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A collaborative Indigenous Community Planning Project with the Tobacco Plains Indian Bands Mendes, Wilson Pereira; Stephen, McGlenn Aug 31, 2014

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A COLLABORATIVE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY PLANNING PROJECT WITH THE TOBACCO PLAINS INDIAN BANDbyWILSON PEREIRA MENDES B.A., University of Victoria, 2011STEPHEN MCGLENNB.A., University of Lethbridge, 2010A PROJECT SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OFTHE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OFMASTER OF ARTS (PLANNING)inTHE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCESchool of Community and Regional PlanningWe accept this project as conforming to the required standard..............................................................................................................................................................................THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIAVancouverAugust 2014© Wilson Pereira Mendes, 2014© Stephen McGlenn, 2014EXECUTIVE SUMMARYOur practicum with Tobacco Plains Indian Band (TPIB) began in October 2013, and concluded in June 2014. TPIB acquired funding through the British Columbia Community Initiative (BCCI) to fund a second phase of  community planning. In combination with funding provided through the Real Estate Foundation of  BC, we were able to travel to and from TPIB, developing our understanding of  Indigenous planning, planning for and with Indigenous people, and supporting planning in the community. Tobacco Plains is a small First Nation in Southeast BC, along the Montana border, with a total population of  about 140, only about half  of  which live on reserve. We joined the Community Planning Coordinator, Band Administrator and Administrator’s Assistant, and our UBC Instructor in forming the core Planning Team in TPIB to complete this phase of  the TPIB CCP.The practicum represents the pinnacle learning achievement for students in the new Indigenous Community Planning specialization at the School of  Community and Regional Planning (SCARP). Our approach for the practicum was founded on a positive and collaborative relationship with TPIB, identifying both personal and mutual learning objectives (see page 10). Our practicum was a 9-month, immersive and applied cultural experience in Indigenous community planning. In total, we visited the community seven times and contributed well over 800 hours in combined planning capacity to TPIB, with the end result of  drafting a new community plan (phase 2) for TPIB (see page 88). We were guided by the creation of  key documents and strategies, including our Learning Agreement, Student Partnership Agreement, and Work Plan. As an exercise in comprehensive community planning (CCP), the practicum gave us real, on the ground experience in Indigenous community. We witnessed the results and ineffectiveness of  Western based planning in TPIB, envisioned and experimented with our own new and creative planning pro-cess based strongly on community participation and interactive, engaging planning activities. In total, the Planning Team engaged 50 members, including 15 youth and 3 elders, through seven community events, three youth events, three elder interviews, and one off-reserve session, formed a Community Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC), and gathered the issues, needs, concerns and vision of  the community through the use of  various tools, methods and techniques (see page 23).Planning information and knowledge was gathered from three distinct areas: Past planning history, community sessions, and Chief  and Council’s Strategic Planning Session. Information was gathered, recorded, analyzed, documented and presented by the Planning Team.  Information was placed into a framework that highlighted TPIB’s pressing issues, it’s strengths, it’s overall planning themes, strategic directions, pathways and actions. Continuing with the framework from CCP phase 1 in 2011, informa-tion fit into 8 planning themes: Economic Development, Governance, Infrastructure, Health, Social, Language & Culture, Education, and Lands & Resources. Within these 8 themes, the Planning Team identified 8 strategic directions, 15 pathways and 33 action-options (see page 29-33). The broad nature of  CCP meant that we gained experience and familiarity with a broad range of  planning areas that impact the community members of  TPIB. These issues are represented in the eight planning themes identified above. Each of  these planning themes has an accompanying action strategy (see Table 6). We also gained critical experience in process design, research and analysis, documentation & presentation, and employed culturally relevant metaphors to represent the planning process (see page 34). Our practicum encompassed pre-planning, developing a situational analysis, visioning, identifying issues and actions, and formulating action-strategies. Important next steps for TPIB is to continue on with the planning process the Planning Team identified for the community (see page 34). This means continuing into the implementation and monitoring and evaluation phases (see 36); the Planning Team developed important tools to assist in the delivery of  these planning phases. Continuing on with the community planning process will help to create unity and cohesion in TPIB, and encourage Chief  and Council to work more collaboratively with TPIB members.SCARP is trying to reimagine it’s place in the planning education world, and its impact on and rela-tionship with First Nations people, through the creation of  the ICP program. Still in its infancy, ICP has the potential to impact greatly the planning realm, and the complex interconnections between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. Finally, determining the nature and scope of  the practicum projects at an early enough date will help students, communities and the school to gain the most from the practicum process. 2ACKNOWLEDGEMENTWe would like to honor the Musqueam First Nation peoples whose unceded traditional territory we are on, and offer our deep gratitude for their generosity to share their traditional lands, knowledge, and wisdom with our school. We would also like to thank the Indigenous Community Program Advis-er Committee for their hard work in providing input to improve the ICP program. Also, we would like to thank the School of  Community and Regional Planning faculty, seasonal instructors, and staff, who invested their time, energy, knowledge and wisdom, and supported us throughout our graduate work. A special thanks goes to Professor Leonie Sandercock for her extraordinary work in putting together the ICP program, also for our practicum instructor Jeff  Cook, for his dedication and for providing us with guidance towards our future profession. We also would like to thank instructor Norma-Jean McLaren for providing us with the foundation of  the multifaceted planning realm, and to remind us about our hidden gems. We also would like to acknowledge and thank Patti Toporowski to support us through our journey at SCARP. Finally, a special thanks is owed to our colleagues at SCARP, and our friends and family who shared in the frustrations and joys of  this special journey.  