care should be transferred to another physician or health care provider, safe handover of care and structured approaches to both transitions in care and ongoing shared care. Role Clarification E Negotiate role overlap and responsibilities in a complex care case Role Clarification E Demonstrate proficiency in active team-based care including determining when care should be transferred to another physician or health care provider, safe handover of care and structured approaches to both transitions in care and ongoing shared care. Team Functioning  E   88 Version: 5/15/2018 Apply strategies to integrate and engage physicians and other health care professional colleagues in respectful shared decision making.  Team Functioning  E Pharmacy Pharmacy -Pharmacy Technician Interactive Webinar Year 1 - Term 1 Required  List the benefits of working in a team with a pharmacy technician. None   List the different licensure requirements in British Columbia for a pharmacy technician and pharmacist. Role Clarification E Describe the overlapping role of the pharmacy technician and pharmacist in different case examples Role Clarification E Describe the responsibilities and role of the pharmacy tech in comparison to an unregulated pharmacy assistant and a pharmacist. Role Clarification E Pharmacy The Contraceptive Conversation Year? - Term 1 Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of effective communication in support of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Practice using communication skills, strategies and tools to support interprofessional communication Communication E Practice collaborative approaches to sharing information that actively engage patients and families in their own care; Communication E   89 Version: 5/15/2018 Practice collaborative approaches to sharing information that actively engage patients and families in their own care; Patient-centred E Contextualize patient-centred care within interprofessional practice; Patient-centred E Recognize the diversity of other health and social care roles, responsibilities, and competencies. Role Clarification E Pharmacy The Physician-Pharmacist Relationship  Year? - Term ? Optional Evening Session for Pharmacy and Medicine Students Summarize potential solutions to the challenges discussed in justifying the challenges and benefit of interdisciplinary practice in various environment and teams. Communication E Recognize the practical challenges of working in interdisciplinary teams. Conflict E Create a synergistic relationship with other healthcare professionals in your team to resolve a complex clinical problem. Leadership E Summarize potential solutions to the challenges discussed in justifying the challenges and benefit of interdisciplinary practice in various environment and teams. Team Functioning  E Recognize the practical challenges of working in interdisciplinary teams. Team Functioning  E    90 Version: 5/15/2018 Create a synergistic relationship with other healthcare professionals in your team to resolve a complex clinical problem. Team Functioning  E Justify the challenges and benefits of interdisciplinary practice in various environments and teams. Team Functioning  E     91 Version: 5/15/2018       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Physical Therapy Advanced communication skills (RSOT 549 or PHTH 549) Term 1 Passport and Program level requirement Demonstrate appropriate therapeutic and interpersonal skills with the standard patients and other members of the healthcare team.  Communication I Demonstrate appropriate therapeutic and interpersonal skills with the standard patients and other members of the healthcare team.  Team Functioning  I Physical Therapy Client-centred Practice, ICF and Social Determinants of Health – (OSOT513)  Year ? - Full Year, Passport and Program level Requirement Describe purpose of International Classification of Functioning (ICF) Communication E Define client-centred practice (CCP) Patient-centred E List at least five concepts contributing to a client-centred philosophy Patient-centred E Discuss major barriers to client-centred practice and possible solutions to address them Patient-centred E Physical Therapy DentPharmPhysio Case-based Learning (Neurology Case), Complex Pain – Year ? - Term 2 Required Communicate to ensure a common understanding of care decisions by actively listening to other team members Communication E   92 Version: 5/15/2018 (RHSC 420 ) Identify common situations in chronic pain management that are likely to lead to disagreements or conflicts, including role ambiguity, power gradients, and differences in goals Conflict E Describe the pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, causes, classifications, risk factors, goals of therapy, pharmacological interventions/evidence, and physical therapy exercises for the following conditions: tension type headaches, medication overuse headaches, migraines, MSK pain, neuropathic pain, facial pain, insomnia None   Describe the role of pharmacist, dentist and physical therapist in patient-centred care and collaborative management of a patient with chronic pain Role Clarification E Identify the scope of practice, professional obligations, and current guidelines/resources for each discipline with regards to the opioid crisis and