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Family activiy baggies : linking play and literacy at home Hartley, L. D. 2011-04

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FAMILY ACTIVITY BAGGIES: LINKING PLAY AND LITERACY AT HOMEbyL.D. HARTLEY IB.Ed (Elem.) The University of British Columbia, 2001B.A. The University of British Columbia, 1998 A GRADUATING PAPER SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION inTHE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES Department of Language and Literacy EducationWe accept this major paper as conforming to the required standardApril 2011 © L.D. Hartley, 2011ABSTRACTFramed by socio-cultural theory and third space theory, this paper examines the role of play in the literacy lives of Kindergarten-aged children. First, the definitions of both play and literacy are examined. Next, a review of literature examines the role of play on young children’s development of literacy at home and at school. Knowing that student success is impacted by the home environment, the literature review also examines the role of parents on the literacy development of their children. Finally, the paper suggests implementing a play-based literacy program at school as a means of supporting parents as they enhance their child’s literacy development at home.TABLE OF CONTENTSAbstract . ................................   iiTable of Contents.............................................................................  iiiINTRODUCTION..........................................................................  2Significance of the Project....................................................................................................................3Theoretical Framework......................................................................  4LITERATURE REVIEW...........................................................................................  8Definitions of Play and Literacy...........................................................................................................8Play and Literacy: A Survey of Research at School and at Home......................................   13The Home Environment................................................................................................................     .25CONNECTIONS TO PRACTICE ............................................................... 33The School Community......................................................       -33The Family Activities Baggie (FAB) Program................................................................................. 35Program Implementation  .............       3 6Future Directions ........................................................................................................................   38CONCLUSIONS...........................................................................     39REFERENCES....................................................................................   42Appendix A: Description of each FAB Card..................................................................  47Appendix B: Teacher Information Presentation on FAB..........................................  48Appendix C: Sample FAB................   49Appendix D: Parent Questionnaire................................................................................................... 50SECTION ONE: INTRODUCTIONAs a Kindergarten teacher, one of the most commonly asked questions that I get from my parent community is, “how can I support my child’s learning at home?” Despite the focus on play as a vehicle for learning throughout the school day, I often suggest that parents read daily and engage their child in authentic writing tasks, like making cards, writing notes, drawing pictures and making lists. While I believe these are worthwhile suggestions, they are very narrow in focus in terms of the learning that happens (reading and writing), and how this learning takes place (paper and pencil activities). I also sense that parents are yearning for more concrete and varied activities on how to support their child’s learning at home. As an early childhood educator who understands the value of play as a learning tool, it is imperative that any additional suggestions that I make are developmentally appropriate and involve an element of play. For my graduating project, I wanted to find or design a program that could embrace parents as partners in their child’s learning and potentially guide them at home as they engaged in a wide variety of literacy activities with their children. The Family Activity Baggie program is intended to provide families with quick, easy and playful activities using readily available resources at home. Furthermore, I wanted this program to be spontaneous in nature and to involve a number of family members, not just parents. However, as a Kindergarten teacher, I also recognize that for the notion of play as a pathway into literacy development to be embraced by a parent community that has a predominantly traditional sense of literacy and learning, the benefits of a play based program on student success at school and at home needs to be communicated.2Significance of the projectIt is often said that play is the work of children. According to the Primary Program: A Framework for Teaching (2000), a document designed to guide B.C. primary school teachers, “children benefit from engaging in self-initiated, spontaneous play and from teacher planned and structured activities, projects and experiences” (p. 18). Furthermore, it states that “play should be seen as an essential experience that extends, enhances, and enriches a child’s learning” (Primary Program: A Framework for Teaching, 2000, pp. 33-34).The draft edition ofthe new Primary Program: A Guide for Teaching (2010) also recognizes the importance of the community at large on young children’s learning. It subscribes to the notion that it takes a village to raise a child. That is, learning is a collaborative process between home, school and the community. According to this document:IEducators, families and the broader community are partners in children’s education. For children to have optimum success as learners, all parties have a role to play in creating the climate for lifelong learning. Children benefit when educators, parents and the broader community work in partnership to support their learning. (Primary Program: A Guide for Teaching, 2010, p. 53).With full day Kindergarten being implemented and the pressure to appear increasingly academic, it is thus critical that I, as a Kindergarten teacher, articulate to the parent community the importance of play to overall student success, and respond to queries about families supporting student literacy at home in a manner that is in keeping with the Primary Program pedagogy.This paper will attempt to answer the following questions: What are some of the current perspectives and definitions of play and literacy? How does a play based environment benefit student literacy learning at school and at home? Furthermore, what characteristics of the home3environment positively impact student literacy development and school success? I conclude by suggesting that nurturing the notion of play as a pathway to literacy and communicating to parents the importance of the home environment is optimal for literacy development and student success in the Kindergarten years.Theoretical frameworkThe Primary Program: A Guide for Teaching (2010) recognizes that parents are a child’s first and most important teacher (p. 190). Furthermore, it suggests that parents who engage with their children’s learning make a significant contribution to their child’s success (Primary Program: A Guide for Teaching, 2010, p. 190). In order to effectively examine the potential for families to support young children’s literacy learning through playful activities, a theoretical framework that considers the child’s social world is required. Thus, two overarching theories frame this project: sociocultural theory and third space theory.Sociocultural theoryLiterature on learning in the early years frequently draws upon Vygotskian theory. Vygotsky (1978) contends that the role of play is critical in the development of children. For it is through play that, “a child’s greatest achievements are possible” (Vygotsky, 1978, p. 100). Play, a pleasurable activity, starts with an imaginary situation that mirrors a real one, and then with time and age, develops into a complex and sophisticated experience; it is the precursor to abstract thought. Play also creates a zone o f proximal development (ZPD) whereby the experienced other scaffolds the learning of the novice allowing the child to, “stand a head taller than himself’ (Vygotsky, 1978, p. 102). Scaffolding therefore, “enables a child or novice to solve a problem, carry out a task or achieve a goal which would be beyond his unassisted efforts” (Wood & Bruner, 1983, p. 90). Scaffolding results not only in the completion of the task, but4also, “task competence by the learner at a pace that would far outstrip his unassisted effort” (Wood et al., 1983, p. 90).Literacy learning is culturally situated, that is, “each community has rules for socially interacting and sharing knowledge in literacy events” (Heath, 1983, p. 50). To deepen our understanding of how children learn, Rogoff (2003) argues that it is imperative to attend to, “how people come to understand their world through active participation in shared endeavors with other people as they engage in sociocultural activities” (p. 236). Cognition in sociocultural theory therefore entails not just the acquisition of skills and knowledge, but also entails the learner developing through, “active participation in an activity, changing to be involved in the situation at hand in ways that contribute to both the ongoing event and to the person’s preparation for involvement in other similar activities” (Rogoff, 2003, p. 254). Like Vygosky (1978), Rogoff acknowledges the roles of the experienced other, the learner’s active participation, the co-construction of knowledge in the learning process, and the gradual relinquishing of the task from the expert to the novice. She furthers the work of Vygotsky by situating individual learning within the context of a cultural group, and signaling the importance of the cultural elements and resources available to individuals of that group during knowledge transmission.The family group is usually identified as the first, and primary social or cultural group an individual interacts with in the early years. Situating learning in the context of the family has recently resulted in a broadening of the definition of “family” to include the role of various family members in the sharing and scaffolding of new knowledge (Anderson & Morrison, 2007; Gregory, 2001; Volk, 1999). Much of the recent research in this field has been conducted in non-mainstream bilingual families to uncover the ways older siblings support the language and5literacy development of their younger siblings. Gregory (2001) refers to this interaction as, “synergy, a unique reciprocity whereby siblings act as adjuvants in each other’s learning, i.e. older children ‘teach’ younger siblings and at the same time develop their own learning” (p.309). That is, siblings act as knowledgeable others supporting each other’s development, enabling one another, to achieve beyond their individual competencies. Gregory’s (2001) research thus challenges educators and researchers to rethink the role of the parent as the primary teacher at home. Assuming that siblings are present in a family, and that a child is possibly surrounded by a number of extended family members, the potential for literacy learning through play therefore requires that we recognize the impact and contributions of all the people and relationships present in a child’s home life when considering family literacy initiatives.Third space theoryGee (1996) refers to discourse as the way we think, act, speak and dress which identifies us with a particular cultural group (p. 18). As social beings, we belong to a variety of social groups, (e.g. family, school, church, etc.) each utilising particular discourses. Gee argues that compatability between primary.discourse (family) and secondary discourse (school) increases successful participation at school. Heath’s (1985) seminal work on family literacy practices across communities in the U.S. demonstrated the impact of compatible and incompatible discourses on student literacy participation, development and school success. In an attempt to acknowledge and value the wide range of discourses and funds o f knowledge (Moll, Amanti,Neff & Gonzalez, 1992) children present as they enter school, Moje, Ciechanowski, Kramer, Ellis, Carillo, and Collazo (2004) suggest creating a third space that merges knowledge and discourses drawn from the first spaces of people’s homes and communities with the second space knowledge and discourses they encounter in the more formalized setting of school (p. 41). A6third space thus functions as a place where, “everyday resources are integrated with disciplinary learning to construct new texts and new literacy practices, ones that merge the different aspects of knowledge and ways of knowing offered in a variety of spaces” (Moje et. al, 2004, p. 44).For a third space to develop, it is therefore absolutely critical that bridges be built between home and school.Drawing on Sociocultural theory and Third Space theory, this literature review examines the definitions of play and literacy, explores how playful activities at home and at school support student literacy development, and the characteristics and impact of a supportive home environment on student success at school. This review attempts to demonstrate how the Family Activity Baggies could possibly function as a third space whereby family members support and scaffold the literacy learning of young children through playful activities at home using both school and cultural resources available to them in their everyday lives.7SECTION TWO: LITERATURE REVIEWThe next section reviews current literature in the fields of literacy, play and the home environment as it relates to early literacy development in young children. It begins with an examination of the varied definitions and play and literacy, followed by a review of current research linking play and literacy at school and at home.Definitions of play and literacyThe definitions of play and literacy have evolved over time and continue to change. This section of the paper first examines each of these constructs individually and then discusses how these two constructs are related in early childhood settings.Play: What is it?In the words of Fromberg (2002), “Play is multifaceted. It changes constantly, and unfolds differently in different places” (p. 8). How play is defined will depend largely upon that person’s position and perspective.Two dominant theorists in the realm of play and learning are Vygotsky (1978) and Piaget(1962). Both researchers acknowledge the value of children’s symbolic play as a way of,)“learning [Vygotsky] and practicing [Piaget] higher level thinking and representational skills” (Pellegrini & Galda, 1993, p. 165). Piaget contends that play is an important site for cognitive development. He believes that two processes (assimilation and accommodation) need to operate simultaneously for individuals to gain knowledge. In assimilation, the individual uses his or her existing frameworks and understandings to make sense of new information, events, situations or objects. When the new situation is in opposition to the individuals existing framework and cannot be adapted into the existing framework, the individual must modify his or her understanding of the world, which is accommodation (Nicolopoulou, 1991, p. 132). Piagetcontends that these processes are constantly working to create a sense of equilibrium. Thus, he believed that, “through play, individuals take information from the outside world and adapt that information to their already developed schemes of learning” (Saracho & Spodek, 1998, p. 7). Piaget identified three different phases of play: practice play (the first 18 months of life), symbolic play (4-7 years) and play with rules (7-11 years). He believed that play evolved from an individual process using idiosyncratic symbols to a social process using collective symbols (Nicolopoulou, 1991, p. 132). -On the other hand, Vygotsky situates play within a social context. He considers play as, “contributing to cognitive development-rather than simply reflecting it- and he treats play as an essentially social activity” (Nicolopoulou, 1991, p. 135). Vygotsky believed that cognitive development occurred through the scaffolding process that resulted from the creation of the zone of proximal development. For Vygotsky, pretend play from the age of three onwards signalled the start of true play. This type of play was characterized by two elements: an imaginary situation and the rules implicit in an imaginary situation. Vygotsky believed that play evolved from an explicit imaginary situation with covert rules to an implicit imaginary situation with explicit rules (Nicolopoulou, 1991, p. 136).Unlike Piaget and Vygotsky, research by King (1979) with elementary aged children set out to define play from the perspective of the child. Specifically, she wanted to understand what constituted play versus work in a Kindergarten classroom. Based on her interviews, she found that pleasure did not differentiate between play and work. Rather, “how an activity is defined depends on the context in which the activity is carried out” (King, 1979, p. 84). Playful activities that were required and assigned by the teacher with the intent of teaching an academic goal were categorized as work regardless of the level of pleasure attained. Whereas, the more an activity9was controlled by the child, the greater the likelihood of it being labelled play, not work. Curiously, activities that the children defined as play were characterized by the voluntary nature of the activity and the absence of teacher involvement.Fromberg’s (1999) multi-dimensional approach to play amalgamates the previously discussed theories. According to her, play is voluntary, that is, it has been selected by the child. Play is meaningful in that it connects to that child’s experiences. Play is symbolic in that children often use resources at hand to represent their world. Play is rule-governed, however the rules are fluid and likely to change. Play is pleasureable, and that pleasure is perhaps derived from the child’s sense of control. Finally play is episodic and non-linear whereby the emphasis is on the activity itself rather than a stated goal.For the purpose of this paper play is viewed as a social practice, whereby children are active participants, and their learning is scaffolded by both peers and adults in the children’s world. Although there may be varying degrees of child and adult control over the activity, for it to be considered play, the child must derive a sense of pleasure and enjoyment from the activity. Play capitalizes on a child’s interest and is seen as an opportunity for the participant to learn and further their cognitive development; sometimes the goal may be overtly stated or it may develop spontaneously. Thus the process of playing is far more critical to learning than the outcome or product.Literacy: What is it?There are multiple perspectives and definitions of literacy. Traditionally literacy has been defined as a set of neutral skills -the ability to read and write. It has been, “page bound, rule governed, mono-cultural and mono-lingual in nature” (The New London Group, 2000, p. 9).10From the 1970s onwards, a proliferation of theorists and researchers proposed alternate theories of literacy that refuted this narrow definition.Research in the late 1970s is characterized by a growing interest in what children were actually doing while engaged in literacy activities. Their findings revealed that although children’s literacy related behaviors were incorrect, they were actually developing and testing hypotheses about how the system worked (Gillen & Hall, 2003, p. 5). Based on their observations, they concluded that:rather than literacy development being something that began at the start of schooling after a bout of reading readiness exercises, it was becoming a much broader continuum that had its origins in very early childhood and drew its meaning from making sense rather than formal teaching. (Gillen& Hall, 2003, p. 6).The term ‘emergent literacy’ was coined to describe this movement. The emergent literacy perspective distinguished itself from other perspectives in the assertion that reading, writing and oral language developed concurrently and that literacy developed, “from an early age from children's exposure to interactions in the social contexts in which literacy is a component, and in the absence of formal instruction” (Whitehurst & Lonigan, 1998, p. 849).Building on his research in Iran in the 1970s, Street proposed that literacy was a social practice. He contended that literacy is an ideological practice that is socially situated, rather than an autonomous system unconnected from people’s needs and lives and the larger social world.He believed that literacy is tied to economic, political and social situations, social structures and local belief systems rather than just being a neutral skill, thus the function and value assigned to literacy vary across cultures and contexts (Hull & Schultz, 2001, p. 585). According to Street, formal academic schooling is seen as one of many different types of literacies and it is tied to a11particular setting with a particular purpose in mind. Following the sociaocultural turn in literacy research, researchers began to investigate children’s out of school literacy lives (Hall, 2000, p. 191).Gee (1996) argued that to view literacy solely as the ability to read and write, “rips literacy out of its sociocultural contexts and treats it as an asocial cognitive skill with little or nothing to do with human relationships” (p. 46). Rather, Gee proposed a much broader definition of literacy. The discourses (i.e. ways of being, acting, thinking, dressing, talking) taken up by each individual function as an identity kit that is recognizable by others across contexts and is situated within a larger social system. He also argued that literacy development occurs wherever literacy practices are happening (Purcell-Gates, 1996, p. 406). He thus refocuses our understanding of literacy away from learning and language use solely in school settings to understanding, “learning, literacy and identity construction in and out of schools and across lifespans” (Hull & Schultz, 2001, p. 585).More recently, the New London Group (2000) has developed a multiliteracy perspective in response to increased globalization which has resulted in the co-mingling of multiple languages and cultures in society, as well as a variety of texts associated with new technologies. Broadly speaking, this perspective views literacy as the process of meaning making using a variety of available modes. It attempts to embrace the discourse, knowledge, and experience students bring with them to school and challenges students to transform their understanding and meaning making across contexts.For the purpose of this literature review, literacy refers to the many ways that we make meaning of our world. It is a social practice that is often, but not always, mediated by print and includes activities such as reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and representing.12Literacy is multi-modal, in that there are many different ways to express and communicate ideas. Furthermore, there are many different pathways into literacy. How families practice literacy is dependent on a number of factors such as cultural background and socioeconomic status among many others. Thus, the literacy practices employed by families are unique to each individual family. Ultimately, being literate enables one to function and participate successfully in society.Play and literacy: A survey of research at school and at home In British Columbia, the importance and value of play as a tool for student learning is communicated to educators through the Primary Program: A Framework for Teaching (2000). The goal of the English Language Arts curriculum in B.C. is to, “provide students with opportunities for personal and intellectual growth through speaking, listening, reading, viewing, writing, and representing to make meaning of the world and to prepare them to participate effectively in all aspects of society” (English Language Arts Kindergarten to Grade 7: Integrated Resource Package, 2006, p. 2). The Kindergarten curriculum specifically focuses on oral language learning, learning to read and learning to write within a play based setting. As a Kindergarten teacher trying