We also would like to pay respect, acknowledge, and honor the Tobacco Plains Chief  and Council, and the Community at large for welcoming us into their traditional territory. The moments we spent together have been imprinted in our hearts, and the stories we heard from this resilient people will walk with us until the end of  our days. In addition to the gratitude we hold towards the Tobacco Pains people we would like also to say thank you for the generosity and hospitality offered to us for the many feasts we had together, the stories of  their Elders, and for the fun moments we spend in the company of  the youth. We would like to extend our special thanks to Anna Morigeau who dedicated her time to accommodate us in our many weeks in the community, for driving us around and making sure we were fed and safe. We also would like to thank Vickie Thomas for supporting us through out the community process. We also would like to acknowledge the Band administration staff  for sup-porting us, as well as the Planning Team.3TABLE OF CONTENTS  I.  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2  II.  ACKNOWLEDGMENT  3  1.O BACKGROUND  7 1.1 Indigenous Community Planning  7 1.2 Practicum Requirement  7 1.3 Practicum Purpose  7 1.4 Student-Community Relationship  8 1.5 Report Purpose & Layout 8  2.O COMMUNITY PLANNING CONTEXT  9 2.1 Tobacco Plains Indian Band  9 2.2 Planning In Tobacco Plains  9 2.3 Learning Objectives  10 2.3.1 Student Learning Pillars   10 2.3.2 Community Learning Objectives  11 2.3.3 Mutual Learning Objectives 11  3.O OUR APPROACH  11 3.1 Work Plan   12 3.2 Monitoring & Evaluating Our Results   14 3.3 Tobacco Plains Planning Team   14 3.4 Tobacco Plains Community Planning Process  15 3.4.1 TPIB Engagement Strategy   15 3.4.2 Tobacco Plains Community Planning Process  17 3.4.3 Process Tools, Methods & Techniques 22  4.O PLANNING OUTCOMES  23 4.1 Substantive Analysis & Methodology  23 4.2 Situational Analysis  24 4.2.1 Cultural Identity  24 4.2.2 The Land & The Physical Resources  25 4.2.3 Tobacco Plains Population  26 4.2.4 Substantive Issues   26 4.2.5 Community Strengths  27 4.2.6 SWOT - Start & Our Truth   27 4.2.7 Tobacco Plains Vision & Values Statement 29 4.2.8 Community Planning Actions Strategies  29  5.O PROCESS AND PRODUCT DELIVERABLES  34 46.O NEXT STEPS  36  7.O CLOSING REFLECTIONS  37 7.1 Moving Forward   37 7.2 Community Challenges  37 7.2.1 Communication & Capacity  37 7.2.2 Community Engagement   38 7.2.3 Cultural Transition  38 7.3 Student Context 39 7.3.1 The Magic Of Planning  39 7.3.2 Relationship & Connection  39 7.3.3 Youth, Photography & Videography   40 7.3.4 Research, Data Collections, Analysis & Management  40 7.3.5 Planning Pedagogy & Decolonization  40 7.3.6 Timing & Scope   41 7.3.7 School, Work & Life  42  8.O FINAL CONSIDERATIONS  43   Appendix A: Practicum Documentation  45 Learning Agreement 46 Student Partnership Agreement 54 Student Practicum Work Plan   59 Practicum Progress Report  64 Practicum Work Plan  71 Trip Reports  77  Appendix B: Tobacco Plains Planning Documentation  87 Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2   88 Tobacco Plains Community Engagement Strategy 147 Tobacco Plains Advisory Committee Terms of Reference  151  Appendix C: Community Session Reports  155 Open House   156 Visioning Session Report  160 Community sessions Report  165 Priority Setting and Ranking Session Report  168 Community Planning Advisory Committee Report  171 SWOT Analysis Community Update Report 174 Youth Session Reports  179 Elders Session Report  184   5 Appendix D: TPIB Community Planning Activities,  Process and Results 187 Open House Session  188 Survey Results  192 Results Visioning Session Situation Assessment  194 Community Planning Off-Reserve Survey 199 Tobacco Plains Community Plan: Planning Areas  203 It matters - Sticky Note Shuffle Results   204 It matters - Sticky Note Shuffle Summary   207 Community Planning Ranking Results   208 TPIB Themes, Directions, Pathways & Actions Map 213 CPAC Meeting  215 CPAC Questionnaire   216 CPAC Themes/Issues Questionnaire   218 SWOT Summary   221 TPIB Community Update Summary   225 TPIB Community Planning video exercise  228 Youth Video Interview Session Responses   229 Elders Interview Transcripts #1,2,3  231 TPIB Community Planning Engagement Pictures  246  List of Tables Table 1. Practicum Work Plan 13 Table 2. TPIB Planning Team Roles & Responsibilities 14 Table 3. TPIB Engagement Accomplishment 22 Table 4. TPIB SWOT Summary 28 Table 5. Community Planning Directions by Theme  30 Table 6. TPIB Action Strategies per Themes  32 Table 7. TPIB Planning Process Product Deliverables 35  List of Figures   Figure 1. Visual Tools 12  Figure 2. TPIB Engagement Pillars  16 Figure 3. Planning Team’s Tour 18 Figure 4. Community Planning Session 19 Figure 5. Ktunaxa Territory 24 Figure 6. Tobacco Plains Indian Reserve Map  24 Figure 7. TPIB Reserve Land Uses  25 Figure 8. TPIB Population Projection  26 Figure 8. TPIB SWOT Analysis 27 	  61.O BACKGROUND1.1 INDIGENOus COMMuNITy PLANNINGThe new Indigenous Community Planning (ICP) program is the result of  a partnership between the Musqueam First Nation and the School of  Community and Regional Planning (SCARP), which resides on the unceded territory of  the Musqueam people. In 2012, Chief  Wayne Sparrow of  the Musqueam First Nation endorsed a partnership with SCARP to explore a new curriculum in Indig-enous community planning. Officially launched in the fall of  2012 as a five year pilot project, ICP students complete a community based practicum project with a BC First Nation engaged in a CCP process. Funding was secured from the BC Real Estate Foundation to launch the program.1.2 PrACTICuM rEquIrEMENTIn pairs, we spent 8 months working with and visiting the community of  Tobacco Plains Indian Band (TPIB), gaining critically necessary cultural and planning experiences, while offering support to the community as they engaged in a Comprehensive Community Planning (CCP) process. CCP is a plan-ning framework being pursued by many First Nations in BC that aims to identify and achieve commu-nity aspirations in land stewardship, community development, cultural revitalization, governance & health improvements, etc. We took a critical approach to planning in Tobacco Plains by asking: “how can we decolonize planning?” This question gets at the heart of  ICP’s intent and mission: to train a new generation of  community planners that will “break the colonial legacy and culture of  planning in order to work in respectful partnerships with Indigenous communities.”1.3 PrACTICuM PurPOsEOur practicum is divided into two main courses, the Field Studio (6 credits) and the Master’s Project (6 credits). The key outcomes of  our practicum placement are for us to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of  Indigenous ways of  knowing, Indigenous planning protocols and practice. In addition to offer our support and capacity to a BC First Nation engaged in a CCP process, and fi-nally to understand the implications of  participating and engaging in community planning with First Nations. The position of  many Indigenous communities in Canadian society highlights the ongoing bias - and relevance - of  Western planning traditions in Indigenous community development, which highlights the need to empower graduating planning professionals with a new perspective. This in-cludes an awareness of  the Indigenous-Canadian historical and legal arena, critical planning capacity and creativity, and a willingness on our part to learn from and respect First Nations ways of  knowing, being and doing, both in and of  themselves and in a planning context. Broader objectives of  the practicum and ICP program as a whole are to promote healing and build new relationships between and amongst First Nations and Canadian society, and reimagine Indigenous and Western planning. 