UBC Graduate Research

The UBC Public Bicycle System Feasibility Study Cooper, Adam Sep 30, 2009

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
310-SCARP_2009_gradproject_Cooper.pdf [ 31.58MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 310-1.0107180.json
JSON-LD: 310-1.0107180-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 310-1.0107180-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 310-1.0107180-rdf.json
Turtle: 310-1.0107180-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 310-1.0107180-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 310-1.0107180-source.json
Full Text
310-1.0107180-fulltext.txt
Citation
310-1.0107180.ris

Full Text

UBC  the public bicycle system feasibility study.  by: Adam Cooper M.A. Candidate, SCARP, UBC September, 2009  The UBC Public Bicycle Feasibility Study  by    Adam Stuart Cooper  B.A. Geog.(Hons), B.A. Planning,  M.A. Planning Candidate    A PROJECT SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    MASTER OF ARTS (PLANNING)  in  THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES    School of Community and Regional Planning    We accept this project as conforming  to the required standard    ......................................................    .....................................................    .....................................................      THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  September, 2009  © Adam Cooper, 2009        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|i   Acknowledgements  The author would like to first thank Carole Jolly and Michael Peterson of the TREK Program Centre at the University of British Columbia for the  opportunity to compile and complete this report. The leadership of UBC TREK and their support of student projects focused on sustainable  transportation is greatly appreciated.   Dr. Larry Frank and the Bombardier Foundation deserve many thanks for their help in supporting the vision of this project and sustainable  transportation across the Metro Vancouver Region. Without Larry’s guidance and enthusiasm for his students, this report would not have  materialized.   The author would like to thank Michel Philibert and the wonderful people at Stationnement de Montréal and BIXI who provided first hand access  to their award winning system, as well as financial and technical information that have greatly improved this report.  Gavin Davidson and Andrew Curran at TransLink, as well as Meghan Winters of the Cycling in Cities Study at UBC, deserve many thanks for  providing the initial opportunity to become involved in the study of bicycles in both Vancouver and Paris.   Appreciation is extended to one of the most charismatic people I have had the pleasure to meet; Mr. Eric Britton of EcoPlan International. Eric,  inspired me to make a difference at UBC and acted as a gracious host while I studied first‐hand the genesis of the bike sharing phenomena: the  always fantastic Vélib'.  Finally, I would like to thank my parents, Barbara and Cody Cooper, who have lovingly supported me through nine years of university education.  I love you both very much.  Thank you all.  ‐  a                 UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|ii   Executive Summary  Introduction  This report was initiated and funded by the UBC TREK Program Centre to assess the feasibility of an on‐campus public bicycle system (PBS). The  report considers whether such a system could improve on‐campus mobility, reduce travel times and advance transportation and sustainability  goals of the University and the region. The report evaluates relevant components of implementing a public bicycle system: the success factors,  usage rates, and the expected costs and benefits. The report concludes with recommendations on how to best implement a PBS at UBC.    A Snapshot of Transportation at UBC   As Figure 1 indicates, public transit accounts for 44% of all trips to and from UBC. Notwithstanding the progress made by the TREK Program  Centre, cars continue to permeate the UBC campus, remaining the dominant mode of transportation. Vehicles account for over half (53%) of all  trips arriving to UBC: 37% as single occupant vehicles and 16% as vanpool and carpool. Cycling, walking and other modes of transportation  account for the remaining 3%.  Figure 1: Mode Share to UBC, 2008 Travel to UBC is easy. However, the central core of the 402 hectare campus suffers  from  limited  mobility  options.  Prohibited  car  access  to  portions  of  the  campus,  combined  with  community  shuttles  that  serve  the  perimeter  of  campus,  leave  walking  as  the  main  mode  of  on‐campus  transportation.  Walking  distance  is  frequently  cited  as  an  issue,  and  there  is  a  desire  among  many  to  improve  on‐ campus mobility. Bicycles represent one affordable and sustainable option.   Nevertheless,  several  factors  limit  the  popularity  of  cycling  on‐campus;  fear  of  theft, the topography en‐route to UBC and the limited capacity of the bike racks on  buses. With intervention, cycling could imporve on‐campus mobility, especially as  60%  of  all  potential  cyclists  in  the  Lower  Mainland  describe  themselves  as  “interested but concerned,” with regard to increasing the amount they cycle1. As  the residentail population of UBC continues to grow ‐ especially in the far southern  portion of campus – more people will be seeking alternatives to the automobile to meet their daily mobility needs at UBC.                                                                1  2009 TransLink Regional Cycling Strategy: Setting the Context          UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|iii   A Primer on Public Bicycle Systems  The terms public bicycle system (PBS), free bikes, or city bikes are commonly interchanged, but all describe the same phenomena; a network of  bicycles distributed across an urban area, available for public access from self‐service docking stations. Public bicycles can be picked up at any  self‐serve  station  and  returned  to  any  other  station  in  the  network  area,  making  them  appropriate  for  point  A  to  point  B  travel.  The  pricing  structure of PBS is designed to encourage short utilitarian trips, differentiating them from typical bicycle rental programs, which target tourists  and leisurely bicycle trips. Typically, bike share programs can be defined by their low cost, high concentration of stations and 24 hour operations.  Public use bicycles differ from typical bicycles in their heavier construction for durability, and the use of proprietary parts to reduce theft. The  bicycles are designed to accommodate a range of body types and users. Their low stand‐over height, fenders and enclosed drive train, allow for  riders in business casual clothing to use the bikes in all weather conditions. The bikes feature integrated, always‐on lighting as well space for  carrying  personal  items  and  a  locking  mechanism  that  interfaces  with  the  self‐serve  docking  station.  The  primary  purpose  of  PBS  is  not  to  generate profit through user fees, but rather to enhance existing transit options , therefore membership rates and use fees are typically kept as  low as possible.  PBS is commonly viewed as a compliment to the existing public transit network; extending and improving its reach, at a comparatively low cost.  When  located  close  to  transit  interchanges,  commercial  areas  and  other  major  destinations,  PBS  can  act  as  the  first  and  last  leg  of  a  transit  journey. Around the world, public bicycles are being embraced as a form of sustainable transportation; over 125 cities now operate bike sharing  systems.    The Benefits of a Public Bicycle System  A  PBS  will  bring  many  benefits  to  the  members  of  the  UBC  community,  including;  students,  faculty,  staff,  tourists  and  those  living  in  the  residential  communities.  The  expected  benefits  will  likely  accrue  to  six  general  categories;  transportation,  health,  environmental,  social,  educational and economic. The bulk of the payback from investing in a public bicycle system will come in the form of transportation benefits to  the UBC community, followed by health and environmental benefits that will improve regional quality of life. UBC will benefit from the social  and  educational  opportunities  created  by  an  investment  in  PBS,  as  it  will  create  opportunities  for  cross‐disciplinary  research  and  advance  positive  social  change.  The  economic  benefits  of  PBS  are  likely  to  be  moderate  and  are  highly  contingent  on  the  program’s  operating  and  financing model. However, options for improving the program’s financial viability do exist and should be pursued at the will of the university.          UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|iv   Figure 2, visually displays the magnitude of expected benefits in relation to each other, and lists the expected benefits across the six previously  outlined categories. The image is not based on a common quantified scale of benefit, rather it depicts the scale of expected benefits accruing in  each category.     Figure 2: An Ordinal, Visual Representation of PBS Expected Benefits             UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|v   Policy Support for a PBS  A  comprehensive  policy  review  examined  material  produced  by  UBC,  not‐for‐profit  organizations,  and  external  stakeholders,  including,  TransLink, the City of Vancouver and Metro Vancouver. Notwithstanding the diversity in the sources of policy, their goals and policies for bicycle  use  and  bicycle  facility  planning  are  consistent.  Generally,  all  of  the  policy  documents  had  specific  actions  focused  on  increasing  access  to  cycling, improving its safety and making cycling a substitute for vehicle trips. The analysis reveals that a PBS fits the regional goals as well as the  goals of UBC, as outlined in the Campus Plan, Strategic Transportation Plan and the Sustainability Strategy.   The Financials of a PBS   Purchasing  and  operating  a  public  bicycle  system  represents  a  major  capital  investment  in  sustainable  transportation  infrastructure  at  UBC.  Based on the financial model developed for this report, an appropriate PBS at UBC is likely to cost $4000/bike, with ongoing operating costs of  $1250/bike/year. This represents a total capital investment of approximately $1,030,511 over a ten year period.   A PBS at UBC is likely to generate enough revenue from subscriptions and user fees to cover the annual operating costs of. However, without  sponsorship, grant funding or the inclusion of advertising, the program will not recover its capital costs. Without these other sources of revenue,  the  cost  of  operating  and  installing  a  PBS  over  a  ten  year  period  is  equal  to  $509,956  or  $50,995/year.  With  minimal  amounts  of  advertising  introduced  into  the  program,  the  capital  costs  can  be  recovered  and  the  program  will  generate  revenue  that  could  be  used  to  fund  other  sustainable initiatives at UBC.    Conclusion  Cycling culture in Vancouver is becoming entrenched in daily life. The evidence of cycling’s renaissance in Vancouver is everywhere. In 2009, the  Burrard Street Bridge Bike Lane Reallocation Trial was launched, the Museum of Vancouver celebrated Vancouver and the Bicycle Revolution via  “Velo‐City”  an  art  exhibition  exploring  Vancouver’s  cycling  history.  In  June  of  2009  the  Central  Valley  Greenway,  a  24  km,  multi‐use  pathway  opened  to  cyclists,  pedestrians  and  other  active  transportation  users.  In  addition,  the  City  of  Vancouver’s  Greenest  City  Team  identified  bike  sharing as a quick start project capable of being implemented before the 2010 Olympics.   As  the  second  largest  commuter  destination  in  the  Metro  Vancouver  region,  UBC  must  consider  its  impact  on  the  region  and  the  world.  By  implementing a public bicycle system,  UBC has the  opportunity to showcase its commitment  to leadership in sustainability.  The program will  have an immediate and direct impact on public health, the environment, and generating social change. From a triple‐bottom‐line assessment,  PBS is an excellent way to bring social and environmental benefits to UBC and the region, in addition to a moderate return on investment.        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|vi   Contents  Section 1.0: Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 3  1.0   Purpose of the Feasibility Study of Public Bicycles at UBC ............................................................................................................................ 3   1.1   Report Scope and Limitations ........................................................................................................................................................................ 3   Section 2.0: Background and Context ............................................................................................................................................................................ 4  2.1   Recent History of UBC Vancouver .................................................................................................................................................................. 4   2.3   Future Transit Infrastructure ......................................................................................................................................................................... 7   Section 3.0: Policy Review ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 8  3.1   Regional Policy Review ................................................................................................................................................................................... 8   3.2   UBC Policy Review ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 11   Section 4.0: What are Public Bicycles? ........................................................................................................................................................................ 13  4.1   An Introduction to Public Bicycles ............................................................................................................................................................... 13   4.2   The Goals of Bike Sharing ............................................................................................................................................................................. 15   4.3   The History of Public Bicycles ...................................................................................................................................................................... 16   4.4   Other Characteristics of Public Bicycle Systems .......................................................................................................................................... 18   Section 5.0: Is PBS Right for UBC ? ............................................................................................................................................................................... 19  5.1   Success factors for Public Bicycles ............................................................................................................................................................... 19   5.2   Who Uses Bike Sharing ................................................................................................................................................................................ 21   5.3   UBC’s Culture of Sustainability .................................................................................................................................................................... 