the use of naloxone Role Clarification E   93 Version: 5/15/2018 Develop a set of principles for working together which respects the ethical values of team members Team Functioning  E Physical Therapy Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E Physical Therapy PHTH 514 Ambulation Session – (RSOT 515 or PHTH 514  Year ? - Term ? Passport and Program level requirement Instruct a client in the use of ambulation aids Communication E Appropriately select and measure an aid for a client Patient-centred E Instruct a client in the use of ambulation aids Patient-centred E Identify the most common types of ambulatory aids Role Clarification E Identify and demonstrate different weight-bearing categories and gait patterns used with ambulatory aids Role Clarification E Identify major safety concerns when using aids Team Functioning  E           94 Version: 5/15/2018 Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Social Work Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E       Program Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) School of Population and Public Health Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E    95 Version: 5/15/2018 Appendix B – Integrated Curricula Mapping Data Activity Timing Learning Objective(s) Competency Exposure (E) Immersion (I) UBC Health Connect: Social Determinants of Health Term 1, mid-September Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Describe the breadth of health care programs of UBC and connect with students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Become familiar with the concept of social determinants of health Patient-centered E Explore the connections and complexities between the social determinants of health and interprofessional collaboration Patient-centered E Q1 iEthics: Foundations of Ethical Practice TBD by program- early Articulate how personal and professional values, beliefs and perspectives influence ethical decision-making Team Functioning E Communication E Compare codes of ethics from different professions Role Clarification E Use your professional code of ethics to describe your professional responsibilities in relation to specific ethical scenarios  Role Clarification E Communication E Describe how the fundamental elements of an ethical decision-making framework might be applied in specific cases Team Functioning E Communication E Patient Centered E Q3 iEthics: Interprofessional Ethical Decision-Making – Important Concepts TBD by program- late Demonstrate how to effectively approach differences in your personal values and beliefs with those of others as they relate to ethical practice Team Functioning E Communication E Conflict Resolution E Consider multiple perspectives in addition to your own when involved in shared ethical decision making  Team Functioning I Role Clarification I Demonstrate collaborative practice competencies with other members of the healthcare team when engaged in complex ethical discussions Team Functioning I Role Clarification I Leadership E Conflict Resolution E Communication I Patient-Centered E Apply an ethical decision making framework to a complex clinical situation in an interprofessional setting Team Functioning I Leadership E Conflict Resolution E Communication I Patient-Centered E Recognize the importance of effective Team Functioning E   96 Version: 5/15/2018 collaboration with patients/clients/families and healthcare team members when engaging in shared ethical decision-making Leadership E Conflict Resolution E Communication E Patient-Centered E Q1 eHealth: Health Informatics TBD by program- late Describe the overarching goals of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) within the current healthcare context Communication E Analyze how ICT supports or inhibits safe, collaborative, person-centered care to diverse populations across practice settings Patient-centered E Analyze the potential impact of ICT on the relationship between patients/clients and their healthcare team Patient-centered E Communication E Apply the principles that guide effective ICT use in healthcare in a specific case Team Functioning E Role Clarification E Conflict Resolution E Communication E Leadership E Patient-centered E Identify appropriate ways to use ICT based on an individual’s digital literacy Communication E Patient-centered E Q1 Indigenous Cultural Safety TBD by program- early Explore diversity and aspects of identity  Patient-centred E Examine Intersectionality in relation to privilege and oppression  Patient-centred E Acknowledge Indigenous people’s diverse perspectives on culture, language and identity Leadership E Communication E Patient-centered E Explore concepts of stereotyping, prejudice and implicit bias  Conflict Resolution E Communication E Patient-centered E Discuss how to integrate cultural safety and cultural humility approaches into health care practice and strategize to leverage power relationships between health care professional and patient/client  Team Functioning E Leadership E Conflict Resolution E Communication E Patient-centered E      97 Version: 5/15/2018 Appendix C – IPE Passport Activity Mapping Data Programs Involved Activity Timing Learning Objectives Competency Exposure (E), Immersion (I) Available to all programs Aboriginal Community as Teacher Cultural