71.4 sTuDENT-COMMuNITy rELATIONshIPAs students in the ICP program at SCARP, we entered into a partnership with the Tobacco Plains Indian Band to assist them in their community planning process and to complete our practicum re-quirement.  Joining the Tobacco Plains Community Planning team, we offered support and planning capacity for the current community-planning project being initiated by the Band (see CCP Context, page 9).  We visited the community a total of  seven times over the course of  the practicum project, which began in November, 2013 and concluded in June, 2014, contributing approximately 800 hours in planning support to Tobacco Plains (see Planning Outcomes, page 23, and Progress Report, Ap-pendix 34).The people of  Tobacco Plains have always engaged in planning. Elders play a key role in providing cultural guidance and wisdom, and the community has a history of  strong leaders, and of  coming together to make decisions as a community. Since the arrival of  Europeans settlers, a new, Western paradigm of  planning has overshadowed this traditional cultural process. Under the jurisdiction of  Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), Chief  and Council’s planning policies and practices have largely been dictated by strict government regulation under the Indian Act, with other planning initiatives larger undertaken by external consultants. In 2004, AANDC began working in partnership with five BC First Nations on Comprehensive Community Planning (CCP) projects as part of  it’s Sustainable Development Strategy to help support long-term community based planning in BC First Nations, and to refocus the approach and intent of  planning to one designed, driven and implemented by communities, for communities. Tobacco Plains received funding in 2011 to complete the first phase of  its CCP, which was done with the aid of  an external consultant. Again, in 2013, funding was received from the British Columbia Community Initiative (BCCI) to pursue an-other CCP phase in the community, at which point the partnership with SCARP began. A key need identified early in the process was to honour and include the voice of  the community into the plan-ning and decision making process of  TPIB.1.5 rEPOrT PurPOsE AND LAyOuTThis report provides readers with an understanding of  our overall approach, planning actions, out-comes and deliverables that resulted from the planning initiative and student-community relationship, the key next steps for the community, and an insight into our key student learning experiences in the context of  the community specifically, and Indigenous Community Planning generally. Section 2, Planning & Community Context, provides important information about our community partner, the Tobacco Plains Indian Band, including their location, regional information and demographics, the previous planning that has occurred in the community, the conditions that triggered the current phase of  community planning, and the vision and intent of  this current phase of  community planning. Section 3, Approach and Methodology, describes the process and approaches we undertook to form and maintain the relationship with the community, as well as key information on the operation of  the planning project itself, including the Learning Agreement, Work Plan, and the main pillars of  our practicum work. Section 4, Planning Actions, describes in detail the planning framework and activities that drove the planning process. “Planning Outcomes” presents the results from the partnership and planning process. Section 5, Process and Product Planning Deliverables, summarizes the quantity and scope of  the practicum deliverables and our commitments to the community planning process. Sec-tion 6, “Next Steps” outlines how the community might move forward to complete and implement the CCP project. Section 7, Closing Reflections, offers insight into the strengths and challenges of  the community planning project, and the depth of  the learning experienced us in regards to Indigenous Community Planning, as well as some considerations for future students interested or enrolled in ICP. Lastly, the Appendices contains the reports, student documents and deliverables, and the Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2 (Draft).82.O COMMUNITY & PLANNING CONTEXT2.1 AKINK’uM?AsNuq?I?IT: TObACCO PLAINs INDIAN bANDThe people of  akink’um?asnuq?i?it (Tobacco Plain Indian Band), are one of  the six communitymembers of  the Ktunaxa Nation. Known as Akan’kunik: people of  the place of  the flying head, their identity remains closely tied to the distinctive traditional lands, language, and culture inherited from their Ktunaxa ancestors. The traditional lands of  Akan’kunik extend well east of  the Rocky Mountains, and south into present day Montana, Idaho, and Washington states (see figure 6). The akink’um?asnu?i? are located within unceded and unsurrendered traditional territory of  the Ktunaxa Nation, which has been occupied exclusively and continuously by their ancestors for more than ten thousand years. Their traditional territory extends well east of  the Rocky Mountains, and south into present day Montana, Idaho, and Washington states. The landscape is dominated by the valleys of  the upper Columbia and Kootenay River systems, and by slopes and peaks of  the Rocky Mountains and the adjacent mountain ranges to the west. Colonization of  the area by European settlers began in the late 1800’s. The climate of  the Tobacco Plains area is the mildest of  all the Ktunaxa Bands, averaging 317 days per year with a maximum temperature greater than zero degrees Celsius. The majority of  the lands are flat and open grassy lowlands, suitable for agricultural activities. The main road access to the community is through the Highway 93, which dissects the reserve in the north/south direction. The Tobacco Plains reserve encompasses 10,680 acres of  land along the Canada/USA border to the south, the Koocanusa reservoir, Baynes Lake to the west, and the Waterton Lakes National Park to the East. Presently the Band has approximately 144 members and 26 housing units. The community has seen a slight increase of  membership over the past 8 years. According to the TPIB, community population and membership is increasing at a rate of  about 1.25% annually. Membership levels vary from 135-145 members with an estimated population increase of  25 people over the next 20 years. Half  of  the members live off  reserve. Figure 8 (page 26) summarizes the registered population as of  January 2014 including those living on reserve and off  reserve and other by gender as reported by the Tobacco Plains Indian Band.2.2 PLANNING IN TObACCO PLAINsIt is important to note that TPIB has engaged in planning since time immemorial. Recently, the TPIB has carried out a series of  planning projects, many through external consultants, which produced important information and policies that have subsequently informed and guided our Community Planning process. The key past planning documents that informed our planning process were (1) The Tobacco Plains Strategic Plan 2006-2011; (2) the Comprehensive Community Plan Phase 1; (3) the Five Year Community Economic Development Plan and Implementation; and (4) the Community Energy Plan. The catalyst for the current Tobacco Plains community-planning project stemmed from two important events in 2013. The first one was an internal shift in the Band management level where the Band contracted a new Band manager; the second was the acquisition of  external funding from the British Columbia Capacity Initiative (BCCI). The BCCI funding was used to give continuity to the comprehensive community planning process which was first initiated by