21   Section 6.0: The Benefits of a Public Bicycle System ................................................................................................................................................... 24  6.1   PBS Benefits Summary ................................................................................................................................................................................. 24   6.2   Transportation Benefits ............................................................................................................................................................................... 25   6.3   Health Benefits ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 29   6.4   Environmental Benefits ................................................................................................................................................................................ 30         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|1   6.5   Social Benefits .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 31   6.6   Economic Benefits ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 31   6.7   Educational Benefits .................................................................................................................................................................................... 32   Section 7: The Financials of a Public Bicycle System.................................................................................................................................................... 33  7.1   The Information Void ................................................................................................................................................................................... 33   7.2   Typical Costs of a PBS ................................................................................................................................................................................... 33   7.3   Expected Ridership at UBC ........................................................................................................................................................................... 35   7.4   Capital Costs for PBS at UBC ........................................................................................................................................................................ 36   7.5   Operating Costs of PBS at UBC ..................................................................................................................................................................... 37   7.6   Operating Revenue of PBS at UBC ............................................................................................................................................................... 37   Section 8: Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 40  8.1   Triple Bottom Line Assessment .................................................................................................................................................................... 40   8.2   Recommendations ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 41   References ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 43                UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|2   Section 1.0: Introduction  This section outlines the purpose of the report, its scope and limitations as well as the project partners.    1.0  Purpose of the Feasibility Study of Public Bicycles at UBC   This report was initiated and funded by the UBC TREK Program Centre to assess the viability of an on‐campus public bicycle system (PBS), with  support from the Bombardier Foundation and the Active Transportation Lab, in the Centre for Human Settlements at UBC. Specifically the report  considers whether such a system could improve on‐campus mobility, reduce travel times for students and meet transportation and sustainability  policy goals of the University and the Metro Vancouver region.   The  report  evaluates  relevant  components  of  implanting  a  public  bicycle  system  at  UBC,  from  ridership  projections  and  technical  analysis  to  social, environmental and economic considerations.   1.1  Report Scope and Limitations   The study will:   Review the current and expected demand for transit to and from UBC.   Review relevant policy documents produced by UBC and other stakeholders.   Utilize data from public bicycle systems worldwide.   Evaluate  and  report  various  options  for  public  bicycle  systems  at  UBC.  Identify  the  required  number  of  bicycles  to  support  the  UBC  population as well as station locations.   Estimate costs to install and operate a public bicycle system at UBC   Provide a triple bottom line conclusion as well as recommendations for the deployment of a PBS at UBC.  This report relies upon:   Ridership, vehicle and population data provided by UBC TREK, UBC Campus and Community Planning as well as TransLink.   TransLink reports regarding future transit planning associated with UBC.   A public bicycle assessment provided by The Public Bicycle Company, operators of the BIXI PBS in Montreal, Canada.    Reports from other cities and non‐profit agencies on the feasibility of public bicycles and the state of public bicycles world‐wide         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|3   Section 2.0: Background and Context   This  section  summarizes  the  existing  transportation  system  of  the  UBC  Vancouver  campus,  analyzes  current  and  future  transit  ridership,  and  reviews transportation policy to provide context for past and future transit decisions.   2.1  Recent History of UBC Vancouver   In  1908  the  Provincial  legislature  of  BC  passed  a  new  University  Act  establishing  the  University  of  British  Columbia  (UBC,  2008)1.  In  over  100  years since the inception of the University, enrollment has grown dramatically and in 2007 the school graduated its 250,000th student. Currently,  the UBC Vancouver campus is home to 11,000 full time residents and is expected to have a residential population of 28,167 upon completion of  University Town (UBC, 2009)2 – a livable, more sustainable community, at the UBC campus.   The  University  of  British  Columbia  has  demonstrated  a  strong  commitment  to  sustainable  initiatives  and  in  1997  was  the  first  Canadian  university to enact a sustainable development policy. In the same year the University also established the TREK Program Center; mandated to  reduce automobile trips to and from UBC, by promoting more sustainable modes of transportation, including; transit, carpooling, walking and  cycling.  The  TREK  Program  Center  has  proven  very  successful.  In  1997,  when  TREK  began,  transit  accounted  for  18%  of  all  trips  to  and  from  campus.  By  2008,  transit  accounted  for  44%  of  all  trips  (see  Figure  2.1.1).  During  the  same  time  period,  single‐occupant  vehicle  (SOV)  trips  Figure 2.1.1 – Mode Share at UBC  decreased by 6%, even with a 36% increase in daytime population (UBC, 2009)3 at UBC.     2.2  Existing Transportation Infrastructure      The University of British Columbia is committed to providing a wide range of  transportation  options.  The  transportation  network  on‐campus  has  been  designed  to  ensure  accessibility  by  automobile,  public  transit,  cyclists  and  pedestrians.  However,  historic  land  use  and  development  decisions  have  produced a campus that the UBC community is sprawling; making walking and  cycling less feasible. The University has worked to reduce automobile trips to  campus and the mode split for travel to and from UBC reflects these efforts;  transit now accounts for 44% of all trips, while automobiles make up 53% of  trips.  Once  on‐campus,  travel  is  primarily  pedestrian;  likely  due  to  the  high  levels  of  transit  ridership  and  the  pedestrianized  core  of  the  campus,  which  limits automobile mobility.         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|4   Automobiles  For more than ten years, UBC TREK has been working to reduce automobile  trips  to  and  from  campus  and  to  encourage  the  use  of  other  modes  of  transportation,  such  as,  transit,  carpooling,  cycling  and  walking.  The  introduction of the U‐Pass, in conjunction with other transportation demand  management measures such as increased parking fees, a restricted parking  supply,  and  upgraded  cycling  infrastructure  have  helped  UBC  reduce  the  number of trips made to campus by automobiles.     Although  great  progress  has  been  made  during  the  last  ten  years  of  transportation intervention, cars still permeate the UBC campus and remain  the primary mode of transportation for daily trips to UBC. In total, vehicles  account for over half (53%) of all trips arriving to UBC; with 37% arriving as  single occupant and the remaining 16% as vanpool or carpool (UBC, 2009)4.  This  automobile  dominated  mode  share  has  major  implications  for  the  University,  as  Provincial  climate  change  goals  strive  to  make  the  campus  carbon neutral by 2010.     The  carbon  dioxide  emissions  associated  with  commuting  to  and  from  UBC  represent  the  University’s  second  highest  output  at  22,815  tonnes/year (UBC, 2006)5. The high output of carbon from commute patterns places it second only to emissions associated with the burning of  natural gas to produce steam for plant operations. The current commute patterns produce more emissions than those associated with electricity  use  and  those  generated  from  buildings  (22,365  and  12,012  tonnes/year  respectively),  (UBC,2006)6.  In  order  to  advance  sustainability  and  achieve carbon neutrality at UBC, further transportation intervention will be necessary.    Public Transit  Coast Mountain Bus Company (CMBC) a subsidiary of TransLink; the regional transportation authority for Metro Vancouver, serves UBC with 13  bus routes (see Table 2.2.1), including one express bus (99 B‐Line) as well as 3 community shuttles (C19, C20, C22). Since 1997, transit ridership  to  and  from  UBC  has  increased  168%  totaling  51,000  weekday  trips  (UBC,  2009)7.  The  dramatic  increase  in  ridership  resulted  from  the  introduction  of  a  mandatory  student  U‐Pass  program,  significant  improvements  in  transit  service  levels  (including  new  routes  to  UBC  and  extended hours of service), a reduced supply of commuter parking and higher prices for on‐campus parking (UBC, 2009)8.        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|5   Table2.2.1: Current Transit Servicing UBC Vancouver   Route   4   9   17   25   33   41   43   44   49   84   99   258   480   Total Ridership   2,091   1,334   3,469   3,580   1,610   5,495   1,965   2,836   2,500   3,117   19,470   300   3,250   Ridership Share   4.1%   2.6%   6.8%   7.0%   3.2%   10.8%   3.9%   5.6%   4.9%   6.1%   38.2%   0.6%   6.4%          Public transit ridership to UBC is expected to increase in the future as the residential and academic population of UBC continues to grow. It is  expected  that  this  increased  demand  will  be  met  through  the  implementation  of  a  light  rail  or  advanced  light  rail  link  and  through  land  use  planning decisions intended to reduce the demand for trips to and from campus. As the number of permanent residents at UBC increases, it is  likely that providing options for on‐campus transportation will become more important.    Walking   Figure 2.2.1: Community Shuttle Routes  and Pedestrian Zones   Despite the high level of transit service, the large central core of UBC’s 402 hectare (UBC,  2009)9 campus suffers from limited mobility options. The removal of car access to campus  facilities  along  portions  of  Main  Mall,  East  Mall,  Agricultural  Road  and  University  Blvd,  combined  with  community  shuttles  routes  (See  figure  2.2.1)  that  primarily  service  the  perimeter  of  the  campus,  leave  walking  as  the  main  mode  of  on‐campus  transportation  (UBC, 2007)10.   Walking  distance  to  transit  is  frequently  cited  as  an  issue  by  students,  staff,  faculty  and  others on‐campus. There is a desire among many persons to bring transit services further  into campus, in order to reduce walking distances and improve on‐campus mobility options.     Cycling  Cycling  is  highly  encouraged  and  appropriate  for  travel  on  the  UBC  campus.  The  temperate  west  coast  climate,  combined  with  flat  topography,  a  traffic  calmed  environment  and  a  student  population  who  are  physically  active  and  sustainably  minded,  make  the  campus  an  ideal  place  to  foster  cycling  culture.  The  University  has  recognized  the  opportunities  for  cycling  on‐campus  and  have  provided  bicycle  parking  (secure  cages,  racks,  and  bike  lockers),  on  road  infrastructure  and  end‐of‐ trip facilities (showers, lockers, and washbasins) to capitalize on the opportunity to increase the cycling mode share at UBC. With all of these        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|6   measures in place and more bicycle racks consistently being added across campus, the mode share for cycling trips to and from UBC is 1.4%,  down from a pre U‐Pass high of 2.6% in 2002 (UBC, 2009)11.  The relatively low mode share for cycling to UBC is likely a result of several factors. Foremost is UBC’s isolated location on Point Grey ‐ increasing  distances from the City of Vancouver and other destinations. Additional factors include the topography en route to campus, fear of theft once at  UBC and the relative attractiveness of alternatives, particularly public transit (Winters & Cooper, 2008)12.  While the University can address some  of these deterrents to cycling, topography proves difficult to overcome and can be prohibitive to attracting new riders, older cyclists or those  with  health  conditions.  TransLink  has  ensured  that  the  majority  of  buses  running  to  UBC  are  or  will  be  equipped  with  bicycle  racks  as  one  solution to overcoming the steep topography, although the Fall 2008 Transportation Status Report indicate that the bicycle racks are not well  utilized. Unfortunately, this report  may be misleading, as the usage rates for the racks are averaged across a full day and fail to illustrate the  demand for bicycle rack capacity during peak travel times. Personal observation during peak travel times, especially in good weather, reveals  many  pass‐ups  for  transit  riders  wishing  to  bring  bicycles  to  UBC.  This  lack  of  capacity  at  peak  demand,  likely  discourages  transit  users  from  bringing their bicycles to campus, further compounding on‐campus mobility problems and contributing to the low cycling mode share.   Table 2.2.2: Bikes on Buses (Daily Averages)   Route   4   9   17   25   33   41   43   44   49   84   99   258   480   Bicycles   17   6   22   36   10   40   5   20   11   36   135   2   11   Buses with Racks   135   95   198   182   101   250   55   82   126   185   429   14   103   Avg. Bikes/Rack   0.13   0.06   0.11   0.20   0.10   0.16   0.09   0.24   0.09   0.19   0.31   0.14   0.11      2.3  Future Transit Infrastructure   Table 2.3.1: Expected Future Transit Load to UBC  UBC Line Expected Transit Load  In the future, public transit will continue to play  Baseline (Broadway)    24,273   a  critical  role  for  transporting  the  UBC  Baseline + Surrounding (Broadway, 4th and 16th)    37,807   community.  Transit  ridership  can  generally  be  Baseline + Surrounding + Expected Increase     54,745   expected  to  grow  and  remain  integral  to  the  commuting patterns at UBC.     Currently, TransLink is expected to meet future demand with the construction of a high speed rail link. It is expected that this upgraded transit  linkage to UBC will improve the attractiveness of public transit for those commuters currently travelling in an automobile. A reduction of vehicles  on‐campus combined with the centralized location of public transit facilities at UBC will further compound the issue of on‐campus mobility. In  order to make public transit as viable and attractive as possible, it is imperative that UBC improve options for on‐campus mobility.        