Camps  Summer - Passport activity elective  Students will be able to reflect on their behaviours, including communication, with First Nations youth, camp leaders, and within an interprofessional team; including identifying effective and ineffective or counterproductive behaviours Communication I Students will be able to reflect on their behaviours, including communication, with First Nations youth, camp leaders, and within an interprofessional team; including identifying effective and ineffective or counterproductive behaviours Conflict I Students will be able to develop skills in cultural awareness, sensitivity, and safety by identifying their own cultural norms and describing cultural differences that can affect professional practice. Patient-centred I Students will be able to describe the unique ways in which culture affects health needs of First Nations people and communities Patient-centred I Students will be able to compare and contrast the definitions of “health” from a First Nations perspective with that of their own. Patient-centred I Students will be able to describe examples of traditional healing practices and sources of community expertise. Role Clarification I Students will be able to recognize the diversity of other health and social care roles, responsibilities, and competencies and describe your own role and that of others Role Clarification E   98 Version: 5/15/2018 Students will be able to reflect on their behaviours, including communication, with First Nations youth, camp leaders, and within an interprofessional team; including identifying effective and ineffective or counterproductive behaviours Team Functioning  I Available to all programs BC Special Olympics Healthy Athlete Program Term 1 and Term  2 - Passport activity elective Experience in communicating and administering health screenings to people with ID Communication I Gaining a better understanding of the challenges and barriers experienced by with ID as it relates to access to health care Communication I Create projects that generate data that will help to promote awareness for inclusive health for people with ID Communication I Experience in communicating and administering health screenings to people with ID Patient-centred I Gaining a better understanding of the challenges and barriers experienced by with ID as it relates to access to health care Patient-centred I Providing a positive and desensitizing experience to people with ID and help them build rapport with medical professionals and common procedures. Patient-centred I Provide professional networking opportunity for FLEX students while also making new partnerships with medical professionals who could volunteer or provide follow up care to Health Athlete Screenings Role Clarification E Create projects that generate data that will help to promote awareness for inclusive health for people with ID Team Functioning  E   99 Version: 5/15/2018 Medicine, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy, Social Work CHIUS 3 Bridges Interprofessional Student Led Clinic Term 1 and Term 2 (October-March), Saturday mornings, 3-week blocks, - Passport activity elective Students learn with and about other health care professions, including the roles that they play on contemporary health care teams. Role Clarification I Under the supervision of preceptors, students interview persons living with chronic health conditions, and through a unique, team-based approach, provide appropriate counselling and deliver interventions. Patient-centred I Medicine, Nursing CHIUS Vancouver Native Health Interprofessional Student Led Clinic Term 1 and Term 2 (September-April),  - Passport activity elective Students work in a multidisciplinary comprehensive care clinic under the supervision of a family medicine preceptor and nursing (RN) preceptor to deliver comprehensive medical, counselling and social services generally to Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) Aboriginal community. Patient-centred I Students work in a multidisciplinary comprehensive care clinic under the supervision of a family medicine preceptor and nursing (RN) preceptor to deliver comprehensive medical, counselling and social services generally to Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) Aboriginal community. Team Functioning  I Audiology & SLP, Medicine, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy CHIUS Vancouver Native Health Youth Initiative Dinners September-August, 1 dinner per month - Passport activity elective Students work in a multidisciplinary comprehensive care clinic under the supervision of a family medicine preceptor and nursing (RN) preceptor in order to serve nutritious meals and develop socially responsible attitudes. Patient-centred I   100 Version: 5/15/2018 Students work in a multidisciplinary comprehensive care clinic under the supervision of a family medicine preceptor and nursing (RN) preceptor in order to serve nutritious meals and develop socially responsible attitudes. Team Functioning  I Available to all programs CWGHR Module: Rehabilitation in the Context of HIV Term 1 (October), Term 2 (January) - Passport activity elective  Students will stimulate taking HIV antiretroviral drugs by using candy. Students will experience firsthand how easy or difficult it is to fully adhere