an external consultant in 2011. The primary need of  continuing with community planning was to engage with the community and to prioritize their needs, concerns, and vision for the future. Secondly, it attempted to rebuild the community’s trust toward their government and administration, and to bridge the community’s vision with that of  Chief  and Council and the Band administration’s mandate. The intended outcome of  the process was to produce a community plan that includes objectives and actions, based on a solid understanding of  the current state and vision of  the community. The plan is intended to guide Chief  and Council’s decision making, and the operational work planning of  Band staff, to enable the com-munity to move forward as identified in the plan.92.3 LEArNING ObjECTIvEsOur Learning Agreement set out both individual learning objectives for us as students and for TPIB, as well as mutual learning objectives.2.3.1 Student Learning PiLLarSThe Learning Agreement framed our student learning objectives within five pillars, each representing a broad but critical area of  Indigenous planning where we as students hoped to increase our under-standing, awareness and practice. These pillars are: Relationship Building, Community Engagement, Facilitation, Research & Analysis, and Documentation. The pillars are iterative and interconnected, and served as an important roadmap for our student learning. These became the framework for our work plan (see section 3.1, below, and Appendix A “Work Plan”) by acting as temporal markers; as the practicum moved along, the focus of  our planning work moved to the next pillar. Below is a brief  description of  each pillar; for more detail of  each pillar (see figure 2, page 16).Pillar #1: Relationship building and getting ready to plan:Through meeting the Band staff, community members, and Chief  and Council, we formed a genuine, solid relationship with the community that exemplified our values, ethics, and principles. This served as a firm foundation and inspiration for our work in the community, as well as our understanding of  the community’s planning needs. Having a solid and positive relationship was key to our communica-tion, handling tense and sensitive issues, and dealing with issues, challenges and unexpected changes in the planning process. Pillar #2: Engaging the community and gathering information.The objective of  this pillar was to learn how to effectively engage community members and include them in the planning process, and to fulfill our principles in the Learning Agreement of  a community driven process. The result of  this pillar was the design of  a comfortable and inclusive planning space, where the community was aware of  who the planning team was, what their roles and responsibilities were, and was able to share their views and make decisions on critical community issues. Pillar #3: Facilitating planning activities, and building planning facilitation capacity in the community:The objective of  this pillar was to develop the planning teams facilitation skills and to engage the community on identifying key planning issues, needs and actions. We used a fun and interactive ap-proach, employing music, magic, photography and videography, and interactive activities to break the cycle of  monotonous, externally driven planning procedures. Our intent was to collectively and col-laboratively build the skills, understanding and practice of  planning within the TPIB Planning Team. Pillar #4: Researching and Analyzing Community Data:The objective of  this pillar was to learn and practice methods of  data collection, organization, coding and analysis, based on knowledge gained from engaging with the community, planning activities, and the historical planning information. The majority of  the work in this pillar occurred in-between our visits to the community. 10Pillar #5: Documenting and Presenting Planning Information:The objective of  this pillar was to learn how to create effective documentation when compiling the results of  the planning process, and effectively presenting planning results back to the community, the Planning Team, UBC, and to ultimately have TPIB Chief  and Council approve the TPIB Community Plan upon completion. Our intent was to produce accessible and easy to read documents that were visually appealing with clear flow and presentation of  data, as well as fun and engaging presentations, to build excitement and buy-in into the planning process. The majority of  the documentation work took place outside of  our time in the community. 2.3.2 Community Learning objeCtiveSOur Learning Agreement also set out key learning objectives for the community, which include the following:1. Community Process: Launch a collaborative community planning process that is accessible, fun and meaningful; commit to the planning process.2.Community Involvement: Support community engagement and local planning sessions ways that maximize participation.3. Respect Knowledge: Honor local planning and traditional knowledge, incorporating local Tobacco Plains wisdom, values, preferences and cultural knowledge into the process and decision-making. 4. Document Results: Document the results of  the process into a comprehensive community plan in ways that are accessible and practical. 2.3.3 mutuaL Learning objeCtiveSFinally, the Learning Agreement set out our mutual learning objectives to focus on together during the planning process and practicum journey:1. Develop Planning Capacity: Facilitation tools and strategies to promote and support community engagement and strategic planning process.  2. Maintain Personal communication: Engage in reliable communication between students, instruc-tor, and community partner. 3. Commit to Relationship Building: Create and maintain meaningful relationships with the Tobacco Plains community and with other people involved in the community planning process.4. Practice Cultural sensitivity: Honor, respect and understand the respective cultural  perspect ives of  everyone involved in the planning process.3.O OUR APPROACHThe Learning Agreement identified our approach to an enduring and trustful relationship with the community, based on recognition and honoring of  the wishes, needs and preferences of  the com-munity in the formation, growth, evolution and conclusion of  the relationship during the practicum project. From this approach we identified four key themes:  1. First, we intended to work in solidarity with the community of  Tobacco Plains, recognizing the history of  settler-indigenous relations, and aiming to promote reconciliation. 2. Second, we were committed to a transparent process, whereby the work of  the Planning team and practicum students was open and accessible to the community and Band staff, and was ultimately reflective of  the community’s needs. 3. Third, we were committed to collaboration, to share in the strengths and experiences of  the stu-dents and the community. 4. Fourth, we intended that as a result of  our learning experiences, that the community’s planning capacity increased along with ours; this meant the development of  key tools, processes and actions to contribute to the legacy of  planning that already exists in the community. 