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|7   Section 3.0: Policy Review  The  following  section  outlines  the  relevant  policies  of  regional  government,  local  government  and  the  University  which  relate  to  the  implementation of a large scale public bicycle system at the UBC Vancouver campus.   3.1  Regional Policy Review   Decisions with respect to the provision of transportation infrastructure at UBC occur within a broader policy context, therefore transportation  planning  should  consider  regional  objectives,  City  of  Vancouver,  Metro  Vancouver  and  TransLink  policies,  as  well  as  advice  from  local  independent  research  organizations.  Notwithstanding  the  diversity  in  the  sources  of  policy,  their  suggestions  for  transportation  planning  and  policy are fairly consistent. The three key themes that emerge from the policy and research review are; connecting transportation to land use,  reducing reliance on the private automobile and supporting the transportation hierarchy (see Figure 3.1.1).   Table 3.1.1: Policy and Research  Review   Sector   Organization  Document   Regional  Government   TransLink      Metro  Vancouver   Local  Government   City of  Vancouver   Applicable Policies / Goals / Targets  Aggressively  reduce  greenhouse  gas  emissions  from  transportation  support  of  federal,  provincial and regional targets.  Transport 2040,  Regional Cycling Strategy Background   The majority of trips will be by transit, walking and cycling.  Study   Metro Vancouver is the most bicycle friendly city/region in the world   Cycling is a normal activity – everyone cycles.   Increase transportation choice.   1996 Livable Region Strategic Plan   Reduce reliance on private automobile  1997 Transportation Plan, 1999 Bicycle Plan,  2003 Downtown Transportation Plan,  2005 Community Climate Change  Action Plan   Smart  Growth BC   2005 Transportation Vision   Victoria  Transport  Policy  Institute   Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and  Costs   Non‐Profit         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY          Identifies cycling as a high‐priority transportation mode within the city.  Identifies 12 action items to improve cycling in Vancouver  Create a balanced transportation system that includes a network of bike lanes.   Identifies the role of active transportation in meeting climate change targets.     Use  TDM  to  reduce  congestion  and  decrease  commuting  costs  by  encouraging  drivers  to  choose alternatives to travelling in private automobiles   Transportation  infrastructure  investments  designed  to  provide  all  citizens  with  safe  convenient  and  affordable  access  to  most  daily  needs,  including  employment,  education,  shopping, personal services and recreation.    Non‐motorized  modes  (walking  and  cycling)  are  important  in  their  own  right  and  provide  access to public transit. Non‐motorized improvements can leverage shifts to transit.    Cycling is one of the most practical ways to increase community health and fitness.            Page|8   Theme #1: Connect Transportation to Land Use   The  efficient  provision  of  public  transportation  is  only  possible  by  adopting  land  use  policies  which  enhance  transit’s  attractiveness  as  an  alternative  to  the  automobile.  Communities  designed  on  the  principles  of  SmartGrowth  or  Transit  Oriented  Design  (TOD)  have  high  street  connectivity and a mixture of land uses and are more often associated with increased walking, transit, and biking (Frank, 2007)13. The proximity  of diverse land uses, including; residential, commercial, industrial, institutional and recreational, allow people to access many of their daily needs  by  walking  or  cycling,  thereby  reducing  the  need  to  invest  in  costly  road  and  transit  infrastructure.  When  longer  distance  travel  is  necessary,  compact  communities  make  public  transportation  a  viable  option  by  increasing  demand  and  reducing  the  costs  of  transit  provision.  When  potential  riders  are  concentrated  within  smaller  geographic  areas,  transit  service  can  be  more  frequent,  convenient  and  comfortable.  When  transit exhibits these characteristics, ridership increases and economies of scale allow reinvestment to ensure continued provision of effective  and attractive public transportation.    Figure 3.1.1: Transportation / Land Use Interaction (Wegener,1999)14.        Theme # 2: Reduce Reliance on Private Automobiles  Driven by mounting concerns about the environmental, health and social consequences of automobile use, such as reliance on fossil fuels linked  to  declining  global  reserves  and  vehicle  emissions  which  contribute  to  lower  air  quality  and  climate  change,  contemporary  policy  in  Metro  Vancouver is focused on discouraging reliance on the private automobile for local and regional mobility.         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|9   The automobile requires significant raw material and energy inputs and generates solid, liquid and gaseous waste that in many cases is toxic and  difficult to reuse or recycle. For some individuals, cars are economically unfeasible to own, operate and or maintain. For communities, the roads  and parking areas required by motor vehicles are costly to build and maintain, and consume valuable land that might otherwise be available for  houses, shops or parks.    Theme # 3: Support the New Transportation Hierarchy   The policy documents under review for this study suggest either implicitly or explicitly, a hierarchy to guide transportation planning, funding and  infrastructure. The hierarchy prioritizes inexpensive and environmentally benign modes of transport. The hierarchy’s role in policy is significant  not only for establishing  priority modes, but also for guiding public decisions. Any review of transportation policy suggests that investment is  required to support the hierarchy. This does not require more money to be spent on bike paths than buses, but it does imply that support for  modes lower on the hierarchy should not come at the expense of the higher priorities.             UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|10   3.2  UBC Policy Review   UBC has produced several important transportation and sustainability policy documents and reports which impact the feasibility and likelyhood  of developing a large scale public bicycle system on‐campus. The following list is a chronological outline of policies and reports that support the  implementation of a PBS.   Table 3.2.1: UBC Transportation and Sustainability Policies / Reports   Plan, Strategy or Study  1992 Campus Plan  1997 Official Community Plan  & MOU   Strategic Transportation Plan  1999, Updated 2005   2007 Access and Movement  Study   Inspirations and Aspirations:  the Sustainability Strategy,  2007  Trek 2010   PBS Alignment  with Policy Goals   Policy Goal   An enhanced on‐campus transit system should be developed to overcome the extreme walking  distances from parking facilities and between buildings, and to improve user safety and  comfort at night   Committed to consider measures to improve the bicycle network on‐campus, provide  additional bicycle parking, and implement a “public bike” program.   A commitment to reduce the number of commuter parking stalls on‐campus  Based on four primary goals 1. Provide a wide range of transportation choices for everyone at UBC.  2. Shift travel from automobiles to transit and other modes of transportation.  3. Improve safety for all modes of transportation, particularly for vulnerable road users —  pedestrians and cyclists.  4. Mitigate the impacts of heavy truck traffic   Walking distance on‐campus cited as an issue by students, faculty, staff and others.    Desire to bring transit further into campus in order to reduce walking distances. However,  TransLink have stated that they do not support extending bus routes into the campus; would  result in substantial increases in operating costs   Community shuttle service has been cited as an issue; prefer that the service operated more  frequently so that it could be used for trips on‐campus.    Improve human health and safety.   Make UBC a model sustainable community   Reduce pollution.   Develop improved and innovative ways for the external community to gain access to UBC ’s  many academic, cultural, and recreational offerings   Model UBC as a responsible, engaged, and sustainable community, dedicated to the principles  of inclusivity and global citizenship.    High   High   High       High  High  Medium  Low    High   High   Medium   Medium   High   Low   High   High            UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|11   UBC policy typically reiterates the themes found in the external policy review. However, the language, tone and scope of the UBC policies tends   be stronger and broader, reflecting the University’s deep commitment to sustainable development and environmental stewardship. The most  critical  policies  identified  in  the  review  are  related  to  improving  transportation  options  for  all  and  improving  on‐campus  mobility  as  well  as  specific statements in the 1997 Campus Plan which indicate the opportunity to develop a bike sharing system at UBC. Developing a PBS will help  UBC to advance many of its policy goals in both the transportation and sustainability divisions. The system will provide environmental, social and  economic  benefits  to  the  UBC  and  its  residential  communities.  For  greater  detail  on  the  benefits  that  will  accrue  please  see  Section  6  of  this  report.              UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|12   Section 4.0: What are Public Bicycles?  The following section introduces the concept of public bicycles and outlines the current state of technology worldwide, focusing on the largest  and most successful systems worldwide.   4.1  An Introduction to Public Bicycles    Bike sharing systems, also known as city bikes, free bikes or public bicycle systems (PBS) are innovative urban schemes that provide a network of  public‐use bicycles distributed from self‐service docking stations located within the public realm (Figure 4.1.1). Bicycles can be picked up at any  self serve station and returned to any other bike station, which makes PBS ideal for Point A to Point B transportation. A UBC student living in  Totem Park could, for example, ride a public bike to the bus loop, leave the bicycle there and hop on the express bus into Vancouver without  worrying about bicycle theft. Alternatively a UBC professor living in Kitsilano could arrive at UBC and ride a bicycle for the last kilometer of his or  her trip, instead of walking across campus. In this way, public bicycle systems enhance the existing forms of urban transportation and serve as a  form of personal public transit, perfect for daily mobility needs. Typically, bike share programs are defined by their low cost, high concentration  of stations and 24 hour operations (NYC, 2009)15.      Figure 4.1.1: BIXI PBS Station, Bike and Locking Mechanism in Montreal           UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|13   After paying the initial subscription fee (annually, monthly, weekly or daily), users typically have low‐cost or free access to the bicycles for the  first half hour, via the swipe of a smart card or credit card. These systems differ from traditional, mostly leisure‐oriented bicycle rental services  because they provide fast and easy, self‐serve access to a large volume of bicycles, available within a short walking distance of any given point  within the program area. Docking stations are typically located every 300 m – 600 m, providing a high degree of mobility utility to subscribers  while  simultaneously  creating  a  new  tourist  attraction  and  way‐finding  system  for  visitors.  The  majority  of  PBS  accommodate  one‐way  trips,  making them well suited for multi‐modal trip chaining and spontaneous trips. The bicycles are designed to suit a wide range of users, providing a  fast, convenient and flexible option to public transit, walking or driving, that is particularly useful in congested urban areas or places with limitied  mode choices. As a result of their high utility, the systems identified in Table 4.1.1 have dramatically exceeded initial ridership projections. Some,  such as Vélib’ in Paris, have reduced total car trips by up to 5%, and more than doubled the cycling mode share within a year of implementation  (TransLink, 2008)16.   The early examples of bicycle sharing, such as Amsterdam’s “White Bikes” or  UBC’s own “Purple and  Yellow” bikes  were somewhat idealistic  experiments in which large numbers of bicycles were left haphazardly around city centers or university campuses for people to use as needed.  Not surprisingly these programs amounted to bike giveaways, with the bicycles disappearing almost immediately (DeMaio and Gifford, 2004)17.  UBC’s  own  “Purple  and  Yellow”  program  utilizes  volunteer  labour  and  donated  bicycles  to  provide  an  ever‐fluctuating  number  of  bicycles  to  program  volunteers.  Unfortunatley,  the  system  uses  a  standardized  keyed  master  lock,  and  has  no  permanent  stations.  These  lack  of  user  accountability has led to theft debilitating the program (TransLink, 2008)18.   Table 4.1.1: Mainstream Public Bicycle Systems   City  Operator  Opening Date  Current Fleet  Size  Current # of  Stations  Business Model  Technology  Funding   Paris, France*   Lyon, France*   Barcelona, Spain*   JC Decaux   JC Decaux   Clear Channel Adshel   15‐Jul‐07   20‐May‐05   27‐Mar‐07   23,900   4000   6,000   1,751   340   400   For Profit  Smart Card  Subscriptions and Outdoor  Advertising   For Profit  Smart Card  Subscriptions and Outdoor  Advertising   Local Government  Smart Card  Subscriptions and  Parking Revenue   Washington DC   Montreal, Canada   Clear Channel Adshel  Public Bicycle System  Co.  12‐May‐09   13‐Aug‐08 120  3,000**   10  200***   For Profit Smart Card Subscriptions and Outdoor  Advertising    Non‐Profit  Smart Card  Subscriptions and  Sponsorship   * Compiled with data obtained from the OBIS (The Opitimising of Bike Sharing in European Cities Project) ** Expanding to 5000 in summer 2009, *** Expanding to 300 in summer 2009         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|14   Although many small‐scale bicycle rental systems are currently in operation in Vancouver, these are intended to serve limited niche markets for  tourists  or  corporate  and  university  campuses.  The  latest  generation  of  bike  sharing  systems  (see  Table  4.1.1)  function  as  a  new  mode  of  individual public transportation and have become an integrated and integral component of the wider public transportation network. For a full  review of the existing PBS worldwide, please refer to the following reports available online; Bike Share: Opportunities in New York City; Public  Use Bike Share Feasibility Study for King County Washington or the TransLink Public Bike System Feasibility Study. For the latest information on  the location of existing and proposed bicycle sharing systems worldwide, see the The Bike‐Sharing Blog’s world map which keeps an update to  date log of the rapidly expanding number of systems worldwide.    