to balance the developmental needs of young children, as well as the mandated curriculum, this begs the question, how can play in the classroom be structured such that it functions as a vehicle for students’ literacy development at school? Furthermore, how can parents support their children’s literacy development through playful activities at home? Following is an examination of evidence-based research conducted in the schools and homes of young children to determine the many ways that play supports their literacy development.Play and literacy development at schoolIn order to investigate the impact of the classroom design on spontaneous literacy behaviours (defined as reading, writing, and paper shuffling or handling) during free play in13preschool and Kindergarten aged children, Morrow (1990) conducted a study involving 170 children (84 girls, 86 boys). These students were from 13 suburban, middle class pre-school or kindergarten classes. The Kindergarten and preschool classrooms were randomly assigned to one of four groups: (a) the control group (no changes); (b) the paper, pencil, and books with adult guidance group; (c) the thematic materials with adult guidance group; and (d) the thematic materials without adult guidance group. Free play periods were scheduled in all groups for at least thirty minutes a day. Data were collected three weeks prior to the classroom design changes, three weeks after the changes and then again one month after the study ended. Each set of data was statistically analyzed to determine significant differences between the treatment groups and the control group.Morrow (1990) found that changes to the physical environment did have statistically significant effects on the children’s spontaneous literacy behaviours during play. Pre­intervention, there were no significant differences between groups in their literacy behaviours. Post intervention, Morrow found that the paper, pencil and books with adult guidance group engaged in more writing activities than any other group. On the other hand, the children in the thematic materials with adult guidance group engaged in more reading activities than any othergroup. The three experimental groups showed significantly more instances of paper handling(than the control group. Based on the findings, Morrow concluded that the physical environment increased the number of voluntary literacy behaviors in children during free play. He stated that, “by providing well designed classrooms, teachers are able to facilitate literacy behaviors and possibly enhance cognitive development” (Morrow, 1990, p. 549). He also found that the children assigned to the groups with teacher support exhibited more and varied literacy behaviors14than the children assigned to the groups with no teacher support. That is, despite the richness of the play environment, teacher support was integral to student literacy development.Morrow’s (1990) study persuasively argues for purposefully planned classroom environments, as her study demonstrated that daily play in a literacy rich, carefully designed classroom could promote children’s literacy behaviors. An examination of the total number of literacy events across groups found that the context impacted the frequency of literacy events. Students in the playful, thematic setting with teacher guidance group participated in more literacy events than any other group suggesting that a meaningful play based setting functioned most effectively as a conduit for student engagement in literacy. The children in this study were from predominantly Caucasian, middle class families attending a school with an average class size of twelve. In today’s global society, one has to wonder if the results would have been replicated with a class reflective of today’s ever changing society- a class of diverse learners, speaking multiple languages from varying cultural backgrounds, in larger classroom settings. Would literacy-enriched physical environments promote similar spontaneous literacy behaviors or would these children need more explicit teacher guidance and intervention in order to facilitate their literacy learning through play. Finally, this study defined literacy as reading and writing, neglecting the role of oral language, one of the primary modes of communication and expression for young children. Further research could examine the role of play settings on oral language use and development to provide us with a more holistic picture of young children’s literacy learning during play.Like Morrow (1990), a study by Neuman and Roskos (1990) alsojnvestigated the role of the physical environment on children’s literacy activities during free play. Using the same sample and data from their 1990 study, Neuman and Roskos (1991) later analyzed the15participating children’s verbal exchanges during play in a print enriched preschool environment. Both studies involved a small sample of 37 preschool children, aged four and five. These children attended a half day preschool program that included 40-50 minutes of daily free choice play time. Prior to changes in the physical environment, the classroom consisted of a variety of play areas (e.g., housekeeping, blocks, art areas etc.), however, these play areas were neither labeled nor partitioned. Post-intervention, four kinds of physical changes were implemented: (a) defining each space; (b) increasing environmental print; (c) reorganizing the dramatic centres; and (d) clustering noisier centres together. Prior to the reorganization and enrichment of the classroom, data were collected over a two week basis. Each child’s actions and language were recorded for ten minutes during four separate occasions by two trained observers. Additionally, play at four different centres (house, book comer, art, manipulative/board games) was videotaped for 30 minutes for a total for two hours of footage per centre. Post intervention, four weeks elapsed before data was collected in the same manner. Exchanges involving reading and writing like behaviours were then coded and analyzed for patterns.In analyzing their data, Neuman and Roskos (1990) noticed a number of changes in the children’s play after the physical changes to the environment. First, they found that children engaged in longer, more purposeful reading and writing behaviors in a literacy enriched environment. “Literacy was part of the play flow, that is, reading and writing were the activities that bound the play theme” (Neuman & Roskos, 1990, p. 219). They also found that children’s play became more situated, that is, they reenacted familiar social stories. The “provision of an explicit situational context with appropriate props tended to result in more complex literacy activities,” such as dramatic role play (Neuman & Roskos, 1990, p. 219). Finally, they noted16that the children engaged in less solitary play, and more interactive play with their peers and teachers post intervention.In the second study by Neuman and Roskos (1991), an analysis of the children’s verbal exchanges revealed that children’s conversations during play served three purposes. First, children used conversation as a means to label the names of literacy related objects, such as pictures in a book. Second, children often conversed to negotiate the meaning of literacy related objects or literacy related roles, such as deciding on the role of the librarian and the rules for “borrowing” library books from the Library centre during play. Finally, children used language to coach or help each other overcome a literacy related obstacle that interfered with the play episode, such as helping a classmate spell a name.Like Morrow (1990), Neuman and Roskos (1990) demonstrated that literacy enriched centres promote children’s literacy behaviors (reading and writing) during play. Their second study further demonstrated the multiple ways children’s informal conversations during play functioned as an apt mode to express and communicate their understanding of literacy. Through peer collaboration, students were able to co-construct and scaffold each other’s learning, thus practicing and enhancing not just their literacy development, but also the literacy development of their peers. Given the diverse make-up of many classrooms in B.C., and the multiple languages present, peer scaffolding through informal conversations during play is critical and should not be overlooked or undervalued as it is a safe place for children to identify and negotiate meaning with peers.\Vukelich (1994) was also interested in the potential impact of the physical environment on children’s literacy learning. She conducted a quantitative study examining the effect of print exposure and interaction with a more knowledgeable other on children’s meaning making of17renvironmental print. Fifty-six Kindergarten children (32 boys, 24 girls) from three classes in the same school participated in the study. The sample was ethnically diverse and represented families from predominantly lower socioeconomic levels. Children were assigned to one of three groups: exposure to print during symbolic play in play-enriched settings, exposure to print and experiences with a more knowledgeable other in play-enriched settings, and play in non­enriched settings. Children’s ability to read environmental print appropriate to each setting was tested first out-of-context on a list, and then in-context with the words embedded in their supporting context (dramatic centre).The findings of this study were two fold. In analyzing her data, Vukelich (1994) found that the children in the two play-enriched settings who were exposed to print performed better on the reading tests than those children who played in non-enriched play settings. The type of play setting (centre) also significantly impacted the children’s performance on the reading test. Children were able to read more words from the post office and veterinary centres than from the camping centre. Additionally, Vukelich discovered that children exposed to environmental print in the context of a play setting with a more knowledgeable other (teacher) were able to read more words than any other group pre-intervention and post intervention.Vukelich’s (1994) study once again speaks to the importance of literacy-enriched environments on children’s literacy learning. This study exemplifies the notion that not all play is good play, and that not all play has the same literacy benefits. Play alone was not enough to encourage maximum language learning. All groups made gains in their ability to read environmental print, however the gains made by the two groups exposed to environmental print far exceeded the modest gains made by those not exposed to print. Furthermore, the finding that the children in a play setting with teacher support were able to read more print than any othergroup reinforces the notion that learning is a social process, mediated by experienced others. It highlights the importance of having a knowledgeable other to scaffold literacy learning during knowledge transmission. Vukelich also discovered that literacy learning varied across play settings. This variation could be due to the lived experience of the children in this sample. Based on the demographic information provided, one could assume that these children have had more experience and knowledge of going to the post office or veterinarian office than going camping. Consequently, engaging with print in those two possibly familiar settings perhaps resonated with them, and motivated them to participate in the literacy related activities as it potentially connected to their out-of-school lives. Vukelich’s finding thus challenges classroom teachers to be aware of children’s out of school lives in order to design centres that are meaningful and that draw on their lived experiences. Creating such appealing centres should result in greater student engagement in literacy activities, which in turn should result in their literacy development. However, as her research and the research by Neuman and Roskos (1990, 1991) suggests, optimal literacy development is contingent on the teacher being present and involved in the play.Play and literacy development at homeTraditionally, literacy at home or family literacy has been conceptualized as parents reading story books to their children. Research has shown modest gains in children’s emergent literacy skills (listening comprehension and vocabulary development) when exposed to storybook reading (Anderson, Anderson, Friedrich & Kim, 2010; Senechal & LeFevre, 2002). Heath’s (1985) research suggests that shared storybook reading is not a universal literacy practice criss-crossing cultures, but rather a predominantly Caucasian, middle class practice. In fact, an examination of 100,000 randomly chosen family literacy websites found that literacy19was predominantly portrayed as a Caucasian mother reading a book to her child (Kendrick, Anderson, Smythe, & McKay, 2003). Oversimplifying family literacy as shared storybook reading misses the complexity, depth and variety of literacy practices happening in homes. Furthermore, Janes and Kermani (2001) have documented how laborious shared reading can be for families from other cultural groups. According to William H. Teale and Elizabeth Sulzby as cited in Senechal, LeFavre, Thomas and Daley (1998, p. 96), the home environment provides three types of literacy experiences: (a) experiences in which children interact with adults in reading and writing activities, (b) experiences in which children explore print on their own, and (c) experiences in which children observe adults modelling literate behaviours. While Teale and Sulzby acknowledge that literacy development is a sociocultural practice, they ignore the role of peers and siblings in this literacy development. The following case studies will examine how playful experiences at home functioned as a pathway into literacy development, and how these pathways were shaped by various members of the study participants’ social world.Long’s (1998) 9-month ethnographic study of her 8 year old American daughter’s attempt to learn Icelandic revealed the importance of her peer group, teacher and parents on her language acquisition and development. Field notes, audio-tape, video tape, interviews and artifacts were all part of the data collection process.Long’s (1998) study documented the language development stages the participant, Kelli, went through as she acquired Icelandic. Acquiring Icelandic in order to interact and develop friendships was of critical importance to Kelli. Formal instruction at school and informal play episodes with peers constituted the two primary sites for Kelli’s.Icelandic language development. Through real play interactions with her peers, the experts, Kelli negotiated meaning and in doing so, learned vocabulary, sentence structure, grammatical form, pronunciation, and appropriate20usage. Conversely, Kelli found Icelandic instruction at school to be frustrating and, “had little in common with their social worlds, was used in the context of workbook exercise, and was rarely applied or reinforced in other contexts” (Long, 1998, p. 38). In informal play settings, “Kelli began trying Icelandic at the end of the first month, and by the second month, was using the language feely and comfortably,” whereas, “her Icelandic at school happened more gradually with more hesitation and much less experimentation” (Long, 1998, p. 28). Informal play episodes with peers thus served three important purposes. First it allowed for language scaffolding by Kelli’s peers, it functioned as a safe place for Kelli to freely experiment with Icelandic and it provided a relevant social context within which to learn Icelandic.Long’s (1998) study clearly demonstrated how play at home can function as a pathway into literacy development. Play episodes with peers demonstrated the multimodalcommunicative potential, safety and pure joy associated with play. Furthermore, Long’s study/validates the impact of significant others, aside from parents, on literacy development in the home. Based on observations of her daughter’s language use at school and during informal play sessions with friends, Long juxtaposes the social currency and relevancy of language associated with peer play against the drudgery of learning context removed Icelandic at school. That is, Kelli’s rate of language acquisition appeared to be directly related to the function and context in which Icelandic was used. For Kelli, successfully learning Icelandic was not an autonomous process, but rather a social process scaffolded predominantly by her peers and parents and tied to her social needs. It begs the question what pathways into literacy are available for young children at home as they develop their literacy skills; is it context removed and confined to work books or is it playful, authentic and relevant to their everyday social lives. Furthermore, who determines which pathways are taken, children or adults? According to data presented on the21British Columbia Ministry of Education (BCTF) website regarding class size and composition for 2008-2009, there were 554 Kindergarten to Grade 3 classes in Vancouver with more than four English-as-a-Second Language (E.S.L.) learners (BCTF, 2009). In Vancouver, 84 percent of primary classes (615 out of 728) had at least one E.S.L. student (BCTF, 2009). Thus, if being literate means being able to successfully function in society then it is critical for our E.S.L. learners to have home experiences that are playful, safe, authentic and relevant to their social needs and social worlds in order to potentially maximize their language acquisition and overall literacy development. Although the results of this study are site specific, the findings deepen our understanding of the importance of play and social networks in the development of literacy, especially for second language learners.McTavish’s (2007) ethnographic study of a Canadian working class family attempted to uncover the many ways that the family (Sally, 8 years old; Nadine, mid-thirties; Bruce mid­thirties) supported the literacy development of their youngest child, Katie, 5 years old. Over a month long period, McTavish collected various forms of data including, interviews with Katie and Nadine, field notes, observations, video tapings of the home environment and artefacts of Katie’s drawings and writings. Based on her findings, McTavish wanted to determine if Katie understood the functional and communicative purposes of print, and how this understanding was scaffolded by her parents and sibling.McTavish (2007) noted that this family engaged in a wide variety of literacy activities at home, involving varying levels of participation from individual family members. The parents provided a literacy rich home environment and provided Katie with experiences to interact with print both on her own and with adult support, to experiment with print and to see them model literate behaviours. Through such activities as using a family calendar to schedule activities,22working from home, writing cards, playing grocery shopping (finding items in the supermarket beginning with a particular sound) and reading the TV guide to decide on a TV program to watch as a family, Katie and her parents engaged in a number of literacy activities. During this time, her parents also modelled the functional nature of literacy. Katie’s parents also engaged in a number of literacy practices purely for pleasure. For example they often read books (fiction and non-fiction) on their own or with the children, did crossword puzzles and word searches, read magazines and cook books, and sang songs and nursery rhymes and retold oral stories to entertain the girls on long car drive. Katie was also given ample opportunity to interact with print on her own- reading books and writing for pleasure while her sister did her homework.Katie and her sister also enjoyed re-enacting favourite TV shows and play at school-type activities. McTavish framed her conclusions using the foundational concepts of emergent literacy as defined by Purcell-Gates (1996). She found that Katie understood that: (a) print is intentional in that it carries meaning, (b) written language differs from oral language, (c) there are various conventions of print, (d) print is based on a symbolic system, and (e) the symbols are coded at the phoneme level.McTavish’s study illustrates the multiple and varied pathways a family took to enhance their youngest child’s literacy development. Through a variety of informal and fun, oral and print based activities Katie was able to learn about the world of print. Katie’s literacy learning was predominantly scaffolded and shaped by her parents, and to a lesser degree her older sister. The playful pathways chosen and the individuals that shaped the literacy development of Katie (McTavish, 1998) and Kelli (Long, 1998) were different but they both achieved the same outcome- furthering the literacy learning of the participant at a far faster rate than if that person had attempted to learn in isolation. This further reinforces the notion that literacy learning is a23collaborative process that is shaped by the people in a child’s social world, and is reflective of the values and beliefs of that world. Although the findings of this study are specific to this family, it reaffirms the notion that parent values and beliefs about literacy are transmitted to children through engagement in a wide variety of literacy practices which impacts child literacy development.Mui and Anderson’s (2008) ethnographic study of a middle class, Indo Canadian, multi- generational family in western Canada sought to determine the many ways that literacy was practiced in this multicultural and multilingual setting. The family consisted of 15 members: 3 nuclear families and the grandparents. Seven of the family members were children aged 3 to 14 years. Besides the family members, there were 4 part-time nannies, one cook, and 2 part-time domestic workers. Punjabi and English were spoken with varying fluency by the different family members. Six year old Genna was the focal child in this study. Data was collected through field notes, semi-structured interviews, informal conversations with family members and caregivers, photographs, videotaped visits, sample literacy activities and artefacts.The presence and abundance of literacy materials and the variety of literacy practices engaged in by the various family members suggests that the Johal family highly valued and practiced literacy. The researchers discovered that literacy in this home differed from conventional literacy practices. Much of the literacy that infused the Johal’s daily lives was functional in nature. Furthermore, shared storybook reading between Genna and her mother was described as unenjoyable and therefore not practiced despite the recommendations of Genna’s teachers. Genna’s literacy development was supported by her parents, siblings and cousins, but in markedly different ways. Genna’s literacy learning was facilitated by her parents through highly structured school like activities. On the other hand, Genna’s siblings and cousins24supported her literacy development through dramatic play and structured play activities like playing school, board games, playground games, and complex socio-dramatic play episodes.The JohaPs truly illustrate the complexities and depth associated with capturing and describing family literacy practices; it is messy and does not neatly fit into a preconceived box. The Johals also illustrate that how a family chooses to practice literacy at home is deeply affected by their cultural beliefs. Genna’s parents’ school experiences and cultural beliefs led them to design more traditional literacy activities that resembled school. Also transmitted to the children was the cultural belief that it is the responsibility of the older children to prepare the younger children for school entry. This ensured that the older children adapted activities and games and scaffolded her learning in such a way as to maximize Genna’s participation.Although not quantitatively captured, the play episodes witnessed by the researchers suggest that play functioned as a very effective site for literacy development. In essence, the Johal’s appeared to create a third space whereby the literacy practices of school were combined with the family’s beliefs to create a third space comprised of a wide variety of literacy practices. Despite the small nature of this study, the findings challenge educators to rethink the types of activities suggested to parents by teachers to support children’s learning at home. Perhaps the suggestions need to be more varied and functional in nature.The home environmentMost parents have high expectations of their children and hope that they will be successful in both school and life. According to interview data collected and analysed by Falk- Ross, Beilfuss and Orem (2010), over