11In total, these four themes informed and achieved our approach to the relationship building, and, in combination with our principles, values and ethics (see Appendix A, Learning Agreement, Page 46) formed an important foundation as we began moving into the different aspects of  our practicum.3.1 WOrK PLANAnother foundational piece to the success of  our relationship was the creation of  our Work Plan (see Appendix A, page 59). Recognizing the scope, deliverables and outcomes as set out in the Learning Agreement, the Work Plan acted as an overall framework to guide the timing, direction, focus and activities of  the planning project from start to finish, through the five pillars identified in the Learning Agreement. Created as a living document, the Work Plan was adaptable and flexible to the chang-ing needs and conditions of  the community. The Work Plan echoed the five pillars of  the Learning Agreement to achieve the core duties required by the TPIB. The five pillars are listed in Appendix A, along with their proposed timing, outcomes and key activities involved. This was created in con-sultation with the Planning Team in Tobacco Plains and our Instructor at UBC as we envisioned the work ahead. Figure 1: Wilson Mendes working on TPIB planning history visual tool.12Table 1. Practicum Student Work Plan.Pillar 1 rELATIONshIP(Oct – Dec, 2013)Pillar 2 ENGAGEMENT (Nov .2013 – Apr. 2014)Pillar 3 FACILITATION(Nov. 2013 – Apr. 2014)Pillar 4 rEsEArCh & ANALysIs(Nov. 2013 – May 2014)Pillar 5DOCuMENTATION & PrEsENTATION(Jan. 2014 – June 2014)Outcome: Practi-cum students form meaningful relationships with community, band staff, as a founda-tion to the planing process, and a clear understand-ing of  planning process needs and local planning context.Outcome: Commu-nity connects with the planning team and the community understands the roles and responsi-bilities of  the plan-ning team. Planning stage is set.Outcome: Plan-ning team has increased skills and confidence., and significant plan-ning knowledge to begin process of  analyzing priori-tization of  needs and actions.Outcome: A solid analysis based on knowledge gained from community sessions to inform the community’s CCP and bring about the desired change.Outcome: Plan-ning document for TPB that highlights themes, priorities for Council to follow. Practicum presentation and report to TPB and UBC as per practi-cum requirements. A completed CCP based on the needs of  the community; community endors-es the community with pride and acknowledgment.Key Activities:1. Meet with Band Manager, staff, Chief  and Coun-cil and communi-ty members2. Develop Plan-ning Approach, princi-ples and vision3. Identify roles and responsibil-ities of  planning team4. Create commu-nity engagement strategyKey Activities:1. Implement our Engagement Strat-egy2. Organize, pro-mote and launch events (Elders, youth and commu-nity)3. Design and deliv-er surveys, ques-tionnaires, activities to gather communi-ty information4. Review planning history5. Report back results of  planning activities to com-munityKey Activities:1. Facilitate the creation of  a Com-munity Planning Advisory Commit-tee (CPAC)2. Facilitating meetings, planning events and activ-ities3. Develop facili-tation capacity in the community through CPAC4. Facilitate SWOT Analysis and community update to Chief  and Council’s Strategic Planning SessionKey Activities:1. Define CCP framework & table of  contents2. Determine frame-work to analyze community, past planning, and chief  and council strategic planning information3. Organize, code and categorize our data4. Provide updates to community members and TPB staff  Key Activities:1. Compile summa-ry reports of  all ses-sions and activities2. Quantify the issues and strengths of  the community3. Determine Direction, pathway and actions of  each planning area4. Complete a draft plan, submit to TPB for comment and revision5.  Present practi-cum project to UBC and Com-munity Plan draft to Tobacco Plains for adoption and discussion.133.2 MONITOrING AND EvALuATING Our rEsuLTs:The guiding mechanism used to monitor the process and results of  our work was our work plan (see Appendix A, page 71); which would periodically be updated to reflect the changing circum-stances and adapt to new knowledge about the community. The work plan kept us on track to meet the time commitments, goals, objectives, activities and outcomes under our five pillars of  our work plan and learning agreement: (1) relationship building; (2) facilitation, (3) community engagement, (4) research and analysis, and (5) documentation. Our progress reports (see Appendix A, page 64) were key to evaluating our progress. The progress report acted as a measuring tool to analyze how much we accomplished within each pillar, based on our work plan targets, and it helped us to reeval-uate our next steps and formulate new strategies to reach our final desired goal.3.3 TObACCO PLAINs PLANNING TEAMThe Tobacco Plains Community Planning team was composed of  three TPB members: Vickie Thomas, Tania Brewer, and Anna Morigeau; two UBC/SCARP students: Wilson Mendes and Ste-phen McGlenn, and our practicum Instructor, Jeff  Cook. The following table identifies the plan-ning teams roles and responsibilities within the TPIB community planning process.Table 2. Planning team Roles & Responsibility. TOBACCO PLAINS INDIAN BANDVickie Thomas Tania Brewer Anna MorigeauTPIB Band Administrator TPIB Executive Assistant TPIB Planning Coordinator• Overall project Guidance• Ensure project follows cor-rect procedures as identified by Council• Ensure project meets funding criteria set by AANDC• Provide input on overall project planning• Provides conflict resolution and decision making authority when necessary• Provides feedback and eval-uation to Planning team and practicum students.• Ensure project stays on time and on budget• Provide approval of Project direction, expenses.• Ensures access to equipment and resources  (i.e.  workspace,   infor-mation technology, etc.)• Guide community process• Develop key messaging• Organize outreach activities  and event  planning  to  community  members, both on and off- ‐reserve• Organize, coordinate and chair meetings and workshops• Facilitate events & track event attendance• Reports to Band Manager/Exec-utive AssistantUBC/SCARP Students & InstructorWilson Mendes Stephen McGlenn Jeff CookSCARP Practicum Students Practicum Instructor• Pre-Planning Research• Strategy Development• Facilitation• Research & Analysis• Plan Development & Docu-mentation• Process Support and Facilitation• Pre-Planning Research• Strategy Development• Facilitation• Research & Analysis• Plan Development & Documen-tation• Process Support and Facilitation• Provide instruction, support, feedback and guidance to Practi-cum students• Provide input and suggestions on planning process, methodolo-gy, data analysis, activities, tools and planning communication• Maintain strong working relationships and offer conflict resolution as necessary.143.4 ThE TObACCO PLAINs COMMuNITy PLANNING PrOCEss:Background: TPIB secured funding from BCCI to engage in a comprehensive community planning initiative, however the word ‘comprehensive’ was dropped at the beginning to become simply the Tobacco Plains community planning process, to make the process more accessible. The vision for the Tobacco Plains Community Plan engagement (see 4.2.7, below) was developed collaboratively by us and the community Planning Team through various meetings, Skype calls, emails, etc. (see Appendix B, Engagement Strategy, page 147). This fulfilled the purpose of  the planning project as set out in the Learning Agreement:  “[T]o create and showcase an authentic and genuine planning process that would allow the planning team to better understand the needs and concerns of  the community, and to create a document that clearly outlines the priorities of  the community to Chief  and Council and Tobacco Plains administration”.  