Open Collections

UBC Graduate Research

Green commercial real estate : corporate social responsibility Goldberger, Nicole 2010

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
42591-Green_Commercial_Real_Estate.pdf [ 3.62MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 42591-1.0078391.json
JSON-LD: 42591-1.0078391-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 42591-1.0078391-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 42591-1.0078391-rdf.json
Turtle: 42591-1.0078391-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 42591-1.0078391-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 42591-1.0078391-source.json
Full Text
42591-1.0078391-fulltext.txt
Citation
42591-1.0078391.ris

Full Text

 	  Green Commercial Real Estate: Corporate Social Responsibility   Fall 2010 Prepared by: Nicole Goldberger ISIS, Sauder School of Business, UBC   K?<LE@M<IJ@KPF=9I@K@J?:FCLD9@8__________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  1	  ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS   Many individuals and groups supported the Green Commercial Real Estate project over the course of its design, development and implementation. We are grateful to all that believed in the vision and helped make it a reality including:   Project Leads Joanna Buczkowska, ISIS Research Centre   Graduate Student Project Team Andreas Boehm, ISIS Research Centre Nicole Goldberger, ISIS Research Centre Amin Shahbaz, ISIS Research Centre H.J. Geoff Taylor, ISIS Research Centre   Advisors, Contributors & Supporters Sauder School of Business, UBC MITACS   Partners Faaiza Lalji, Larco Investments Ltd.  Amin Lalji, Larco Investments Ltd.     __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  2	  TABLE OF CONTENTS  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................3 OVERVIEW ......................................................................................................................................................4 GLOBAL REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY .........................................................................................................4 CANADIAN REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY .....................................................................................................5 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY .................................................................................................5 SUSTAINABILITY DRIVERS AND COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE ..........................................................6 SUSTAINABILITY TRENDS ........................................................................................................................7 ANALYSIS .......................................................................................................................................................8 IDENTIFIED GLOBAL BEST PRACTICES .................................................................................................8 ECONOMIC..................................................................................................................................................9 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE..................................................................................................................9 CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY............................................................................................................10 CONTRIBUTION TO COMMUNITY .......................................................................................................11 ENVIRONMENTAL ....................................................................................................................................12 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ..................................................................................................................12 CLIMATE CHANGE................................................................................................................................13 ENERGY AND EMISSIONS...................................................................................................................13 RESOURCE USE AND WASTE ............................................................................................................15 SOURCING ............................................................................................................................................15 BIODIVERSITY ......................................................................................................................................16 SOCIAL ......................................................................................................................................................18 EMPLOYMENT AND DEMOGRAPHICS ...............................................................................................18 EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION, TRAINING AND EDUCATION...............................................................19 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (OH&S)...............................................................................19 GOVERNANCE ......................................................................................................................................20 TRANSPARENCY ..................................................................................................................................20 CULTURAL ................................................................................................................................................21 RECOMMENDATIONS..................................................................................................................................23 APPENDICES ................................................................................................................................................25 APPENDIX 1: CORPORATION OVERVIEW.............................................................................................25 APPENDIX 2: CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY MODELS .......................................................26 DEXUS ...................................................................................................................................................26 HAMMERSON........................................................................................................................................27 MITSUIBISHI ..........................................................................................................................................28 STOCKLAND..........................................................................................................................................29 BRITISH LAND.......................................................................................................................................30 LAND SECURITIES ...............................................................................................................................31 OXFORD PROPERTIES ........................................................................................................................31 FOOT NOTES ................................................................................................................................................32  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  3	  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  This report is a guide and reference document for best practices in corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the global commercial real estate industry. This report identifies the drivers and trends in CSR in the real estate industry, and how such strategies have been converted into tangible operational initiatives and corporate changes.   The report examines thirteen corporations, which are considered to be leading global real estate companies based on their profitability, transparency and sustainability index ratings in: The Carbon Disclosure Project, Dow Jones Sustainability World Index, the FTSE4Good Global Index, and the Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations List. These companies were evaluated by reviewing the above indexes, industry reports, and each company’s respective web site and CSR report.   The report provides an overview of CSR and discusses best practices within each of its key: economic, environmental, social, and cultural.   Economic: includes a company’s financial performance, their commitment to corporate philanthropy, and their contribution to the community.  Environmental: consists of an environmental policy that enables a company to develop strategies to manage energy and emissions, resource use and waste, sourcing and biodiversity.     Social: refers to a company’s employment policy, including demographics, training and education, health and safety, and the satisfaction of its employees. In addition, it takes into account the governance and transparency of an organization.   Cultural: divides into three main categories, including employees, suppliers and the community. It relates to the training and retention of employees, the type of suppliers a company uses and its community engagement.   Each area is looked at in-depth with case study examples of companies that are considered to be best practice. By embedding sustainability into a company’s overall corporate strategy it will enable them to achieve a sustainable bottom line. Real Estate companies can utilize these recognized best practices to implement sustainability in their organization.   __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  4	  OVERVIEW GLOBAL REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY  The commercial real estate industry can be sub-divided into focuses of activity, including: development, ownership, construction/contracting, property management and funds management.1 This highly fragmented industry has been moving towards sustainability, as a result of increased consumer and tenant awareness of green buildings and sustainable principles. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency defines green building as “the practice of creating structures and using processes that are environmentally responsible and resource–efficient throughout a building’s life–cycle from siting to design, construction, operation, maintenance, renovation and deconstruction.”2  As of 2009, the global real estate management and development industry was worth a total market value of $461.4 billion, 8% down from the year prior. However, this decline was a result of the global recession, and Canada’s major office and industrial real estate markets are expected to recover faster than many markets including the United States and Europe.3 Over the next 5 years, the global real estate management sector is forecasted to increase by 10.8% to reach $511.1 billion.4  Globally, residential real estate is the largest segment of real estate, accounting for 56.7% of the industry’s value. It is also the most lucrative segment, generating revenues of $261.4 billion. Whereas the non-residential segment composed of commercial and industrial real estate, make up the industry’s remaining revenue of $200 billion.5   The European market accounts for the largest share of the real estate industry, with 36.3% of the market, generating $167.7 billion. The Asian-Pacific market generated the second greatest revenues with $96.4 billion in 2009.  The leading player in this industry is Mitsui Fudosan Co Ltd, generating the greatest amount of industry’s value.6 In addition to being market leaders in 2008, Land Securities (0.7%), CB Richard Ellis (1.2%), Mitsui Fudosan (2.1%) and Mitsubishi (1.6%) were also recognized as best in show in CSR7 based on index ratings in The Carbon Disclosure Project, Dow Jones Sustainability World Index, the FTSE4Good Global Index, and the Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations List.  