4.2  The Goals of Bike Sharing   One  of  the  principle  goals  of  bike  sharing  is  to  better  integrate  transit  facilities  within  an  urban  network  to  achieve  a  higher  overall  level  of  mobility and efficiency. This applies not only to users of PBS, but to transit riders and car drivers who benefit from increased capacity on the  road network and in transit vehicles. While improved mobility may be the number one goal and benefit of PBS, the majority of cities around the  world have a range of secondary goals they believe can be advanced by implementation of PBS.   The secondary goals of many cities include, but are not limited to; fighting climate change, improving air quality, reducing reliance on the private  automobile, improving public health, creating jobs, stimulating economic activity, increasing tourism and creating opportunities for impromptu  social  interaction.  Furthermore,  it  is  clear  that  PBS  is  viewed  by  many  politicians  and  local  councils  as  an  opportunity  to  demonstrate  their  commitment to sustainability and “going green.” The relatively low cost of PBS, compared to other interventions which can meaningfully impact  a  wide  range  of  public  policies,  makes  the  concept  extremely  popular.  In  the  summer  of  2009  alone,  Boston,  London,  Mexico  City  and  Melbourne all announced plans to implement bike sharing systems by 2010 (MetroBike LLC, 2009)19. In Canada, Montreal’s BIXI system become  such  “an  extraordinary  success,”  according  to  André  Lavallée,  (Vice‐Chairperson  of  Montreal’s  Transportation  and  Planning  system),  that  the  program will expand ahead of time; increasing from 3000 bicycles and 200 stations to 5000 bicycles and 300 stations.   On the periphery of all of these goals, is the hope that PBS will act as a catalyst to increasing the acceptance of cycling as a legitimate mode of  urban transportation, eventually leading to significant increases in levels of cycling on both PBS as well as privately owned bicycles. Many of the  transportation planners and PBS advocates view bike sharing in the same light as recycling, canvas grocery bags and compact fluorescent light  bulbs: a tool capable of creating a social phenomenon that will forever change the face of modern urban living. As Gérard Collomb, the President  of  Greater  Lyon  said,  “there  are  two  types  of  mayors,  those  who  have  bike  sharing  and  those  who  want  bike  sharing”  (DeMaio,2008)20.  This  certainly  seems  to  be  the  case  ‐  as  each  new  system  creates  more  interest  in  the  idea.  With  hundreds  of  bike  sharing  systems  now  in  use  worldwide and more being planned and announced daily, PBS just might be the transportation breakthrough cities have been craving.           UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|15   4.3  The History of Public Bicycles    There have been four generations of public use bicycles, beginning with their original implementation in 1964, in Amsterdam. The bicycles in the  original experiment were known as the Witte Fiesten or white bikes and were a haphazard supply of several thousand donated bikes, painted  white for easy identification within the city (DeMaio, 2008)21. The bikes were left in the streets of Amsterdam for people to use on an honour‐ system basis. The bicycles had no locking mechanism and users of the system had no way of knowing where the bikes would be located at any  given time.   The white bike program was launched by Luud Schimmelpennink and his radical youth, political group; the Provos (Angell, 1998)22. The Provo’s  discussed the possibility of removing all of the motorized vehicles from Amsterdam’s city center and focused their work on provoking violent  responses from government using non‐violent bait. Their social experiment quickly deteriorated and many of the bicycles were stolen or found  floating in the city’s canals. The program quickly collapsed, but the lessons that were learned from this social experiment are still valuable for  organizations looking to implement bike sharing today.   Nearly  30  years  later,  the  second  generation  of  public  bikes  was  launched  in  Copenhagen,  Denmark  in  1996.  The  critical  difference  between  Amsterdam’s white bikes and the Copenhagen system is that the bikes were specially manufactured for the program and had to be picked up  and returned at specific locations across the city. The Bycyklen bikes are simple, durable, and conspicuous, and users of the system have the  added benefit of knowing where to find the bicycles on a regular basis. In an additional effort to reduce theft, the bicycles were equipped with  an integrated coin operated locking system, similar to those used on grocery shopping carts. Although theft is still an issue, the Bycklen are still  on the streets of Copenhagen with a total of 2000 bicycles at 110 locations in the city’s core (Bycyklen, 2009)23.   The problem of theft and the lack of user accountability gave rise to the third generation of public bicycles; commonly known as ‘smart bikes’.  The first large scale deployment of a smart bike system was in Lyon France, in 2005. The Velo'v was responsible for introducing new technologies  to  bike  sharing  including;  magnetic  swipe  cards,  computerized  terminals  and  electronic  locks,  all  of  which  were  intended  to  introduce  accountability on behalf of the user. These emerging technologies are now common to all large scale PBS’s and they allow program managers to  know  the  identity  of  the  customer  and  follow  up  if  the  bicycle  is  not  returned.  This  increased  level  of  security  is  intended  to  reduce  theft  to  manageable levels, although some systems still suffer high levels of theft and vandalism, due to poorly engineered locking mechanisms.  Current  PBS’s  generally  use  two  kinds  of  locking  systems;  in  the  first  type,  you  can  get  a  bicycle  from  an  automated  rack  by  using  a  special  magnetic  card.  Companies  such  as  Clear  Channel,  JC  Decaux  and  the  Public  Bicycle  Co.  use  this  technology;  with  examples  in  Lyon,  Paris  and  most recently Montreal. In the other type of system, bikes are checked out using an automated locking device, accessed from the customer’s  mobile phone. The German national rail company, Deutsche Bahn developed this Call‐A‐Bike system, with examples found in Berlin, London, and  the City of Chalon‐Sur‐Saone in Southern France.        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|16   Figure 4.2.1: The Generations of Bike Sharing     The  fourth  generation  of  public  bicycles  are  currently  emerging  into  the  marketplace.  Thanks  to  an  increased  awareness  of  the  benefits  of  cycling and the need to develop and utilize more sustainable transportation options, bike sharing is growing more rapidly than ever. The new  breed  of  bicycles  are  more  secure,  cheaper  to  install  and  operated  not  by  advertising  companies,  but  non‐profit  or  quasi‐government  enterprises. Currently, there exists only one example of a fourth generation bicycle sharing system: “BIXI” (a combination of the words bicycle  and taxi), located in Montreal Canada and has only been operational since May 12, 2009.    BIXI  has  raised  the  bar  on  earlier  generations  by  utilizing  the  latest  technologies  to  improve  on  their  flaws;  wireless  data  transmission,  solar  powered and modular stations, RFID tags and a web 2.0 interface, round out a PBS that has been highly successful since its launch. Users of BIXI  have the ability to track their carbon offsets, the amount of gasoline they have saved and their total kilometers travelled; all in an attempt to  create ownership over the system, in order to reduce theft and vandalism.         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|17   4.4  Other Characteristics of Public Bicycle Systems   Public  use  bicycles  differ  from  typical  bicycles  in  their  heavier  construction  for  durability,  and  use  of  parts  calibrated  not  to  work  on  other  bicycles to enhance theft reduction. They also use an enclosed chain or shaft drive system, to prevent users’ clothes from being caught in the  gears. Public use bicycle programs are not a regular bike rental service, they are geared for more short, utiliatarian trips than recreational rides.  Providing bicycles is meant to support larger transportation goals, including improving mobility and access, just like any other public transport  system or service. Also, their primary purpose is not to generate profit through user fees, “as bike sharing programs are designed to enhance  existing transit options, membership rates and use fees are kept low” (NYC, 2009)24.                         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|18   Section 5.0: Is PBS Right for UBC ?  This section summarizes the success factors for the planning and implementation of a public bicycle system and identifies why UBC is an ideal  location for implementation of such a system.    5.1  Success factors for Public Bicycles   Will UBC be a good place to create a public bicycle system? Success factors relate to the physical attributes of the proposed location and include  its topography, climate, land use and built form, as well the provision of bike infrastructure. Additional success factors are related to the cultural  attributes of the location; its acceptance of cycling as an alternative to the car, the transportation patterns of the target user population, quality  of public transit service and institutional or governmental commitment to sustainability.   These  initial  success  factors  define  whether  a  PBS  could  work  in  a  specific  place.  After  implementation,  another  set  of  success  factors  will  determine whether the PBS will succeed in meeting its goals and achieving desired ridership levels. Operational success factors relate to network  configuration and density, maintenance levels, redistribution and the incidence of theft and vandalism. The TransLink Public Bicycle Feasibility  Study, the World City Bike Strategies Implementation Guide, as well as the European Commission’s report on public bicycles and the King County  Public  Use  Bike  Share  Feasibility  Study,  identify  quantitative  and  qualitative  factors  critical  to  the  success  of  a  PBS  from  the  planning  and  operational stages. Table 5.1.1 is an amalgamation of the planning success factors from these sources, including UBC’s rating on these factors.    Table 5.1.1: PBS Planning Success Factors   Factor    Cycling Infrastructure      Cycling Culture      Land Use and Transportation    Weather and Topography     Quality of Public Transit Service    Description KM’s of safe cycling access  Demand for cycle parking  Plans to extend cycling infrastructure  Road condition / maintenance  Perception of mode / willingness to utilize  Commitment to sustainable transportation  Vandalism and theft levels  Proximity and mixture of uses  High demand for one way  trips  Amount of Precipitation  Area (km’s) easily cyclable,  # of cyclable months/year  Capacity to motivate population to forgo auto trips Ridership and mode split         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY     Importance  UBC Scorecard  High   High   Medium   High   High   High   Medium   Medium   Medium   High            Page|19   Although  many  of  the  factors  in  Table  5.1.1  are  qualitative,  it  is  important  to  keep  in  mind  that  important  characteristics  often  do  not  lend  themselves  to  quantitative  comparison.  Rather  than  attempting  to  limit  the  evaluation  to  numeric  data,  or  ignore  or  conceal  the  subjective  aspects,  a  preferable  approach  “does  not  eliminate  subjectivity,  but  rather  makes  it  explicit,  spelling  out  the  basis  of  the  judgment  and  facilitating discussion of that assessment” (Smith and Theberge, 1987)25. Efforts to force these intangible qualities into a numeric scale can be  counterproductive as “certain intangibles lose significance when attempts are made to quantify them” (Fausold and Liliholm, 1996)26. For this  reason, it is equally important to consider the relevance of factors such as the Alma Mater Society, Student Union Building Survey results which  identify a PBS as the number one choice for enriching student life.  As indicated in Table 5.1.1, UBC is an excellent choice for a PBS when examined across the critical success factors. Further adding to the likely  success is the socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the University community. UBC is a place full of youth, where new ideas are born,  incubated and exported to the external world. It is a place where creativity thrives and experimentation is a part of every‐day life. It is a place  where youth congregate to expand their horizons, to dream and consider the possibilities of a future different from today.             UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|20   These  characteristics  point  to  bike  sharing  being  successful  at  UBC.  Further,  the  University’s  commitment  to  being  a  “green”  institute;  a  place  where  sustainability  is  not  only  preached,  but  practiced, makes bike sharing a practical solution to addressing on‐campus mobility concerns while  also  advancing  the  school’s  sustainability  agenda.  Finally,  the  weather,  topography  and  healthy  lifestyle  associated  with  Vancouver  and  the  West  coast  of  Canada,  further  point  to  UBC  being  a  successful location for PBS.    5.2  Who Uses Bike Sharing   Cyclists and bike share users tend to share a similar demographic profile, in terms of gender and  age (Benson et al., 2009)27. CityRyde;  a consulting firm, specializing in public bicycle systems, has   identified the defining characteristics of typical PBS users to be: (CityRyde, 2009)28       18 – 34 years of age  High level of education  Require a high level of mobility  Cognizant of environmental and social issues    These  characteristics  of  the  typical  bike  sharing  user,  bode  well  for  the  success  of  PBS  at  UBC.  There  is  also  some  indication  that  bike  share  users  may  encompass  a  more  diverse  group  than  identified  by  CityRyde.  In  Paris,  a  large  portion  of  the  users  (70%+)  said  they  had  never  ridden  a  bicycle  in  Paris  before  the  introduction  of  Vélib’  (CityRyde,  2009)29.  Unfortunately,  there  is  no  strong evidence from North American examples to suggest that bike share programs will have an  appeal beyond those who are already regular cyclists.    5.3  UBC’s Culture of Sustainability   The  university  has  made  tremendous  progress  in  advancing  the  sustainability  goals  of  key  policy  documents, outlined in Section 3.2 of this report. Aggressive actions intended to reduce waste,  conserve  energy  and  curb  automobile  trips,  have  made  UBC  a  recognized  world  leader  in  sustainability.  However,  opportunities  to  continue  our  progress  exist  and  the  institution  must  continue to develop new programs, policies and plans that work towards the vision of Trek 2010  and the goals of the Sustainability Strategy outlined in Table 3.2.1.        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|21   The UBC community extends well beyond the boundaries of the campus, drawing students, staff and faculty from the Metro region, while the  institutes research work and sustainable practices connect us to a global network. The benefits created by a PBS at UBC (see Section 6) will also  transcend  campus  boundaries,  effecting  the  Metro  region,  Canada  and  the  entire  world.  As  a  leader,  we  have  the  opportunity  and  the  responsibility to set an example of the highest caliber, one that can be drawn on by our partners who rely upon us to lead by example. By taking  action now, UBC can be the first university in Canada to implement a large scale bike sharing system, continuing the tradition of leadership in  sustainability.   As  seen  in  Table  5.3.1,  the  results  of  the  AMS  SUB  Renewal  survey  indicate  that  the  students  of  UBC  support  the  concept  of  bicycle  sharing.  