three quarters of the 84 parents surveyed at an ethnically diverse elementary school in the U.S. believed that reading was either extremely important or very important to their child’s development. Furthermore, these parents articulated their belief25that reading was the foundation to “all academic learning” (Falk-Ross et ah, 2010, p.25). Parents also reported wanting ongoing communication with their child’s teachers in order to gain specific information on how to support their child’s learning (Falk-Ross et ah, 2010, p. 26).Based on this survey, the authors concluded that these particular parents highly valued the role of literacy in their child’s life, believed it was the'ticket to overall school and life success and with teacher guidance, were keen to support their child’s literacy development. Below is a review of various studies that seek to examine the impact of parent involvement and the home environment on student literacy development.Purcell Gates (1996) examined the relationships between types of literacy practices and the print knowledge that a sample of 24 preschool, Kindergarten and Grade One aged students brought from home to school. This was a one-year descriptive study involving 20 low income and ethnically diverse students in an urban area in the United States. All of the families spoke English at home and were located through family literacy and adult education programs in the area. The purpose of the study was not shared with the participating families in order for researchers to gain as genuine a portrait as possible of family literacy practices in the homes of , these families. Six graduate student researchers assumed the role of participant observers and visited the families 2-5 times before beginning their data collection. The goal of the researchers was to collect an aggregated typical week of activity for each family over the course of the year. Data were collected about the families’ uses of print, the literacy materials present in the home, and the participants involved in these episodes. A variety of standardized tests and activities were administered to the focal children to uncover their literacy understandings. The results were coded and quantitatively and qualitatively analysed for emerging trends.26The findings of this study revealed that all the families used print in their daily lives, but to varying degrees. These families used print most frequently for entertainment purposes and to complete daily routines. In keeping with the functional use of print, further analysis revealed that these families read predominantly at the phrasal or causal level. That is, these families read the types of text commonly found on coupons, TV guides, advertisements, recipes, to-do lists etc. Three patterns emerged upon examining the relationship between the home literacy environment and the children’s knowledge about written language. First, children who had a deeper understanding about the functions and conventions of print came from homes in which print was used to a greater degree, and who experienced more interactions with their mothers around print. In these cases, parents, specifically mothers functioned as the child’s first teacher, and the home environment functioned as an important site for literacy learning prior to school entry. Second, Purcell-Gates found that preschoolers whose home lives included more instances of people reading and writing texts demonstrated greater understanding of how the written system works. For these children, formal and explicit teaching of the written system was not necessary for them to begin to develop an understanding of how print works. Rather, parent modelling of the various uses and functions of print was sufficient to help them develop an understanding of print. Finally, Purcell-Gates noted that school entry resulted in an increased level of parent involvement in the literacy lives of their children.Pucell-Gates (1996) grounded her research question in the notion that literacy is a culturalpractice and that knowledge construction occurs during interactions and experiences with others.vIt demonstrates the critical role that the home environment plays during this significant period of language development in young children. This study also supports the emergent literacy perspective that suggests that children develop an understanding of language and its function27prior to school entry. Assuming that Gee’s (1996) discourse theory to be true, then early childhood educators are faced with two challenges. First, to pro-actively communicate to parents prior to school entry literacy activities that support school readiness, rather than parents beginning these activities after school entry. Second, to uncover and value the unique and varied ways that children are learning about literacy in their homes, and to make space for these practices in the classroom. Although this study was incredibly thorough, and many steps were taken to ensure validity and reliability, the generalizability of the results are limited due to the small sample size that was neither randomly chosen nor representative of families across the North America. However, the study does provide more details and complexity about interactions around print that occur in young children’s homes. Further research needs to address issues of cultural diversity and bilingual families as there were no non-English speakers or English as an Additional Language (EAL) children included in this study.Lahaie (2008) set out to investigate the link between parental involvement and the school^ readiness of children of immigrant parents. Lahaie defined parent involvement as cognitive learning at home, cognitive learning out of home, choice of private or public school, and parental involvement at school. The sample of 13,078 students, 2,678 of whom were children of immigrant families was derived from a nationally representative sample of children in the U.S. called the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study- Kindergarten Cohort of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K).In order to analyse the effect of parent involvement on school readiness, the researcher created two samples. The first sample consisted of children of immigrant families; English proficiency scores were used as an outcome. The second sample consisted of children of both immigrant and native families; math scores were used as an outcome. Multivariate regression analysis was used28to determine the link between parent involvement and student school readiness as measured by the participants’ print knowledge and Math scores.Lahaie (2008) found that parental English proficiency and parent involvement was linked to school readiness. Parental level of English proficiency was strongly associated with children’s early math scores and English proficiency scores. Children with immigrant parents who both spoke a language other than English at home did significantly worse in English and math than children of immigrant parents who spoke only English at home. Resources at home (like children’s books, music tapes and CDs), pre-Kindergarten schooling experience and attending a private school were parent variables positively associated with English proficiency. Math scores were also positively associated with these variables as well as a parent meeting the teacher one time. Furthermore, Lahaie found that these parental involvement variables eliminated the difference in math scores between children of English speaking immigrant parents and children of non-English speaking immigrant parents. Overall, it was found that parent involvement as defined and measured by this study, reduced the gap in math scores between children of natives and children of immigrants by one-third of a standard deviation.Lahaie (2008) urges readers to interpret the findings of this study, specifically those related to the math scores, with caution. The math sample represented children who were deemed proficient in English, thus excluding immigrant children who were not proficient in English, and overstating the impact of parent involvement on Math scores. As in previous studies, resources at home and cognitive learning activities with parents at home were strongly correlated with school readiness for immigrant children. This study indicates the need for educators to consider the resources that parents, specifically non-English speaking parents, may have access to and to assist them in ascertaining further resources to support their children’s29literacy development. It reaffirms the notion that it is the responsibility of schools and educators to equally support parents and students to ensure overall student school success.Weigel, Martin and Bennett (2006) conducted a one-year study to investigate the impact of the home environment on preschool-aged children’s emerging literacy and language knowledge. The study took place in the U.S. mid-west. Participant families were contacted from a randomly selected sample of licensed childcare facilities. Eighty-five parents and children participated in the year-long study. These families were predominantly Caucasian, middle class and well educated. Parents completed self-administered questionnaires and were interviewed by the researchers. The researchers used a variety of measures to assess four components of the home environment: parental literacy habits, parental demographics, parental reading beliefs, and parent-child activities. They also assessed children’s print knowledge, reading interest, emergent writing skills, and expressive and receptive language skills. Data were collected at the onset of the study, and one year later.Four major findings were reported by the researchers. First, the more parents engaged in literacy and language activities with their child, the greater the child’s print knowledge and interest in reading at the beginning of the study, and one year later. Second, parent literacy habits were also positively associated with children’s print knowledge. That is, the more children were able to see their parents model and engage in literacy, the greater their understanding of print. Third, the ability of a child to express his or her thoughts verbally and to understand verbal language (expressive and receptive language) was associated with greater parent educational attainment, income, literacy skills and more positive school experiences rather than the frequency of parent child literacy activities. Finally, parents who highly valued children’s literacy and language development tended to engage more frequently in language30activities at home. Based on their findings, the researchers concluded that early reading and print awareness skills were associated with literacy activities occurring in the home, whereas early language skills were associated with parent demographics.vAlthough informative, the findings and conclusions of this study were based on a small homogeneous sample of participants; noticeably absent were families from differing socioeconomic status and families from differing cultures speaking a language other than English. Furthermore, the researchers suggest the quality of the home environment is indicative of parent beliefs which are a reflection of their literacy experiences. The researchers contend that parents with positive schooling experiences create an enthusiasm for learning whereas parents with negative schooling experiences create, “an atmosphere of disinterest, or even disdain, for reading” (Weigel et al., 2006, p. 374). While I agree with the overall sentiment expressed in this claim it is one that is based on a narrow collection of home literacy activities that were measured for the purpose of this study. It fails to capture the wide range of literacy activities that could be happening in these families and it fails to acknowledge the functional literacy activities that could be taking place organically as the day unfolds. To assume that literacy, as defined by this study is absent in families and that these parents are transmitting a negative perception of literacy is, I believe, somewhat short-sighted and lacks cultural sensitivity. However, if parents have had negative school experiences, educators are thus challenged to engage parents in positive literacy activities by creating positive home-school connections in order to indirectly create literacy rich home environments for children. This becomes far more complex when considering the social and cultural complexities of most classrooms. Parents coming from different cultures, holding differing beliefs about their role inthe child’s education may not be aware of the impact that a literacy rich home environment couldJhave on their child’s early school success./32SECTION THREE: CONNECTONS TO PRACTICEThe following section outlines the school community where the Family Activities Baggie (FAB) program will be implemented, a detailed description of the program, as well as information on program implementation.The school community Although located in an affluent neighbourhood in Western Canada, this particular elementary school services a predominantly transient and ESL community that is financially, culturally and linguistically diverse. The majority of families in this community are from a low to middle socio-economic backgrounds, however, there are a few families from high socioeconomic backgrounds. Furthermore, the school community is made up of a number of different cultures, including families from Iran, Korea, China, Taiwan, Japan, Mexico, Thailand, the Philippines, Pakistan, India, Australia, Europe and the U.S. and Canada. According to school statistics collected from September 1st, 2010 to March 1st, 2011, 100 out of the school’s 227 students (or 44 percent) are categorized as ESL speakers and receive small group ESL support. Of these 100 students, 37 percent are level one or level two ESL speakers. Using this statistic, it is assumed that these are non-English speaking families who have been in the Canada for less than two school years. The schools population is transient in nature, whereby children who begin their careers in Kindergarten often return to their home countries or transfer to neighbouring schools before their Grade 7 graduation. This year, 16 percent (or 6 out of 37) of the students in the Grade 7 graduating class began their careers in Kindergarten at this school. From September 2010 to March 2011, 77 students entered the school at different times after the school year had commenced, whereas 26 students withdrew. Furthermore, 43 out of the 77 (or 56 percent) students who entered the school were from a country other than Canada. Having a 33parent and student community that is culturally and linguistically diverse and constantly changing presents this school with many unique challenges. One of its greatest challenges is navigating the many and varied cultural differences to create working partnerships between parents and school staff that are supportive and maximize student learning.The Kindergarten class reflects the school’s diversity. In the 2010-2011 Kindergartenfclass, 33 percent of the students are categorized as ESL speakers and receive small group ESL support. Of these students, 29 percent are level one or level two ESL speakers, thus it is assumed that these students and their families have been in Canada for less than two school years. Fifty-two percent of the families speak a language other than English at home.The mission statement of the school is, in cooperation with the community, to enable and inspire individuals to discover and develop their full potential in a supportive learning environment. The school culture is warm, inviting and celebrates diversity in a collaborative environment that embraces parents as partners in their child’s education. As previously stated, many families are from cultural and educational backgrounds that are distinctly different from Western educational systems. Thus, parent expectations about the role of the school and their role as parents in their child’s education are often in sharp contrast with Canadian held expectations. Consequently, there are many district and community based supports available to families at the school to foster this partnership. One-site supports include Settlement Workers, a Strongstart program, the local Parent Council, as well as many parenting and child development seminars offered throughout the year at a school and district level. School community events (like Barbeques, Pancake Breakfasts’ Family Literacy Day, Student-Led Conferences, Openhouses, etc.) are often held throughout the year as a way of inviting parents to be part of their child’s learning, as well as the broader parent community. Additionally, the school library,34the living room of the school, opens twenty minutes before school begins and parents are always invited to arrive early and to stay to read, draw or play a game with their child. In an attempt to be transparent, school goals are visibly posted around the school. Furthermore, classroom teachers communicate frequently and in a variety of ways (for example, virtual classrooms, weekly newsletters, classroom calendars, etc.) to ensure that parents feel connected to the school and to ensure that they are aware of their child’s learning. Classroom teachers also have an open door policy whereby they are available to meet with parents and answer questions or concerns as they arise.The Family Activities Baggie programThe Family Activity Baggie (FAB) program is intended to provide families with a variety of ways to support their Kindergarten child’s literacy development at home through fun, engaging and playful activities. The activity cards were developed by L.E.A.P. B.C (2010). LEAP is, “a set of resources for families, caregivers and early learning practitioners, integrating Literacy, Education, Activity and Play” (2010 Legacies Now: LEAP BC, 2010). LEAP BC promotes healthy child development through Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair activities. Thirty- one activities for the Kindergarten FAB program were chosen from among the Hop, Move and Food Flair LEAP BC activities. Activities that were included in the FAB program were selected based on their age appropriateness, the needs of the community and their connections to the prescribed learning outcomes for Literacy in the Kindergarten curriculum. However it is worth noting that, although the Language Arts curricular connections are being emphasized in the baggies, there are cross curricular connections with Physical Education, Health and Career Education, Social Studies, Math, and Science. Knowing that the parent community is culturally diverse and may place varying degrees of value on the role of play in learning, the intent of the35chosen FAB activities is to demonstrate to families the potential of play as a learning tool by drawing parent’s attention to the type of learning that happens while children are playing. Following is a list of the cards that were selected for the FAB program: Box Town; Mystery Objects; Never NOT EVER!; Let’s Pretend; Remember When...?; Rainbow Ice; Show Me a Face; Simon and Sarah; Sorting Stones; Pick a Letter, Find a Word; Snap! Card Sharks; Treasure Hunt; TV Talk; Wacky Words; Will You Read to Me?; What is Not?; Sort and Separate; Tri-spy; Counting Walks; Hit the Target; Bubble Chase; Bean Bag Golf; Follow the Trail; Bread; Five Senses Pretend Grocery Shopping; Knock Down; Teddy Bear’s Picnic; Going on a Picnic; Tread Lightly, Look Closely; Pizza Pizzazz!; and Read, Set, Eat! Placemats. For detailed information about each activity card, please see Appendix A. Each FAB will contain a LEAP BC laminated activity card, a related picture book and a feedback book. Also included will be a highlighted copy of the Kindergarten prescribed learning outcomes for Language Arts, outlining the literacy learning outcomes that pertain to each activity.Program implementation Successful implantation of the FAB program will require that a number of steps be taken prior to actual implementation. Gathering materials, coordination between the staff at the school, as well as communication between parents and teacher will be pivotal to the program’s success. Gathering materials and organizing the bagsjThe activity cards for the Baggies are available online at the LEAP BC website, however, for the purpose of FAB a hardcopy of each activity card needs to be created. In order to create a hard copy of each card, the activity needs be downloaded onto a data stick and taken to a high quality printer. Once printed, the cards will be laminated to ensure longevity.36Picture books recommended by each card needs to be ordered for each baggie. Funds for these picture books will be accessed through the schools Learning Resource fund, and purchased through a local children’s book store.Thirty-one copies of the Language Arts prescribed learning outcomes for Kindergarten need to printed, one for each baggie. The outcomes that pertain to each individual activity needs to be highlighted. Additionally, thirty-one feedback books need to be created by labelling an exercise book for each baggie.Finally, Ziploc freezer bags need to be purchased and labelled with the name of each activity. A FAB card, a copy of the Language Arts Learning Outcomes and a feedback booklet need to be placed in each baggie. Once made, the baggies will be stored in plastic baskets at the back of the classroom along with a record book. The record book will include a list of all the FAB activities in the program. The purpose of the record book is to ensure that all materials are accounted for and returned week to week.The parent shareAt this particular school, September is the time for parents to meet with their child’s classroom teacher, as a large group and individually. A lot of information is shared during the first month of school, as the school expectations are set and home routines are established. As this is an overwhelming time for parents, students and teachers alike, the FAB program will begin after the Thanksgiving long weekend. In the week prior to this break, parents will be invited to attend an informational session explaining the FAB program. Parents will have been made aware of this opportunity via “Meet the Teacher” night, the classroom calendar, the school calendar, and verbal and print reminders. Choosing the actual day for the informational session will depend on the music teacher’s schedule and the librarian’s schedule. On the selected day,37the session will begin after the students have been safely dropped off at the Kindergarten classroom at 8:40 a.m. Once parents have dropped off their child, they will be invited to make their way to the Library, where coffee and muffins will be served until 9:00 a.m. The teacher will make her to thelLibrary once the students have been picked up for music by the music teacher. The presentation is intended to last half an hour and will formally begin at 9:00 a.m.The purpose of the presentation will be threefold: (i) to review the Kindergarten philosophy and, to discuss the role of play in learning (ii) to examine the Kindergarten Language Arts curriculum and, (iii) describe the FAB program, explore the baggies and answer any questions or concerns. Please see Appendix B for the power point presentation and accompanying handouts that will be shared with the parents at this informational session. For the purpose of this paper, only one sample FAB is located in Appendix C, however on the day of the informational session, all activity bags will be prepped and available for parent exploration.Future directionsThe FAB program is a classroom based attempt to engage families in a conversation1about learning through play in the Kindergarten year. It is not a family literacy program, nor is it an evidence based program that has been through stringent empirical testing. Rather, this program was designed in response to a parent query: how can I support my child’s literacy learning at home? Once the program has been implemented, its success will be evaluated on a regular basis through informal conversations with parents and comments made in the Feedback booklets located in each baggie. During Student-Led Conferences at the end of second term, a questionnaire (located in Appendix D) will be handed out to parents, as a way of collecting concrete feedback about the program. Assuming the feedback is positive, this information will be used to implement changes to enhance the program and ensure further success in future years.38SECTION FOUR: CONCLUSIONThe research examined in this paper attempted to explore two questions: (i) how does a play based environment benefit student learning at school and at home and (ii) what characteristics of the home environment positively impact student literacy development?Research on the development of literacy at school revealed the power of play as an important site for children to