UK and Australian real estate property companies are leading the way in CSR reporting. In comparison Canadian Real Estate companies, are far behind in adopting and implementing CSR programs.8  As of August 1st 2009, there were only 58 real estate sector reports published in 2008 and compiled on CorporateRegister.com out of 3,347 corporate responsibility/sustainability reports. Of these 58 reports released by real estate property companies 17 were from the UK, 10 from Australia, and two from Canada.9       __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  5	  CANADIAN REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY  Canadians spend approximately 90% of their time inside buildings, as a result there are approximately 12.5 million residential homes and 500,000 commercial / institutional buildings in  Canada.10 Buildings in Canada account for at least one third of Canada’s energy production11 While the commercial building sector accounts for 13% of Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions.12 This presents a large opportunity for real estate companies to positively impact the commercial real estate sector while reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.   CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY  Sustainable development is defined as meeting the “needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”.13   A competitive advantage can be gained by identifying and then leveraging the interdependence between an organization and society. Implementing corporate social responsibility (CSR) can enable organizations to achieve a sustainable bottom line by incorporating social, cultural, environmental and economic factors into their business plan.14   According to Porter and Kramer, there are three ways to intersect with society: generic social issues, value chain social impacts, and social dimensions of competitive context. It is important to be a good corporate citizen and mitigate risks from business activities on society. However, companies should be strategic, and go beyond best practices to transform value chain social impacts into activities that benefit society. This leverages a company’s capabilities to improve its competitiveness.  Strategic CSR allows an organization to transform its value chain activities to benefit society by identifying opportunities to benefit the business, stakeholders and the local community.15 According to an Accenture study, 96% of CEOs believe that sustainability issues should be fully integrated into the strategy and operations of a company (up from 72% in 2007).16 Thus, utilizing these frameworks will enable an organization to integrate sustainability into its corporate strategy. The ‘Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations in the World’ report identifies companies, which have successfully integrated sustainability into their strategy. The report recognized General Electric as the most sustainable company worldwide, several of the real estate companies examined in this report were identified within this index, including Prologis, Stockland, GPT Group, and Dexus Property Group.17  Economic	  factors	  Environ-­‐	  mental	  factors	  Social	  factors	  Cultural	  factors	  Sustainable	  bottom	  line	  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  6	  SUSTAINABILITY DRIVERS AND COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 	   	     According to a CB Richard Ellis US representative, “renovating a building to comply with LEED EB can translate into improved market ability and higher rents”; and according to Cushman Wakefield LePage “buildings that aren’t undergoing energy and environmental retrofits are at a great risk of future functional obsolescence and will become difficult to refinance and/or sell”.18 As a result, it is becoming common practice to incorporate standard CSR into one’s real estate portfolio. CSR determines the impacts of a corporation’s operations and finds opportunities to benefit employees and the community. The commercial real estate sector does not only require CSR within its business operations, but also the movement towards more green building developments and responsible property investment (see diagram above). Green building refers to the proactive management of real estate buildings, which reduces the environmental impacts and creates benefits for owners, tenants and the community. Whereas responsible property investment allows for real estate investors to consider the risks and opportunities for long-term value creation by evaluating portfolios based on environmental, social, cultural and economic factors rather than just on economic factors.19 By incorporating all of these areas, real estate companies create a much more diversified value to the economy, as identified by the intercepting area, and inherently improve relationships with stakeholders.   Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability (CSR) Green Building Responsible Property Investing __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  7	  SUSTAINABILITY TRENDS  Corporations are making sustainability a priority. This has been achieved by following GRI standards to CSR reporting, which is the most common framework. In addition, corporations are being measured by the following indices:   • Dow Jones Sustainability Index: tracks corporate sustainability performance20  • FTSE4Good: measures the performance of companies that meet globally recognized corporate responsibility standards to aid investment21 • Carbon Disclosure Project: database of corporate climate change information22  • Goldman Sachs JBWere Climate Leadership Index: measures CDP responses of companies to determine leadership23 • London Benchmarking Group Business in the Community: measures corporate community investment24  The simplest of CSR programs in commercial real estate companies are incorporating basic principles such as corporate governance, risk compliance, and transparency, in addition to promoting environmental management, social programs, creating a diverse workforce and engaging communities and stakeholders. By integrating in depth CSR within the corporate strategy of an organization and communicating those strategies efficiently and transparently to stakeholders, organizations can reap brand and reputational rewards.25 Take for example, the number of tenants moving towards having green lease spaces and facilities because it exemplifies their own CSR commitment.26    The identified trends in CSR include:  • CSR imbedded in Corporate Strategy: integrating CSR strategically into a corporation’s strategy and across their value-chain. • CSR Transparency: communicating corporate practices online and through CSR reporting following real estate GRI standards and communication best practices.27  • Carbon Disclosure: measuring greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, reducing energy usage and disclosing one’s current corporate carbon footprint. • Green Leases: encouraging environmentally friendly practices by both the landlord and the tenant through removing disincentives.28   “As an active owner, GPT is committed to improving the social, environmental and economic capital of our stakeholders and the communities we touch. We engage our tenants, communities and our people to actively manage the evolution of our assets over their lifecycle.” - GPT Corporate Responsibility Web site  GPT was the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index Leader 2009 (Real Estate Sector) __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  8	  ANALYSIS IDENTIFIED GLOBAL BEST PRACTICES   This report identifies global best practices by benchmarking thirteen corporations, which are considered to be the leading real estate companies.  These organizations were selected based on published CSR reports, and/or organizations listed in The Carbon Disclosure Project, Dow Jones Sustainability World Index, the FTSE4Good Global Index, and the Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations List.     North America • Brookfield Properties • Minto Group • ProLogis • Oxford Properties       Europe • British Land • Hammerson • Land Securities Group        Australia/Asia • The GPT Group • Lend Lease Corp • Stockland • Landcom • Dexus Property Group • Mitsubishi Estate Co., Ltd.   Organizations and general trends were evaluated based on the following quadruple bottom line matrix: 	  	  • Diversity • Equal employment opportunity • Accessibility • Employee volunteering • Employee retention • Stakeholder analysis • Consult with community to meet their needs/get support • Local community programs • Employee training and development • Reduction of CO2 emissions • Monitor energy usage for common areas • Renewable energy technologies • Increased energy efficiency • Waste minimization • Water conservation • Supply chain analysis • Community economic contribution/impact • Financial situation Economic Environmental Social Cultural __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  9	  ECONOMIC 	  	  	   FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE  Financial performance and reporting is a key component of CSR. The study of best practices indicates that corporations should provide a corporate overview, key economic indicators and a financial snapshot of performance to communicate their viability over the long run. The inclusion of financial health provides stakeholders with a greater understanding of business activities.29 Communicating these measures through a corporate website and a CSR report indicates to stakeholders that the corporation considers CSR to be integrated within financial performance.   The majority of organizations reviewed, communicate financial information and performance to stakeholders when discussing CSR. For instance, Landcom provides a financial benchmark of their performance over the past six years against various profitability indicators including:  • Total revenue • Sales margins • Return on sales • Earnings before interest and tax • Return on equity • Return on total operating assets • Debt to equity  • Dividend and tax equivalents  • Job creation • Total economic output from activities30  •  Financial snapshot of performance and total asset value •  Indicates that CSR is integrated with financial performance  •  Key economic indicators •  Landcom and Land Securities are transparent with their       financials when discussing CSR Financial Performance • Cash contribution (> 1% of net earnings before tax) • In-kind contribution • Employee time contribution • British Land, Land Securities Group, Landcom, and GPT report total cash and in-kind donations and measure employee volunteer hours Corporate Philanthropy • Economic impact of initiatives on communities • Measure number of jobs or economic value created  • Landcom includes a measure describing economic impacts of their business activities and estimated number of jobs created. • British Land calculates people impacted by activities Contribution to Community __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  10	  Oxford Properties on the other hand provides a breakdown of its portfolio, indicating the categorizing of its operations.31 Whereas Minto Group, a private organization, discusses the impact of the economy on its financials and operations, but do not disclose exact figures.32     Socially responsible investing is considered under financial performance, as organizations are developing policies on responsible investing at the same time they are incorporating these into their portfolio management. This allows commercial real estate corporations to address risks and identify opportunities for long-term value creation.33 While responsible investing is currently emerging in Canada, globally real estate companies, such as Lend Lease, are incorporating the UN’s six Principles of Responsible Investing  (see call out box) and are engaging with the UN regarding their compliance and feedback.34, 35 Stockland is a signatory to the UNPRI and apply those principles when managing their properties and projects.36         CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY   Real estate companies impact the local community both positively and negatively and therefore choose to give back to the community