1,360  respondents  chose  a  comprehensive  bicycle  sharing  system  as  the  number  one  option  for  enriching  student  life  on‐campus.  The  opportunity for bicycle sharing has been recognized since the 1997 Campus Plan and has been experimented with via the Bike Co‐op’s Purple  and Yellow program, although it has failed to be implemented on the correct scale and with the right technologies. The recent advances in the  design and operation of PBS have addressed early failures, making PBS a viable mode of transportation. For UBC and the TREK Program Centre,  who are focused on reducing automobile trips and supporting sustainable transportation, the development of a campus wide PBS presents  a  rare opportunity to showcase UBC’s commitment to sustainability, while simultaneously addressing regional and institutional policy goals.   Table 5.3.1: AMS SUB Renewal Survey Results       These 4 Businesses are Most Important in Terms of 'Enriching Student Life'  1st Choice: 2nd Choice: 3rd Choice:  4th Choice:  N ‐ Grocery store (possibly ethical/sustainable focus)   22.6% (281)   19.9% (243)   14.7% (174)   9.5% (110)   N ‐ Comprehensive bicycle sharing system   35.0% (434)   12.4% (151)   8.9% (105)   7.2% (84)   N ‐ Used book store (general, NOT UBC textbooks)   15.7% (195)   17.9% (219)   11.3% (134)   7.7% (90)   C – Copyright (photocopy & printing)   5.4% (67)   6.5% (79)   8.9% (106)   10.4% (121)   C ‐ Post office   4.0% (50)   6.7% (82)   8.9% (105)   11.3% (131)   N ‐ Thrift store (used clothing, maybe other used goods)   2.5% (31)   8.3% (101)   10.9% (129)   8.5% (99)   N ‐ Hostel (see Q.4)   3.9% (49)   7.2% (88)   6.9% (82)   8.8% (102)   N ‐ Bank (possibly ethical, e.g. Vancity)   2.7% (34)   7.0% (86)   7.6% (90)   7.7% (90)   C ‐ Travel cuts (travel consultation & booking)   2.5% (31)   4.5% (55)   6.7% (80)   10.2% (118)   C – Computer patch (computer repair)   1.9% (23)   3.6% (44)   6.0% (71)   5.9% (69)   C – Lucky 101 (Convenience Store)   1.6% (20)   2.0% (24)   3.1% (37)   5.4% (63)   C – Outpost (stationary)   1.3% (16)   2.3% (28)   3.5% (42)   3.5% (41)   C – On the Fringe (Hair salon)   0.8% (10)   1.7% (21)   2.6% (31)   3.8% (44)         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|22   The popularity of public bicycles continues to grow, with over 125 cities worldwide now taking advantage of the high‐tech, pollution free and  affordable  solution  to  urban  congestion  and  mobility  (DeMaio,  2009)30.  At  the  same  time,  cycling  and  its  associated  culture  is  becoming  entrenched  in  the  daily  lives  of  Vancouverites.  The  bicycle  is  now  viewed  among  many  as  a  legitimate  mode  of  transportation  and  a  viable  alternative to the automobile.   The evidence of cycling’s renaissance in Vancouver is everywhere. In 2009, the Burrad Street Bridge Lane Reallocation Trial was launched (City of  Vancouver,  2009)31,  The  Museum  of  Vancouver  celebrated  Vancouver  and  the  Bicycle  Revolution  via  “Velo‐City  (MOV,2009)32,”  and  a  24km  multi‐use  path;  The  Central  Valley  Greenway,  opened  to  cyclists,  pedestrians  and  other  active  transportation  users  (TransLink,2009)33.  In  addition, the City of Vancouver’s Greenest City Team identified bike sharing as a quick start project capable of being implemented before the  2010 Olympics (City of Vancouver, 2009)34. With Vancouver and the world embracing cycling culture and public bicycles, the time for UBC to take  action is now.              UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|23   Section 6.0: The Benefits of a Public Bicycle System    This following section will outline the expected benefits of a PBS and indicate who will likely receive them. The typical benefits of PBS fall into  several categories, including; transportation, health, the environment, social and economic and will fall upon individual users, UBC, TransLink as  well as society at large.   6.1  PBS Benefits Summary   Public Bicycle Systems provide many benefits. They offer convenient mobility for many types of urban trips, provide healthy exercise, and by  reducing automobile travel, they can help reduce traffic congestion, road and parking facility costs, consumer costs, energy consumption and  pollution emissions (Litman, 2008)35. The primary or direct benefits of a public bicycle system will accrue to the individual users of the system.  Secondary benefits of a PBS are less tangible, more challenging to measure and will likely accrue on a macro scale to the University, TransLink  and people living in the region. Table 6.1.1 summarizes the expected benefits generated by a PBS and who will likely be the beneficiary.    Table 6.1.1: Benefits of a PBS   Students, Faculty, Staff   UBC   TransLink   Society      Increased mobility  choices     Improves campus livability     Effective first and last  kilometer       Cost effective  transportation  Reduced on‐campus  travel times  Increased health benefits     Positive public image          Supports Green 2010  Winter Olympics  Supports the transportation  hierarchy (pedestrian and  transit modes)  Increases local retail  utilization  In line with transportation /  sustainability policies  Increases private bicycle  use, makes cycling safer.     Promotes multi‐modal  trips  Potential to increase  transit ridership  Extends the reach of  transit network   Improved public health as  increased proportion meeting  recommended physical activity  levels  Creates green collar jobs     Green house gas savings     200g less CO2 per km travelled   Improves transit  accessibility  Cost effective     Improves transit  accessibility     Zero emission transportation  mode.  UBC graduates will export  learned behaviors to society.  Increases social interaction         Increased access to UBC  services.  Improved access to  transit  On‐campus job creation                       UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|24   6.2  Transportation Benefits    On‐campus Mobility  As noted in Section 3, Figure 3.1.1, the design of a built environment has a direct impact on travel behavior (Wegener,1999)36. This relationship  is highly evident at UBC, where the original campus plan developed from 1912 to 1914, still has a major impact on the way students, staff and  faculty move around the campus. After the creation of 18 successive campus and neighbourhood plans, UBC still bears the marks of the original  plans, including; the historic road network, wide boulevards and segregated land uses.   The effect of historic planning decisions, combined with the most recent plans for the 402 hectare campus, that promote public transit usage  and  discourage  private  automobile  trips,  has  produced  a  campus  defined  by  its  vastness.  As  a  result  of  land  use  and  its  transportation  relationship, walking has become not only the dominant way to move around UBC, but in many ways the only option. The pedestrianized core of  the  campus;  an  area  entirely  restricted  to  automobiles  and  not  serviced  by  the  TransLink  Community  Shuttles,  further  reduces  on‐campus  transportation options. Students wishing to overcome the lengthy walking  times, may choose to bring a bicycle  to campus.  Sadly, the fear of  theft and the lack of bicycle rack capacity on buses, during peak travel times make this option less feasible. A portion of the UBC community  does take advantage of the bicycle racks on buses; however these riders represent a small portion of the total demand for bicycles on‐campus,  as all buses arriving to UBC can only accommodate two bicycles at a time.   Although, walking brings health benefits to the UBC community, it should not be at the expense of mobility options and reduced utilization of  campus services. Students, staff, faculty and especially visitors to UBC, may choose not to take full advantage of the services offered on‐campus.  Walking  across  campus  to  reach  the  food  services,  tourist  attractions,  or  other  amenities  can  be  extremely  time  consuming,  making  the  community and its visitors less likely to utilize them. With improved on‐campus mobility, food services, tourist destinations and other service  providers would benefit from increased usage, resulting in greater economic return. A side benefit consistent with UBC’s mission could be cross‐ disciplinary interaction resulting from increased social interaction.   On‐campus mobility challenges could be addressed through a large‐scale, self serve PBS. Such a system would significantly improve on‐campus  mobility and provide visitors and residents alike with greater transportation options. A PBS can dramatically reduce travel times on‐campus, as  the average cycling speed is approximately 3 times faster than walking (Advani and Tiwari, 2006)37. As Figure 6.1.1 indicates, a trip leaving the  University Services Building on foot would cover 350 meters in 3 minutes, while a trip leaving on bicycle could cover 948 meters. Reducing travel  times creates greater access to on‐campus services, which in turn generates greater demand for the services at UBC.          UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|25   Figure 6.1.1: Time and Distance for Walking and Cycling        *based on walk speed of 7km/hr and bike speed of 19.31 km/hr   Trip Chaining: the first and last Kilometer  Most transit trips begin and end with walking. A typical journey on public transit begins walking out of the home to the closest transit stop. After  boarding and riding to a stop, the trip typically ends with a walk to a final destination. A public bicycle system can reduce overall trip times on  public transit by replacing walking portions of a trip with cycling. In this way, a PBS can serve as the first and last kilometer of a trip. In Paris,        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|26   Vélib’ is used to supplement and enhance the existing public transit network; 28% of subscribers using the service to travel from home to a bus  stations,  another  28%  use  the  system  to  travel  from  a  subway  station  to  work  or  school,  with  the  remaining  23%  using  the  system  for  transferring between buses and subway stations (Velib, 2009)38.   At UBC, a PBS could enhance the attractiveness of public transportation by improving access to the service and reducing travel time to reach  transit stations. Permanent residents, as well as students, rely heavily on the bus routes that serve UBC to gain access to goods and services not  available on‐campus. By providing campus residents with improved access to transit services, a PBS can help reduce the need for vehicles on‐ campus and lead to the development of a car free culture at UBC.   Figure 6.1.2: PBS as the First and Lask Kilometer   For those living in any of UBC’s student residences or residential communities, a PBS would provide exceptional value by providing a fast, reliable  and healthy option for reaching public transit. The reduction in travel time to the bus loops, will effectively improve access to all of Vancouver  and  the  entire  Metro  Vancouver  region.  Combined  with  car  sharing  and  other  transportation  demand  management  programs,  a  PBS  could  dramatically reduce the need for automobiles in the residential communities at UBC. Over time this enhanced network of public transportation  could result in fewer automobile trips, less carbon emissions and a reduced number of vehicles on‐campus. In Paris, Vélib’ users report that they  are now 46% less likely to use their car for daily mobility, with 18% using the bikes to make trips they otherwise would not have made (Velib,  2009)39.     For  transit  users  terminating  their  journey  at  UBC,  a  PBS  will  act  as  the  last  link  in  their  commute  trip.  Transit  riders  will  have  the  ability  to  transition from trolley or diesel bus, to self serve bicycle, travelling quickly to their final destination. The reduced travel times associated with         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|27   cycling will be attractive to students who must travel long distances from one classroom to another. The improved speed and access created by  a PBS will likely attract new ridership to public transit, further reducing car trips on‐campus.    Improved Way Finding On campus  Introducing  a  public  bicycle  system  presents  an  opportunity  for  UBC  to  improve  way  finding  on‐campus.  Public  bicycle  station  terminals  can  easily be equipped with a map to display not only the location of other bike stations in the system, but also the entire UBC campus, indicating  the location of key services and tourist attractions. Ideally, the density of PBS stations across the campus and their location in relation to transit  loops, residences and other major destinations, will ensure that at any location on‐campus, visitors will never be far from a map.   A map and way finding system adds value to a PBS, this would be especially true at UBC, where visitors and new students often find the size and  layout  of  the  campus  overwhelming  and  confusing.  Evidence  from  UBC  TREK  supports  this  argument,  as  it  is  a  daily  occurrence  to  have  conference delegates, tourists and potential students, visit the office to request directions and a map. The introduction of a PBS, would allow  UBC to enhance the tourist experience two‐fold: visitors will have the ability to choose a fast, fun and sustainable mode of transportation and  have the added benefit of not getting lost in the process.    Effect on Community Shuttles  A  PBS  can  offer  an  alternative  to  the  community  shuttle  service  at  UBC.  By  providing  a  new  option  for  people  travelling  across  campus,  the  community shuttle will be free to better serve its target demographic; people with mobility impairments, people carrying large or heavy objects,  and people walking at night. The UBC community shuttles are intended to provide transportation where typical transit is unsuitable or where  demand is not sufficient. However, the community shuttles fail to penetrate the core of the campus, an area that is devoid of transit service and  private  vehicles.  A  public  bicycle  system  will  allow  some  users  of  the  community  shuttles  to  reduce  their  travel  times  by  switching  to  an  alternative mode. The reduction in demand for the shuttle will mean improved access for those who must rely on it as walking and cycling are  not options for reaching their destination.    The Effect of Future Transit Investments   In the future, it is expected that UBC will be served by a form of rapid transit that can carry greater numbers of passengers than the existing bus  routes. The upgraded transit infrastructure, combined with continued efforts to reduce automobile trips, will result in a greater proportion of  the UBC community choosing public transit for their commute trip. The centralized location of transit facilities at UBC, combined with increased  ridership levels will compound on‐campus mobility issues. Investment in a PBS now will provide the time necessary for UBC to scale the system  up to meet future demand.         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|28   6.3  Health Benefits   The built environment can be considered an enabler or disabler of public health, as it has a  direct  effect  on  transportation  choices  (see  Figure  3.1.1),  which  in  turn  directly  affect  our  personal health and the health of society. Environments that promote walking, cycling and  other  active  modes  of  transportation  generate  positive  health  benefits  for  their  residents  and  society  at  large  (Dora,  1999)40.  