This section outlines the Engagement Strategy vision and pillars, as well as the Tobacco Plains Plan-ning Phases (and key activities within each phase) as developed and implemented by the planning team, and ends with a list of  some of  the tools, events and activities used to complete the practicum and planning phases.3.4.1 tPib engagement StrategyOur vision for the engagement strategy is for community participation to be the highest priority in the TPIB community planning process. The TPIB Community Plan will be founded on strong, authentic and genuine community engagement that allows the planning team to better understand the needs and concerns of  the community.The Tobacco Plains engagement strategy plan defines a vision, approach and set of  activities to sup-port direct community participation and involvement in the community planning process. It  outlines the five pillars of  engagement that formed the foundation to our engagement process. The five pil-lars are: strong involvement, accurate information, effective consultation and engagement, on going collaboration, and empowerment (see figure 2, page 16). The planning activities were envisioned as a road map for the Planning Team to provide knowledge, input and directions on local issues and needs throughout the planning process. A critical aspect to deciding on the framework of  the engagement strategy was to deliver a survey to community members that asked them for their engagement and participation preferences; the results of  this survey were then used to inform our engagement strate-gy (see Appendix D, Survey Results pg 192). 15Figure 2: TPIB Community Engagement PillarsEmpowermentFoster a sense of  empowerment within the community members to build the confidence, momentum and leadership of  members and staff, and seed the commitment of  the community to the implementation of  the community plan. Action: Honor community needs as a fundamental right to enable them to assume a formal place in local gov-ernance and direct access to Chief  and Council.Ongoing CollaborationWork together and in partnership with community membersAction: Maintain active community engagement and participation throughout the process, i.e., during the develop-ment of  planning alternatives and in the identification of  preferred solutionsStrong InvolvementInclude and maintain community mem-bers’ involvement in the decision-making pro-cess and appropriately inform them about when and how they can participate in the engagement process on an ongoing basis.Action: Work directly with community members through-out the planning process to maximize community partici-pation and ensure that community members’ concerns and aspirations are considered and included in the planning process. Form a planning commit-tee to maintain community members engaged in the community Accurate Information Summarize and communicate information about data, issues, strategies or plans that may direct or indirectly affect community members. Action: Provide community members with the Tobacco Plains past and present planning information and assist them in understanding the planning history. Constantly update community members on where the planning process is at.Effective Consultation & EngagementSeek and share direct knowledge, opinion and information from community members through a variety of  methods and tools. Respond to the pref-erences of  members. Fun, interactive, respectful, etc Action: Ask commuity members for feedback on the planning process.163.4.2 tobaCCo PLainS Community PLanning ProCeSSThe Tobacco Plains people are stewards of  the forests and lands of  their territory. As we got to ex-perience and get to know Tobacco Plains members, their challenges and strengths, the community’s relationship with the land and forest stood out as a powerful metaphor for the planning process. In one planning session, community members identified and drew a tipi, a fire, and a tree as their cul-turally relevant symbols or metaphors to represent planning (see Appendix C, Community Session Report, page 165). From the firewood that fuels and warms the community, to the supporting roles of  the forest pines in the Ktunaxa tipi and canoe, to the economic and cultural importance of  the forest to the community’s identity, the use of  the forest as a planning metaphor was intended to re-flect this powerful relationship. Like the forest, community planning is something that all members of  Tobacco Plains share, rely on, protect and preserve.  This process, outlined below, is represented in four phases; it helps to reinforce the central role and importance that planning can play in the lives of  all community members, just like the forest. While this planning process aligns and parallels our practicum process as outlined in the Learning Agreement & Work Plan pillars, it is intended to also be a stand-alone process that TPIB can utilize if  and when it engages in community planning in the future. The TPIB planning process is defined by  The Four Phases of  the Tobacco Plains Community Planning   1. Gathering the Fire Wood: Preparing to Plan             Key questions: What do we need to get ready to plan? Who will plan, how and why?           2. Knowing where we came from, and where we are going: Engaging the Community             Key questions: Where is our community now, and where do we want to go?           3. Lighting the Fire: Creating and Implementing the Plan             Key questions: How do get to where we want to go?           4. Empowering the Community: Monitoring & Evaluation             Key questions: Have we arrived? How are we progressing?17PhAsE 1: GatherinG the Fire Wood (PreParinG to Plan)The first phase in the Community Planning process is called “Gathering the Fire Wood”. In this phase, we answered the question “What do we need to get ready to plan?” by becoming familiar with and getting to know the community, the culture and traditional lands, and gathered the necessary fuel to light the fire of  community planning in Tobacco Plains. This phase involves the pre-planning research necessary to begin the planning process. For us, this involved developing our planning ap-proach and principles (see Approach & Methodology, page 11) and developing a work plan and work pillars to guide our process (see Appendix A & B). We identified the existing resources and planning capacity within Tobacco Plains, including the people, budget and timeline to carry out the plan, and determined our principles, values and approaches to planning (see Appendix A, Learning Agreement, page 46). Gathering the Firewood also meant visiting and touring the community and forming solid and posi-tive relationships within the community, Band Administration and Chief  and Council (aligning with Learning Agreement Pillar #1). We also identified the main stakeholder groups in the community, and designed an inclusive community engagement process that would allow all community members and community groups to be consulted and involved in the planning process (aligning with Learning Agreement Pillar #2). Our aim was to build community ownership. In the process of  creating and developing the engagement strategy (see Appendix B, page 147), the Planning Team identified elders, youth, community members, and off-reserve members as core groups requiring special focus and inclusion into the planning process. Figure 3: Anna Morigeau taking us on a tour of Tobacco Plains.18PhAsE 2: KnoWinG Where We Came From, and Where We’re GoinG (enGaGinG the Community) This phase involves engaging and gathering information from the community, in order to answer the question “Where is our community now, and where do we want to go? ” This involved engaging with and honoring the heritage and connection