practice and learn further about how print works. Studies by Morrow (1990), Neuman and Roskos (1990) and Vukelich (1994) pointedly illustrated how play in a Kindergarten classroom could enhance student literacy development. Through rich and purposeful classroom designs, children’s literacy learning could be scaffolded either by their peers or teachers. Sutton-Smith (1995, 1997), as cited in Roskos and Christie (2001) however cautions educators of the notion of “play as progress” (p. 82). Underlying this idea is the assumption that any and all type of play that children engage in will have a positive effect on their learning; that is, all play is good play. As Christie (1990) states, “simply giving children an opportunity to engage in free play will not guarantee that rich, sustained dramatic play will occur or that literacy activities will become integrated into children’s dramatizations” (p. 543).A literacy rich environment and support from a knowledgeable other (preferably a teacher, but also a peer) are critical to the success of a Kindergarten play based program intended to enhance student engagement and development of literacy.Studies by Long (1998), McTavish (1998) and Mui and Anderson (2008) examined how children’s play experiences at home functioned as a pathway into literacy development and enrichment. Their findings illustrated that children and families engaged in a variety of playful literacy activities with a variety of people. Furthermore, their literacy experiences were39grounded in the context of their everyday lives. Literacy unfolded naturally, either as part of their day to day functioning or during play episodes.Studies by Purcell-Gates (1996), Lahaie (2008) and Weigel, Martin and Bennett (2006) examined the impact of the home environment and parent involvement and attitudes on student literacy development. Their findings suggest that parents play a critical role in fostering a positive and rich literacy environment at home. Resources at home, positive parent attitudes and beliefs towards literacy, as well as parent interactions with print all positively impacted children’s literacy development outside of school. Based on her findings, Purcell-Gates (1996) suggests that, “children who experience many uses of written language to which they attend and personally experience have more opportunities to build the important conceptual basis of literacy development- that print is symbolic and serves communicative purposes” (p. 426, emphasis in the original). Regardless of race, language, socioeconomic status, family composition or any other factor, the research reinforces the notion that parents are a child’s first teacher and that literacy learning happens prior to school entry.As stated at the beginning of this paper, the most common question I get from my parent community is: how can I support my child’s literacy development at home? This question is very telling as it reveals the value parents place on developing their child’s literacy skills, as well as their desire to get ideas to help support their children’s literacy learning at home. The Family Activity Baggies is not intended to be a family literacy program, but rather a purposeful response to a parent community that values literacy and perhaps sees, “literacy and schooling as the key to mobility...” (Auerbach, 1989, p.170). Designing this program is not founded on the belief that my parent community lacks “essential skills” (Auerbach, 1989, p. 170) needed to further their child’s learning at home. Rather, it is in response to a parent community that is seeking40information and knowledge about available resources and ways to support their child’s literacy learning outside of school. The Family Literacy Baggies program is not intended to replicate school experiences, but rather to provide parents with a plethora of playful, engaging, and no­fuss activities that they could do with their children as their day unfolds.Anderson, Anderson, Friedrich and Eun (in press) refer to parents who participated in a study 20 years earlier appreciating and recalling that one of the benefits of the Family Literacy program was that it made visible the literacy program and pedagogy at school (p. 17). The Family Activity Baggies attempts to articulate to parents that there are many different pathways into literacy development. For many families the program will validate the many ways that they are already practicing literacy at home, but perhaps without even knowing it. The Family Activity Baggies provide a means for making the play based Kindergarten curriculum transparent to parents. Additionally, due to the open ended nature of the activities, the Family Activity Baggies also affords families the right to take the activity outlined in the Baggies and transform it to suit their needs, and to create literacy experiences that are in keeping with their specific home literacy practices.The research on literacy suggests that it is a social practice that is fostered by a number of people in a child’s social world. That is, literacy cannot be understood nor enhanced unless it is examined within its social and cultural contexts. The research examined in this paper also suggests that optimal student literacy development is a shared endeavour. It requires that the home and school environment work collaboratively to foster positive, lifelong attitudes towards literacy and learning in young children. The Family Activity Baggies attempts to enhance student literacy development by supporting parents as they engage their children in a variety of play based literacy activities.41REFERENCESAnderson J., Anderson, A., Friedrich, N. & Eun, K. J. (In press). Taking stock of family literacy: Some contemporary perspectives. Journal o f Childhood Literacy.Anderson, J., Anderson, A., Friedrich, N. & Kin, J. (In press). Taking stock of family literacy: Some contemporary perspectives. Journal o f Early Childhood Literacy.Anderson, J., & Morrison, F. (2007). “A great program... for me as a Gramma”: Caregivers evaluate a family literacy initiative. Canadian Journal o f Education, 30, 68-89.Auerbach, E. (1989). Toward a social-contextual approach to family literacy. Harvard Educational Review, 59, 165-181.British Columbia Teacher’s Federation. (2008). Overview o f Class Size and Composition in B.C. Public Schools 2008/09. Retrieved May 19, 2009, from http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/reporting/enrol/class-size.php ^. Chapman, M., Balabanov, R., Bischoff, C., Dean, H., Denyer, D., Jesten, B., Johns, C. &Politano, C. (2000). The primary program: A framework for teaching. Victoria, BC: BC Ministry of Education.Christie, J.F. (1990). Dramatic play: A context for meaningful engagements. The Reading Teacher, 43 (8), 542-545.Falk-Ross, F., Beilfuss, S. & Orem, S. (2010). Seeking parental input in children’s literacy programs: Factoring diversity. Journal o f Reading Education, 35 (2), 22-29).Fromberg, D.P. (2002). Play and meaning in early childhood education. MA: Allyn and Bacon.Gee, J (1996). Social linguistics and social literacies: Ideology in discourses. London: Taylor Francis.)42Gillen, J. & Hall, N. (2003). The emergence of early childhood literacy. In N. Hall, J. Larson and J. Marsh (Eds.), Handbook o f early childhood literacy. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Ltd.Gregory, E. (2001). Sisters and brothers as language and literacy teachers: Synergy between siblings playing and working together. Journal o f Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 301-322Hall, N. (2000). Literacy, play and authentic experience. In K.A. Roskos and J.F. Christie(Eds.), Play and literacy in early childhood: Research from multiple perspectives. NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.)xHeath, S. (1982). What no bedtime story means: Narrative skills at home and school. Language in Society, 11, 49-76.Hull, G. & Schultz, K. (2001). Literacy and learning out of school: A review of theory and research. Review o f Educational Research, 71 (4), 575-611.Janes, H & Kermani, H. (2001). Caregivers’ story reading to young children in family literacy programs: Pleasure or punishment? Journal o f Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 44, 458- 466.Kendrick, M., Anderson, J., Smythe, S., & MacKay, R. (2003). What images of family literacy revealabout family literacy practices and family literacy programs. In C. Fairbanks, J. Worthy, B. Maloch, J. Hoffman & D. Schallert (Eds.), 52nd Yearbook o f  the National Reading Conference (pp. 245- 258). Oak Creek, WI: National Reading Conference.King, N.R. (1979). Play the Kindergartners’ perspective. The Elementary School Journal,80(2), 80-87.Lahaie, C. (2008). School readiness of children of immigrant parents: Does parental involvement play a role? Social Science Quarterly, 89(3), 684-705.43Long, S. (1998). Learning to get along: Language acquisition and literacy development in a new cultural setting. Research in the Teaching o f English, 33, 8-47.McTavish, M. (2007). Constructing the big picture: A working class family supports their daughter’s pathways to literacy. The Reading Teacher, 60(5), 476-485.Ministry of Education, Province of British Columbia (2006). English language artskindergarten to grade 1: Integrated resource package, Victoria, BC: BC Ministry of Education.Ministry of Education, Province of British Columbia (2010). Primary program: A guide forteaching. Retrieved October, 5, 2010 from http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/primary_program/Moje, E.B.,Ciechanowski, K.M., Kramer, K., Ellis, S., Carillo, R., & Collazo, T. (2004).Working toward third space in content area literacy: An examination of everyday funds of knowledge and Discourse. Reading Research Quarterly, 39(1), 38-70.Moll, L., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (2005/1992) Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. In N. Gonzalez, L. Moll,- &C. Amanti (Eds.). Funds o f knowledge: Theorizing practices in households, communities, and classrooms (pp. 71-87). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Morrow, L.M. (1990). Preparing the classroom environment to promote literacy during play. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 5, 537-554.Mui, S. & Anderson, J. (2008). At home with the Johars: Another look at family literacy. The Reading Teacher, 62(3), 234-243.Neuman, S.B. & Roskos, K. (1990). Play, print and purpose: Enriching play environments for literacy development. The Reading Teacher, 44(3), 214-221.44Neuman, S.B. & Roskos, K. (1991). Peers as literacy informants: A description of youngchildren’s literacy conversations in play. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 6,233- 248.Nicolopoulou, N. (1991). Play, cognitive development, and the social world. In B. Scales, M. Almy, A. Nicolopoulou & S. Ervin-Tripp (Eds.), Play and the social context o f development in early care and education. NY: Teacher’s College Press.Pellegrini, A. & Galda, L. (1993). “Ten years after: The reexamination of symbolic play and literacy research.” Reading Research Quarterly, 28, 163-175.Piaget, J. (1962). Play, dreams and imitation in childhood. NY: Norton.Purcell-Gates, V. (1996). Stories, coupons and the “TV Guide:” Relationships between home literacy experiences and emergent literacy knowledge. Reading Research Quarterly, 31(4), 406-428).Rogoff (2003). The cultural nature of human development. NY: Oxford University PressRoskos, K. & Christie, J. (2001). Examining the play-literacy interface: A critical review and future directions. Journal o f Early Childhood Literacy, 1(1), 59-89.Saracho, O.N. & Spodek, S. (1998). A historical overview of theories of play. In O.N. Saracho & B. Spodek (Eds.), Multiple perspectives on play in early childhood education. NY: State University of New York Press.Senechal, M. & LeFevre, J. (2002). Parental involvement in the development of children’s reading skill: A five-year longitudinal study. Child Development, 73(2), 445-460.Senechal, M., LeFevre, J., Thomas, E.M. & Daley, K.E. (1998). Differential effects of homeliteracy experiences on the development of oral and written language. Redding Research Quarterly, 33(1), 96-116.45The New London Group (2000). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: Designing social futures. In B. Cope and M. Kalantzis (Eds.), Multiliteracies: Literacy learning and the design o f social futures. London: Routledge.Volk, D. (1999). “The teaching and the enjoyment and being together...”: Siblingteaching in the family of a Puerto Rican Kindergartner. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 14 (1), 5-34.Vukelich, C. (1994). Effects of play interventions on young children’s reading of environmental print. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 9, 153-170.Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society. MA: Harvard University PressWeigel, D.J., Martin, S.S., Kymberley, K.B. (2006). Contributions of the home literacyenvironment to preschool-aged children’s emerging literacy and language skills. Early Childhood Development and Care, 176, 357-378.Whitehurst, G.J., & Lonigan, C.J. (1998). Child development and early literacy. Child Development, 69 (3), 848-872.Wood, D.J., & Bruner, G. (1983). The role of tutoring in problem solving. Journal o f  Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 17, 89-100.2010 Legacies Now (2010). LEAP BC. Retrieved November, 22, 2010 from http://www.20101egaciesnow.com/leap_bc/46Appendix A: Description of Each FAB Card47Never NOT EVERILet’s play and talk togetherExplain to your child that you are going to play a game in which you use your imagination to think of activities that you would never want to do.Introduce the phrase "Never N O T  EVER." Ask your child to think of something that he or she would never N O T  EVER do. Take turns thinking of d ifferent possibilities, and talk about why you would not want to do these things.Have fun playing with your ideas, e.g. ”1 will never NOT  EVER swim in a pool with an alligator!" Encourage your child to imagine what might happen if you did.❖ Mix some serious ideas with silly ones, e.g. “I will never NOT  EVER be a litter-bug." Help your child understand the difference between realistic and imaginative possibilities.A good read-together book’HEAD AND JAM -IW  FRANCES-Bread and Jam fo r Francesby Russell HobanThismctivityiis-qood}for:imaqjniMlgQrninq to slayjwith ideas a r id S p inteiQeosi l^ ^ r o  gar es.Hints for success❖ Take the first turn to show your child how the game works.❖ Encourage your child to have fun with imagination.Ways to say itL e a p r c20 1 0  LEGACIES KNOWj^’r  B iuusiiL 'Av rnnt\(«nLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair, www. 2010LegaciesNow. com/LEAP_BC/Never NOTLet's play and talk together❖ Explain to your child that you arc going to play a game in which you use your imagination to think of activities that you would never want to do.❖ Introduce the phrase "Never NOT  EVER." Ask your child to think of something that he or she would never NOT  EVER do. Take turns thinking of d ifferent possibilities, and talk about why you would not want to do these things.❖ Have fun playing with your ideas, e.g. “I  will never NOT  EVER swim in a pool with an alligator!" Encourage your child to imagine what might happen if you did.This is a language development activityfor children ages 3 to 5EVER!Hints for success❖ Mix some serious ideas with silly ones, e.g. “I  will never NOT  EVER be a litter-bug." Help your child understand the difference between realistic and imaginative possibilities.A good read-together bookBREAD AND'JAM-. Wtf'FMNGESBread and Jam fo r Frances by Russell HobanTake the first turn to show your child how the game works.Encourage your child to have fun with imagination.Ways to say itL e a p BC'Mr- LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.EAP BlUTLSI I’ kv rn,llMm'v www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/2010LEC^ J k EpUAMBlAThis is a language development activityfor children ages 3 to 5More ideas for Never NOT EVER!Try this wayChange the game to talk about things you will do "always and forever," e.g. “I  will always and forever love reading books with you" or “I  will always and forever hate the feel of wet socks on my feet."Read the book Bread and Jam fo r Frances. Talk about how people sometimes change their minds and do things they said they would never do. Use yourself as an example.Language developmentIntroduce new words to talk about your imaginary ideas, e.g. "preposterous," “ridiculous," "outrageous," “unbelievable” or "disgusting." Have fun playing with big words, e.g. “I  think it would be disgusting to eat worms on toast!"Creativity and imaginationRead the book I  Will Never N O T  EVER Eat a Tomato together. Enjoy the imaginative ways that food is described to make it more attractive. Then try the same approach with your own “never NOT  EVER" ideas.Book linkI  Will Never NOT  EVER Eat a Tomatoby Lauren ChildLeapBC' 2010 LEGACIES rw NOVVj^T  BRITISH< ' Av f'i»i i lu iu i LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/N e v e r  N O T  E V E * IP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of time"A5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain; inquire, and compare- A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fa r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities - A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak.clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing.Strategies fo r  Learning to Write and RepresentC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yThis is a language development activityfor children ages 3 to 5Let's pretendLet’s play and talk togetherPut some old clothes, hats, shoes, stuffed  animals and other props into a box or basket.Start playing "let’s pretend" by choosing a prop and talking about what you are going to pretend.Invite your child to join in the pretend game. Make up a story together.Encourage your child to tell you what is happening as you act out the story.A good read-together bookCouchWas.a:The Couch Was x  Castle by Ruth OhiThis activity will heip your chn and creativity, think out loud and d actions with words.Hints for success❖ Have conversations in which you pretend to be different characters.❖ Include parts in the story for dolls, stuffed  animals or puppets.❖ Change your voice fo r d ifferent parts.Ways to say itL e apB c2010  LEGACIES UN°wJkM r- LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.; k. rn'™ !“ldl www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Let's pretendTry this way❖ Use empty cardboard boxes and blankets to build a "let's pretend" play space. Talk about what kind o f space you are building and who will be there.❖ Put a few chairs in a row to make a train, a bus or a subway car. Ne on an imaginary trip.❖ Act out a story you have read together in a book. Take turns telling parts of the story as you act it out.This is a language development activityfor children ages 3 to 5WritingMake signs for your imaginary play space.Healthy eatingInclude healthy foods as you play “let's pretend." Serve real food and have a meal together in your play space.Book linksLittle Fox Nevr  to the End of the World by Ann Tompert Rainy Day Play: Explore, Create, Discover, Pretend by Nancy F. CastaldoOv 1 sag.L e a p s cy  Smf! LEAP BC™ is 3 set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.. k. www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/20 1 0LEGACIES Tv ......... .N Q W J k  COLUMBIAL e + ' S  P r c K n JP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories; information text; and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of time-A5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral Language^A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speakclearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaning ,C2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming,t o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) ya■ * PEPBCThis is a language development activityfor children ages 2 to 5Remember when-?Let’s play and talk together❖ Think o f a good memory to talk about with your children.❖ Start your story with, "Do you remember when...?" For example, "Do you remember when we went to Grandma's birthday party?I  remember how you played tag with your cousins."❖ Invite each child to add a memory, e.g. “What do you remember about Grandma's party?"❖ Keep on taking turns. Let the memories grow.A good read-together bookW h e n■ YOU :VEffe IiWhen You Were Small by Sara O'LearyHints for success❖ This activity works well during mealtimes.❖ Ask simple questions that help each child remember some details.❖ Invite other people to add their memories.❖ I f  a child wants to talk about a different memory, follow along.BC"Ways to say itY  mSm! LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.. x. www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/Arer LEGACIES f>f S lO W lk  COLUMBIAThis is a language development activityfor children ages 2 to 5More ideas for Remember when...?Try this wayWith younger children (ages 1-2), use familiar words to help your child remember something specific about an event, e.g. "Auntie has a cat.Do you remember Auntie's cat?"With older children (ages 3 and up), invite a child to choose a favourite memory to start the game.Take photos of important events that your child may want to remember later. S tart a scrapbook with your child that you can add to in the future.Drawing and writingMake a Memory Book with your children. Use photos or simple drawings to tell the story. Invite the children to help you add words to the pictures. Read your memory book together often.Physical activityTalk about milestone events when your child learned to do something new, e.g. jump, climb the jungle gym, ride a tricycle.Book linksAlexander and the Terrib le, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst Zoe and the Fawn by Catherine Jameson Listen, Said the Donkey by Jean LittleLE A P20 1 0  LEGACIES Tw NOWJ^\jr  *++E™P BMTISII> 'k .  (Vll 1 I.MUI ALEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/W  1r \V r \ • • .  ?P r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text; and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening; activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed);A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  Bij Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersD e v e l o p in g  W r i t i n g  a n d  R e p r e s e n t in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representingC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yRainbow iceLet's play and talk together❖ Put out several clear jars of water and some food colouring.❖ Invite your child to put a few drops of food colouring into each jar of water. Use one colour fo r each jar.❖ Talk about what you see happening as the food colouring mixes with the water.❖ Help your child pour each jar of coloured water into a d ifferent ice cube tray. Put the trays into the freezer for several hours.❖ When the cubes are frozen, put some fresh  warm water into the clear jars. Then add different coloured ice cubes into the jars. Talk about how the colours change as they mix.❖ Encourage your child to try mixing d ifferent coloured ice cubes into the same jar to see what happens.A good read-together bookWhite Rabbit's Color Book by Alan BakerHints for success❖ Show your child how to stir the food colouring gently into the water, then let your child take a turn.❖ Get the ice cubes ready in the evening so they can freeze overnight.Look! The dark blue drops make the water turn pale blue. I  wonder what happened?What do you think will happen if we add yellow and blue cubes to this glass?UapreWays to say it2010f/^  LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.ECACIES K  BBH1SII i sN°wJk www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP BC/w - m This is a language development activityfor children ages 2 to 5More ideas for Rainbow iceTry this wayHelp your child make ice cubes of d ifferent colours to add to drinking water on a hot day.Collect scraps of d ifferent coloured cellophane paper. Show your child how to make new colours by putting two scraps of d ifferent coloured cellophane together and holding them to the light.Read the book Mouse Paint together. Talk about how the mice made d ifferent colours with paint. Make some finger paint and experiment with colours.Book linkMouse Paint by Ellen Stoll Walsh\ArtHelp your child cut out scraps of different coloured cellophane wrapping paper and glue them onto a piece of clear plastic packaging. Experiment with putting scraps together to make different colours.L e a p BC"I k '  m+0 LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.,"K BRITISHwww.