through corporate philanthropy. This can be achieved by cash contribution, in-kind contribution and employee time contribution. In order to determine the economic impact of these contributions, each area should be recorded, measured and communicated to stakeholders. These contributions are part of corporate citizenship, which is evaluated for all indices, including GRI, Dow Jones Sustainability Index and FTSE4Good.37  According to REALPac, best practice in corporate philanthropy is giving greater than or equal to 1 per cent of net earnings before taxes. Although, they have not been able to find evidence that any Canadian company has donated more than 0.5 per cent.38   Investing (UNPRI)  The performance of investment portfolios can be affected by environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) issues and therefore investments need to be aligned with broader societal objectives. The Principles for Responsible Investment provides organizations with a framework to consider these issues:  1. Incorporate ESG issues into investment analysis and decision-making processes 2. Be active owners and incorporate ESG issues into ownership policies and practices 3. Seek appropriate disclosure on ESG issues by the entities in which they invest 4. Promote acceptance and implementation of the Principles within the investment industry 5. Work together to enhance their effectiveness in implementing the Principles 6. Report on their activities and progress towards implementing the Principles 	  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  11	  GPT uses best practices from London Benchmarking Group, a global group measuring corporate community involvement, to measure donations and contributions.39 Whereas, Land Securities reports the total cash and in-kind donations, per project and total, and measures the total time invested in the community.40 British Land also reports total donations made and the total value of volunteer time by measuring employee volunteer hours (at cost and during company time), contributing £717,000 in community investment41. Minto Group has formed a foundation whose goal is to support five main areas of giving: children, education, health, the environment and the arts. Minto Group believes that the local community needs more than houses to establish a good quality of life. Minto Group communicates their key contributions to various charities and organizations, in addition to providing information about the organization and the impact of their donation.42    CONTRIBUTION TO COMMUNITY  Corporations also measure the economic impact of their initiatives on local communities. This is accomplished by measuring the number of jobs or economic value created by those activities. In Europe and the UK, real estate corporations report the economic impacts their initiatives have had on the communities they work in by describing the program and measuring the number of jobs or economic value created through the operations of the company.43   For instance, Landcom includes a measure describing the economic impacts of their business activities and estimated number of jobs created.44 While British Land calculates the number of people impacted through their property management and developments. This enables them to give a more comparable measure describing the economic effect of their actions. They engage in job training programs and sports sponsorships and communicate their practices and impact through case studies. In addition, British Land is in the process of developing a methodology to measure local satisfaction with them as a developer.45   __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  12	  ENVIRONMENTAL 	  	  	  	  	  ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY  All international companies examined in the study had an environmental policy and have publically committed to going beyond compliance. Developing environmental policies provides guidance to corporations on operations and demonstrates their commitment to conduct business in a responsible manner. Corporations should be setting stricter standards than just meeting requirements in order to reduce their environmental impact. For example, Oxford Properties Group Environmental Policy • All International companies have an environmental policy • Oxford Properties Group – Sustainable Intelligence Guiding Principles • Mitsubishi Estate Group Basic Environmental Policy Climate Change • Greatest risk • Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) • Brookfield and Oxford perform GHG reporting and reduction Energy and Emissions • ISO14001-certified buildings reduce energy use and emissions • Oxford has made a public commitment to reduce GHGs by 20% (per square foot basis) and work with tenants to find ways to reduce. • Alternative energy - Mitsubishi procured 1 million kWh of wind-power per year Resource Use and Waste • Water measurement, reduction and conservation by source • Waste measurement, recycled and diversion rate from landfill • British Land is a leader in measurement and reporting (Resource Use Website) Sourcing • Green procurement policies and programs • Recycled and environmentally friendly material • Preferred status to environmentally responsible vendors • Lend Lease’s Responsible Sourcing Guidelines Biodiversity • Building design • Ecological and indigenous heritage preservation • British Land has a Biodiversity Program • Mitsubishi Estate Group has a nature information center __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  13	  has developed its Sustainable Intelligence Guiding Principles46, which are precautionary but also take a leadership approach with their use of innovative technologies and tenant engagement.47  	    CLIMATE CHANGE  Climate change is the greatest risk facing the real estate industry, with commercial real estate now living within the constraints of a “low-carbon” economy. This is a result of regulatory and industry standards that are emerging, that if ignored could result in reputational, regulatory, and financial risks.	   In order to manage these risks in the evolving regulatory environment, corporations have begun measuring their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.  One of the opportunities with GHG reduction is reputational with organizations disclosing their emissions to the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP).48 The CDP has over 475 institutional investors who manage assets of over USD$55 trillion, which could potentially impact every major real estate project.49 Currently in Canada, Brookfield Properties is the only corporation to respond to the CDP with their GHG exposure/energy related risk, which is substantially below the UK and Australia where the majority of real estate firms are submitting their GHG emissions.50  ENERGY AND EMISSIONS  In order to mitigate emissions, international real estate developers are building to ISO 14001-certification to reduce energy use and emissions. However, none of the Canadian companies examined have pursued ISO 14001-certification.51  Some Canadian companies are making a public effort to reduce their emissions. For instance, Oxford Properties has made a public commitment to reduce GHGs by 20% (per square foot basis) and work with tenants to find ways to reduce emissions.52 Other organizations such as Mitsubishi have been purchasing alternative energy, having procured 1 million kWh of wind-power last year.53 Oxford Guiding Principles  1. Leadership: recognized by their tenants, employees, investors and the market at large as industry leaders in sustainability 2. Performance: continuously measure their energy, water and environmental performance, and compare favourably against internal and external standards and best practices 3. Innovation: foster innovation in technology and building management practices aimed at higher levels of sustainability 4. Credibility: follow recognized, high standards, work with industry-leading service providers, and engage in credible initiatives in their pursuit of sustainability 5. Risks and Opportunities: actively monitor, mitigate and exploit the market, regulatory and economic issues related to and arising from sustainability 6. Stakeholder Engagement: engage co-investors and tenants as active partners in pursuit of higher levels of sustainability and demand a high level of excellence from itself and all of their stakeholders 	  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  14	  Currently, Canadian corporations are assessing opportunities but have not been increasing their use of renewable power from onsite generation.54    Carbon is seen as the Trojan horse of building sustainability programs. However, carbon emissions can only be understood by measuring energy consumption to quantify the amount of carbon used.55 This can be achieved by utilizing the Real Property Association of Canada (REALpac)’s Guide to Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Canadian Real Property Sector, which provides a guide to help Canadian property companies understand the basic performance metrics to track and how to report on CSR in a meaningful and comparable way including energy used, energy saved, initiatives undertaken, incorporation of energy efficient design and use of renewable energy sources.56    Real estate companies have been incorporating sustainability initiatives into their asset management programs, resulting in an increase to their ROI through carbon offsetting. A few corporations, such as British Land strive for carbon neutrality. British Land has achieved this across the common parts of their entire managed portfolios over the past two years. This was accomplished by the implementation of their carbon strategy, which measures their carbon footprint. British Land is able to manage their carbon emissions by working to improve their energy efficiency, developing sustainable buildings using low-carbon energy sources, and purchasing carbon credits to offset their remaining emissions.57  	  GPT also measures their energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions as a key focus of their business. They are committed to reducing their direct emissions and facilitate the emissions reductions of their tenants, customers and local communities that use their assets. GPT discloses their emissions Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions to CDP to maintain communication with their stakeholders. They also purchase green power to achieve reductions in their annual energy and greenhouse gas emissions intensity (energy use and emissions per square meter), reducing the overall portfolio energy intensity by 24% and emissions intensity by 28% since 2005, with 19% coming from energy efficiency measures and a further 9% from the purchase of green power. They achieved this by assessing the impacts of climate change to the business and introducing initiatives to reduce the risks and mitigate GPT's carbon exposure, which include: ecological footprint calculators, evaluating the greenhouse intensity of assets, initiating renewable energy projects and instituting green leases.58  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  15	  RESOURCE USE AND WASTE  Resource use and waste refers to water and waste measurement and reduction. International companies have instituted water goals and programs to increase efficiency, since water represents a significant risk.  Canadian corporations are behind in measuring their water use, but companies such as Oxford Properties have begun publicly reporting their water usage on both an absolute and intensity basis.59 Water should not only be measured, but also reduced and conserved by source, including instituting rainwater, well water, grey water recycling, black water recycling, and desalinated water. Whereas waste needs to be measured, recycled and diverted from the landfill.   