with the territory experienced by our core groups identified in phase 1: TPIB community members, youth and elders (aligning with our Learning Agreement Pil-lar #2). By speaking with the Elders we heard stories about the community’s past, where they have been as a community and how things have changed (see Appendix C, Elders Report). Through fun and interactive activities (aligning with our Learning Agreement Pillar # 3), youth and community members defined what community planning means for Tobacco Plains (see Appendix C, Community Session Reports, and Youth Report), and shared with us the current state of  Tobacco Plains, as well as a vision of  where they want to go (see Planning Outcomes, page 23). From November 2013, to April 2014, we engaged the community through 7 events involving fun and creative planning workshop (see Appendix D, list of  tools, events and activities). In this phase we also analyzed and summarized past planning documents to understand the community planning history, in order to connect and integrate substantive information regarding issues, concerns, opportunities, values and action considerations from past planning results into the current iteration of  community planning in TPIB (see Appendix D, past planning history summaries). Figure 4: TPIB member participating in a community planning session.The past planning documents we summarized include: (1) The Tobacco Plains Strategic Plan 2006-2011; (2) the Comprehen-sive Community Plan Phase 1 (2011); (3) the Five Year Com-munity Economic Develop-ment Plan and Implementation (2013); and (4) our Community Energy Plan (2014). Finally, we assisted in the facilitation of  the Chief  and Council’s Strate-gic Planning Session, providing Band administration and leader-ship an update on our commu-nity engagement process and results, and the visions, values, issues, needs and concerns of  the members.This knowledge based informed the Band’s creation of  a strategic framework, including strategic goals identified by the Band leadership. This became the third ‘stream’ of  information gathered for the community’s plan, together with the other two streams (community information and past plan-ning). All three streams were combined to describe the current situation of  the community, and in-form the vision, directions, pathways and actions of  the TPIB phase 2 Community Plan (see Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2, page 88). Another important element of  this stage of  the process was to introduce and create a Community Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC), with the aim of  building planning capacity and interest in the community members to participate in a more involved way in the community planning process (see Appendix D, CPAC Report).19Phase 3: Lighting the Fire (Creating and Implementing the Plan)Once we’ve answered the questions “What do we need to get ready to plan?” and “Where is our commu-nity now, and where do we want to go? ”, the third phase in the Tobacco Plains community planning process seeks to answer the question, “How Do We Get There?” This phase is named “Lighting the Fire” of  community planning, as it utilizes the resources and strengths identified in the first phase (“Gathering the Firewood”), and builds on the engagement and inclusion developed in the second phase, to turn planning knowledge into action and begin the work of  implementing the plan. This phase involves creating and adopting the plan, prioritizing and ranking the actions that will best achieve the vision and goals of  the community, and dedicating real time and resources to implementing the action items identified by the community. This phase of  the process comes after gathering and analyzing knowl-edge and data from all of  the community engagement facilitated by the Planning Team and the CPAC (aligning with our Learning Agreement pillars 4 & 5). This phase also involves setting targets, scoping, costing and sequencing actions, linking actions with annual work plans of  Band staff, and identifying community members as planning champions to help ‘carry the torch’ in specific planning areas (see “Next Steps”, page 36). The remainder of  this phase has yet to be completed by Tobacco Plains, and involves formally adopt-ing the Community Plan (i.e. through a Band Council Resolution), and beginning implementation. We developed several tools and recommendations to aid in the process of  implementing the plan (see “Next Steps”), such as ranking and prioritizing planning actions, creating a funding strategy, action scoping, costing and sequencing, and creating annual implementation plans whereby key Band staff  and community members become community planning champions and take a lead role on an action or action area. 20PhAsE 4: emPoWerinG the Community (monitorinG and evaluation). Once the fire of  our community planning is lit, the last phase is to ensure that the fire is serving the needs of  and empowering the community. Too much fuel and the fire could burn out of  control or suffocate; not enough fuel, and the fire could vanish. The fourth and last phase of  the Tobacco Plains community planning process seeks to answer the question “Have We Arrived?” and to sustain the fire of  community planning at a healthy and feasible level. The key tasks in this phase involve monitor-ing and evaluating the compliance, impacts and results of  the planning actions identified in Phase 3. Reporting progress based on those targets back to the community is essential, as is adapting the im-plementation strategy to ensure ongoing success, and to celebrate achievements of  planning actions. A critical aspect of  this stage is to determine the future process of  community planning in Tobacco Plains, and to dedicate resources to continue that process (see “Next Steps”). Again, this phase is a key next step for the community, following the expected adoption of  the Plan and implementation of  planning actions (see “Next Steps”). We developed key tools for monitoring and evaluation of  planning actions, including compliance, impact and action evaluation monitoring tools (see page 36).213.4.3 ProCeSS tooLS, methodS and teChniqueSThe following tools, methods, and techniques were used to carry out our process:Table 3. Tobacco Plains Community Engagement Process Accomplishment. Community ProcessEngagement ToolDocumentation Communication Planning summaries X X XWork plan X XLearning agreement XEngagement strategy X X XYouth workshops XElder interviews XDoor-to-door visits X XCommunity news letter X XOff-reserve presentation X XVideo archive X XVideo Editing XPhoto Editing XQuestionnaire design & analysis X XSurvey design & analysis X XEvent report X X XSWOT analysis workshop XFacebook updates XPhotography context XPrizes X XCommunity Planning Ad-visory Committee Terms of ReferenceX X XEvent poster design X XAudio transcription XTrip report X XBand meetings XStrategic planning meeting XSkype meeting X XChair meetings X XEvent Facilitation XCommunity planning ses-sions presentation XLive music XMagic session ice breaker X224.O PLANNING OUTCOMES4.1 subsTANTIvE ANALysIs AND METhODOLOGyThe information from our three data ‘streams’ (the community information sessions, past planning history and Chief  and Councils Strategic Planning Session) provided the Planning Team with a set of  knowledge and data to guide the final phase of  our Work Plan (Documentation), and the drafting of  the Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2 (see Appendix B, page 88). Core steps are as follows:1.o Information and data was first compiled and analyzed by the Planning Team; beginning with the past planning analysis, we determined 8 overall planning areas or themes that provided a framework for Stephen, Wilson, and Anna to categorize and code data (Economic Development, Governance, Infrastructure, Health, Social, Language & Culture, Education, Lands & Resources). 