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/2010LBS 8 & X  C o lu m b iaRamboWP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  * By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas— experiment with new ideas or materials A2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to.be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECTV S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing.Strategies fo r Learning to Write and RepresentC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y/ '?  ' • '! 1 , . .  :This is a language development activityfor infants and young childrenShow me a faceLet’s play and talk together❖ Sit or stand in front of a mirror with your child.❖ Look at your faces in the mirror. Talk about what you see. Point to d ifferent parts of your own face and then point to the child's face.❖ Show one another your smiles. Talk about things that make you feel like smiling.❖ Show some other expressions, e.g. a frown, a scared face, an angry face, a wondering face. Talk about things that make you have those feelings.❖ Ask your child to show you some faces, e.g. “Show me how you feel when..."A good read-together bookThe Feelings Book by Todd ParrYou will need a large mirrorM CHints for success❖ Talk about what faces do to show the feelings, e.g. “When you are surprised, your eyebrows go up!"❖ Feel the changes in your faces with your fingers.❖ Have fun with silly faces as well as serious ones.❖ Look straight at one another as well as in the mirror.Ways to say it• : ***• LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.L i  C i p B C "  www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/.1e. . -S-This is a language development activityfor infants and young childrenMore ideas for Show me a faceTry this wayWith younger children (ages 1-2), catch their emotions as they happen. Look in the mirror when the feelings are real.With older children (ages 3 and up), play “Guess how I'm feeling." Each person takes a turn to make a face, and the others guess what their face is saying.Drawing and writingMake a “Faces Show Feelings" book using paper and crayons or markers. Use one page fo r each feeling. Draw simple faces with d ifferent expressions. W rite  some words to go with each picture.Healthy eatingRead How Are You Peeling? Foods with Moodstogether, and talk about the feelings in each picture. Learn the names of all the fruits and vegetables in the book.Book linksFeelings to Share Board Bookby Todd and Peggy SnowHow Are You Peeling? Foods with Moodsby Saxton Freymann and Joost E lffersWalter Was Worried by Laura Vaccaro SeegerHere Are My EarsHere are my ears.Here is my nose.Here are my fingers.Here are my toes.Here are my eyes.Both open wide.Here is my mouth With white teeth inside.Here is my tongue That helps me speak.Here is my chin.And here are my cheeks.Here are my hands That help me play.Here are my feet For walking today.Author unknown(Make actions to go with the words.)2010 Wl£ U £ IE S rhLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/Show ae t  ™toeP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  Bij Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A 7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fa r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral Language*A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speakclearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingBl demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsC6 engage-in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text andt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yThis is a language development activityfor children ages 3 to 5Simon and SarahLet's play and talk together❖ First, teach your children to play "Simon Says." Give the children an instruction to follow, starting with the words "Simon Says...," e.g. “Simon says sit down." The children should follow Simon's instructions. I f  you do not say “Simon says..." before giving the instruction, the children should not do as you say. The point of this game is to catch a child doing something that Simon has not said they should do. When this happens, the child takes a turn to give the instructions.❖ Next, teach the children to play “Sarah Says." This game is almost the same, but Sarah always means the opposite of what she says. I f  you say “Sarah says sit down," you really mean “Sarah says stand up." The children try  to do the opposite of what Sarah says. The point of this game is to catch a child doing what Sarah says, instead of the opposite. When this happens, the child takes a turn to give the instructions.A good read-together bookExactly the Opposite by Tana HobanJThiS;activi- mstrucfio play with languageflearmthetconcepToFopjposites andHints for success❖ These games are more fun when there are several children playing.❖ I f  a child doesn't understand an opposite, explain it and show an example.❖ Switch places if your child starts to lose interest.Ways to say it* „ *»o Y  LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.'W  Q p B C ” www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Simon and SarahTry this wayFor younger children (ages 3-4), use simple pairs of opposites, e.g. up/down, over/under, off/on, fast/slow.With older children (ages 5 and up), use more complicated pairs of opposites, e.g. right/left, near/far.Once children are very familiar with the two games, mix “Simon says..." and “Sarah says..." in the same game. The children must think of three d ifferent possibilities: do what Simon says, do the opposite of what Sarah says, or do nothing if Simon's or Sarah's name is not used.This is a language development activityfor children ages 3 to 5' V *r i't*V V s# \W rCraft activityHelp your child make an “opposites" picture by put­ting stickers on a piece of paper in different posi­tions, e.g. at the TOP and at the BOTTOM, on the FRONT and on the BACK, etc.Physical activityDuring the game, have Simon or Sarah instruct chil­dren to do a healthy physical activity, e.g. “Simon says run around the telephone pole three times."Book linksHot, Cold, Shy, Bold by Pamela Harris My F irst Canadian Opposites: A OT EeVRI  Board Book by Chez PicthallTen Little FingersI  have ten little fingers. And they all belong to me. I  can make them do things. Would you like to see?I  can shut them up tight. Or open them wide.I  can put them together. O r make them all hide.I  can make them jump high, I  can make them jump low. I  can fold them up quietly. And hold them just so.Author unknownf C u f a E U Q B  f t  ,•"“A.LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/Sinrtoo god S grainP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguagerA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant others?F AMA IL YCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messagesusing a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing:C4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsC6 engagein discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) ySorting stonesLet's play and talk together❖ Look around for interesting stones. Pick up some stones and look at them carefully.❖ Talk about the stones one by one. Use words that say how they look and feel.❖ Sort the stones into groups, e.g., big, medium, small.❖ Make patterns with the stones, e.g., by putting the stones in a row (big, medium, small, big, medium, small).A good read-together bookHints for success❖ Start by talking about one stone that you like and say why.❖ Invite the child to do the same.❖ Choose one way to sort at a time (e.g., by shape, or size or colour).Let's Ne Rock Collecting by Roma Cansd so^ P^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ and  a flatI  like my stone „ because it is shiny. What do you like about your stone?Where shall we put this stone? In the brown group or the white group?Ways to say itBC'7 S I S  LEAF> BC™ ’s 3 set resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair., k. www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/2010 LEGACIES KN O W JV  COLUMBIAMore ideas for Sorting stonesTry this wayPut the stones in water. Notice how they change when they are wet.Look fo r stones with d ifferent shapes and tex­tures. Sort them by how they feel.Make groups of stones and count them, e.g.,"Can you make a group of three small stones? How about five big ones?"Start a collection of favourite stones. Talk about why you like each of your favourite stones.This is a language development activityfor children from ages 2 to 5Talking and writingMake up poems together about your favourite stones. Follow an easy pattern, describing size, shape, colour, how it feels or what makes it special.ArtDraw and colour pictures of your favourite stones. Make a display of favourite stones.StonesI  like my favourite stone.I t  is not too big.I t  is shaped like an egg.I t  is mostly brown.I t  feels rough.And what makes it special is that it has sparkles in it.I  like my favourite stone.AnonymousSafety tipBook linksRocks and Minerals by Jan Brennan Stone Soup adapted by Marcia Brown Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig Very young children might put small stones in theirEverybody Needs a Rock by Byrd Baylor mouths. Keep an eye on your child.MapBC' 2010 LEGACIES UN° w j yT  BRITISHi ' l v  CniMMKIA LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/S o r f i n q  S t o n e sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare- A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersD e v e l o p in g  W r i t i n g  a n d  R e p r e s e n t in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsC6 engage.in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text andt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yPick a letter, find a wordLet’s play and talk together❖ Put some plastic, wooden or hand-written alphabet letters into a paper bag.❖ Shake up the bag and invite your child to reach in and pick a letter.❖ Look at the shape of the letter together and say its name. Talk about how the letter makes a sound at the beginning of a word, e.g. “B" makes a “buh" sound.❖ Look around the house to find objects that start with the letter sound. Try to find five things whose names start with that sound.A good read-together bookMax's Words by Kate Banks ie DHints for success❖ Start with letter sounds that are easy to hear, e.g. B, D, H, L, M, N, R and T.❖ Explain that some letters make similar sounds, e.g. L and S, K and NG F  and W.❖ Add Q , V, Z  and X  only when your child can play the game with confidence.l e a p e cWays to say itv "  SSHf! LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.■k www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/2010LEC^ V CSuiMBlAk : s ¥ r - . o :This is an early literacy activ ityfo r  children ages 3 to 5iSMftMore ideas for Pick a letter, find a wordTry this way❖ Write on labels the names of objects found around the house, and then put the labels on the objects. Help your child look fo r labels containing words that start with the letter he or she has picked from the bag.❖ Make a collection of objects that start with the same letter. Put out a box or basket with a let­ter on it, and invite your child to find things to go into the collection.CraftsMake alphabet letters with playdough or clay. Bake them in the oven and then paint them. Use them to make words.Early readingLook through old magazines with your child to find things that start with a letter you have picked. Help your child cut out some of the pictures that match the beginning letter. Make a book by pasting each picture on a separate sheet of paper and put­ting the pages together. Write the words for the objects on each page. Put a title on the book, and then read it together.Book linkMax's F irst Word by Rosemary WellsI Use My BrainI  use my brain to think, think, think.I  use my nose to smell.I  use my eyes to blink, blink, blink.I  use my throat to yell.I  use my mouth to giggle, giggle, giggle.I  use my hips to bump.I  use my toes to wiggle, wiggle, wiggle.And I  use my legs to jump.Author unknownLeapBC' Arer LECACIES WN°wJkACV, 2  um . .Ed (i ' I .  f—I'll ! IX f Ul A LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010 Legaci esNow. com/LEAP_BC/f i c k  0  L e - H - e r ,  F i n d  a  W o r d .P r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories> information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral Language' A8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak.clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  B y Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersD e v e l o p in g  W r i t i n g  a n d  R e p r e s e n t in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Writing (and Representing) and Extending Thinking :Cl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing:classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text andt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) ySnap! card sharksLet's play and talk togetherFirst, make some playing cards with your child. You will need two copies of the same magazine or catalogue to make pairs of cards which are the same. To make the cards, get some blank recipe cards or cut out cardboard rectangles from cereal boxes, and glue one picture on each card. You will need about 15 pairs of playing cards.Now you can play “Snap!" together. Shuffle the cards and deal an equal number to each player. Take turns placing a card face up between you. When two cards with the same picture come up one after the other, the person who says “Snap!" first takes all the cards in the pile. Keep putting down cards until someone has no more cards to play.A good read-together book*~ u K- rK <V"U* ‘ n ft}Dud GamesThe Book of LSVI NSKvr ’eV  Little  Kids by Gail McCollL e a p e cHints for success❖ Choose magazines or catalogues with interesting pictures for your child, such as toys, tools or hardware.❖ xr  you make the cards, talk about the pictures. Help your child notice the shapes and details in each picture.❖ Before you start, play a simple matching game where you mix up the cards and then put the pairs together.❖ Show your child how the game works before you play.Ways to say it2010 LEGACIES nNOWJllT  BRITISHf 'ftv r'fM i r\iuiaLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow. com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Snap! card sharksTry this way❖ The person who says "Snap!" first makes up a short story or a sentence about the object on the winning Snap card before taking the pile of cards.❖ Make playing cards with large numbers on them. Use only the numerals from 0 to 9, and make at least two pairs of each numeral. Play snap with the numeral cards, and say the name of the numeral when you get a Snap!❖ Make playing cards with simple shapes (e.g. pairs of circles, squares, triangles, rectangles) in d ifferent colours (e.g. red, yellow, blue, green). Help your child learn the names of the shapes and colours as you play “Snap!" with the cards.Book link The More We Get TogetherThe Book of Cards fo r  Kids The more wg t  thepby Sail MacColl Together, together.The more we get together.The happier we'll be.For your friends are my friends. And my friends are your friends. The more we get together.The happier we'll be.TraditionalLeap BC*2010 LEGACIES KN° w J kfjr' LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.T  BRITISH JS !iaS* www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/Snap! Gourd SlnarKsP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  • By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain; inquire, and'compare*- A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fa r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral Language-A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough; to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMA I L YCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning- Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;Strategies fo r  Learning ta  Write and Represent*C4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yThis is an early literacy activityfor children ages 3 to 5Treasure huntLet's play and talk together❖ Hide a treasure somewhere in your home or outdoor play space.❖ Make a treasure map with pictures of familiar landmarks on it, e.g. a big rock, a path, a tree.❖ Help the child or children read the map and signs as they search for the treasure.A  good read-together bookThe Treasure Hunt Book by Klutz Press,'  Hints for success❖ Encourage older children to help younger ones figure out the map.❖ Don't make it too hard or too easy to find the treasure.- 5 , LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Treasure huntTry this wayFor younger children (ages 1-3), hide a toy or favourite object and give the child spoken clues, e.g. "Look near the TV" or “I  think it is hiding in a corner."For older children (ages 4 and up), give clues that help them learn to follow directions, e.g. "First take three steps toward the house, then turn to face the tree.”For extra clues, put up a few signs that lead toward the treasure, e.g. arrows, footprints. Put them along the route of the treasure hunt so that each clue leads to the next.ftV  .■* . '.VDrawing and writingHelp your children make their own treasure maps.Physical activityNe fo r a treasure walk with your children. Use local landmarks for clues, e.g. BNe past the bakery and stop at the corner," BNe past two white houses." End up with a healthy treat.Healthy eatingTake your children on a treasure hunt to the grocery store. Look for healthy foods in d ifferent catego­ries. Look at Treasure Hunt with the Munch Crunch Bunch fo r ideas.Book linkPoint to the RightPoint to the right of me.Point to the le ft of me.Point up above me.Point down below.Right, le ft, up.And down so slow.Author unknownUse both arms to do the actions. Start slowly, then go faster each time you say the poem.Treasure Hunt with the Munch Crunch Bunchby Jan Wolterman)BC'2010 LECACIES U  NOWjy2  1 h EUEd (• 'Av <"7<l 1 IVIUI ALEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 201 OLegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/Treasure Hun-}*P r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures of Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9P r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMA IL YCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representingclassroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and Representingru  print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text andt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yTV talkThis is an early literacy activityfor children ages 3 to 5Let’s play and talk togetherWatch TV with your child. Talk together about what you see and hear.Ask your child to tell you about favourite programs. Listen and ask questions. Find out what your child likes and why.Ask your child to choose one show and re-tell the story.Hints for successA good read-together bookmyFAVORITESnow Is My Favourite and My Bestby Lauren ChildSit side-by-side with your child and focus on the TV and your child's responses.Let your child take the lead in the conversation. Listen carefully with an open mind to your child's ideas.Ask questions that encourage your child to talk about his or her interests, likes and dislikes.Ways to say it LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/This is an early literacy activityfor children ages 3 to 5More ideas for TV talkTry this wayMake a three-part storyboard by putting three rectangles in a row on a piece of paper. Help your child draw the beginning, middle and end of a favourite TV show in the rectangles. Write words together to go with the pictures.Make a TV schedule of good children's programs with your child. Put the schedule where your child can see it, and look at the schedule with your child to decide what you will watch together.Limit TV time each day. Encourage your child to choose which programs to watch during TV  time.Language developmentHelp your child re-tell stories from TV by using prompts such as "At the beginning...," “And then...," “Next...," “At the end...". This will help your child learn the language of putting events in order.Book linkBrian Wildsmith's Favourite Nursery Rhymesby Brian WildsmithEarly numeracyMake a chart that lists several of your child's favourite TV programs. Each time you watch a program, put the date on the chart and rate the show by putting stars beside the date, e.g. 3 stars for outstanding, 2 stars for OK, 1 star for not very good, and 0 stars for terrible. Talk about your rat­ings. Compare favourite programs over time to see which you like best.BC'2010 LECACIES Tv NQWJkBlU  TL SISNQ< ’k . Pi x N iu u ii LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/T V  TalkP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningsFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e lo p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  • B y  Grade■ \ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e Lr Prescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMA ILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending Thinking;Cl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representingC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsC6 engagein discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and Representingru  print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a word5 0  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yM i 'IBhilSiS This is an early literacy activityfor children ages 3 to 5Wacky wordsLet’s play and talk together❖ Cut out some large print letters from newspapers or magazines.❖ Use some letters to make a word your child knows, e.g. "Mom," "stop," “go," or the child's name.❖ Slue the word onto a sheet of paper.❖ Ask your child which word he or she would like to make next.❖ Help your child find the letters needed to make the next word.A good read-together bookiWord W izard by Cathryn Falwellpaper, glue and olcfijA9 8 ( GR11D ( G[or learning letters,! sounds, and, helpi r IS S le t te r in  d iffe r!!Hints for successBegin the activity with only a few different letters. Choose letters bigger than the width of your thumb.Cut out letters which form words your child already knows.Start with capital letters first, because they are less confusing for young children.Ways to say it2010 ft, BC™ i s aCeLt  nnmsHLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Wacky wordsTry this way❖ Choose one letter. Talk about the letter: its shape, its name, and the sound it makes at the beginning of a word. Find the same letter in d if­ferent sizes, shapes and colours. Cut them out and glue them all onto a sheet of paper.❖ Make a list of several words that start with the same letter. Cut out some examples of the beginning letter. Slue the letters onto a sheet of paper, and print the rest of each word with coloured markers.❖ Invite your child to choose a favourite word. Find the letters for the word, cut them out and glue them onto a sheet of paper. Then find a picture to match the word, and glue it next to the word.WritingAsk your child to think of a simple message you could write with letters from a newspaper or magazine. Write out the message on a piece of paper. Then look for all the letters you need to make the message.Cut them out and glue them onto a sheet of paper. Read the message together.Book linkABC o f Canada by Kim BellefontaineThis is an early literacy activityfor children ages 3 to 5*r! • -y:An AlphabetA was once an apple pie,Pidy Widy Tidy Pidy Nice insidy Apple Pie!B was once a little bear,Bearyl Wary! Hairy! Beary!Taky cary!Little Bear!C was once a little cake,Caky Baky Maky Caky Taky Caky,Little Cake!D was once a little doll,Dolly Molly Polly Nolly Nursy Dolly Little Doll!Edward Lear" J O6CAC1ES Tv M OW .J^  (-LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow. com/LEAP_BC/W o & k v  W o r d sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  • By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  • B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words; including their name and names of significant othersF AMA ILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKRHORCl create simple messages rising a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;C4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and Representingru  print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yThis is an early literacy activityfor children ages 2 to 5Will you read to me?Let’s play and talk together❖ Invite your child to choose a favourite picture book.❖ Look at the cover together. Talk about what the story is about.❖ Ask the child to tell you the story as you turn the pages together.❖ Listen as the child recalls the story or talks about the pictures.A good read-together bookP u r p l e .  G r e e n  . a n d  Y e l l © wKolMriM unschPurple, Green and Yellow by Robert Munschchild®IpBC"picture book which youror helping childrenileanrffclues.Hints for success❖ Talk about why your child chose the book.❖ Help the child use picture clues to remember what the book is about.