This  is  because  when  walking  and  cycling  are  a  viable  alternative to driving, residents have a greater opportunity to engage in the 30 minutes of  moderate physical activity per day, recommended by the Center for Disease Control (Center  for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009).41 The health benefits of exercising for a half hour  per day, cannot be understated and include halving the risk of developing heart disease – an  act  equivalent  to  the  effect  of  not  smoking.  Even  when  spread  over  two  or  three  shorter  episodes,  this  amount  of  physical  activity  can  also  reduce  the  risk  of  developing  diabetes,  reduce blood pressure, and improve functional capacity (Oja, Pekka et al., 1999). 42  Public  bicycles,  because  they  do  not  require  users  to  own,  store  or  maintain  a  personal  bicycle, tend to introduce new people to bicycling and make bicycling a part of peoples’ lives  in new ways. In its first year of operation, 96% of the subscribers to the Velov’s program in  Lyon,  France  had  never  cycled  in  the  city  before.  ClearChannel  Adshel,  the  provider  of  SmartBike  in  Washington  DC,  as  well  as  Bicing  in  Barcelona,  found  that  45%  of  their  membership  used  a  bike  share  more  than  five  times  per  week  (NYC,  2009)43.  Introducing  large  new  numbers  of  the  population  to  cycling  and  having  them  sustain  these  physical  activities over extending periods of time, will help to achieve the health impacts previously  mentioned.  Although  UBC’s  built  environment  is  semi‐permanent,  it  is  possible  to  overcome  the  physical  barriers  to  increased  cycling  we  face,  via  investments  in  cycling  infrastructure.  These  investments  include,  but  are  not  limited  to;  secure  bicycle  storage  facilities,  bike  racks,  on  street  bicycle lanes, as well as, end of trip facilities including washbasins and showering facilities. These types of investments enhance a public bicycle  system  and  combined  with  transportation  demand  management  measures  intended  to  reduce  reliance  on  automobiles,  will  foster  a  campus  transportation system centered on cycling and other active modes.   Investment in public bicycles will further generate positive health benefits, as they tend to increase the use of both private and public bicycles.  Experience in North America and Europe has demonstrated that the introduction of a PBS can have a dramatic and sustained impact on bicycle        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|29   mode share. In Early 2001, cycling represented about 1% of 10.6 million trips made daily in Paris. Following the introduction of Vélib’, cycling  mode share increased 118% ‐ from 1.6 to 3.6% in the span of a few months. Similar results were seen in Barcelona, where mode share rose from  1% to 2% in the first four months of operation (TransLink, 2008).44 Experience from Lyon suggests that a significant increase in private cycling  trips (up to 50%) is likely to occur as the public bicycle system acts a door opener to increase the acceptance of cycling an urban transport mode.   Unfortunately, a PBS at UBC is unlikely to have a dramatic impact on the health of students, faculty or staff, as the majority of trips on‐campus  are  already  made  by  foot.  However,  residents  living  in  UBC’s  new  communities  could  choose  to  replace  car  trips  to  the  village  and  future  commercial  destinations  with  bicycle  trips,  leading  to  greater  amounts  of  daily  physical  activity.  The  greatest  health  impact  for  the  UBC  community will likely accrue to those who shift their commute trip from private automobiles to a combination of public transit and PBS.   Although immediate health effects may not ensue, the exposure to alternative modes of transportation will generate long term health impacts,  as the substantial health‐enhancing potential of physical activity can be best realized on a population when people incorporate physical activity  into their daily routines (Oja, 1998)45. By providing active transportation options on‐campus, UBC can help foster healthy living habits that will  transcend the temporal limits of the typical university experience, leading to long term improved public health.    6.4  Environmental Benefits    An  on‐campus  PBS  will  advance  the  UBC  community  towards  achieving  the  goals  of  pollution  reduction  and  making UBC a model sustainable community, as outlined in  the  2007  Sustainability  Strategy.  Currently,  the  commute  patterns  to  and  from  UBC  represent  the  institutes  second  highest  source  of  carbon  dioxide  emissions,  falling  only  behind  the  burning  of  natural  gas  to  power  steam  operations. As the second largest commuter destination in  the  Metro  Vancouver  region,  UBC’s  contribution  to  regional  air  quality  and  climate  change  must  be  taken  seriously.            UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|30   Table 6.4.1: UBC’s 2006 Emissions as Reported by the Sustainability Office   Scope   Source   Scope 1     Scope 2 Scope 3  Natural Gas Oil Fleet Electricity Buildings Air Travel Commuting Waste Paper Fertilizer     Total Emissions (Tonnes CO2)   Rank   66,418 455 2,248 22,365 12,012 15,385 25,761 1,065 1,146 149  1  9  6  3  5  4  2  8  7  10      6.5  Social Benefits   The social benefits of a PBS are difficult to quantify, but this does not mean they do not exist. Bicycle sharing, by virtue of improving access to all  areas of the UBC campus, increases the likely hood of interaction between all members of the institute. My personal observation in Paris and  Montreal indicates that bicycle sharing creates a “buzz.” The bicycles become a topic of conversation in the street as people are curious about  where they came from and how to use them. People feel a sense of community about their new street furniture and this translates into social  interaction. While in Montreal exploring the BIXI system in the summer of 2009, I had conversations that would not have taken place if I was not  on a shared bike. I spoke to a garbage truck driver, towering over me in his truck, as well as curious passerby’s at the station terminals. These  conversations provide an opportunity to begin a dialogue around urban transportation, sustainability and health – a conversation that may not  take  place  otherwise.  Although  these  conversations  may  seem  inconsequential,  education  is  the  key  to  changing  behavior  and  therefore  the  social  value  of  PBS  must  not  be  underestimated.  At  UBC,  the  opportunity  to  promote  conversation  between  disparate  interests  is  extremely  valuable.  As  a  leading  research  institute,  UBC  must  foster  and  incubate  new  ideas  and  partnerships.  PBS  adds  to  UBC’s  ability  to  spawn  new  research ideas and this in turn brings economic value to the institute.    6.6  Economic Benefits   The amount of revenue and jobs generated by bike sharing programs is entirely dependent on the program size, its operating model and any  additional revenue streams including in the operations, such as advertising on bikes, kiosks or docking stations. In Paris, Vélib’ which has 20,600  bicycles, earned over €30 million in its first year of operations from membership fees alone (NYC, 2009)46. As the costs of the Vélib’ program are        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|31   covered through advertising revenue, this money goes directly to the city of Paris. Washington DC’s SmartBike program also directs all of the  membership  fees to the  city as revenue, in addition to 30% of advertising revenue, although the small size of the  program means that these  revenues are much lower than in other systems. Given UBC’s limited on‐campus advertising potential ‐ a product of the campus’s ad‐free nature  ‐  it  is  unlikely  that  a  PBS at  UBC  will  generate  large  surplus  revenue  streams.  However,  the  administration  fee  charged  to  access  the  system,  combined  with  the  sale  of  day  passes  and  revenue  from  trips  longer  than  30min,  will  likely  make  the  program  revenue  neutral,  in  terms  of  operational costs. The addition of advertising revenue to a potential UBC system, would have a dramatic effect on the revenue potential of the  program  and  would  result  in  the  generation  of  profit  that  could  be  used  to  fund  other  capital  projects  to  advance  university  sustainability  objectives.    6.7  Educational Benefits   The presence of a bicycle sharing system at UBC creates opportunities for research projects across a variety of fields. Computer science, urban  planning, transportation engineering, environmental studies and health students, among others, will benefit from the opportunity to utilize the  PBS  to  conduct  experiments  in  their  fields.  Planners  and  transportation  engineers  may  be  interested  in  how  this  intervention  effects  travel  patterns,  future  land  use  planning  and  social  interaction  on‐campus.  Students  in  health  fields  could  use  the  opportunity  to  investigate  the  amount of physical activity students get before and after the introduction of the program. Geographers and students of environmental science,  could use the opportunity to study the impact that PBS has on greenhouse gas emissions and how the system could be used to generate carbon  credits for a future trading system.   The ability of PBS to attract and retain talented individuals, combined with its ability to foster cross‐disciplinary dialogue, means that a PBS could  help the university work towards achieving some of the goals outlined in its Strategic Research Plan. The broad goals from the Strategic Research  Plan, that a PBS is most likely to affect include (UBC, 2009)47;    1. Creative innovative ideas and methodologies across disciplines – a PBS will help to foster greater cross disciplinary social interaction.   2. Improve quality of life for Canadian citizens – a PBS at UBC can act as a catalyst to show other western Canadian cities that cycling is a  viable form of urban transportation that can reduce carbon emissions, while improving air quality and public health.    3. Chart a course for society to lead and adapt to rapid technological and social changes – bike sharing is a new phenomena that utilizes  many recent technological breakthroughs, while also facilitating rapid social change.   4. Inform responsible ethical, legal, environmental and public policy – A PBS addresses many areas of public policy in a fiscally responsible  manner.  Policies  developed  at  UBC  are  often  exported  to  other  places  around  the  globe,  helping  to  inform  the  development  of  responsible public policy worldwide.          UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|32   Section 7: The Financials of a Public Bicycle System  This  following  section  will  outline  costs  associated  with  implementing  a  PBS  at  UBC  and  will  provide  examples  of  operating  models  currently  used  worldwide  to  finance  public  bicycle  systems.  The  section  will  outline  expected  membership  levels  and  will  conclude  with  a  financial  feasibility model of a proposed PBS at UBC.   7.1  The Information Void    Large  scale,  mainstream  public  bicycle  systems  are  a  new  phenomena.  The  oldest  of  the  three  largest  systems  in  the  world;  Vélib’,  only  celebrated  its  second  anniversary  in  the  summer  of  2009.  Consequently,  there  is  little  publicly  available  data  on  the  capital  costs,  operating  costs,  revenues  and  operating  statistics  for  such  systems.  JC  Decaux  and  Clear  Channel,  two  of  the  largest  suppliers  of  PBS  worldwide,  have  consistently declined to share information about capital and operating costs, as they are competing to win contracts worldwide for new systems.  Thankfully,  the  information  void  is  slowly  being  filled  by  researchers  collecting  new  information  and  refining  existing  data.  The  market  has  responded to the PBS boom and new vendors as well as consultants on PBS are emerging on what seems like a daily basis.   One  important  company  to  arise  in  the  last  year  is  the  Public  Bike  System  Co.,  a  non‐profit  organization  spun  off  from  Stationement  De  Montreal, the parking regulator for the City of Montreal who was mandated to design, build and operate a PBS one year ago. The Public Bike  System Co. is responsible for the launch of Canada’s first PBS and the world’s 3rd largest system – the award winning “BIXI”. Due to the quasi‐ governmental,  non‐profit  nature  of  the  company,  the  PBS  Co.  has  been  willing  to  share  critical  information  about  BIXI.  To  date  they  have  provided UBC with cost information, station planning information, as well as a tour of their facilities in Montreal.   In the past year, I have had the opportunity to interact and build relationships with several of the PBS technology providers and consultants,  including; BIXI, JC Decaux, TransDev, Veolia Transport, CityRyde, EcoPlan International and UBC’s own Bike Co‐op. Directed studies, internships  and  research  appointments  have  provided  opportunities  to  travel  to  France  and  Montreal  to  study  the  various  PBS  systems  first‐hand.  Additionally, I have invested many hours exchanging information with PBS program operators at conferences, online webinars, and via email to  obtain accurate information on program costs and station planning. These first‐hand experiences proved invaluable in obtaining the information  required to successfully model the finances of a PBS for UBC.   7.2  Typical Costs of a PBS   The cost for setting up and operating a PBS service depends very much on the size of the service and the scheme chosen. In general the majority  of solutions are not financially self sufficient and typically need to be financially backed by a large transport operator or by public resources. In  many  cases  a  public‐private‐partnership  between  an  outdoor  advertising  company  and  a  local  authority  is  established.  A  billboard  company        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|33   receives the right to use specific public spaces for advertisements and in return implements and operates a PBS (i.e.: Clear Channel, JC Decaux),  which  can  raise  the  issue  of  foregone  revenue  for  the  local  authority.  Cities  can  also  buy  a  PBS  “off‐shelf”  from  providers  that  offer  the  technology, these programs typically aim at being self financing through advertisements on the bicycles.   Typically there are four major cost associated with a PBS:  1. Direct capital costs for producing and installing the system (bicycles and terminals)  2. Direct operating costs for running the system (staff, IT support, etc.)  3. Associated capital costs for building cycling infrastructure and needed streetscape improvements (bicycle lanes and station area  improvements)  4. Associated operating costs for maintaining the on‐road cycling and docking station infrastructure (bicycle maintenance).   Cost  information  was  provided  to  UBC  TREK  on  a  per  bike  basis,  including  the  cost  of  any  necessary  supporting  station  infrastructure.  Both,  Veloia Transport who operate the campus‐based PBS known as ”GreenBike” at St. Xavier Univeristy in Chicago using their OY Bike Technology, as  well  as  The  Public  Bicycle  System  Co.,  who  operate  the  BIXI  program  in  Montreal  provided  cost  estimates  to  UBC.  The  cost  information  was  provided  based  on  a  “turn‐key”  installation  scenario  in  which  the  supplier  would  be  responsible  for  all  aspects  of  the  program’s  operation,  including;  IT  and  call  center  support,  maintenance  and  redistribution.  These  costs,  outlined  in  Table  7.2.1  also  include  a  10%  contingency  for  theft and vandalism.   