British Land is a leader in measurement and reporting of the resources they use. They accomplish this through their internal Resource Use Website, which allows each property manager to upload resource use data into an integrated database helping each site track its energy and water usage and providing ongoing aggregate data to headquarters. British Land’s goal is to send zero managed waste to the landfill by 2012, and they have been able to divert 83% of waste this year from landfill at their properties and 86% from developments, equivalent to £445,000 in landfill taxes.60  GPT also actively manages their waste from their own operations and facilitates the waste reduction, recycling and disposal of their tenant’s waste. They are able to accomplish this through education campaigns, signage and the provision of recycling options.61   SOURCING  According to an Accenture study 88% of CEOs believe that they should be integrating sustainability through their supply chain.62 As a result corporations have been using green procurement policies and programs to encourage employee engagement and mitigate risk.63 The goods/services a company purchases impacts its credibility and as a result these policies manage a company’s reputation. For instance, some corporations provide preferred status to environmentally responsible vendors.64  Hammerson engages with their suppliers to share best practice and procure sustainable goods and services. They also carried out a risk assessment of their supply chain against economic, social and environmental indicators and launched a Responsible Procurement Policy. Through this process they learned that all suppliers should be engaged during the tender process and now issue all suppliers with a sustainability questionnaire providing them with a score according to responses. They have set a minimum score that suppliers must reach in order to work with them, and have given their existing suppliers three years to comply, with year-on-year improvements.65   GPT's suppliers fall into three categories (property managers, construction/development contractors and integrated service providers) represented in the chart below. “[British Land] aims to improve energy efficiency reduce water use and cut waste to landfill. This reduces [our] costs and those of [our] occupiers, as well as conserving precious natural resources.” 	  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  16	  GPT’s Retail and Office development contracts include environment, social and corporate governance targets and deliverables. This allows GPT to influence their supply chain through contractual obligations and reporting, with particular focus in the area of construction and development, materials use and sustainable sourcing.66  BIODIVERSITY  McKinsey & Company has found that 59% of executives see biodiversity as an opportunity for their business.67  Biodiversity can be described as the degradation of ecosystems. By addressing biodiversity, commercial real estate companies can mitigate risks and enjoy the benefits. The main risks caused by biodiversity include:  • Higher operational costs as a result of water use • Regulatory fines or fees  • Reputational harm caused by non-governmental organizations • Customers switching • Banks implementing stringent lending requirements   However, this presents an opportunity to implement sustainable practices, which are efficient and provide cost savings. It also presents an opportunity to engage government, banks, and regulatory bodies to collaboratively develop policies and incentives.68  By targeting biodiversity issues, it will enable corporations to improve their reputation with environmentally conscious stakeholders. The impact a corporation has on biodiversity can be determined by assessing their entire value chain to determine where they are vulnerable to risks, which could threaten biodiversity.69 The two main areas in biodiversity include building design and the ecological and indigenous heritage preservation.    Landcom has developed detailed reports on the preservation of biodiversity on their properties and within new development projects, in addition to developing four guiding principles of sustainability. The indicators measure native vegetation management, qualifies the quality of ecological communities, area cleared and replanted and the impacts and zoning of their projects.70   GPT has developed initiatives to directly improving the biodiversity of the sites they are developing through implementing the following measures:  • Using bio-swales and ponds for toxics removal from stormwater  • Implementing gross pollutant traps to filter stormwater __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  17	  • Planting thousands of trees and plants that are primarily indigenous • Developing a garden to provide insulation, stormwater management and green space • Working with the current topography and vegetation to minimize impact • Communicating messages on stormwater grates to inform visitors and employees71  Whereas ProLogis ensures that an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is completed for every project they undertake to determine whether their plans for the site will impact or threaten any species or habitats. This assessment is conducted during the land procurement and entitlement process in partnership with relevant stakeholders to mitigate any potential impacts.72    __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  18	  SOCIAL 	     EMPLOYMENT AND DEMOGRAPHICS  The social framework refers mostly to employee management. This includes a corporation’s hiring and employment policies including diversity, gender, turnover, pay parity, satisfaction, absenteeism, retention per year and fairness.73 To date, there are no Canadian commercial real estate companies that have demonstrated leadership in hiring for diversity, however internationally Land Securities, Lend Lease and GPT have emerged as the companies to look up to. Land Securities has a diversity policy for recruitment and retaining a diverse workforce and they also provide demographic data (the above metrics) in their CSR report.74 Since 2008, Lend Lease has instituted a Diversity Strategy, appointed a Global Diversity Officer and committed to increasing the ratio of women to above 30%.75 Dexus has implemented a “People management framework” outlining their approach to managing their 284 DEXUS employees. They also communicate the median age of employees (36) and the percentage of executives that are women (40%).76 At GPT, 75% of employees “believe that GPT is committed to creating a work environment that is open and accepting of individual differences,” based on the 2009 Hewitt Best Employer Australia and New Zealand Study.77   •  Diversity, gender, turnover, pay parity, satisfaction, absenteeism, retention and fairness •  Land Securities has a diversity policy for recruitment and retaining a diverse workforce •  Lendlease has a Diversity Strategy with a Global Diversity Officer Employment and Demographics •  Employee satisfaction surveys, focus groups and training are more prevalent in Australia (Land Securities) •  Training for sustainability initiatives and personal development (Landcom) Employee Satisfaction, Training & Education •  OH&S Policies and Procedures •  Total number of injuries, type, frequency rate and lost days (Land Securities, British Land) •  Canada lack of programs or transparency Occupational Health and Safety • Management oversight integrating sustainability into corporate strategy • Committees, ie. Minto has a  green team that is a corporate-wide function with a mandate to define, measure and reduce their environmental footprint.  • Independent verification • Ethics policies • Whistleblower policy Governance • Improves corporate reputation and brand equity • Reporting: GRI, Indices • Canada: Brookfield published a brief first sustainability report in 2009. Oxford published three documents Transparency __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  19	  EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION, TRAINING AND EDUCATION  Employee satisfaction, training and education represent the next component, as employee satisfaction is correlated to productivity. Employee satisfaction can be determined by employee surveys and focus groups. Australian real estate companies are at the forefront in determining employee satisfaction NS Corporations such as Landcom and Land Securities have been analyzing and reporting their employee’s satisfaction since 2003 and 2004 respectively. Through these satisfaction surveys DEXUS has determined that 92% of their employees are proud to work at the company.78 Communicating these metrics online and through a CSR report is not only beneficial to management and employees, but also recruitment.    Training programs are developed to build on satisfaction and enable professional/personal development and awareness/training for sustainability initiatives.79 Land Securities reports on total training days per employee and total monetary value of training per employee per year.80 They also review outline personal Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for their employees’ performance every year and correlate each individual’s actions to their business strategy. Land Securities also has a wellbeing policy in place and a wellness week with events that help employees “get fit, stay healthy, eat well and manage stress”. 81   GPT utilizes the Hewitt Best Employer Study (Australia and New Zealand) to conduct their employee surveys and gain an understanding of areas for improvement.  Last year GPT won the recognition as a Best Employer, which was achieved by engaging 75% of employees in the study, which is high compared to other organizations. GPT also has a training education program, entitled GPTU, which offers an array of training and development courses to enhance capabilities. GPT then tracks and communicates the average training hours per employee, with an average of 34.54 training hours per employee during 2009, which was an increase 2008 with 32.68 hours.82 Minto Group also has the Minto Learning Centre, where employees attend training sessions. They reported a 7% increase in training in 2009 over 2008.83   OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (OH&S)  Real estate corporations require OH&S policies and procedures to indicate the duty of care that the corporation takes with its employees. Corporations that are seen to be best practice in the real estate industry not only provide injury and fatality rates but they also communicate proactive mitigation strategies to improve safety. The metrics provided include total number of injuries/fatalities, types of injuries, frequency rate, lost time due to injury, and reduction from previous year.84 While Minto Group has a health and safety record that is one of the best in the industry; they are mostly compliant with the regulatory conditions and have not been as proactive as some international companies.85 Very few Canadian companies show evidence of OH&S policies, which may indicate either a lack of programs or transparency within the Canadian environmental compares to internationally.86 On an international scale, all real estate companies examined record and communicate the above metrics. British Land reports the total number of lost days and total number of reportable accidents per property.87 Land Securities produces has an annual health and safety plan, which is reviewed quarterly by their Board. They have also developed a health and safety week, a Personal Health and Safety e-learning course for all employees and an additional course on Managing Health and Safety for line managers. They also __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  20	  benchmark their performance to other UK companies with similar employee levels, and placed third overall compared to 115 companies in the Corporate Health and Safety Performance Index (CHaSPI).88    GOVERNANCE  Governance refers to management/board oversight in integrating sustainability into corporate strategy and risk management. The key to governance is developing structures (policies and procedures), appointing representatives (and systems for employees to provide recommendations) and developing corporate mandates (codes of conduct, corporate values, mission statements). In order for CSR to be successful, it is imperative for a manager or a committee to oversee the management of sustainability issues and report to the board or executive team. In addition, governance includes: sustainability reporting, external verification of reporting, policies on bribery and corruption, whistleblower policies, and responsible investment policies. Internationally, all companies examined have a committee in place to plan and manage CSR initiatives. In Canada, Minto Group has corporate-wide green teams, whose mandate is to define, measure and reduce environmental impacts.89 Oxford Properties has a whistle blower policy and a steering committee, which is represented by the CEO, an OMERS representative and company’s pension fund owner.90   TRANSPARENCY  Transparency includes the disclosure of sustainability practices and corporate performance to stakeholders. It can be achieved by communicating these initiatives online and through a published CSR report.  