to a treatment program and discuss this in relation to collaborative care-planning and the responsibilities each healthcare provider plays in the world of HIV. Role Clarification I  Students will stimulate taking HIV antiretroviral drugs by using candy. Students will experience firsthand how easy or difficult it is to fully adhere to a treatment program and discuss this in relation to collaborative care-planning, decision making and the responsibilities each healthcare provider plays in the world of HIV. Team Functioning  I Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, Dental Hygiene, Dentistry, Dietetics, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy Eating, Feeding and Swallowing (DHYG 310)  Year ? - Term 1 Required for Dental Hygiene Students, Passport activity elective for others Discuss the interprofessional role of dental hygienist on a provided health scenario with other health professions Role Clarification E Gain awareness of roles and responsibilities of other health care professionals Role Clarification E Dietetics, Medicine, Nursing, Hatching Health  Term ? - Passport activity Critically reflect on your own communication style and how this may influence an interprofessional Communication E   101 Version: 5/15/2018 Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Social Work elective work environment Integrate and apply frameworks to support overall learning and interprofessional communication development Communication E Collaborate with other professions to set common, patient-centred goals and share decision-making Communication E Identify and practice conflict management strategies to deal with interprofessional conflicts effectively. Conflict E Initiate purposeful collaborations and create opportunities to maximize the contributions of each discipline involved in care. Role Clarification E Strategize ways to improve interprofessional team functioning Team Functioning  E Available to all programs Health Care Team Challenge  Term 2 - Passport activity elective To demonstrate the concept of a health care team and how various health professions contribute to the solution of clinical problems Role Clarification I To enhance students’ knowledge about each other’s health professions and each other’s health professional roles in the clinical arena Role Clarification E To demonstrate the concept of a health care team and how various health professions contribute to the solution of clinical problems Team Functioning  I To provide an opportunity for all to reflect on and dialogue about team processes Team Functioning  E Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, Dental Hygiene, Health Care Travelling Roadshow  May - Passport activity elective Showcase healthcare careers as options for rural students None   Showcase the rural community as a career option for healthcare students None     102 Version: 5/15/2018 Dentistry, Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy Provide an interdisciplinary experience for the healthcare students None   Understanding the benefits and challenges of working in a rural underserviced area Patient-centred E Available to all programs Health Connect  Term 1 - Passport and Program level requirement Describe the importance of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Actively seek out other interprofessional learning activities. None   Describe the breadth of health care programs at UBC and connect students in different health professional programs Role Clarification E Apply basic principles of interprofessional collaboration Team Functioning  E Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, Dentistry, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy Health Mentors Term 1 - Passport activity elective Provide learning relevant to all six interprofessional competency domains identified in the National Competency Framework for Interprofessional Collaboration (role clarification, team functioning, interprofessional conflict resolution, patient/client/family centered care, communication and collaborative leadership) Communication E Provide learning relevant to all six interprofessional competency domains identified in the National Competency Framework for Interprofessional Collaboration (role clarification, team functioning, interprofessional conflict resolution, patient/client/family centered care, communication and collaborative leadership) Conflict E   103 Version: 5/15/2018 Provide learning relevant to all six interprofessional competency domains identified in the National Competency Framework for Interprofessional Collaboration (role clarification, team functioning, interprofessional conflict resolution, patient/client/family centered care, communication and collaborative leadership) Leadership E Help students learn about the experience of chronic disease and the range of work involved in its management, from the perspective of the patient and family Patient-centred I Help students explore their roles, both as individual practitioners and interprofessional teams; support Chronic Disease Self-Management (CDSM) addressing psychosocial and biomedical needs Patient-centred I Provide learning relevant to all six interprofessional competency domains identified in the National Competency Framework for Interprofessional Collaboration (role clarification, team functioning, interprofessional conflict resolution, patient/client/family centered care, communication and collaborative leadership) Patient-centred E Permit students to meet discipline specific objectives in related topics, such as the social determinants of health and communication skills Patient-centred I Offer members of the wider community opportunities to share their lived experiences and participate in educating future health care professionals Patient-centred I   104 Version: 5/15/2018 Help students explore their roles, both as individual practitioners and interprofessional teams; support Chronic Disease Self-Management (CDSM) addressing psychosocial and biomedical needs Role Clarification I Provide learning relevant to all six interprofessional competency domains identified in the National Competency Framework for Interprofessional Collaboration (role clarification, team functioning, interprofessional conflict resolution, patient/client/family centered care, communication and collaborative leadership) Role Clarification E Help students learn about the experience of chronic disease and the range of work involved in its management, from the perspective of the patient and family Team Functioning  I Help students explore their roles, both as individual practitioners and interprofessional teams; support Chronic Disease Self-Management (CDSM) addressing psychosocial and biomedical needs Team Functioning  I Provide learning relevant to all six interprofessional competency domains identified in the National Competency Framework for Interprofessional Collaboration (role clarification, team functioning, interprofessional conflict resolution, patient/client/family centered care, communication and collaborative leadership) Team Functioning  E Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy Influenza Immunization Clinic  Term 1 - Passport activity elective Students interact and communicate with other health profession students during both the orientation session (attending a didactic session together and practicing skills on one another) and the actual flu clinic day (in the running of the clinic and in the post-clinic debrief). Students from Communication E   105 Version: 5/15/2018 multiple health disciplines are scheduled within each clinic to ensure they have the opportunity to work with one another. Learners will be able to understand each health disciplines role and limitations when providing immunizations. Additionally, they will understand the requirements for operating a pop-up health clinic for the purposes of serving a large population. This is different from a standard clinical practice. Learners are advised of their roles and limitations during orientation and are discussed in small group settings during clinic debriefs. Role Clarification E Learners will be able to understand each health disciplines role and limitations when providing immunizations. Additionally, they will understand the requirements for operating a pop-up health clinic for the purposes of serving a large population. This is different from a standard clinical practice. Learners are advised of their roles and limitations during orientation and are discussed in small group settings during clinic debriefs. Team Functioning  E Learners/practitioners understand and can apply principles that support a collaborative practice model. This supports shared decision-making as well as leadership but it also implies continued individual accountability for one’s own actions, responsibilities and roles as explicitly defined within one’s professional/disciplinary scope of practice. The objective is met by regular supervision and discussion Team Functioning  E   106 Version: 5/15/2018 with immunization supervisors. Available to all programs IP Placement Activity 1: Reflection on an IPE Session Upper level students - Passport activity elective Develop a different understanding of issues of common concern for a range of health care providers. Role Clarification E Understand the roles of other health care providers and the contributions they make to the health care team Role Clarification  E Available to all programs IP Placement Activity 2: Shadowing a Team member Upper level students - Passport activity elective Describe their own roles, responsibilities, values and scope of practice effectively to a team member  Role Clarification E   107 Version: 5/15/2018 Explain how other professions’ goals are related to and different from their own role  Role Clarification E Relate their learning to patient/client goals  Patient-centred E Describe why or why not interprofessional collaboration is required for patient/client care  Leadership E Explain the concept of a team Team Functioning  E   108 Version: 5/15/2018 Demonstrate effective team skills by sharing information effectively, listening attentively, using understandable communications and responding to feedback from others Communication E Available to all programs IP Placement Activity 3: Participation in a Team meeting Upper level students - Passport activity elective Identify factors that contribute to or hinder team collaboration Team Functioning  E Recognize the dynamic nature of teams Team Functioning  E Consider conditions that promote collaboration Leadership E   109 