❖ Accept what the child is able to re-tell without expecting it to be correct.Ways to say it2010? ^  LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.ECACiLSf k BRITISHwww. 201 OLegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Will you read to me?Try this wayFor very young children (ages ius!G choose books with simple pictures of familiar objects on each page. Help the child turn the pages. Point to each object and ask, “What's this?" Connect the words with the pictures.For older children (ages 4-5), choose books with words or sentences that are repeated. When the child re-tells the story, join in on the repeated parts to show your enjoyment.Share picture books without words to show your child how to tell a story using only the pictures.Healthy eatingMake a simple sentence book about what you ate today. Put one sentence on each page:Today I  a te . Then I  ate _ Next I  ate'Read the book together.Physical activityTake photos of your child doing d ifferent physical actions. Make an “I can..." book with one picture on each page, e.g. “I  can run" or “I  can stretch" or “I  can jump.”Book linksThe Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle What Colour? by Debbie MacKinnoni, ___ lanW LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.LEGACIES^ mtlTIFH c  r  'U j j B C  www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP BC/Will s/om L E A P T o M e lI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  M By  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories; information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compareA7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking1 and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral Language 1A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed) !A ll speakclearly enough to be understood by peers and adults :A12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in,words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  jLearning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;C4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yThis is a language development activityfor children ages 1 to 5What is not?Let's play and talk togetherGather a collection of objects that can be sorted into "it is" and “it is not" groups, e.g. by colour (“This IS  red, but this IS  NOT  red") or by size (“This IS  tiny, but this IS  NOT  tiny").Show the child how to sort the objects into “it is" and “it is not" groups, e.g. say “This IS  blue and it goes in this pile; this IS  N O T  blue, so it goes over here."Invite the child to take a turn choosing an ob­ject and putting it into the “it is" or “it is not" group.A good read-together bookw m rn m n  e v e rN ONv TOE ELEMONSARCL a u r a  V a c c u r o  S e c g e r .Lemons xVv Not Red by Laura Vaccaro Seegericontoinersfcfoissoi#ihq Choo ie.some?vblects J M b c lp n g  in a group, and some that do not ’ belon q l j lh a t  group s  djity helps children notice how things | farciSimildr and different.LeapBC"Hints for successStart with a simple way to sort, e.g. by colour.❖ Sort into two containers to show that there are only two choices: “it is" or “it is not."❖ bo one or two examples with the child. As you place each object, explain why it belongs where you put it.Ways to say it2oiof/^ •*** LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.VRIx L G www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/This is a language development activityfor children ages 1 to 5More ideas for What is not?Try this way❖ With younger children (ages 1-2), play the game during bath time, e.g. say "Is this your nose?" while you are washing an ear or a toe.❖ With older children (ages 3 and up), play this game as you do chores around the house, e.g. “This IS  fun, but this IS  NOT  fun," "This IS  easy fo r me, but this IS  NOT  easy fo r me."❖ Invite children to choose the objects that will be sorted.Art and writingMake a book about things that belong together. Cut out pictures from magazines or catalogues, and put short sentences underneath each picture, e.g."A ____________________  has wheels" but“A _________________ does NOT  have wheels."Healthy eatingAt the grocery store, look fo r foods that "are" and "are not," e.g. "A pepper IS  red, but a lemon IS  NOT  red."Book linkBlack? White! Day? Night! A  Book of Oppositesby Laura Vaccaro SeegerWhat is Pink?What is pink? A rose is pink By the fountain's brink.What is red? A poppy's red In its barley bed.What is blue? The sky is blue Where the clouds float through.What is white? A swan is white Sailing in the light.What is yellow? Pears are yellow.Rich and ripe and mellow.What is green? The grass is green.W ith small flowers between.What is violet? Clouds are violet In the summer twilight.What is orange? Why, an orange.Just an orange!Christina 20 RossettiLeapec 2010 LECACIES K  NOWJ^ACV M d. T  BRITISH<'Av f n i i i u n uLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/Whorh I s  Nlot ?I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  L By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:F AMAILYCTV . GS I  US T V e S V A  p aYAS r CTV  S T :  UCKEA T CT Vt P DCICECAKOral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas— experiment with new ideas or materials A2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories> information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speakclearly enoughtto be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersD e v e l o p in g  W r i t i n g  a n d  R e p r e s e n t in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;Strategies fo r  Learning to Write and RepresentC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/ representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) ySort and separateLet's play and talk togetherStart with a big pile of laundry, along with some baskets or a space on the floor for sorting.Explain that you are going to play a sorting game together.Help your child or children sort the laundry into piles based on colours.Talk about what you are thinking as you decide where each piece of laundry should go.Talk about the d ifferent materials and how they look and feel.A good read-together book\tl 6WLlamas in the Laundry by William Newlisfagfiyify will help your child learn words frag  ^lgur^pd%erns and textures, and how to sort j l^hinqsjlnfofgrpupsThis is a language development activityfor children ages 3 to 5Hints for successStart with solid colours first. Name the colours as you sort.Remember that getting the laundry done is only one of your goals. You are also helping your child learn about colours, patterns and textures of clothes.Ways to say itLE A o t£CAU&s nT iiK rn sHN O W .J V  CtfJ-'MIUALEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/This is a language development activityfor children ages 3 to 5More ideas for Sort and separateTry this way❖ Teach your child some words used for sorting laundry, e.g. "light load," “dark load," "delicate fabric," “heavy material," etc.❖ Show your child how to combine piles sorted by colour to create light or dark piles, e.g. "We need to make a bigger pile to save water. Let's put the blue and green piles together because they are both dark."❖ Talk about different materials and how they feel, e.g. “This shirt is nylon. Feel how slick and smooth it is."❖ With older children (ages 4-5), use more de­scriptive words, e.g. "sky blue shirt," “velour jacket," etc.❖ Talk about how to sort clothes that are multi­coloured and/or have patterns, e.g. "I'm going to put the blue and white shirt in the blue pile, because it has more blue than white."Craft activityCut out pictures of clothing from a catalogue or news­paper. Draw several ovals on a piece of paper for sort­ing the pictures. Invite your child to sort the pictures into piles of laundry and glue them onto the paper.Counting activityxr  you put a pile of laundry into the washing ma­chine, count how many items you have, e.g. "How many socks are going into this load?"Book linksFirst Colours by Jo  LitchfieldWhose Clothes xVv Those? by Shaheen BilgramiSorting LaundrySorting laundry one by one. Sorting laundry 'til it’s done. Sorting laundry two by two.That one's red and this one's blue. Sorting laundry three by three. Look at the grass stain on that kneel Sorting laundry four by four.Into the basket by the door. Sorting laundry five by five.Into the piles we're going to dive. Sorting laundry six by six.The washing machine whirs and clicks.Judith ScottL ' t fLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/h l syd and Seoaw teI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text; and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain" inquire, and compare - A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral Language*A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak.clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsin discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningB5B6b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representingC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning dining writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yv ,This is a language development activityfor children ages 2 to 5Tri-spyLet's play and talk togetherWhile you are on a walk, invite your child to look fo r three things: something special, something strange and something beautiful.As you walk along, share what you notice. Point out your choice for each category and ask your child to do the same.Encourage your child to use words that describe each choice.Explain why you chose each item and ask your child to do the same.-  -WALKS:A good read-together bookEk c \  O we §pecra lFrieda WKImiskv \  11. Werner /im m cm unnEach One Special by Frieda WishinskyThis activity is good learning descriptive worcii^ancPe^ll choicesHints for successNe slowly so you can look carefully.Start with just one kind of choice, e.g. “Let’s look for something special."Help one another find interesting choices.Ways to say itrBC”2010LEGACIESNOW.BKniSHC-OIX'.VLRULEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 201 OLegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas forTri-spyTry this wayFor younger children (ages 2-3), show your child how to play this game by pointing out things that are special, strange or beautiful whenever you can.Invite older children (ages 4-5) to choose or change the category of things to look for, e.g. something happy, something slimy, something funny, etc.Drawing and writingTake a camera or sketch pad on your walk, and draw or photograph some of the things your child chooses. Use the pictures to make a story about the walk. Write down what your child has to say about each picture.The RainbowBoats sail on the rivers.And ships sail on the seas;But clouds that sail across the sky Are prettier fa r  than these.There are bridges on the rivers. As pretty as you please;But the bow that bridges heaven. And overtops the trees.And builds a road from earth to sky. Is prettier fa r  than these.Christina 10 Rossetti2010ECACIESTkLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/T n - SpyI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaning.Features o f Oral Language-A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough; to be; understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMA I L YCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;Strategies fo r  Learning to Write and RepresentC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in: discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yCounting WalksI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Langtiage Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities ,A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaning. Features o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough: to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and thatprint carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representingC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsC6 engagein discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a word5 0  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yCounting walksLet’s play and talk togetherInvite your child to take a counting walk. Talk about some things you could count as you walk.Choose one thing to look for, and keep track as you walk along. Count out loud together.Once your child knows the game, let him or her choose what you will count next.A good read-together bookEmeka's Sift, ’H  African Counting Storyby Ifeoma Onyefulu— lgqunt i^ le a rnm ord s^ ord if f erenf! ||vgunts«and understand the meaning of "more thanLeapB C '-  < 2 & \4 ,  • . . .'W*Hints for successHelp your child point to each object as you count out loud together.At first, use fingers to keep count.Ways to say it■ y "  AC C S LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move; Talk and Food Flair.. k. r ™ www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/2010LEC^ k Q^L'dMBlAMore ideas for Counting walksThis is an early literacy activityfor children ages 1 to 5Try this way❖ For younger children (ages 1-2), count groups of things when you see them together, e.g. 3 red cars, 5 children, 2 dogs. Point to each one as you count.❖ For older children (ages 3-5), decide on a tar­get you want to reach, e.g. 4 dogs, 3 joggers, 7 silver cars, 5 cyclists, etc. Celebrate when you reach your target, then set a different one.❖ With older children (ages 3-5), make predic­tions using "more than." For example, say “I think I'll see more than 4 people wearing boots," or "Do you think we'll see more than 5 dogs with long tails today?"❖ Take a pencil and small notebook on your walk. Show your child how to use tally marks to keep track of your counting. Make a tally mark each time you see what you are looking for.Healthy eatingStop for a healthy snack along the way. Count how many bites it takes to eat your snack.Physical activityGuess how many steps it will take to reach a point on your walk, e.g., “How many steps will it take to get to the next corner?" Count out loud as you take each step, and see how close you came to your prediction.100 StarsI  saw 100 stars last night Shining in the sky.I  wondered as I  watched them. How did they get so high?AnonymousBook linkMy Little Counting Book by Roger PriddyUapec V i :  BRITISH2010 fi LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/P R E S C R I B E ^ ^ E A R N I N ^ O i n T O M E ^ ^ ^ G m d ^\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A 7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fa r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed);A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB 7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersD e v e l o p in g  W r i t i n g  a n d  R e p r e s e n t in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and Representingru  print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text andt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yHit the targetLet's play and talk together W .Invite your child to help you set up some throwing targets to knock down, e.g. empty milk cartons, or put some paper targets on a wall at different heights.Give your child several objects to use for throwing, e.g. a bean bag or a paper or sponge ball for indoors; a tennis ball for outdoors.Invite your child to choose a target and try to hit it by throwing one of the objects.Teach your child how to throw a ball overarm. Learn the poem together, and practice the motions as you say it.How to Throw a Ball Overarm: -J*, v  ^j.-s!Hints for successStand side on. Make a star. Point your finger. Throw it far.AnonymousA good read-together bookOne Bright Monday Morningby Arline and Joseph BaumYou will need some empty plastic or cardboard containers, some sheets of coloured paper, tape, markers, and some throwing objects such as bean bags, crumpled paper balls, sponge balls or tennis balls.This activity helps children develop throwing skills and eye-hand coordination. It is also good for learning the names of letters and numbers, and for counting and measuring.When you first start the game, let your child decide which target to aim for, where to stand and whether to throw underarm or overarm.Encourage your child to practice aiming and throwing at different targets.Ways to say itLeapBc ArerLECACIESNOW.Sir:5 f t  BRITISHO  H-UMBIALEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow. com/LEAP_BC/i i i ' iI1 This is a physical development activityfo r  children ages 3 to 5More ideas for Hit the targetTry this wayInvite children to measure the distance to a target with their footsteps, and help them keep a record of how far they can throw to hit a target.Put up paper targets of different colours or shapes. Encourage children to call out the shape or colour each time they hit a target.Put up paper targets of different sizes and heights. Have children aim and throw from largest to smallest, lowest to highest, etc.Put numerals from 1 through 5 on targets. Try some of the following games:— Throw until you have hit each of the numerals.— Aim to hit each numeral in order.— Hit the Number 1 once, Number 2 twice, etc.— Take turns making three throws each. Count up your scores by adding the numerals that you hit, e.g. 1 + 4 + 2 = 7.Early literacyRead the poem Throw the Ball together. Make targets that look like the sun and the moon. Say the poem aloud as you try to hit the targets.Throw the BallLet’s throw the ball at the sun. Make it laugh and sigh.See it hide and smile and run, Then fall from the evening sky.Let’s throw the ball at the moon. And watch it falling down, Then catch it with a silver spoon In the middle of the town.Edwin ThumbooLeapec 2010 LECACIES ! l  NQWjl^S 'rBlU TL SISNQ> Cl U I IMUIl LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow. com/LEAP_BC/B u b b l e ,  C - h a s eI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text; and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak.clearly enough.to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words; including their name and names of significant othersD e v e l o p in g  W r i t i n g  a n d  R e p r e s e n t in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Writing (and Representing) and Extending Thinking:Cl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaning;C2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing:C4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and Representingru  print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a word5 0  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yWf ' V' ' ' 1. '" IThis is a physical development activity a ‘ fo r children ciges 1 to 5hopBubble chaseLet's play and talk together❖ Blow some bubbles and invite your child to chase them.❖ Invite your child to pop the bubbles using different actions, e.g. clapping hands, a karate chop.❖ Try to catch the bubbles using different body parts, e.g. knees, elbows, fingers.❖ .Try to catch some bubbles without breaking them.Hints for successA good read-together bookPopl x  Book About Bubblesby Kimberly Brubaker BradleyYou will need some bubble soap and a bubble wand or a pipe cleaner shaped into a wand.This activity is good for developing spatial awareness, eye-hand coordination, and using words to describe shape, size, colour and movement.❖ Talk about the bubbles as you play. Use words to describe how they move, e.g., high, low, fast, slow, floating.❖ Take turns being the bubble blower and the bubble chaser.LeapBC" Ar er , LECACIES K  N°VYJWW  TL SISNQE ’ki. A  « IIVtWALEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Bubble chaseTry this way❖ Sing Pop Goes the Weasel as you play.❖ Do an experiment to see how the bubbles change when you blow different ways, e.g. hard, soft, steadily, in puffs. Encourage the children to talk about what they see and try to explain what happens.♦> Read the book Pop! A Book about Bubbles tolearn more ways to play with bubbles.Let's make—Bubble recipeEpSw Te< 'vvIf• 2.5 L (10 cups) of water• 250 ml (1 cup) of soap detergent• 30 ml (2 tablespoons) glycerine (from the pharmacy)»el wef1. Put water in a pail or bucket and add the detergent and glycerine.2. Stir slowly to avoid bubbling.3. For best results let the mixture sit overnight.Let's make—Bubble wands• For a yogurt lid bubble wand, you will need a plastic lid, a thumb tack and a wooden chopstick. Cut the centre out of the plastic lid and tack it to the wooden chopstick.• For a fly swatter bubble wand, you will need a plastic fly swatter. Dip the fly swatter into a plate of bubble mix and wave it around for lots of tiny bubbles.• For a pipe cleaner bubble wand, you will need a pipe cleaner. Shape it into a circle, with an end to hold on to.Leapec%  \Pop Goes the WeaselAll around the cobbler's bench The monkey chased the weasel.The monkey thought ‘twas all in fun- Popl Nevr  the weasel.Johnny has the whooping cough, Mary has the measles.That's the way the money goes— Pop! Goes the weasel.A penny for a spool of thread A penny for a needle.That's the way the money goes— Pop! Goes the weasel.All around the mulberry bush. The monkey chased the weasel.That's the way the money goes— Pop! Goes the weasel.Traditional2010LEGACIESNOW.o ACVwJi.LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/& e a n  £>aq  G o l fI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral Language-A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral languageB2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading,talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text toconfirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and Viewingcu  demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words; including their name and names of significant othersD e v e l o p in g  W r i t i n g  a n d  R e p r e s e n t in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;C4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artst o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yi l l■This is a physical development activityrj*?-. . .. for children ages 3 to 5Bean bag golfLet's play and talk together❖ Make a golf course using large containers, hoops, old tea towels or rope circles for the “holes." Make as many different holes as you wish.❖ Put a "tee" or start marker about three to four metres away from each hole. Lay out the tees and holes so they follow a path through your play space.❖ Start the golf game by inviting your child to throw a bean bag or rolled-up sock from the first tee toward the first hole. Count how many throws it takes to get the bean bag or sock into the hole.❖ Join the game with your child. Take turns throwing until you have both landed in the hole.❖ Move to the next hole. Continue taking turns throwing and counting at each hole.You will need large containers, hoops, old tea towels or pieces of rope to make golf holes, and small objects such as stones to make tees. You will also need some easy-to-throw objects such as bean bags or rolled-up socks.This activity is good for developing eye-hand coordination, counting, learning to take turns and learning new words.Hints for success❖ Set up your golf course in a large outdoor play space.❖ Try throwing underarm and overarm. Talk with your child about which way is easier.❖ In each round of play, start with the person whose bean bag or sock is furthest away from the hole, then the next furthest, etc. Others wait behind the throwers until their turn comes.LeapBC" 2010LECACIESNOW.\jrJ  K BRITISHJ V  OILUMWA LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Bean bag golfTry this way❖ Vary the distances from tees to holes.Encourage your child to predict how many throws it will take to land in each hole. Compare the predictions with the actual number of throws.❖ Set out a tea towel or sheet to make a hazard or "trap." I f  a bean bag lands in a trap, it can only be picked up while standing on one foot.❖ Number the holes with signs, or label them with— names for each day of the week. Play the holesin order (i.e. starting with 1, 2, 3... or going from Monday through Sunday).DrawingHave children draw pictures of sea creatures they might see in an aquarium. Ask them to put some pictures they have drawn into each hoop. Invite the children to imagine they are feeding the fish and mammals at the aquarium. Throw some different objects into each hole to feed the creature.Creative playEncourage children to design their own golf course.LeapBC" 2010LECACIESNOW.\jrESA  BRITISH. Aw J kCOMASh. Ibc Bc« [1k«miLutI LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk andwww. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/Follow +V>e TrailI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaning.Features o f Oral Language-A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak.clearly enough; to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral languageB2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading,talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text toconfirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade■ \ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e Lr Prescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Arts 1Features o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMA IL YCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning- Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing:Strategies fo r  Learning to Write and RepresentC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yFollow the trailLet's play and talk togetherUse a string or rope to make a winding trail through your play space. I t  could be outdoors on a grassy area, or indoors around the furniture or down a hall.Invite children to follow the trail using crawling and creeping actions.Ask children to suggest other ways of moving along the trail, e.g. scampering like a squirrel, stalking like a cat, creeping backwards, etc.A good read-together bookWe’re Going on a Bear Hunt ;A  s. i. k i> h i s  Y I *«? I • •:We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen and Helen OxenburyYou will need a long stretch of space and 10 metres of string, wool or rope to mark the trail.This activity is good for developing creativity, body control and awareness of space, and for learning words to describe positions, e.g. over, under, through, beside, between, alongHints for successStart the game by being the leader. Invite the children to follow your actions.I f  children have difficulty thinking of movements, talk about creatures they know and do some examples of their movements together.Ways to say itLeap \ jrf k BRITISH< ' Al I I'M 1 TMUI AeSnN LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Follow the trailTry this wayArrange the trail to go over, under, between and around objects. As you move along the trail, describe where the trail goes and invite the children to do the same.Encourage children to design a trail using their ■ imaginations. Ask them where it goes and what they might find along the way.Introduce number sequences, e.g. “creep three paces forward, crawl back four, shake like a wet dog, then crawl forward six more."Invite older children to try  this activity in pairs, with one child leading the creeping/crawling while the other child holds on to the leader's ankles and follows behind. Children can take turns being the leader and follower.Creative playA fte r reading We’re Going on a Bear Hunt, pretend the rope is the trail to the bear's cave. Join the children in acting out the story along the way to the cave, and reverse the actions as you escape from the bear.Caterpillar"Who's that ticklin' my back?” said the wall,(crawl fingers up the child’s back) “M e,” said a small caterpillar, “I ’m learning to crawl.”Language developmentRead the Caterpillar poem together, and take turns doing snail tickles up one another's backs.AnonymousBook link"Slowly, Slowly, Slowly," said the Slothby Eric CarleLeapec 2010 LECACIES K  N°WJk'IT BRlTISi II ’Aw r.niMMKIA LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/foodflair™BreadLet's play and talk together❖ Talk with your child about how bread is made.❖ Play bakery with your child. Make pretend products out of playdough using rolling pins, measuring cups, bread pans, muffin tins and plastic knives.❖ Pretend to make breads, cakes and cookies to sell to “customers."This is a healthy eating activityfor children ages 2 to 5Hints for successA good read-together bookBread, Bread, Bread by Ann Morris and Ken Heyman❖ Encourage your child to use imagination and think of d ifferent ideas fo r baked goods.❖ Let your child set the scene and take the lead in pretend play.❖ Play with your child. Pretend you are a customer or a helper in the bakery.You will need some kitchen tools such as measuring cups, a rolling pm, bread pans, muffin tins and plastic knives You will also need some playdough, either from the store or made atThis activity is good for learning how different foods are made, exploring raw foods, and developing imagination, cooperative play and vocabulary.Leap£BC'What kind of bread should we make today?I'm going to squish and stretch my dough before I  make a shape. That’s called kneading the dough.Ways to say itzomljr' LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.egacies fL TL SI SN Q r  r  ’  ’N0« i V  . S S t ,  www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/foodfla irThis is a healthy eating activityfor children ages 2 to 5More ideas for BreadTry this way❖ Have a bread tasting party. Choose three or four d ifferent kinds of bread, e.g. oatmeal, whole grain, rye, corn, raisin, pumpernickel, pita, bagels, chapattis, bread pretzels, hard rolls, bannock, bread sticks, French baguettes, hamburger buns, naan, and corn or flour tortillas.❖ Show your child the d ifferent types of bread.❖ Cut each type of bread into bite-sized pieces and put them on separate plates.❖ Practice passing the plates around so you can try  the d ifferent types of bread.❖ Talk about d ifferent breads and how they are made.❖ Make bread at home with your child.Exploring grainsPut different types of grain in bowls for your childto explore. Try corn, rice, wheat, barley and oats.Use a magnifying glass, some measuring cups, largeand small spoons and a sieve or sifter to encourageexploration.Community connectionsTake your child to a bakery. Look at all the different kinds of baked goods. Ask whether you and your child can visit the kitchen to see how breads are made there.Safety tipsBook linkThe Little Red Hen, by Diane Muldrow and J . P. Miller Always begin activities in the kitchen by helping children wash their hands.Always supervise your child around sharp kitchen utensils and hot surfaces.Leapec j t  SIST. fo r  I T.UUIA2010 filK N O W j ^  F P .m S uEeLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 201 OLegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/B r e a dI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e lo p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough; to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e lo p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e hU ) y  v  r sP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersD e v e l o p in g  W r i t i n g  a n d  R e p r e s e n t in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messagesusing a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representingclassroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text andt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yFive hevpep PreJ-end msnoosEw Show ingf L n N i L S A n r  t n h L o S o g  d O I i k M n N  a By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fa r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMA ILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representingC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words /  representationsC6 engage.in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yfoddflair™This is a healthy eating activityfor children ages 3 to 5Five senses Pretend grocery shoppingLet's play and talk together• Plan a pretend grocery-shopping trip with yourchild. Make a shopping list together of foods youboth like to eat.■ Make up a story about going to the grocery store.Act out the story together.— . Walk, drive or take the bus to the grocery store.— Set your basket or shopping cart.— Choose some ripe tomatoes. They're orangey-red. Look for spots.— Find some nice apples—red and green. Don't bruise them!— Choose some yogurt. What flavour would you like to try?— Pick up a carton of plain milk. Watch out, it's heavy. Brr! It's cold - let's keep these foods cold so they don't spoil and make us sick.— Choose some whole grain bread. Let's get brown. Don't squish it!— Take the groceries to the checkout and put them on the counter.— Pay the cashier.— Load the food into some bags.— Take the groceries home.You will reed pencil and paper to make a list.This activity will help your child develop imagination, plan ahead and learn how to make a listLeapBcHints for successInvite your child to suggest some groceries to buy.Encourage your child to describe the actions you are doing, e.g. "I'm going to open the box of eggs and check for cracks."Ways to say it2010 ^00LECACIES fL BRITISHNQW J f ^  J kCOMAShLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/foodflair*This is a healthy eating activityfor children ages 3 to 5More ideas for Pretend grocery shoppingT ry  this way❖ For toddlers, take the lead and encourage them to follow along with the actions.❖ For older children, make shopping lists together for different foods. For instance:— What groceries will we need for pizza?— What foods will we need for a long hike in the forest?— What groceries should we get for our breakfast?❖ Invite your child to help you on a real trip to the grocery store. Talk about how to act in the store, such as taking care to drive the cart safely.❖ On your next trip to the store, invite your child to choose an interesting new fruit or vegetable to try together.Music and movementChoose some music with a good beat and without any words. Find a space where you can move around and do the actions together. Move to the beat while you act out your trip. Give cues and actions for your child to follow. Stay active and encourage lots of movement.Play the song Corner Grocery Store by Raf fi andlearn to sing it together.Book linksEating the Alphabet by Lois EhlertI  Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomatoby Lauren ChildSafety tipFind an open space to act out your shopping trip safely.LeapBC' ArerLECACIESNOW.LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/K t t o c X  P o W nI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral Language-A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to.be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e lo p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words; including their name and names of significant othersD e v e l o p in g  W r i t i n g  a n d  R e p r e s e n t in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages rising a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representingC 4  engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsC 6  en g a g e  in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a word50  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yhq&Knock downs is a physical development activityfor children ages 3 to 5Let's play and talk togetherInvite your child to help you set up some targets such as empty milk cartons or shoeboxes. Stand the targets up like bowling pins.Draw a "foul line" 2 to 5 metres away fo r the "bowler" to stand behind. Show your child how to roll the ball without crossing the line.Invite your child to knock over the “bowling pins" by rolling a ball toward them.Take turns trying to knock over all the pins with one roll.A good read-together bookRaccoon’s Last Race by Joseph and James BruchacYou will need a large space, some targets such as milk cartons, juice bottles or shoeboxes, a ball for throwing, and a stick or rolled-up newspaper fo r hitting the ball.This activity helps children develop movement skills such as rolling, kicking and throwing, as well as eye-hand and eye-foot coordination.Hints for successStart with the foul line quite close to the bowling pins.Join the game and take turns with your child.Help children with vision impairment to sense the location of the pins by playing music behind the pins or by using a fan to blow air toward the child from the direction o f the pins.Leapec2oiof/^ LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.EGACKS fw BRITISH i  r  r ’  ’www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Knock downTry this wayMove the targets further away as your child becomes more skilled at throwing or kicking the ball.Invite your child to show you different ways to knock down the targets, e.g. by kicking the ball or using a stick to push the ball toward the targets.Early literacyDecorate the targets with colours or shapes. Encourage your child to call out the colours or shapes as they are knocked down.Put the letters in your child’s name on a series of targets. Help your child spell out his or her name by trying to knock over the targets in sequence.Problem-solvingInvite your child to suggest d iffe ren t ways to arrange the targets to make it easier or harder to knock them all down with one throw.T ry  d iffe ren t ways o f throwing or rolling the ball towards the targets to see which works best. Ways to say itLeap 2010 LEGACIES KN°wJkir; T  BRITISHi ’Aw <~ni i EOHE(E e LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/Teddy bear's picnicLet’s play and talk togetherInvite your child to plan a special picnic for teddy bears and favourite stuffed toys.Help your child make an invitation card for each of the teddy bears and other stuffed  toys that might come to the picnic, and give them out to the toys.Decide on what kind of food will be needed for the people and the animals. Make a list of what you need and take it when you go shopping.Help your child prepare some real food fo r these people, and some pretend food fo r the bears and stuffed toys.Pack a picnic basket for the people and a bucket of imaginary snacks fo r the animals.A good read-together bookThe Teddy Bears' Picnic by Jimmy KennedyYou will need a picnic basket or carrying bag, some stuffed animals and picnic snacks.This activity is good fo r planning, counting, writing, pretending and making food.Hints for successHelp your child count how many people and animals will be coming to the picnic. Count the same number of plates, spoons and napkins.Help your child prepare some easy-to-make, tasty snacks to take on the picnic.Ways to say it. Q EI uf2oioW^ LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.rrACIES K BRITISHf rut ch  www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas forTeddy bear's picniTry this wayMake two shopping lists—one list of food for bears (pretend) and one fo r people.Look at the book Fast Food. Create some "picnic creatures" from fru its and vegetables. Name your creatures. Be creative!Pretend you are bears on the way to a picnic. Make the rhythm match the pace of the bears lumbering along.ResearchFind out what bears really like to eat. Look in Owl magazine, on the Internet or in the library.Book linkFast Food by fiwenda TurnerFive Little BearsFive little bears Were dancing on the floor. One fell down And that le ft four.Four little bears Climbed up a tree.One found a bee hive And that le ft three. Three little bears Were wondering what to do. One chased a Bunny rabbit And that le ft two.Two little bears Were looking fo r some fun. One took a swim And that le ft one One little bear Sitting all alone.He looked all around And then ran home!Author unknownLeapBC" LS'fk BRITISHT, ' L i H,s\i 1IMUI12010 fM.WfyPA Q9 c e LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/"Teddy Bear's Pi chic.I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artsfw Lp eTBeowek wFtw pw.kevwp 2L001D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending Thinkingg 0 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare- A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral Language JA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speakclearly enoughito be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral languageB2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading,talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text toconfirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/ representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordF AMA ILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text andt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yfoodflair™Going on a picnicThis is a healthy eating activityfor children ages 2 to 5Let's play and talk togetherPlan a picnic with your child. Choose a place to go where you can eat outdoors.Talk about what kinds of food would be easy to pack and easy to eat with fingers.Talk about what foods need to be kept cold (e.g., milk, meat, salad). Show your child how you will keep these foods cold until it is time to eat.Let your child help you pack the picnic basket or cooler.f j' . N/cCHints for successA good read-together bookThe Best Picnic Ever by Clare Ja rre tt❖ Choose foods and drinks that are healthy and easy to carry (e.g., raw vegetables, fruits, sandwiches, water, etc.).❖ Before you start packing, make a list together of what you will take.❖ Invite your child to choose a snack to carry in his or her own bag or backpack.Ways to say itLeapB C ' EGACIcS fkN°Wjk' f  1 h EUEd (r 'kw rn iHMW * LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for Going on a picnicTry this way❖ Walk to a park, playground, community centre, nature trail or beach.❖ Bring a ball, a flying disc or a jump rope to play with.❖ Think of activities to do that everyone can enjoy.❖ Have a "pretend" picnic using pictures, empty food packages, plastic containers, plastic fruits and vegetables, etc.MusicLearn the song Teddy Bears' Picnic and sing it together.Sing the song The Ants Go Marching while you march to your picnic._ww’Pf d / ■Book linksMother Bear’s Picnic by Maurice Sendak The Teddy Bears' Picnic by Jimmy KennedySafety tipRemember to use ice or cooler packs if you take foods such as milk, salad dressing or meat.Blackberries, Blackberries on the HillBlackberries, blackberries on the hill How many pails can you fill? Briers are thick and briers scratch. But we'll pick all the berries in the blackberry patch.Author unknownleap is fv T L SI SN QNK ’ kv r m  i lum i2010 fi LKNOWj^  COLUMBIA LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/Goina on 'T AyoWs?^o°I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  • By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artsfw Lp eTBeowek wFtw pw.kevwp 2L001D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  (S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas— experiment with new ideas or materials A2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories> information text,,, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and View tB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECTV S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messagesusing a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in> and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing:classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing> brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/ representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and5 0  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yTread lightly.look closelyLet's play and talk together?; /❖ Invite your child on a nature walk through a field, park, patch of woods or backyard. Explain that you are going to stop and look closely at interesting things along the way.❖ Talk about the saying, "Take only memories, leave only footprints" and explain that on your walk you will be looking and listening, but leaving everything just as you found it.❖ On your walk, look and listen carefully. Take turns pointing things out and describing them to each other.❖ Help your child learn new words for patterns, colours, shapes, textures and sounds.A good read-together bookLook Closer by Brian and Rebecca WildsmithThis activity is good for learning to enjoy outdoor physical activity, looking and listening carefully, observing details, and learning new words.Hints for success❖ Stop from time to time to look closely at plants, insects, rocks or other details.❖ Listen fo r sounds made by birds, animals, machines and people.LeapBC"lit ' LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.,’f  B r i t i s h  *www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/2010“ S g f t X  F P .m S uEegjj • Jis is a physical development activ ity  fo r  ch ildren ages 3 to 5*"■ .auJf*LEA EiMMore ideas for Tread lightly, look closelyTry this way❖ Take a camera on your walk, and photograph some of the interesting things you see. Encourage your child to find interesting details for you to photograph.❖ Look at the pictures together when you get home. Try  to find more details when you study the snapshots.Healthy eatingWhen berries are ripe, go out together and gather enough to make a smoothie or a berry parfait. Chant the "Blackberries" poem as you pick. Change the words when you are picking different kinds of berries. When you get home, wash and sort the berries together.Find the LEAP BC activity card for Let’s Make) Berry Smoothie at www.2010legaciesnow.com/ LEAP_BC/. Make the recipe together, and share and enjoy a Berry Smoothie.Early literacyRead The Butterfly Alphabet. Make a game of finding patterns in nature that have the shapes of alphabet letters and numbers.Book linksThe Butterfly Alphabet by Kjell B. SandvedGreen Fun: Plants as Play by Marianne Haug GjersvikBlackberriesBlackberries, blackberries on the hill.How many pails can you fill?Briers are thick and briers scratch.But we’ll pick all the berries in the blackberry patch.AnonymousLeap 2010;GACIE5 K  BRITISHN O W .JW  COLUMBIAlh« Ke* Mace on KaftH LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/" T r ^ a d  L i . d t i H v  » L o o k  C X o & e X 'if L n N i L S A n r  t n h L o S o g  d O I i k M n N  a By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vfw Lp eTBeowek wFtw pw.kevwp 2L001D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text,, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fa r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral Language?A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed);A ll speakclearly enoughito be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artsb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9P r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending TltinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing;C4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/ representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artst o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yPizza pizzazz!Let’s play and talk together❖ Play "pizza delivery" with your child. Let your child lead the pretend play.❖ Choose who will order the pizza and who will deliver the pizza. Talk about what kind of pizza you want to eat and who will be making it.❖ Pretend to eat pizza together. S it down and enjoy a conversation while you eat.A good read-together book^  °Pizza at Sally's by Monica WellingtonHints for success❖ Set down to your child's level when you pretend together. S it down so you can have a conversation eye-to-eye.❖ Help your child lead the pretend play by asking questions that encourage imagination, e.g. “What kind of car does the delivery person drive?"❖ Add some props, e.g. a menu for take-out pizza and a telephone to order the pizza.This activity is good fo r developing imagination, learning about where food comes from and practis.ing meal-time conversation.Pizza is a healthy meal because it includes all food groups Children are more likely to try  fruits and vegetables if  they have a chance to learn about them in a fun wayI  like mushrooms on my pizza. What do you like on your pizza?Let's play pizza delivery! Who will order the pizza and who will deliver it?Ways to say itLeapBC" 2010 LECACIES h  NQWJ^\jr ***•T  BRITISH<'k v  ( 'nn iM H iALEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/foodflair™More ideas for Pizza pizzazz!This is a healthy eating activityfor children ages 2 to 5Try this way❖ Make pizza menus with pictures of foods that go on pizzas.❖ Make individual pizzas using d ifferent breads as bases, e.g., English muffins, pitas, bagels or tortillas.❖ Encourage your child to choose her own toppings.❖ For special days, make pizza treats.• Cookie cutter pizzas: fo r Halloween cut pita bread or English muffins with a jack-o-lantern cookie cutter. Add peppers, mushrooms and ham cut into shapes fo r eyes, nose and mouth.• Holiday pizzas with dough shaped into a heart for Valentine’s Day or an evergreen tree fo r a winter celebration.