The benefits of transparency could result in improving a company’s reputation and brand equity. In Canada, Brookfield published a brief sustainability report in 2009 and Oxford has published three documents online, which outline its sustainability plan. However, internationally CSR reporting has dominated the industry.91 Commercial real estate corporations follow the GRI standard to format their reports and the construction and real estate sector supplement (CRESS). Disclosing sustainability initiatives demonstrates a commitment to transparency and accountability to stakeholders.   While many organizations begin their CSR report as a sub-section in their corporate Annual Report, they shift to developing their own document and/or website as the content and scope broaden to engage with their stakeholders. GPT indicates that an online report is often chosen “because it is consistent with objectives to operate in an environmentally sustainable manner; [gives] the ability to provide ‘real time; information updates throughout the year; and, gives greater flexibility to users in searching for and accessing information”.92 __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  21	  CULTURAL 	  	   Culture refers to manifesting identities and preserving and cultivating traditions and customs over time. It is important for corporations to develop a corporate culture and protect and value this diversity over time. A strong corporate culture is open, welcoming, transparent and driven by larger purpose.93 The most effective corporate cultures are supported through engaging employees, suppliers and the local community. This broader scope of corporate culture provides educational opportunities to employees and helps employees understand the interrelations of the corporate environment through systems thinking.94 While some of the identifiers overlap with the other sections, it emphasizes the impact of one area on another within an organization.  Hammerson has developed a knowledge, education and communication program ensuring employees and suppliers understand Hammerson’s sustainability objectives and the reasons for them and then share this knowledge with their tenants and shopping center visitors.   Hammerson recognizes that suppliers can bring both positive and negative impacts to their sustainability efforts.95 Suppliers refer to the number of visits a company makes to its suppliers and whether it is choosing local suppliers with similar values, such as the percentage of products bought within 500 miles of the location.96  Employee culture relates to the training and development and retention of employees. Minto has a Green Champions membership, which is a grass roots movement within their organization that promotes a culture of conservation. In the past year this group has doubled in size.97    Stockland remains a leader in employee and stakeholder engagement. They developed their CSR report in a collaborative manner with 40 employees contributing through an online wiki portal. They believe that balancing the needs of their stakeholders is “fundamental to the success” of their business. As a result, they have a Stakeholder Engagement Manager that works with the CSR Communities manifest identities, and preserve and cultivate traditions and customs Supplier Visits Local Sources Employee Training and Development Retention Community Engagement __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  22	  team to develop a proactive and measurable framework to balance the needs/interests of their stakeholders. They define their stakeholders as: employees, government/regulators, customers (commercial, retail and industrial tenants), suppliers, shareholders, and communities.98  Community culture refers to community engagement. While many companies engage the community differently, it is important to involved community stakeholders in frequent communications. For instance, Landcom built their first sustainability report with help of many stakeholder groups and continue to collaborate to help develop programs that respond to their needs and concerns.99 In 2003, GPT founded Mutitjulu Foundation to support local people living in villages close to their hotel properties.100 While British Land fostered economic regeneration and in 2009/10 raised £490,000 for good causes at our properties. In London, they also partnered with the East London Business Alliance to help long-term unemployed people to find employment. They also undertook an in-depth stakeholder consultation s to ensure that their developments meet local needs.101 While GPT focus is to integrate sustainability issues into their day-to-day business practices and culture. They take a long-term view and develop models for the co-creation and management of their assets, keeping in mind the value of community and other stakeholder partnerships.102  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  23	  RECOMMENDATIONS 	  By utilizing best practices from global real estate companies and adopting them to a company’s business practice, it can enable an organization to reap the rewards of sustainability. Each of the companies evaluated continue to look for ways to improve their CSR practices year-over-year, since the industry is constantly evolving. Attaining strategic sustainability by incorporating sustainability into a company’s corporate strategy can enable an organization to achieve a sustainable bottom line by integrating the four factors of CSR, economic, environmental, social and cultural, into a company’s operations. Therefore, it is recommended for companies to employ best practices across each of the four pillars.  This will enable that company to achieve multiple benefits, including improved brand equity, strengthened stakeholder relationships, and reduced costs (through environmental initiatives which reduce resource use and increase efficiency).  Companies are becoming more transparent and employing economic best practices, which includes communicating business practices and disclosing a financial snapshot of the company, can be utilizing either a corporate web site or CSR report. Companies are also adding economic value to the community through corporate philanthropy and community contribution, which are both being measured and disclosed.   Globally, companies are also developing environmental policies to strategically operate the organization by creating guidelines to reduce the use of water, energy and waste and preserve biodiversity. In addition, they are finding ways to reduce or offset GHG emissions and measuring and disclosing their emissions annually. Companies are also extending their environmental policies to their suppliers, providing preferential contracts to local, sustainable suppliers with similar policies.   Companies are also creating employee policies to ensure diversity, training/education, health & safety, and corporate governance within the organization. They track and measure employee satisfaction and ensure that they address any potential concerns. To lead these initiatives, companies have created internal sustainability committees, led by a sustainability manager, to oversee all CSR programs and policies. They are then communicating their efforts to stakeholders, and building transparency into their business practices. This information is communicated online, through CSR reports and in indices).  In order to accomplish a successful CSR strategy, companies are creating a culture driven by a larger purpose that is transparent, open and welcoming. They are engaging employees, suppliers and the local community in their initiatives and working with them to continually improve business practices. This is accomplished by implementing a communications strategy, which communicates the CSR initiatives to stakeholders and creates a two-way dialogue. Further to a communications strategy, a change management plan is needed in order to implement CSR into an organization. Senior management, creating a sense of urgency, should drive this change management plan. A sustainability manager or committee should be established to oversee sustainability issues and report to the board or executive team. This group should create a mission and vision for sustainability, strategically integrating sustainability into a corporation’s strategy. This vision should then be communicated to the organization and employees, and the company should create opportunities and to empower employees to work towards integrating sustainability into their __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  24	  positions. Short-term goals should be established to create a driving force for sustainability, starting with low-hanging fruits in each area of the organization. By consolidating these goals, and re-evaluating an organization’s commitment to sustainability a company can institutionalize their sustainability policies into their corporate culture enabling them to achieve a corporate-wide commitment to sustainability.103	    In conclusion, by utilizing the best practices of global firms to enhance CSR practices, real estate companies have the opportunity to take a leadership role in CSR in Canada.    Recommendations:  • Strategic CSR embedded within corporate strategy • Adopt best practices from worldwide competitors104  Economic • Identify business practices and provide a level of financial transparency • Measure community contribution  • Utilize principles of responsible investing  Environmental • Develop an environmental policy to strategically approach environmental considerations, including water, waste, emissions, sourcing, and biodiversity  Social • Create employee policies to ensure diversity, training/education, health & safety, and corporate governance • Measure employee satisfaction and address any concerns • Create an internal sustainability committee, led by a sustainability manager to oversee all programs and policies • Create CSR vision, mission statement and supporting policies at board/executive level • Transparency in business practices (online, CSR report and indices)  Cultural • Engage employees, suppliers and the local community • Implement a communications strategy to communicate CSR to stakeholders105 • Develop a culture driven by a larger purpose, which is transparent, open and welcoming     __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  25	  APPENDICES  APPENDIX 1: CORPORATION OVERVIEW   COMPANY NAME LOCATION HQ OWNERSHIP BROOKFIELD CANADA Public MINTO GROUP CANADA Private PROLOGIS UNITED STATES Public (REIT) OXFORD PROPERTIES CANADA OMERS (pension) THE BRITISH LAND COMPANY UNITED KINGDOM Public (REIT) HAMMERSON UNITED KINGDOM  LAND SECURITIES GROUP UNITED KINGDOM Public THE GPT GROUP AUSTRALIA Public LEND LEASE AUSTRALIA  STOCKLAND AUSTRALIA Public LANDCOM CORPORATION AUSTRALIA State-owned DEXUS PROPERTY GROUP AUSTRALIA Public MITSUBISHI ESTATE CO., LTD. JAPAN Public  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  26	  APPENDIX 2: CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY MODELS  DEXUS106          14 DEXUS PROPERTY GROUP CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2009 At DEXUS we recognise that in order for our CR&S strategy to be successful and add value it must be integrated into our business model: this continued to be our focus in 2008/09. Our business operations and CR&S