Table 7.2.1: Range of Costs for a Public Bicycle System      Costs Capital Cost / Bike Operation Cost / Bike / Year  PBS Supplier   Veolia Transport ‐ “Oy Bike”  Public Bicycle System Co. ‐ “BIXI” $2,500 $4,000   $600 – $1,500 $1,000 – $1,250      A  dramatic  difference  exists  in  the  price  per  bike  between  the  two  referenced  vendors  of  a  PBS.  It  is  important  to  note  that  price  is  directly  related to the quality of the system and the ability of the vendor to provide the necessary support to operate the system. In the case of BIXI the  increased price can be directly attributed to the design and build quality of the bicycles and stations, the technologies used in the system, and its  ability to attract ridership based on these characteristics. In the current market, the ability of a high quality design to attract customers must not  be  underestimated.  Consider,  for  example,  the  value  that  high  quality  design  has  brought  to  consumer  goods  such  as  Apple’s  iPod,  which  dominates its competitors and is now synonymous with the words “MP3 player”.   Although some PBS are more expensive than others, a good argument for making the greater initial investment exists. Investing in a high quality  system up front will likely prove worthwhile over the long term, as it will provide cost savings with regard to theft, maintenance, operations and        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|34   the ability to attract increased ridership. The value in high quality design is becoming evident, as BIXI becomes an increasingly preferred vendor  worldwide. As of the summer of 2009, BIXI is slated to develop systems in Minneapolis, Boston and London. More than any other system, BIXI  has  been  recognized  as  outstanding,  winning  numerous  awards,  including  a  Bronze  in  the  Transportation  category  of  the  2009  International  Design  Excellence  Awards  (IDEA),  a  Gold  award  for  best  product  of  2009  in  the  Energy  and  Sustainability  category  of  the  Edison  Best  New  Products Awards, and a ranking of 19th in Time magazines 50 Best Inventions of 2008 (BIXI, 2009)48. For this reason, all cost estimates in this  document are based on BIXI figures.    7.3  Expected Ridership at UBC   Estimating the ridership for a large‐scale PBS at UBC is the necessary first step in determining program costs and expected revenue, as both are  directly related to number of subscribers. Table 7.3.1 below, shows the total number of estimated annual and daily members classified by their  choice  of  transportation  mode  to  UBC  and  including  the  campus’s  residential  population.  An  examination  of  subscription  rates  in  other  PBS  worldwide has led to the conclusion that students, faculty and staff who live on campus will be most likely to take advantage of PBS, followed by  those who arrive on public transit. The thousands of visitors who come to UBC every year will also play an important role in generating revenue  for the system via the sale of daily memberships. The target percentages for annual and daily membership were developed after consulting with  PBS providers in Paris, Montreal and Chicago and from ridership estimates made by New York City and King County Washington, in their own  feasibility  studies.  The  membership  targets  used  in  the  UBC  model  are  considered  conservative  and  moderate  when  compared  to  existing  systems worldwide.   Table 7.3.1: Estimated Annual and Daily Membership   Targeted Population  (per annum)   Population  Size*   Annual Membership  Target Percentage   Total Annual  Members   Daily Membership  Target Percentage   Total Daily  Members   Live on Campus   11,000   6%   660   6%   660   Transit   22,000   6%   1,320   6%   1,320   Carpool / Vanpool   8,000   3%   240   3%   240   SOV   18,500   3%   555   1%   185   Walk   8,000   1%   80   1%   80   Tourists   126,857   0%   0   1%   1,269   Total Members  2,855**  *Population values from   ** In year one, this figure was reduced to 75% of its total = to 2,141 to account for program uptake.           UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY        3,754         Page|35   7.4  Capital Costs for PBS at UBC    The total capital cost for UBC to implement a PBS will be based on the price of investing in the bicycles and stations over the proposed ten year  period. In order to make an accurate estimation of the capital costs, the number of subscribers per bicycles had to be determined. The technical  planning team from BIXI provided details on their own planning process, which suggested using a value of between 10 and 15 subscribers per  bicycle; having used a value of 13 when planning for the highly successful Montreal system. A sensitivity analysis indicated that this value was  critical to the costs of the program, with capital costs rising sharply when the ratio of members to bicycles decreases below 13:1. The following  capital cost estimates for UBC are therefore based on a value of 13 subscribers per bicycle. At this ratio, capital costs are kept low and program  subscribers will be ensured access to a large number of bicycles at any given time.   For UBC to deploy a high quality PBS, based on the ratio of 13 subscribers per bicycle, with a projected first year annual membership of 2,141  and  capital  costs  equal  to  $4000  per  bicycle  (including  stations),  the  total  capital  cost  in  year  one  will  be  $700,024,  including  the  cost  of  transporting the bicycles to UBC. In year two a second major capital investment in bicycles will be required, as membership is expected to reach  its full potential. In year two an additional $233,341 will be required. After the second year of operations, the program will have a fleet of 220  bicycles and an expected annual membership of 2,855. Table 7.4.1 shows the expected capital costs in the first ten years of the program, which  are equal to $1,030,511. It is expected that ongoing capita investment will be required in the later years of the program to ensure the ratio of  subscribers to bicycles stays in balance. It is recommended that these long‐term investments be made in bulk to achieve any possible economies  of scale.   Table 7.4.1: Estimated Capital Costs of PBS at UBC   Capital Expenses Year   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   # of Bikes in System   165   220   220   220   220   220   242   242   242   242   # of Bikes Required   165   220   224   228   233   238   242   247   252   257   48   4   4   5   5   5   4   5   5   143   48   0   0   0   0   24   0   0   0   $ (658,846)  $ (219,615)   0   0   0   0   $91,431   0   0   0   $ (700,024)  $ (233,341)   0   0   0   0   $(97,145)   0   0   0         New Bikes Required  # of Bikes to Order  Total Bike and Station Cost  Total Capital Cost  (Including Transportation)   Ten Year Total Capital Cost  $1,030,511           UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY        Page|36   7.5  Operating Costs of PBS at UBC    The  cost  of  operating  a  PBS  at  UBC  will  be  equal  to  a  maximum  of  $1,250  per  bicycle,  per  year.  This  value  was  provided  by  BIXI  staff  and  represents the cost of purchasing a PBS as a full “turn‐key” operation. This implies that UBC would not perform any maintenance, redistribution  or back‐end IT operations on the system, instead contracting out all operations to the PBS manufacturer or a management company. Given that  the University is mandated to engage students and create jobs, it is likely that the cost of operating the program will be less than $1,250 per  bicycle, per year, as students could be employed to perform some of the functions normally performed by the contracted maintenance team.   However, for the purpose of this report and to show the maximum expected costs, the assumption is being made that UBC will purchase the  program  as  a  full  turn‐key  operation.  With  165  bicycles  in  the  program  in  the  first  year  of  implementation,  operational  costs  are  equal  to  $205,889. Over time, operational costs will rise with the rate of inflation and with the increasing number of bicycles in the system, as reflected in  Table 7.2.4. However, it is likely that operational costs may decrease on a per capita basis, as the university and the program operators become  more efficient in managing the PBS.   Table 7.2.4: Estimated Operational Costs of PBS at UBC   Operating Expenses  Year  Maintenance Cost/Bike/Year  # of Bikes   Operating Expense/Year   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   $1,250   $1,263   $1,275   $1,288   $1,301   $1,314   $1,327   $1,340   $1,354   $1,367   165   220   220   220   220   220   242   242   242   242   $(205,889)  $(277,264)  $(285,638)  $(294,264)  $(303,151)  $(312,306)  $(321,738)  $(331,454)  $(341,464)  $(351,776)      7.6  Operating Revenue of PBS at UBC   Operating revenue in a typical PBS covers 2/3 of the operating costs, however a PBS at UBC can likely cover more than this if subscription fees  follow the same model used in the BIXI system. The financial model used for this report takes into account both annual and daily membership  revenues, but does not account for monthly subscriptions, as appropriate data for modeling monthly subscriptions was not available. The fee  structure that was used to calculate the operating revenue was based on a price of $75 for a yearly subscription and $5 for 24 hour access. Any  membership to the system will provide unlimited 30 min trips, with trips over 30 min charged an additional $1.50. For the next 30 minute period  the price rises to $3.00, then to $6.00 for any and all subsequent 30 minute periods. This pricing scheme encourages the bicycles to be used for  short trips, ensuring a high number of bicycles are always available to subscribers. In the operating revenue model below, I assumed that 3% of  all trips generated would be longer than 30 min (5% of all trips are longer than 30 min in Paris) and charged these trips an additional $1.50. Trips  extending for additional 30 minute periods were not modeled as reliable data to estimate the frequency of these trips was not available.         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|37   Table 7.6.1: PBS Operating Revenue    Operating Revenue (Membership and User Fees Only) Year  Daily Membership  Revenue  Annual Membership  Revenue  Revenue from Trips Over  30 min   Total Operating  Revenue  Total Operating Cost  Net Operating Revenue   1   2  3  4  5  6   7  8  9  10  $18,768   $19,143   $19,526   $19,917   $20,315   $20,721   $21,136   $21,558   $21,989   $22,429   $160,594   $214,125   $218,408   $222,776   $227,231   $231,776   $236,411   $241,140   $245,962   $250,882   $77,872   $103,830   $105,906   $108,024   $110,185   $112,389   $114,636   $116,929   $119,268   $121,653   $257,234   $337,098   $343,840   $350,717   $357,731   $364,886   $372,183   $379,627   $387,220   $394,964   $(205,889)   $(277,264)   (285,638)   $(294,264)   $(303,151)   $(312,738)   $(321,738)   $(331,454)   $(341,464)   $(351,776)   $51,344   $59,834   $58,202   $56,453   $54,580   $52,580   $50,446   $48,173   $45,756   $43,188   As Table 7.6.1 illustrates, a PBS at UBC could cover its operating costs based solely on revenue from subscriptions and user fees. The surplus  revenue generated from operations, would in turn contribute to paying down the capital expense of the project. Table 7.6.2, shows the expected  cash flows in the program and indicates that the capital investment of $1,030,511 made over during the 10 year modeling period, cannot be  repaid in its entirety when user fees and subscriptions are the only revenue source. Net revenue from operations will only be able to pay back  51%  of  the  capital  investment,  equal  to  $520,554,  or  an  average  of  $52,055  per  year.  It  is  important  to  note  however,  that  payback  of  the  program’s capital expense could be dramatically enhanced in one of several ways; introducing an advertising component to the system, securing  a  corporate  sponsorship  to  contribute  to  the  capital  cost  or  by  applying  for  program  funding  from  Provincial  and  Federal  sustainable  transportation initiatives, which could reduce capital or operating expenses.   Table 7.6.2: Cash Flow Analysis    Cash Flow Analysis   Year   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   N/A   $(648,680)  $(822,187)  $(763,985)  $(707,533)  $(652,953)  $(600,373)  $(647,073)  $(598,900)  $(553,144)   Capital Cost    $(700,024)   $(233,341)  $0  $0  $0  $0  $(97,145)  $0  $0  $0   Operating Cost    $(205,889)   $(277,264)  $(285,638)  $(294,264)  $(303,151)  $(312,306)  $(321,738)  $(331,454)  $(341,464)  $(351,776)   $257,234   $337,098  $ 343,840  $350,717  $357,731  $364,886  $372,183  $379,627  $387,220  $394,964   $(648,680)   $(822,187)  $(763,985)  $(707,533)  $(652,953)  $(600,373)  $(647,073)  $(598,900)  $(553,144)  $(509,956)   Starting Balance    Operating Revenue  Cash Flow          UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|38   The majority of public bicycle systems world‐wide rely on some form of advertising to supplement the revenue generated from user fees and  subscriptions. Some PBS, like Vélib’ are almost entirely funded in this way, while others use advertising to top up revenue. A financial sensitivity  analysis revealed that if minimal amounts of advertising were introduced into a PBS at UBC, it would be possible for the program to become  revenue neutral or better. Adding greater amounts of advertising would allow the program to generate a surplus that could be used to invest in  other sustainable initiatives across campus. Table 7.6.3 shows a financial scenario with incorporated advertising. For the purpose of this model,  the  rate  charged  for  advertising  space  per  month  is  equal  to  the  cost  of  renting  out  the  “Mega‐Lit”  billboards  located  in  the  Student  Union  Building;  $1200  per  month.  In  order  to  become  revenue  neutral,  the  PBS  program  would  require  4  advertising  spaces,  being  utilized  for  12  months per year. Under this scenario, the operating revenue would be increased by $60,000 per year.   Table 7.6.3: Potential Revenue from Advertising   Cash Flow Analysis for a Limited Advertising Scenario   Year  Starting Balance    1   2   N/A   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   $(588,680)  $(702,187)  $(583,985)  $(467,533)  $(352,953)  $(240,373)  $(227,073)  $(118,900)  Capital Cost    $(700,024)  $(233,341)   Operating Cost    $(205,889)  $(277,264)  $(285,638)  $(294,264)  $(303,151)  $(312,306)  $(321,738)  $(331,454)  $(341,464)  $(351,776)   Net Operating Revenue   $111,344   Cash Flow    $0   $119,834   $118,202   $(588,680)  $(702,187)  $(583,985)  $0  $116,453   $0   $0   $114,580   $112,580   $(467,533)  $(352,953)  $(240,373)  $(97,145)  $110,446   $0   $(13,144)   $0   $0   $108,173   $105,756   $103,188   $(227,073)  $(118,900)  $(13,144)   $90,044   Figure 7.6.1 and 7.6.2: Examples of PBS Based Ad­Space and On­Bike Corporate Sponsorship               UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|39   Section 8: Conclusion  This section summarizes the findings outlined in previous sections and provides conclusions on the feasibility of a PBS at UBC. Recommendations  for implementing a public bicycle system are also presented for further consideration.    8.1  Triple Bottom Line Assessment   The purpose of the triple bottom line value system is to equally weight the social, environmental and economic dimensions of a decision. This  ensures  equality  for  people,  the  planet  and  profit.  Throughout  this  report,  each  dimension  of  the  triple  bottom  line  assessment  has  been  discussed and evaluated in detail. A summary assessment follows:   Social  The social component of the triple bottom line assessment is often the most contentious, as the human element introduces a great degree of  subjectivity.  Nonetheless,  when  broadly  considering  the  social  impact  of  a  public  bicycle  system  at  UBC,  the  benefits  are  excellent.  