Version: 5/15/2018 Analyze team dynamics and stages of team development Team Functioning  E Available to all programs Patient and Community Voice Workshop  June - Passport activity elective Describe the perspective of persons living with HIV related to an interprofessional health care team Patient-centred E Discuss what is meant by a right to care in the context of HIV Patient-centred E Discuss the safety and security concerns of persons living with HIV Patient-centred E Describe available community resources available to persons living with HIV Patient-centred E Describe available community resources available to persons living with HIV Team Functioning  E Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, School of Population and Public Health Public Health Symposium Term 1 - Passport activity elective Presenters will discuss an interdisciplinary approach to public health, specifically in 2018 where the theme was centered on improving healthcare for refugees and immigrants. Patient-centred E Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy, Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp Year 2 - Term 1 Passport activity elective To learn supported communication strategies to support people with aphasia Communication I To understand barriers and facilitators to participation in people with aphasia Patient-centred I   110 Version: 5/15/2018 Physical Therapy To learn supported communication strategies to support people with aphasia Patient-centred I To understand your role in relation to community aphasia activities and programming Role Clarification I To understand the role of your health professional peers in relation to community aphasia activities and programming Role Clarification E Available to all programs SOWK 451 - Health Care Team Development Year ? - Passport Activity Elective Understand the components for effective reflective practice in communication, conflict management, leadership and relationship-centred practices Communication E Understand the components for effective reflective practice in communication, conflict management, leadership and relationship-centred practices Conflict E Understand the components for effective reflective practice in communication, conflict management, leadership and relationship-centred practices Leadership E Articulate the role and value of their discipline to patient care  Patient-centred E Identify barriers and strategies to increase greater patient and family participation.  Patient-centred E Articulate the role and value of their discipline to patient care  Role Clarification E Identify the potential impact of professional and personal values on patient care and teamwork Role Clarification E   111 Version: 5/15/2018 Understand the structure and processes of effective teams within health care context health care team  Team Functioning  E Understand what skills are required to work collaboratively on an interprofessional team Team Functioning  E Develop the skills to more effectively facilitate team process Team Functioning  E Develop realistic and relevant team development strategies.  Team Functioning  E Analyze a fictional health care team’s strengths and challenges.  Team Functioning  E Available to all programs SPPH 410 Improving Public Health - (SPPH 410)  Year ? - Term 2 Passport Activity Elective Communicate ideas and opinions with clarity and respect Communication E Demonstrate effective and respectful problem solving skills Communication E Demonstrate effective and respectful problem solving skills Conflict E Demonstrate collaborative teamwork and leadership skills Leadership E   112 Version: 5/15/2018 Perform a thorough analysis of a selected public health issue (also known as a health condition, health problem or health outcome) as it relates to a specific target population Patient-centred E Identify and use information resources from other disciplines Role Clarification E Demonstrate collaborative teamwork and leadership skills Team Functioning  E Demonstrate effective and respectful problem solving skills Team Functioning  E Outline the major component objectives, strengths and weaknesses of different intervention Options, provide rationale for selecting a particular intervention, and describe specific details of the intervention plan reflecting scientific, political, practical, economic, cultural and ethical considerations Team Functioning  E Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing, Pharmacy The Contraceptive Conversation  Term 2 Passport activity and required for Pharmacy Describe the importance of effective communication in support of interprofessional collaboration Communication E Practice using communication skills, strategies and tools to support interprofessional communication Communication E Practice collaborative approaches to sharing information that actively engage patients and families in their own care; Communication E Practice collaborative approaches to sharing information that actively engage patients and families in their own care; Patient-centred E Contextualize patient-centred care within interprofessional practice; Patient-centred E Recognize the diversity of other health and social care roles, responsibilities, and competencies. Role Clarification E  

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