programs are also designed to engage our key stakeholders, who we define as tenants, investors, employees and the wider community in which we operate – including the general public, industry and government.At DEXUS we are committed to ensuring that CR&S is a constant and visible consideration in all aspects of our business by embedding it into our culture.We strive to deliver social, governance, economic and environmental value to our stakeholders and look to engage with them wherever possible to achieve greater sustainability outcomes.Engaging our tenants As one of the largest property groups in Australia, we provide property services to approximately 5,000 tenants primarily major corporate and government organisations. In the last year, we have implemented a number of initiatives to further enhance the relationship we have with our tenants. Portfolio wide initiativesDEXUS tenant surveysFor the last two years we have conducted annual tenant surveys in our office and industrial portfolios and in 2008 ran our first national retailer survey. Our aim is to gain a greater depth of understanding of our tenants’ needs so we can continue to improve our service delivery and ensure our properties meet the needs of our tenants, now and in the future. The surveys enable tenants to provide feedback and rate their level of satisfaction in relation to key areas such as property maintenance, building management, communications and sustainability. To encourage participation in the survey, we make a donation of $25 to our “People’s Choice” charity for each survey completed – this year donations went to the Royal Flying Doctor Service (see page 27).Service excellenceConsistent with our commitment to delivering service excellence to our tenants, we have sought to enhance the quality of our customer service over the past year with new initiatives in tenant engagement and the management of our suppliers. In 2009/10 our office tenant surveys will be undertaken by an external provider to enable more effective benchmarking with industry standards and ultimately enable further improvements in our service delivery. STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENTEMBEDDING CR&S IN OUR BUSINESSENVIRONMENTEMPLOYEES        COMMUNITYDEXUSTENANTS        INVESTORSFOR OUR INVESTORS WE FOCUS ON: ›  Improving the transparency and standards of our reporting  and achieving external rating recognition›  Appropriate investment in sustainability to meet market  demand now and in the future›  Managing risk ›  Maximising returnsFOR OUR PEOPLE  WE STRIVE TO: ›  Encourage learning, innovation  and career development›  Offer competitive reward and recognition›  Provide working practices and support to maintain work-life balance›  Engage our people in our CR&S initiativesFOR OUR COMMUNITY  WE SEEK TO:›  Actively engage with our community through fundraising, consultation and communication›  Operating to the highest levels of corporate governance, ethics and integrityFOR OUR TENANTS WE STRIVE TO DELIVER:›  High quality workspaces›  Full service property management›  Service excellence›  A partnership approach to delivering leading  edge sustainable features in our new developmentsFOR OUR ENVIRONMENT WE STRIVE TO: › Minimise the environmental impact of our operations › Reduce the carbon emissions of our operations › Manage our resources as efficiently as possible 20 DEXUS PROPERTY GROUP CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2009 Our people management frameworkSOCIAL PERFORMANCEOUR PE PLEOur values – Respect, Excellence, Service, Integrity, Teamwork and Empowerment – are the cornerstone of our culture and describe what we believe are the key characteristics of a positive working environment. Our people are assessed on their commitment to our values as part of the annual Employee Performance Review. In 2008/09 we enhanced the review criteria to specifically include performance to our values as we believe that not only is it important to meet and exceed their role and personal objectives and development targets, but equally, to align achievements with our values.At DEXUS we don’t just recognise that our people are key to the success of our business, we actively seek ways to develop and retain our people and create an attractive and productive working environment for them.To achieve this we focus on implementing appropriate policies and practices to create an environment which promotes work-life balance and actively encourages diversity, equal opportunity, employee recognition, career development, open communication and commitment to the DEXUS values. OUR APPROACH OUR FOCUS IN 2008/09Friendly, professional and supportive !Supports worklife bal nce !Encourages diversity in an environment  !free from discrimination and harassmentPromotes open communication and  !values respect, excellence, service, integrity, teamwork and empowermentEmbedd d DEXUS values into our  !performance management program Promoted flexible working options !Implemented a number of new  !feedback opportunitiesOUR PEOPLE MANAGEMENTEnsures our people are engaged and  !enthusiastic about our business and their developmentFocussed on delivering service  !excellence for our ten nts and investorsPerformance objectives alig ed with  !our vision, values and CR&S objectivesRewards individual and team  !contribution to our financial and business performanceProactive management of human capital  !to ensure continuous review of talent, promotion potential and succession plans for key rolesEmployee surveys benchmarked against  !Australian and global company normsEnhanced our employee performance  !management frameworkAdditional remuneration benchmarking to  !m intain competitive frameworkOUR PEOPLE DEVELOPMENTSupports learning and professional  !development through tailored learning and development platformEncourages professional  !development through active participation in industry forumsNew DEXUS Management Series launched  !to develop core management skillsNew DEXUS lunchtime learning  !series launched360 Degree Reviews for all managers !Further promoted diversity in the  !property industryOur commitment to our people extends well beyond our immediate workplace. In addition to creating a supportive working environment for our employees, we aim to form quality relationships with the wider community, including our tenants, investors, suppliers and corporate partners.Learning and developmentIn order to attract the best talent and retain our key talent, we recognise the importance of investing in the develop ent of our people.Following feedback received from the annual Employee Opinion Survey, 360 degree management reviews, employee exit interviews, and bi-annual talent management and performance reviews, we concentrated our development focus in 2008/09 on core management skills. Accordingly, our training expenditure increased by 35% compared with 2007/08 as we increased o r investment in high quality, tailored learning and development programs focusing on core management skills. In 2008/09, we concentrated our learning initiatives in four key areas:Partnering with industry education  !leaders to deliver the highest quality programs tailored to our business and our people’s development needsTwo of these leading enterprises, Australian School of Business (AGSM) and the National Institute of Dramatic Arts (NIDA), were commissioned to tailor specific programs for DEXUS; managing people for performance and effective communication skillsCreating opportunities for individuals  !to work in other business units or to participate in cross-divisional projects to further develop their skills and create value for DEXUS through proactive teamwork and collaboration__________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  27	  HAMMERSON107        CORPORATE RESPONSIBILTY 200915423OUR AREAS  CLIMATE CHANGEAND ENERGY• Carbon footprint •  Changes in weather patterns•  Mitigation and adaptation•  Energy consumption• Transport  RESOURCEUSE• Land use•  Waste and recycling• Environmental design• Water use•  Sustainable consumption  and production• Biodiversity  COMMUNITYREGENERATION• Community investment• Community consultation• Job creation• Local employment• Education and training  SUPPLYCHAIN•  Sustainable procurement•  Measuring and monitoring• EMS/ISO 14001• Auditing CUSTOMERS• Occupier satisfaction•  Customer awareness and engagement on sustainability issues• Occupier partnerships• Visitor travelStakeholdersHammerson engages with a number of stakeholders as part of its activities. These include: investors; office occupiers; retailers; visitors to its shopping centres; Government (local and national); community organisations; suppliers; our employees; leaders in sustainability; and peers.Hammerson focuses its sustainability initiatives on five key areas identified through a materiality study. These areas, around which we group our initiatives and annual targets, encompass a number of more specific issues, as set out below.MATERIAL AREAS AND STAKEHOLDERS__________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  28	  MITSUIBISHI108  The CSR Committee, chaired by the company president and made up of executives in all business fields, including the major Group companies, discusses and shares information on issues related to CSR at the Mitsubishi Estate Group. In addition to two regular meetings a year, the committee also meets on an ad hoc basis.These subcommittees, made up of department managers in all business fields, discuss issues affecting compliance, risk management and  the environment.Risk Management SubcommitteeCSR Committee Compliance SubcommitteeEnvironmental SubcommitteeCommittee Secretariat, CSR Department, Mitsubishi EstateThe Spirit of Mitsubishi: The Three PrinciplesShoki HokoCorporate Responsibility to Society:Strive to enrich society, both materially and spiritually, while contributing towards the preservation of the global environment.Shoji KomeiIntegrity and Fairness:Maintain principles of transparency and openness, conducting business with integrity and fairness.Ritsugyo BoekiInternational Understanding through Trade:Expand business, based on an all-encompassing global perspective.Full text available at   www.mec.co.jp/e/company/charter/Mitsubishi Estate Group Guidelines for ConductWe contribute to society through urban developmentBy building attractive, environmentally sound communities where people can live, work and relax with contentment, we contribute to creating a truly meaningful society.The Mission of Mitsubishi Estate GroupFormulated: December 1, 1997 / Revised: August 1, 2002 / Revised: January 1, 2006In order to carry out the Group Mission, we pledge to observe the following Code of Conduct.The Mitsubishi Estate Group Code of Conduct1.We will act with integrity.We will base our conduct on laws and ethics, and always reflect with humility upon our behavior, valuing our communication with society and placing priority in our corporate activities on earning trust through fairness and transparency.2.We will strive to earn the trust of our clients.We will approach all objectives from our clients' point of view, providing safe and reliable products and services, and make information available as appropriate.3.We will strive to create a vibrant workplace.While aiming at personal growth, we will respect the human rights and the diversity of opinion of others, and increase our creativity and professionalism while displaying our collective strengths as a team.