Everyday,  students will benefit from improved mobility, increased physical activity as well as the increased social interaction and sense of community that  bike sharing can generate. Further, the increased social interaction and improved accessibility of all parts of the campus could have a positive  impact on the universities goal to promote cross‐disciplinary research.   One goal of the university is to expose students to new ideas and to instill the values of a civil and sustainable society. By implementing a public  bicycle  system,  the  university  can  increase  the  chances  that  graduates  will  make  sustainable  transportation  choices  after  leaving  the  UBC  community.  The  impact  of  society’s  collective  transportation  decisions  directly  affects  public  health,  climate  change  and  environmental  degradation. For this reason it is important to expose students to a lifestyle built around sustainable transportation options. By implementing a  PBS, UBC can have a direct and positive impact on society.   Environmental  A public bicycle system at UBC could be implemented with limited to no long‐term environmental impact, given its ability to be solar powered  and  installed  without  “breaking‐ground”.  Further  adding  to  the  positive  outcomes  of  bike  sharing  is  its  ability  to  change  the  transportation  behaviours of commuters arriving to UBC. By extending the reach of the public transit network and acting as the first and last leg in public transit  trip, PBS can encourage fewer drivers to bring their automobiles to UBC. By reducing the number of car trips to and from UBC, the institute can  reduce its carbon footprint associated with commuting. With a relatively low impact to the environment, likely green‐house gas reductions and  the promotion of an environmentally sustainable transit mode, the assessment is clear: the environmental benefits of PBS are excellent.        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|40   Economic  As seen in section 7, there are many variables that will affect the economic performance of a bike sharing system. Nonetheless, assuming the  predictions  made  in  this  report  are  moderate  and  reasonable,  the  economic  benefits  of  a  public  bicycle  system  can  be  considered  to  be  moderate. Without external funding or sponsorship, and based solely on the revenue from subscriptions and user fees, a PBS at UBC will not  generate surplus, instead it will cost the university and average of $52,055 per year to install and operate.  However,  by  introducing  minimal  amounts  of  advertising  or  finding  a  corporate  sponsor,  UBC  can  easily  turn  the  bike  sharing  system  into  a  revenue  generator  which  could  be  used  to  fund  other  sustainable  initiatives  across  the  campus.  By  introducing  only  four,  bus‐shelter  size  ad  spaces  at  key  PBS  stations  the  program  can  easily  generate  an  additional  $60,000  in  operating  revenue.  This  minor  change  creates  enough  additional revenue that the full capital investment can be paid back within a 10 year time span. After the first 10 years of operation, the revenue  generated by the system would become available to finance new capital projects that further contribute to the social and environmental goals of  UBC.   In conclusion, the triple bottom line assessment of a public bicycle system at UBC is good overall. There are excellent benefits relating to the  social and environmental aspects of a PBS, although the current assessment of the economic impact reveals that the program will not generate  more than a moderate economic return.    8.2  Recommendations   This report has investigated the feasibility of a public bicycle system at UBC. In order to advance the potential of developing a PBS at UBC, the  following recommendations should be taken.  1.  Conduct a transportation survey or diary intended to identify on‐campus transportation patterns. Having this information will aid in the  implementation of a PBS, by informing the location and capacity of stations across campus, as well as the program’s boundaries.       2. Submit the report to Campus and Community Planning at UBC for further consideration.     3. Pending support for further investigation of PBS, engage internal and external stakeholders in discussion. This should include but not be  limited to municipalities and others who may be interested in PBS, such as the City of Vancouver, TransLink and UBC’s own Bike Coop.      4. Draft an RFP and engage a PBS provider to obtain full details on financial arrangements, station planning and operations management.  Request the development of an implementation plan, including full details on project scope and phasing.        UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|41     5. Prior to launch identify a suitable funding source and any opportunities for external funding.    6. Pending  a  completed  implementation  plan,  develop  the  proper  education  and  promotion  campaign  through  the  UBC  TREK  Program  Centre.  Ensure  the  launch  date  coincides  with  the  beginning  of  the  academic  school  year  to  capitalize  on  student  energy  and  the  opportunities for promotion. Ensure the launch date includes media attention and a celebration of UBC’s advancement in sustainable  transportation.               UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|42   References                                                               1  The University of British Columbia. (2008). UBC Archives – University History – General History: A Brief History of UBC.  Online: http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/hist_ubc.html    2   The University of British Columbia. (2009). University Town. U‐Town Library, FAQ’s: the Basics  Online: http://www.universitytown.ubc.ca/library_faq.php    3  The University of British Columbia. (2009). Fall 2008 Transportation Status Report. UBC TREK  Online:  http://www.planning.ubc.ca/corebus/pdfs/TSR_Fall2008_6Feb09.pdf    4   The University of British Columbia. (2009). Fall 2008 Transportation Status Report. UBC TREK  Online:  http://www.planning.ubc.ca/corebus/pdfs/TSR_Fall2008_6Feb09.pdf   5   The University of British Columbia. (2006). Climate Action Plan: UBC GHG Emissions Inventory.   Online: http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/pdfs/2006UBC_GHG.pdf    6   The University of British Columbia. (2006). Climate Action Plan: UBC GHG Emissions Inventory  Online: http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/pdfs/2006UBC_GHG.pdf    7   The University of British Columbia. (2009). Fall 2008 Transportation Status Report. UBC TREK  Online:  http://www.planning.ubc.ca/corebus/pdfs/TSR_Fall2008_6Feb09.pdf     8   The University of British Columbia. (2009). Fall 2008 Transportation Status Report. UBC TREK.  Online:  http://www.planning.ubc.ca/corebus/pdfs/TSR_Fall2008_6Feb09.pdf    9   The University of British Columbia. (2009). UBC Facts and Figures (2008/2009). UBC Public Affairs.  Online: http://www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/ubcfacts/index.html    10   The University of British Columbia. (2007) Access and Movement Study. Campus and Community Planning.  Online: http://www.planning.ubc.ca/corebus/pdfs/pdf‐landuse/VCP_AccessMovement.pdf    11   The University of British Columbia. (2009). Fall 2008 Transportation Status Report. UBC TREK.  Online:  http://www.planning.ubc.ca/corebus/pdfs/TSR_Fall2008_6Feb09.pdf    12   Winters, M., Cooper A. (2008). What Makes a Neighbourhood Bikeable. TransLink and the University of British Columbia.  Online: http://www.cher.ubc.ca/cyclingincities/pdf/WhatMakesNeighbourhoodsBikeable.pdf    13   Frank, Lawrence. (2007). Urban form, travel time, and cost relationships with tour complexity and mode choice. Transportation Journal.  Online: http://www.springerlink.com/content/9228326786t53047/fulltext.pdf         UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY           Page|43                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             14   Wegener, Michael. (1999). Land‐Use Transport Interaction: State of the Art. Dortmund, November 1999  Online: http://129.3.20.41/econ‐wp/urb/papers/0409/0409005.pdf    15   NYC Dept. City Planning. (2009). Bike‐Share Opportunities in New York City. New York City: New York City Department of City Planning  Online: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/pdf/transportation/bike_share_complete.pdf    16   TransLink, (2008). TransLink Public Bicycle Feasibility Study.   Online: http://www.translink.ca/site‐info/document‐library‐result.aspx?id={0044F9A5‐BECB‐4C4D‐9FD0‐E3D32D8E9A7F}|{D191F5C3‐2E4D‐4937‐ 9EDC‐578A1FC50285}|{6B6CD0F7‐D14F‐4C72‐BDFC‐A9DA1E4C3919}|{A7685FAD‐DB49‐43D5‐AC93‐C5BF73CA5061}|{9AC16684‐25D3‐4938‐9C83‐ 07EB6DBA83CE}&ref={48F61830‐22A1‐4F90‐804A‐83C0C9A9D367}   17  DeMaio, P. and Gifford, J.(2004). Will Smart Bikes Succeed as Public Transportation in the United States? Journal of Public Transportation, 2004 – Center of  Urban Transport Research. Online: http://www.nctr.usf.edu/jpt/pdf/JPT%207‐2.pdf#page=6    18   TransLink, (2008). TransLink Public Bicycle Feasibility Study.   Online: http://www.translink.ca/site‐info/document‐library‐result.aspx?id={0044F9A5‐BECB‐4C4D‐9FD0‐E3D32D8E9A7F}|{D191F5C3‐2E4D‐4937‐ 9EDC‐578A1FC50285}|{6B6CD0F7‐D14F‐4C72‐BDFC‐A9DA1E4C3919}|{A7685FAD‐DB49‐43D5‐AC93‐C5BF73CA5061}|{9AC16684‐25D3‐4938‐9C83‐ 07EB6DBA83CE}&ref={48F61830‐22A1‐4F90‐804A‐83C0C9A9D367}   19   MetroBike LLC. (2009). The Bike Sharing Blog.   Online: http://bike‐sharing.blogspot.com/search?updated‐max=2009‐07‐01T10%3A23%3A00‐04%3A00&max‐results=10    20   DeMaio, Paul. (2008). The Bike Sharing Phenomena.  Carbusters # 36, Nov 2008 – Feb 2009   Online: http://www.metrobike.net/index.php?s=file_download&id=16     21   DeMaio, Paul. (2008). The Bike Sharing Phenomena.  Carbusters # 36, Nov 2008 – Feb 2009   Online: http://www.metrobike.net/index.php?s=file_download&id=16     22   Angell, Elizabeth. (1998). Luud Schimmelpennink. Luud Schimmelpennink – Advocates Forum. Taken from: Newsweek, Nov. 10, 1998.  Online: http://ecoplan.org/advocates/l‐schimmelpennink‐bio.htm      23  Fonden Bycyklen (2009). News and Facts. Den officielle hjemmeside for Bycyklen.   Online: http://www.bycyklen.dk/english/newsandfacts.aspx    24   NYC Dept. City Planning. (2009). Bike‐Share Opportunities in New York City. New York City: New York City Department of City Planning  Online: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/pdf/transportation/bike_share_complete.pdf          UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|44                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             25   Smith, P.G., and Theberge, J.B. (1987). Evaluating Natural Areas Using Multiple Criteria: Theory and Practice. Environmental Management, 11(4), 447‐460.    26   Fausold, C. and Lilieholm, R. (1996). The Economic Value of Open Space. Land Lines, September   27   Benson, et al. (2009). Public Use Bike Share Feasibility Study for King County, Washington. The University of Washington and King County.   Online: http://drop.io/king_county_bike_share_report   28   CityRyde, (2009). Bicycle Systems Worldwide: Selected Case Studie. CityRyde LLC, Philadelphia, PA  Online: http://www.cityryde.com/reports/    29   CityRyde, (2009). CityRyde Bikesharing Informational Webinar – May 11, 2009. Philadelphia, PA,    30   DeMaio, Paul. (2009). Oh Yes, OBIS! The Bike‐sharing Blog  Online: http://bike‐sharing.blogspot.com/2009/08/o‐yes‐obis.html    31   The City of Vancouver. (2009). Burrard Bridge Lane Reallocation Trial.   Online: http://vancouver.ca/projects/burrard/index.htm   32   The Museum of Vancouver. (2009). Velocity: Vancouver and the Bicycle Revolution. MOV  Online: http://www.museumofvancouver.ca/exhibition.php?id=6    33   Translink. (2009). Cycling: Metro Vancouver: Central Valley Greenway.   Online: http://www.translink.ca/en/Cycling/Central‐Valley‐Greenway.aspx    34   The City of Vancouver. (2009). Greenest City: Quick Start Recommendations.  Online: http://vancouver.ca/greenestcity/PDF/greenestcity‐quickstart.pdf    35   Litman, Todd. (2008). Public Bike Systems: Automated Bike Rentals for Short Utilitarian Trips. TDM Encyclopedia, Victoria Transport Policy Institute.   Online: http://www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm126.htm    36   Wegener, Michael. (1999). Land‐Use Transport Interaction: State of the Art. Dortmund, November 1999  Online: http://129.3.20.41/econ‐wp/urb/papers/0409/0409005.pdf       37   Advani, Mukit., and Tiwari, Gateem. Bicycle as Feeder Mode for Bus Service. TRIPP/IIT‐Delhi, India  Online: http://web.iitd.ernet.in/~tripp/publications/paper/planning/mukti_VELO06%20paper.pdf    38   Vélib’. (2009). Newsletter Vélib’ Juin 2009 ‐ #22: Bientot 2 ans: Votre Opinion sur le service!  Online: http://www.Vélib’.centraldoc.com/newsletter/22_bientot_2_ans_d_utilisation_votre_regard_sur_le_service          UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|45                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             39   Vélib’, (2009). Newsletter Vélib’ Juin 2009 ‐ #22: Bientot 2 ans: Votre Opinion sur le service!  Online: http://www.velib.centraldoc.com/newsletter/22_bientot_2_ans_d_utilisation_votre_regard_sur_le_service    40   Dora. Carlos, (1999). A Different Route to Health: Implications of Transport Policy. BMJ 1999, 318, 1686‐9   Online: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/318/7199/1686    41   Center for Disease Control and Prevention, (2009). Physical Activity for Everyone. How Much Physical Activity do Adults Need?   Online: http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/adults.html      42   Oja, Pekka et al., (1999). Daily walking and cycling to work: their utility as health‐enhancing physical activity. UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research  Online: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TBC‐3YN3PD5‐ C&_user=1022551&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000050484&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=102255 1&md5=633fd217ac31abd57f7c82c3bb393b66     43   NYC Dept. City Planning. (2009). Bike‐Share Opportunities in New York City. New York City: New York City Department of City Planning  Online: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/pdf/transportation/bike_share_complete.pdf       44  TransLink, (2008). TransLink Public Bicycle Feasibility Study.   Online: http://www.translink.ca/site‐info/document‐library‐result.aspx?id={0044F9A5‐BECB‐4C4D‐9FD0‐E3D32D8E9A7F}|{D191F5C3‐2E4D‐4937‐ 9EDC‐578A1FC50285}|{6B6CD0F7‐D14F‐4C72‐BDFC‐A9DA1E4C3919}|{A7685FAD‐DB49‐43D5‐AC93‐C5BF73CA5061}|{9AC16684‐25D3‐4938‐9C83‐ 07EB6DBA83CE}&ref={48F61830‐22A1‐4F90‐804A‐83C0C9A9D367}    45   Oja, Pekka et al., (1999). Daily walking and cycling to work: their utility as health‐enhancing physical activity. UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research  Online: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TBC‐3YN3PD5‐ C&_user=1022551&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000050484&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=102255 1&md5=633fd217ac31abd57f7c82c3bb393b66     46   NYC Dept. City Planning. (2009). Bike‐Share Opportunities in New York City. New York City: New York City Department of City Planning  Online: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/pdf/transportation/bike_share_complete.pdf   47   UBC, (2009). UBC Research Summary: Strategic Research Plan  Online:  http://www.research.ubc.ca/Uploads/Docs/UBC%20RESEARCH%20SUMMARY_12_01_08.pdf    48   BIXI, (2009). BIXI News.   Online: http://montreal.bixi.com/news             UBC PUBLIC BICYCLE SYSTEM FEASIBILITY STUDY              Page|46   

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.310.1-0107180/manifest

Comment

Related Items