• Fruit pizzas: use biscuit dough as a base, yogurt for “sauce" and slices of apple, banana, pineapple chunks, and other fruits as toppings. Sprinkle with cinnamon.Physical activityMark a line several meters from a hoop or other round object that could be a pretend pizza crust. Place a variety of objects (e.g. bean bags, playing cards, small balls or toys) behind the line. Invite your child to decorate the pizza with "toppings" by carrying one item at a time and putting them on the pretend pizza crust.Dramatic playRead Pete's a Pizza - and together act out the pizza making, with your child as the “pizza."MusicI  am a Pizza by Charlotte Diamond.Book link ,Pete's a Pizza by William SteigSa fe ty  tipsHelp your child to wash her hands with soap and water before and after preparing food.Supervise your child when using knives or other kitchen utensils.For active play, make sure the area is clear of obstacles before playing.LeapBC' 2010 LECACIES fvNOWJj +00’K BRITISHf At (TM ! IUUI1 LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/f iz ia  Pi PPBC  ™I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artsfw Lp eTBeowek wFtw pw.kevwp 2L001D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problemsA4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compareA7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed).A ll speak clearly enough; to.be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral languageB2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading,talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text toconfirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMA I L YCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing'Strategies fo r Learning to Write and Representengage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsengage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingCu print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordC4C5C6Prescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artst o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yReady, set, PlacematsLet’s play and talk together❖ Invite your child to make a placemat for snacks and mealtimes.❖ Talk about how people get ready for meal­times—making a table decoration, putting out placemats, choosing which kinds of dishes will be needed, setting each person's place at the table, etc.❖ Talk about other ways people get ready for meals, e.g. washing hands, saying a blessing, etc.A good read-together bookJMt IOI.1* « MAS.* tBASlI*How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? by Jane YolenYou will need some large pieces of paper, some coloured markers or crayons, a magazine or flyer with pictures of food in it and some scissors andThis activity will help your child develop a positive attitude towards eating at the table and participating in family mealseat!Hints for success❖ Encourage your child to decorate his or her own placemat.❖ Use pictures of healthy foods from grocery flyers or magazines to make colourful placemats.LeapBC* 2010 LEGACIES TkNQW:Jk; T  BRITISH« '1. r i <i i:m riaLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/More ideas for PlacematsTry this way•  Make a placemat with your child showing outlines of a plate, a cup and some cutlery. Help your child set the table using the outlines on the placemat as a reminder.•  Help your child say the name of each item as you match it with the outline on the placemat.Let's make—a placematEpSw Te< 'vvI• Heavy paper rectangles or ready-made paper placemats• Crayons, markers or colored pencils• Colourful pictures, e.g. of your child, some healthy foods, or the season• Slue and scissors»el we• Give your child a paper placemat and some art materials.• Encourage your child to decorate the placemat using imagination and creativity.• Add your child’s name.• Protect the placemat with clear adhesive plastic.Safety tipMake a habit of washing hands before each meal. Sing a song for at least 20 seconds while you are washing.Language activitiesI f  you have a toddler, play "I can find the...". Put some foods on a plate. Describe one of the foods by its colour, shape or taste. Ask your child to find it. Then ask your toddler to say what it is. I f  your child does not know the word, say "Yes, that is a red fruit and it is an apple."I f  you have a preschooler, play "I eat my... with a 000B Using a knife, fork, spoon, and chopsticks, ask your preschooler to fill in the words as you say, "I eat mycereal with a  ”. Try other foods, like meat,peas, lettuce, rice, sandwich, milk, etc.Book linkEat Your Dinner, Please: A Pop-Up Bookby Allia Zobel-NolanLeapec 2010 LECACIES TvNOWjlyWsB W  TLSISNQr rw U I IVIUI V LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/, £g f . BCP  ! Iytot’ twpI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artsfw Lp eTBeowek wFtw pw.kevwp 2L001D e v e lo p in g ,  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to ,,-  express themselves * . :ask for assistance,.:, E E/E/E/f  ■'- -  exchange ideas: • \  ■ •. ■ ■experiment with new ideas or materials -- v , ■ ~ k ,  f  • :: ■1A2 . engage in speaking and listening, activities to share ideas about pictures; stories; information text;, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic); • v xA6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare - " » , -A V -A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usage: ' • : ; ‘Strategies fo r Oral Language. .l' C: ‘ ^ - *A8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listerung:activities;' :A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaning. ; : . v- . -  r " -Features o f Oral Language: ~ : ‘ VA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb; and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adults “ - ’ V .'S /W 'A12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words: (i.er, use phonologicalawareness) 'v -> /"."-'-.v, . • . ,  - .F AMAILYCTV N AS : CT V  S T :  m CAn CTV P DCICECAKB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading; writing, and oral language- B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities' (e.g:, role playing, art; music, choral reading,.talking): / "k '*B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviour . V . -Strategies fo r  Learning to Read and-Viezv :B4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and-viewirig to enhance comprehension, including;-  accessing prior knowledge : s j-  predicting, . '. ",.•• Y k, >■ ", \ ,-Y ' *- 1 \-  making connections - ;,4- " Y Y Y-  asking questions ' , Y '' -B5 . .in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-- predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures,-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)'.- -  asking the question, "Does that make sense?" -B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text toconfirm meaning . ‘ . ’ .b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  r sI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant others*F AMAILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl  create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols; letters; and words to convey meaning C2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward; writing and representingStrategies fo r Learning to Write and Represent"C4, engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and  classroom experiences (e.gv observing; listening, using.the other senses, drawing, brainstorming listing,webbing,partner-talk) C5 express meaning during writing and'representing by using invented spelling and copying existingwords/representationsr8  engage in discussions after writing or represenhng about the experience of writing or representing   and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and Representing  ru  print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name; and a few simple words, and record a prominent  - sound in a word t o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yBox townLet's play and talk togetherStart collecting empty boxes of different sizes and kinds. The sizes will depend on how much space you have for building a village, town or city. Talk with your child about different kinds of buildings you have seen in a city, town or village. Name some different kinds of buildings, e.g. house, condominium, school, hotel, store, skyscraper, garage, fire station, community hall, etc.Imagine the boxes are buildings. Think about what kind of buildings they could be. Talk about their shapes and sizes.Use the boxes to build an imaginary city, town or village. As you are building, talk about what the people might be doing there. Hints for successA good read-together bookD1 EUBQSTTI PWltt OUST 113 UZ,Not a Box by Antoinette PortisLeapec❖ Build on a flat surface so the boxes stand upright.❖ Add toy cars, animals, people figures, trees made of twigs, etc. Invite your child to find other objects which could be added.Ways to say itLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.’BRIx L i  www.2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/This is a language development activityfor children ages 3 to 5More ideas for Box townTry this wayI f  you have a large outdoor play space, use big cardboard boxes so children can climb inside. Decorate the boxes to look like different kinds of buildings. Put signs on them and encourage children to use them for imaginary play.Encourage your child to make the boxes look like different buildings. Use paints, crayons, co­loured paper, and tape or glue to decorate each building. Use blunt scissors to cut out windows and doors.Physical activityTake a walk around your neighbourhood and look at the different kinds of buildings you see. Talk about their shapes and sizes.As you pass each building, give it a name and add some descriptive words (e.g. squat, colourful, dark and spooky, etc.).Early literacyMake some signs to add to your buildings, e.g. doc­tor's office, hospital, school, etc.Make some traffic signs like the ones you would see in your city, town or village. Draw and cut out the shapes, glue them to small sticks, and stand them up in lumps of playdough near the box buildings.Go In and Out the WindowGo round and round the village.Go round and round the village.Go round and round the village,As we have done before.Go in and out the window.Go in and out the window.Go in and out the window.As we have done before.Now stand and face your partner. Now stand and face your partner. Now stand and face your partner. As we have done before.Now shake his hand and leave him. Now shake her hand and leave her. Now shake his hand and leave him. As we have done before.TraditionalLeapBC" 2010 LECACIES fk N°WJkyWs ++0, T  BRITISH< ’ k . rL 11 m m4 LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/k y s  T o w nP r e s c r i b e d  L e a r n i n g  O u t c o m e s  •  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artsfw Lp eTBeowek wFtw pw.kevwp 2L001D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text,A3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaningFeatures o f Oral Language:A10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speakdearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant others?F AMA ILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKLearning Writing (and Representing) and Extending ThinkingCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representing:C4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representations-C6 engage indiscussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and Representingr  7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a wordt o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yThis is a language development activityfor children ages 2 to 5Mystery objectsLet's play and talk together❖ Hide an interesting object in a cloth or paper bag.❖ Invite children to feel what is in the bag and guess what it is.❖ Ask children to talk about how the object feels before they make a guess, e.g. soft, pointed, small, bumpy, etc.A good read-together book; y firss wo da touch * and feela *My F irst Word Touch and Feelby Anne MillardBC"Hints for success❖ Start with objects that are simple, e.g. a stone, a feather, a spoon.❖ Take the first turn to show children how to play the game. Use lots of describing words when you are guessing.Ways to say itLEGACIES t  JULIUS! IN O W J V  I.OLUMBIALEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 201 OLegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/This is a language development activityfor children ages 2 to 5More ideas for Mystery objectsTry this way❖ For very young children (ages 1-2), play hide- and-seek with familiar objects. Put an object into the bag and ask the child to find the object, e.g. "Where is your fuzzy teddy?" Let the child reach in, feel the object and pull it out. Name the object and use texture words as the child pulls it out of the bag, e.g. "Here's the fuzzy teddy!"❖ For older children (ages 3 and up), let each child choose a favourite object to put into the bag. Take turns guessing what the object is.❖ Ask older children to think of at least three describing words before they guess what the object is.ArtCollect a variety of fabrics with d ifferent tex­tures. Help children make a texture collage or a quilt. Talk about how each fabric feels. Think of words to go with each piece of fabric.Healthy eatingCollect nutritious foods with different textures. O ffe r the foods as choices during snack time. As the children try a food, talk about what it feels like in the mouth.Book linkPooh’s Touch and Feel Visit by A. A. Milne and Ernest H. ShepardThe Five Senses Song(sung to the tune of Old Macdonald Had a Farm)On my face I  have two eyes.I  use them every day.They are used to help me see When I  work and play.W ith a look, look here.And a look, look there.Here a look, there a look.Everywhere a look, look.On my face I  have two eyes;I  use them every day!On my body I  have skin Feeling cold and heat.I t  stretches from atop my head Way down to my feet.W ith a touch, touch here.And a touch, touch there.Here a touch, there a touch.Everywhere a touch, touch.On my body I  have skin Feeling cold and heatlAuthor unknownMapBC'2010 LECACIES U  NOWus !2N0N1e LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair,www. 2010LegaciesNow.com/LEAP_BC/M y s t e r y  O b j e c t sI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  By Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language Artsfw Lp eTBeowek wFtw pw.kevwp 2L001D e v e l o p in g  O r a l  L a n g u a g e  ( S p e a k in g  a n d  L i s t e n in g )  A b i l i t i e s  Oral Language Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to-  express themselves-  ask for assistance-  exchange ideas-  experiment with new ideas or materialsA2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text, and experiencesA3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a good listener for a sustained period of timeA5 demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaning.Features o f Oral LanguageA10 use meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed)A ll speak clearly enough;to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and orally manipulate sounds in words (i.e., use phonological awareness)D e v e l o p in g  R e a d in g  a n d  V ie w in g  A b i l i t i e s  Learning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate awareness of the connection between reading, writing, and oral language B2 respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing, art, music, choral reading, talking)B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviourStrategies fo r  Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge-  predicting-  making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including-  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6 engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaningb y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading)B8 identify most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMA IL YCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKCl create simple messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey meaningC2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and thatprint carries a constant message C3 show an interest in, and a positive attitude toward, writing and representingC4 engage in discussions before writing and representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing and share work with othersFeatures o f Writing and RepresentingC 7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, own name, and a few simple words, and record a prominent sound in a word5 0  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yAppendix B: Teacher Information Presentation on FABFamily Activity Baggies: They’re FAB-ulous!“Through play, children represent their knowledge and further explore their world. Play should be seen as an essential experience...”(Primary Program: A Framework for Teaching,2000, pp. 33-34)The Kindergarten Program:• The Kindergarten curriculum is a play based one that aims to develop the whole child• Goal: to enhance children’s overall development, not to rush them into academics at an early ageThe Whole ChildoSocial Responsibility DevelopmentKindergarten Literacy Goals• The goal of the BC Language Arts curriculum for K-7 is,“to provide students with opportunities for personal and intellectual growth through speaking, listening, reading, viewing, writing and representing to make meaning of the world and to prepare them effectively in all aspects of society”What is Literacy?Three aspects:1. oral language (accounts for 60-80% of teaching time)2. reading and viewing3. writing and representinghttp://www.bced.qov.bc.ca/irp/pdfs/enqlish I anquaqe arts/2006ela k7.pdfParent Question: How Can I Support My Child’s Literacy at Home?• Read- books, signs, recipes, magazines, board games,TV guide, online games, etc.• Community Outings- Library, Community Events, Extra-Curricular Activities• Play Dates• Homework calendars• Use the themes listed on the classroom calendar to engage your child in conversation• Family Activity BaggiesWhat is FAB?• Optional• A baggie filled with an activity card, a picture book, a copy of the curricular connections, and a feedback booklet• Play based activities that develop predominantly literacy skills• Springboard- Do not have to be followed as outlined on the card• Not limited to parent and child; can include siblings, extended family members, friendsHow to Use FAB• Each parent/child will be assigned a day of the week to sign out a baggie• Sign-out happens in the morning after drop-off on outside table• Please find your child’s name in the binder and record which bag you borrowed• Please only borrow a baggie once the previous baggie has been returnedLet’s Explore!• Have a look at the baggiesQuestions/Concerns?Final Messages...• HAVE FUN!• Please do not hesitate to contact me with questions or concerns• Please share your successes and tips with other families in the booklet located in each baggieI h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  v  B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e vPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsIt is expected that students will:  v : - - 'v  •p )H).PCEyB  N he.  l eyBmeB)  jRC)egEyB  ey i  l EdU)yEyB q T uE.EUE)d Oral Language,Learning and Extending ThinkingA1 use.speaking and listening when engaging in exploratory and imaginative play to ; --  express themselves-  ask for assistance ' •.: . . A-  exchange ideas ■-  experiment with new ideas or materials 'A2 engage in speaking and listening activities to share ideas about pictures, stories, information text,and experiences " , ' ' /  ,A3 demonstrate use of social language to interact co-operatively with others and to solve problems A4 demonstrate being a gopd listener for a sustained period of timeA5, demonstrate being a good speaker (including sustaining conversation on a familiar topic)A6 use oral language to explain, inquire, and compare 'A7 experiment with language and demonstrate enhanced vocabulary usageStrategies fo r  Oral LanguageA8 connect what is already known with new experiences during speaking and listening activities A9 ask questions to construct and clarify meaning .Features o f Oral LanguageA10 rise meaningful syntax when speaking (e.g., include a subject and verb, and simple connecting words when needed) - -. . -•A ll speak clearly enough to be understood by peers and adultsA12 demonstrate auditory discrimination and oraliy manipulate sounds, to words (i.e., use phonological ’. ; _ awareness) .p )H).PCEyB  © )e iEyB  e y i  - E)AEyB  T uE.EUE)d iLearning Reading (and Viewing) and Extending ThinkingB1 demonstrate'awareness, of the connection between reading, writing,, and oral language B2.. respond to literature through a variety of activities (e.g., role playing> art, music, choral reading, talking). .B3 engage in reading or reading-like behaviour A .Strategies fo r Learning to Read and ViewB4 in discussions, use strategies before reading and viewing to enhance comprehension, including-  accessing prior knowledge . •-  predicting j i ,-- making connections-  asking questionsB5 in discussions, use strategies during reading and viewing to monitor comprehension, including - -  predicting and confirming unknown words and events by using language patterns and pictures-  making pictures in their heads (visualizing)-  asking the question, "Does that make sense?"B6/: engage in discussions and create representations after reading and viewing to reflect on the text to confirm meaning • '. ' . - ■’ ‘b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) y  v  4 9I h ) d f h E u ) i  l ) e h y E y B  N m U f P S ) d  • B y  Grade\ / v L e t ’ s t p e v l  a y v p / v n e LPrescribed Learning Outcomes: English Language ArtsFeatures o f Reading and ViewingB7 demonstrate understanding of concepts about print and concepts about books (e.g., there is a directionality to print; books are for reading) . . „ :B8 identify most of the.letters of the alphabet and their sounds, and a few high-frequency words, including their name and names of significant othersF AMAILYCTV B GCECT V S T :  N AYGAKATECTV P DCICECAKCl create simple messages.using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and words to convey ''meaning " A ' '  ■. .C2 recognize that writing can be "talk written down" and that print carries a constant messageC3 show an interest in, and a’positive attitude toward, writing and representingStrategies fo r Learning to Write and RepresentC4 engage in discussions before writing and.representing to generate ideas when responding to text and classroom experiences (e.g., observing, listening, using the.other senses, drawing, brainstorming, listing, webbing, partner-talk)C5 express meaning during writing and representing by using invented spelling and copying existing words/representationsC6 engage in discussions after writing or representing about the experience of writing or representing . ..and share work with others . ’ . .Features o f Writing and RepresentingC7 print most of the letters of the alphabet, ownname, and a few simple words, and record a prominent •sound in a word . . .t o  v  b y B . Ed (  l e y B m e B )  T hUd  n Ey i ) h B e h U ) yAppendix C: Sample FABfo r  ch ildren ages 2 to 5U l lx f l K ,0Tri-spy❖ While you are on a walk, invite your child tp: look fo r  th ree  things: something special, somethingrstrange, and something beautifu l.❖ xr  you walk along, share what you notice. Point out your choice fo r  each category, and ask your child to do the same.❖ Encourage your child to use words tha t describe  each choice.❖ Explain why you chose each item, and ask your child to do the same.x PeeI  read-together bookEach One Special by Frieda W ishinsky❖ Ne slowly so you can look carefully.❖ S ta rt  with ju st one kind o f choice, e.g. "Let's look fo r  something special."❖ Help one another find interesting choices.Ways to say itJ r LEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.-spyTry this wayFor younger children (ages 2-3), show your child  how to play this game by pointing out things th a t are  special, strange or beautiful when­ever you can. Invite older children (ages 4-5) to choose or change the  category o f  things to  look fo r , e.g. something happy, Something slimy, something funny, etc.f o r  ch ild ren  ages 2 to  5rs- e  ... ..  ■ :. f e- ‘f!Drawing and writingTake a camera or sketch pad on your walk, and draw or photograph some o f the things your child chooses. Use the pictures to make a story about the walk. W rite  down what your child has to say about each picture.C0 The RainbowBoats sail on the  rivers.And ships sail on the  seas;But clouds th a t sail across the  sky A re  p re ttie r fa r  than these.The re  are  bridges on the  rivers. As p re tty  as you please;But the  bow th a t bridges heaven. And overtops the  tree s .And builds a road from  earth  to  sky. Is  p re ttie r  fa r  than these .Christina N0 RossettiLEAP BC™ is a set of resources for healthy child development which includes Hop, Move, Talk and Food Flair.Appendix D: Parent QuestionnaireDear Parents,Thank-you for taking the time to tvp2es  the following questions about the FAB program. This is the f irs t  time that I  have run this program and your answers will provide me with valuable feedback for next year. The questionnaire is anonymous and all comments (positive or negative) are valuable. Completed questionnaires can be placed in the envelope affixed to the classroom cupboards in the cubby area. Please return all completed questionnaires by fvtsoF  31st.Thank-you again parents for your continued support!Miss HartleyFAB Parent Questionnaire 20121. How often have you been using the FAB program? Once a week? Once a month? Not at all?2. What did you like, enjoy or find useful about the FAB program?3. What changes do you think would make the FAB program more enjoyable or useful?Any other comments:5

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