__________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  29	  STOCKLAND109                      ABOUT STOCKLANDStockland is one of Australia’s most diversified property groups with total assets of over  $8.7 billion and operations in Australia and the United Kingdom. We are a top 50 Australian Securities Exchange Listed Company (ASX: SGP).Founded in 1952, we have grown to become one of Australia’s leading diversified property groups – developing and managing a large portfolio of residential community, apartment, retirement living, retail, office and industrial assets. COMMERCIAL PROPERTY Retail We have 39 retail centres valued at  $3.9 billion that provide diverse shopping  and social experiences for customers  and other stakeholders.Office We have an office portfolio of 33 properties valued at $2.8 billion. Our track record of high portfolio occupancy levels, solid tenant retention and leasing results demonstrate the benefit of our commitment to strong tenant relationships. Our tenants include government departments and blue chip public and private companies.Industrial Our industrial portfolio is valued at $1.1 billion, with 23 properties, incorporating well over one million square metres of building area. Our tenants include large-scale distribution, warehousing and logistics companies. Our properties are strategically positioned for logistics, infrastructure and employment.RESIDENTIAL Residential Communities We have 67 projects in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia with a total end value of approximately $15 billion. Our focus is on the creation of medium and large-scale masterplanned communities in key urban growth markets, ranging in size from 100 lots to 20,000 lots. In creating new communities we are involved in providing infrastructure to meet local needs. Apartments We acquire, design, project manage and market apartment and mixed-use projects in urban locations. Our apartments business has responded to urban consolidation opportunities, providing accommodation options close to transport and employment. We have nine apartment projects with an estimated end value of $1.7 billion. Planning approvals are being sought for projects yet to commence, however development will only commence if appropriate returns can be achieved. If not, sites will be sold in an orderly fashion over the next two to three years.RETIREMENT LIVING* We have established our business as a top five retirement living operator within Australia, with 3,974 established units across Victoria and Queensland. Our portfolio also includes a short-to-medium term development pipeline  of over 2,900 units. The business  uses our land bank for future developments and draws on our residential development capabilities.STOCKLAND UK Our UK business is a property development and asset management company spanning retail, office and mixed-use property. We have announced an orderly withdrawal  from the UK market, selling assets  over the next two to three years.NSW 46% ACT 2%QLD 23%VIC 18%WA 7%SA 1%UK 3%BUSINESS BY GEOGRAPHYOffice 26% Industrial 11%Retail 37%Retirement Living 4%Apartments 5%Communities 17%BUSINESS BY ASSETSTOCKLAND GROUP STRATEGY*  Retirement Living, formally part of our Residential business, became a separate business from 1 July 2009.Our enduring strategic themesManage a core portfolio ofhigh quality property assetsOur vision:To create aworld class diversified property groupInvest in profitable and complementary growth-focused initiativesActive managementof asset class and geographic diversity to optimise valueOptimise sources of capitalAchieve best practiceoperational efficiencyFoster an engaged culture that attracts and retains high performing peopleStockland Corporate Responsibility & Sustainability Report 30 June 2009 5__________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  30	  BRITISH LAND110 	    British Land aims to protect and enhance biodiversity and has developed this Programme tointegrate biodiversity considerations into the Company’s business.BiodiversityBiodiversity (a contraction of Biological Diversity) means the rich variety of life on earth and theecological communities within which these species live.It is estimated that 1.4 million living species have been described to date but many species still remainto be identified. An estimate of the total number of species that exist on earth is 30 million!Species live in a finely balanced and complex interconnected environment and any disruption of thebalance can result in extinction of species and a loss of biodiversity.Source: Biodiversity, E.O. Wilson, Editor; National Academy of Sciences / Smithsonian Institution, 1988.Responsibly managing biodiversity brings benefit to theenvironment and British Land’s business operations;reducing risk, building trust, identifying opportunities andenhancing reputation. Early identification of key ecological features enables dueconsideration throughout the property lifecycle, enablingclear and effective management.PROPERTY CYCLE ACTION NOTESAcquisition / InvestmentConstruction /Refit worksAsset ManagementDevelopment - ConceptDesign / Pre-PlanningDevelopment - Detailed /Scheme Designand PlanningDevelopment -ProcurementDevelopment -Pre-ConstructionGreen field or derelict site Desk study for designatedsites or protected species Highly urbanised oroccupied site Input to procurementspecificationAdvanced works to minimiseecological impact and fulfilprotected species consent  Protection / monitoringduring works Species or impact monitoringBiodiversity scoping (walkover surveyand desk study as required).Develop or input to sustainabilityobjectives and targetsTargeted surveys for baseline collectionBiodiversity review -Action Plan implementationIdentify presenceof protected speciesor habitatsEcologicalassessmentIdentify opportunitiesfor gainProtected species / habitat mitigationdesignInform detaileddesign• Green field site (new development) and derelict sites even in urban areas are more likely to be areas rich in biodiversity.• Literature and web based search (e.g. for designated sites such as Special Area of Conser- vation, Site of Special Scientific Interest, etc).• Further environmental surveys may be required post acquisition.Biodiversity scoping study:• Determine what features of biodiversity interest are, or could be present.                       • Tailor to the type of development and consent mechanism and to scope for opportunities for gain. • Appropriate qualified person to undertake. • Output to inform the setting of objectives and targets as outlined in the British Land Sustainability Brief.• To form part of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), if required.• Species or site specific surveys to prepare for next stage. Surveys to be undertaken by appropriately qualified person.• Baseline information to feed into ecological assessment, EIA, mitigation design and protected species consents. Identify opportunities for gain.• Identify and incorporate opportunities for gain and protected species mitigation design into projects.• Biodiversity clauses may be required for early  construction or site clearance works. Advanced works could inform procurement requirements for the main works.• Consider advanced ecological works to minimise impact of construction e.g. on nesting birds.• Safeguard sites and species during works.• Monitor and review in accordance with commitments.  • Review site information and input information into site specific or generic Biodiversity Action Plan.• Update objectives & targets as necessary and implement plan.IntroductionBiodiversity Programme andthe Property Life CycleDuring the property life cycle it is important to collect and manage information that may have animpact on biodiversity issues and ensure this is available at each of the stages of the cycle. The process by which British Land considers biodiversity issues is shown diagrammatically inthe flow chart alongside.Considering Biodiversity duringthe Property Life CycleBritish Land | Biodiversity ProgrammeAcquisition / InvestmentThe success of the Biodiversity Programme depends onearly identification of features of nature conservation interestthat may be affected by business activities. These issuesare reviewed during the due diligence process.DevelopmentBritish Land’s Sustainability Brief provides the framework forconsidering sustainability issues throughout all developmentprojects. Biodiversity is an integral part of this and isreviewed at each stage of a development, including, whereappropriate, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA).Concept Design / Pre-PlanningThe nature conservation interest is reviewed through ascoping exercise and targeted surveys. Biodiversityconsideration forms part of objectives and targets for adevelopment as outlined in the Sustainability Brief. Theinformation gathered as part of the Biodiversity Programmeshould be sufficient to respond to the requirements of anyBREEAM assessments.Detailed / Scheme DesignTargeted surveys assist ecological assessments and identifythe presence of protected species or habitats. The surveys inform the design, the proposed mitigation orcompensation and the opportunities for enhancement.ProcurementBiodiversity issues and opportunities are taken into accountwhen buying goods and services. Provision will be made incontracts to ensure information is passed to contractorsand a responsible approach is taken during works.Pre-constructionAdvanced ecological works or investigations may berequired before the main construction period and theseworks can also provide information for managingbiodiversity during the main construction works.Construction / RefitConstruction and refit works are monitored and reviewed toensure appropriate protection measures are in place.Asset ManagementBritish Land will ensure that the appropriate post-construction monitoring is in place for developments.For our large properties, when re-development is notplanned, British Land will collate baseline ecologicalinformation. This will enable site-specific targets to bedeveloped to enhance conditions for key habitats andspecies.These targets will be recorded in Biodiversity Action Plans(BAP) either site specific or generic for similar types ofproperties.British Land will also explore opportunities for tenants’participation in the implementation of biodiversity initiatives.Monitoring and ReviewBritish Land use only recognised experts andprofessionals who are members of the Instituteof Ecology and Environmental Management toensure the quality of the advice received.Progress against objectives and targets ismonitored on an ongoing basis and this isreported within the annual CorporateResponsibility Report.Nature Trail, Teesside Retail Park Triton Square, Regent’s PlaceFront cover photo: Blythe Valley ParkBritish Land | Biodiversity ProgrammeBritish Land | Biodiversity Programme                                __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  31	  LAND SECURITIES111	  	  	       OXFORD PROPERTIES112   	   6To ensure we address the important issues facing our business, we have developed a CR model, as set out below. As you can see, it’s divided into seven key areas, each of which is overseen by a senior manager. Environment The way we design, build and run our properties impacts on the world around us, but through innovation and best practice, our developments can be leading examples of environmental sustainability.Investors We encourage two-way dialogue with existing and potential investors and analysts, to give them a better understanding of our business and to strengthen our relationships with them.Employees We employ in the region of 700 people, whose wellbeing and professional development are crucial to our ongoing success and future growth.SuppliersBy working with partners whose values and principles  mirror our own, we can maintain our high standards and minimise risk.Community We create civic pride and a sense of community ownership through relationships with local government, education partners, community organisations and residents.Health and Safety We are committed to taking every reasonable step to ensure the health and wellbeing of our people, and the safety of everyone who comes into contact with our business activities.Customers By providing best-in-class levels of service, we can stand out from our peers and encourage occupiers and clients to choose us as their business partner.Naturally, the management of, and accountability for, these aspects of our business require sound governance practices.  At Land Securities, we have an eight-strong CR Committee with representatives drawn from across the Group, each with their own area of responsibility. Chaired by Angela Williams, our Group HR Director, the Committee meets four times a year to agree policies, review progress against targets and set future objectives.Beyond bricks and mortarCorporate Responsibility Report 2009View the full report online: www.landsecurities.com/CRreport09How we do itHow we do itIt’s Measured. It Matters.Oxford’s commitment to Sustainable Intelligence is based on our strong c nvictionthat it is good for business. And, because we’re in business, we look for proofon the bottom line, and that includes measuring our sustainability performance.Oxford’s Sustainable Intelligence Scorecard tracks performance at our directlyowned and managed properties according to seven key indicators, datingback to 2005.The five categories on our scorecard align with the principal categories used by therespected Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) rating system.OXFORD SUSTAINABLE INTELLIGENCE SCORECARDEnergy andAtmosphere> electricity> natural gas> emissionsWaterEfficiencySustainableSitesMaterials andResourcesIndoorEnvironmentalQualityStarting in 2009, employees will also haveto report against Oxford’s Target 2012campaign, and must present energy andemission management targets in theirbusiness plans.LEED® is a registered trademark of the Canada Green Building Council.__________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  32	  FOOT NOTES 	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   1  Real Pac, “A guide to Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Canadian Real Property Sector”, April 2010	  2	  	   US environmental protection agency, http://www.epa.gov/greenbuilding/pubs/about.htm	  3	  	   Cushman & Wakefield, “2010 Mid-year Office and Industrial Real Estate Outlook”, June 2010 http://198.73.190.116/StreetSmarts/Links/Cushman%20&%20Wakefield%202010%20Mid-year%20Office%20&%20Industrial%20Real%20Estate%20Outlook.pdf	  4  DataMonitor, “Global Real Estate Management & Development”, March 2010 5  DataMonitor, “Global Real Estate Management & Development”, March 2010 6  DataMonitor, “Global Real Estate Management & Development”, March 2010 7	  	   DataMonitor, “Global Real Estate”, March 2009	  8  Real Pac, “Best Practices in Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Real Estate Industry”, April 2010 9	  	   Real Pac, “A Guide to Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Canadian Real Property Sector”, April 2010	  10	  	  NRTEE and SDTC report, “Geared for Change, Energy Efficiency in Canada’s Commercial Building Sector”, 2009, http://nrtee-trnee.ca/eng/issues/programs/energy-commercial-buildings/energy-commercial-buildings.php 	  11	  	  Morrison Hershfield, “A Business Case for Green Buildings in Canada”, March 31, 2005	  12	  	  NRTEE and SDTC report, “Geared for Change, Energy Efficiency in Canada’s Commercial Building Sector”, 2009, http://nrtee-trnee.ca/eng/issues/programs/energy-commercial-buildings/energy-commercial-buildings.php  13  United Nations, “Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future”, Transmitted to the General Assembly as an Annex to document A/42/427 - Development and International Co-operation: Environment, 1987 http://www.un-documents.net/ocf-02.htm 14  Adam Werbach, “Strategy for Sustainability”, Harvard Business Press, 2009 15  Michael E. Porter and Mark R. Kramer, “Strategy and Society: The Link Between Competitive Advantage and Corporate Social Responsibility, Harvard Business Review, December 2006, Vol. 84 Issue 12, p78-92, 13p; (AN 23081414)  16	  	  Accenture, “A New Era of Sustainability: UN Global Compact-Accenture CEO Study 2010”, June 2010 	  17	  	  Global 100 Most Sustainable Companies, 2010 http://www.global100.org/annual-reviews/2010-global-100-list.html	  18	  	  Commercial Lease Advisory Services Inc., “Lunch and Learn Presentation to CB Richard Ellis Agents”, October 2008	  19	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010 20	  	  Dow Jones Sustainability Index, 2010 http://www.sustainability-index.com/	  21	  	  FTSE4Good, 2010 http://www.ftse.com/Indices/FTSE4Good_Index_Series/index.jsp	  22	  	  Carbon Disclosure Project, 2009 https://www.cdproject.net/en-US/WhatWeDo/Pages/overview.aspx	  23	  	  Goldman Sachs JBWere Climate Leadership Index, 2010 http://www.gsjbw.com/?p=OF_Env_ESGResearch	  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  33	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  24	  	  London Benchmarking Group Business in the Community, 2009 http://www.lbg-online.net/lbg/homepage_content/what_is_the_lbg 25	  	  Basile, G., & Tenderich, B., ”Ecological Sustainability –The Dominant Corporate Communications Issue of the Decade”, July 2007. Retrieved June 2, 2010, from http://www.greenbiz.com/climate/research/tool/2007/08/03/ecological-sustainability-dominant-corporate-communications-issue-decade	  26	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  27	  	  GRI, “A Snapshot of Sustainability Reporting in the Construction and Real Estate Sector”, 2008 28	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  29	  	  Real Pac, “A Guide to Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Canadian Real Property Sector”, April 2010	  30	  	  Landcom, “Six-Year Performance Summary”, 2009 31	  	  Oxford, “Sustainable Intelligence. Our Promise. Our Plan.”, 2009	  32	  	  Minto, “2008 Annual Report”, 2008	  33	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  34	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  35	  	  United Nations, “Principles for Responsible Investment”, 2010 http://www.unpri.org/principles/	  36	  	  Stockland, “Corporate Responsibility & Sustainability”, June 2009 37	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010 38	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  39	  	  GPT, “2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009 http://corporateresponsibility.gpt.com.au/	  40	  	  Land Securities, “Corporate Responsibility 2009”, 2009	  41	  	  British Land, “Driving Performance Together Corporate Responsibility 2010”, 2010	  42	  	  Minto Group, “2008 Annual Report”, http://www.minto.com/about_us.html	  43	  	  Real Pac, “A Guide to Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Canadian Real Property Sector”, April 2010	  44	  	  Landcom, “Annual Report 2009”, 2009	  45	  	  British Land, “Driving Performance Together Corporate Responsibility 2010”, 2010	  46	  	  Oxford, “Sustainable Intelligence. Our Promise. Our Plan.”, 2009	  47	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  48	  	  PriceWaterhouseCoopers, “Carbon Disclosure Project 2009 Global 500 Report”, 2009 https://www.cdproject.net/ 49	  	  KPMG, “Climate Change: Risks & Opportunities in the Canadian Commercial Real Estate Market”, 2009	  50	  	  RealPac, ICF International, “GHG Emissions and Commercial Real Estate: Whose Carbon is it?”,  March 2010 __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  34	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  51	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  52	  	  Oxford, “Sustainable Intelligence. Our Promise. Our Plan.”, 2009	  53	  	  The Mitsubishi Estate Group, “CSR Report 2009”, 2009 54	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  55	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  56	  	  Real Pac, “A Guide to Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Canadian Real Property Sector”, April 2010	  57	  	  British Land, “Driving Performance Together Corporate Responsibility 2010”, 2010	  58	  	  GPT, “2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009 http://corporateresponsibility.gpt.com.au/	  59	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  60	  	  British Land, “Driving Performance Together Corporate Responsibility 2010”, 2010	  61	  	  GPT, “2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009 http://corporateresponsibility.gpt.com.au/	  62	  	  Accenture, “A New Era of Sustainability: UN Global Compact-Accenture CEO Study 2010”, June 2010 	  63	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  64	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  65	  	  Hammerson, “Corporate Responsibility 2009”, 2009	  66	  	  GPT, “2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009 http://corporateresponsibility.gpt.com.au/	  67	  	  McKinsey & Company, “McKinsey Global Survey Results: The next environmental issue for business”, 2010	  68	  	  RealPac, Savanta, “Biodiversity and the Canadian Commercial Real Estate Industry”, July 2009 69	  	  McKinsey & Company, “McKinsey Global Survey Results: The next environmental issue for business”, 2010 70	  	  Landcom, “Annual Report 2009”, 2009	  71	  	  GPT, “2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009 http://corporateresponsibility.gpt.com.au/	  72	  	  Prologis, “A Commitment to Corporate Responsibility 2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009	  73	  	  Real Pac, “A Guide to Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Canadian Real Property Sector”, April 2010	  74	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  75	  	  Lend Lease, “Sustainability Report”, 2009 http://www.lendlease.com/sustainability/index.html	  76	  	  Dexus, “CR&S Report 2009”, 2009	  77	  	  GPT, “2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009 http://corporateresponsibility.gpt.com.au/	  78	  	  Dexus, “CR&S Report 2009”, 2009	  79	  	  Real Pac, “Best Practices in Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Real Estate Industry”, April 2010	  __________________________________________________________	     	  _________________________________________________________	  35	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  80	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  81	  	  Land Securities, “Corporate Responsibility 2009”, 2009	  82	  	  GPT, “2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009 http://corporateresponsibility.gpt.com.au/	  83	  	  Minto Group, “2008 Annual Report”, http://www.minto.com/about_us.html	  84	  	  Real Pac, “A Guide to Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Canadian Real Property Sector”, April 2010	  85	  	  Minto Group, “2008 Annual Report”, http://www.minto.com/about_us.html	  86	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  87	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  88	  	  Land Securities, “Corporate Responsibility 2009”, 2009	  89	  	  Minto Group, “2008 Annual Report”, http://www.minto.com/about_us.html	  90	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  91	  	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  92 	  GPT, “2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009 http://corporateresponsibility.gpt.com.au/ 93	  	  Adam Werbach, “Strategy for Sustainability”, Harvard Business Press, 2009	  94	  	  Accenture, “A New Era of Sustainability: UN Global Compact-Accenture CEO Study 2010”, June 2010  95	  	  Hammerson, “Corporate Responsibility 2009”, 2009	  96	  	  Adam Werbach, “Strategy for Sustainability”, Harvard Business Press, 2009	  97	  	  Minto Group, “2008 Annual Report”, http://www.minto.com/about_us.html	  98	  	  Stockland, “Corporate Responsibility & Sustainability”, June 2009	  99	  	  Landcom, “Annual Report 2009”, 2009	  100	  	  Real Pac, “Best Practices in Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Reporting in the Real Estate Industry”, April 2010	  101	  British Land, “Driving Performance Together Corporate Responsibility 2010”, 2010	  102	  GPT, “2009 Corporate Responsibility Report”, 2009 http://corporateresponsibility.gpt.com.au/	  103	  Kotter, John, “Leading Change Why Transformation Efforts Fail”, Harvard Business Review,	  2007	  104	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  105	  RealPac, Jantzi Sustainalytics, “Canadian Commercial Real Estate Sustainability Performance Report”, 2010	  106	  Dexus, “CR&S Report 2009”, 2009	  107	  Hammerson, “Corporate Responsibility 2009”, 2009	  108	  The Mitsubishi Estate Group, “CSR Report 2009”, 2009	  109	  Stockland, “Corporate Responsibility & Sustainability”, June 2009	  110	  British Land, “Driving Performance Together Corporate Responsibility 2010”, 2010	  111	  Land Securities, “Corporate Responsibility 2009”, 2009	  112	  Oxford, “Sustainable Intelligence. Our Promise. Our Plan.”, 2009 	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.42591.1-0078391/manifest

Comment

Related Items