2.o Our process involved first identifying which planning theme the information fit into best, and with the help of  our Instructor, we then developed a matrix tool to further categorize, code and clus-ter information within each theme, including the issues, strengths, directions, pathways and actions. By listing the issues and strengths within each theme, we were able to provide a strong summary of  the community’s current situation, most commonly heard issues, and some of  the already existing capacity that would be instrumental in moving the Community Plan forward. 3.o Based on this analysis, we identified core Directions, or the broadest statement of  where the community wanted to move forward within a given planning area (see Table 5, page 30). Within each theme’s direction, multiple pathways were identified by the community (getting more specific about where the community wants to move forward) followed by multiple actions that serve to move the vision and values, into action and results. This Directions, Pathways and Actions Framework was used to differentiate action statements from broader vision statements. This section provides an overall summary of  the planning outcomes, as demonstrated in the Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2 (Draft). 234.2 sITuATIONAL ANALysIs4.2.1. CuLturaL identityThe people of  akink’um?asnuq?i?it have a strong cultural identity and connection with their tradi-tional territory (see figure 5, below). ?Aknumuctilil refers to the Natural Law of  akink’um?asnuq?i’it. A natural law is a unique and powerful concept, held by Elders and traditional knowledge keepers in the community. Similar to Western legal documents (such as the Canadian Constitution), this Ktunaxa Natural Law is a broad vision and guide for the people. But unlike any written document, ?Aknu-muctilil is the land itself, it is the behaviors of  the mountains and valleys, rivers and lakes, and the animal and plant beings that live on it. It represents the people’s connection to the land, and to all the beings who live on the territory, and the sacredness and connectedness of  all life. It is the responsi-bility of  the Ktunaxa people, who have lived on the land since time immemorial, to fulfill the values and responsibilities set out in this law including respecting one another, the land, of  being honest, and being inclusive to the community (see section 4.2.7., Tobacco Plains Vision and Values, page 29). ?Aknumuctilil is foundational to the Ktunaxa way of  knowing, being and doing, and plays a critical role in the planning philosophy of  Tobacco Plains.Figure 6: Tobacco Plains Reserve Map.Figure 5: Ktunaxa Territory in Relation to the world.244.2.2. The Land and Physical Resources?Aknumuctilil  also refers to the inherent rights and sovereignty to the land held by Akan’kunik, all Ktunaxa people, who have lived on the land since time immemorial. Framed in the context of  the Canadian Constitution (s. 35), this is understood and defined - though in a much more limited way - as Aboriginal Title. The Ktunaxa Nation is currently in a long treaty negotiation, on behalf  of  it’s member Bands, including Tobacco Plains, with the governments of  Canada and British Columbia. Their traditional territory extends well east of  the Rocky Mountains, and south into present day Montana, Idaho, and Washington states. The Cana-dian portion of  the territory is dominat-ed by the valleys of  the upper Columbia and Kootenay River systems, and by slopes and peaks of  the Rocky Moun-tains and the adjacent mountain ranges to the west. This area contains some of  the largest coal deposits in Canada, and huge coal mining operations, as well as a significant forestry industry, and con-struction. The majority of  the lands on the Tobacco Plains Reserve itself  (see figure 7) are flat and open grassy low-lands, suitable for horses, ranching and other agricultural activities. The main road access to the community is through Highway 93, which dissects the reserve in the north/south direction. The To-bacco Plains Reserve is relatively isolat-ed, being located on the Canada/US border, about an hour’s drive southeast of  Cranbrook. The climate of  the To-bacco Plains area is the mildest of  all the Ktunaxa Bands, averaging 317 days per Figure 7: Tobacco Plains Indian Reserve and land uses.254.2.4. SubStantive iSSueSAccess to housing and secure long-term employment are critical issues on the reserve, both of  which contribute to more members being forced to leave the community. Likewise, access to and success in Western education is limited, and members who do leave to get an education often do not return. More and more members end up leaving the community to find employment. With an aging commu-nity, and many families separated due to issues such as housing and employment, providing adequate health care and social services is also a major concern to many members. Community members feel concerned about the potential loss of  their language and culture as fewer and fewer people practice their traditional ways. The relationship between community members and TPIB (including Band staff, Administration, and Chief  and Council) has been strained for many years, leading to accusations of  nepotism and a lack of  transparency and accountability. This acted as a huge obstacle in trying to renew community planning within TPIB. Similarly, the relationship between TPIB and external entities, such as industry, local municipalities and the provincial and federal Crown needs improving. 4.2.3. tobaCCo PLainS PoPuLationPresently TPIB has approximately 144 members and 26 housing units. The community has seen a slight increase of  membership over the past 8 years. According to the Tobacco Plains Indian Band, community population and membership is increasing at a rate of  about 1.25% annually, with the majority of  their membership over the age of  55. Membership levels vary from 135-145 members, with an estimated population increase of  25 people over the next 20 years. The majority of  TPIB members are over the age of  30. Roughly half  of  the members live off  reserve, in nearby Cranbrook and Fernie. Many of  the children go to school in Eureka, Montana.                                          Source: Ktunaxa Nation Census 2009, AANDC 2014. Census 2011Figure 8: Tobacco Plains Population Projection.264.2.5. Community StrengthSThe regional economy consists largely of  mining, forestry, hydroelectricity, construction and tourism, all industries that Tobacco Plains hopes to access and form partnerships with in the future. With it’s own Development Corporation, Tobacco Plains is operating a successful Duty Free Shop, a Saw Mill, two campgrounds, and has leaseholders on its land; these activities present strong local economic op-portunities for the Band. The band is exploring a potential new housing subdivision, water and alter-native energy projects, has recently hired an Economic Development Officer, and is in the process of  developing a Financial Administration Law and applying under the First Nations Land Management Act to develop it’s own land code. 4.2.6. SWOT – Start With Our TruthA SWOT is a simple tool to reflect the current situation of  a community, identifying it’s internal strengths and weaknesses, it’s ability to leverage and capitalize on external opportunities, and to be-come resilient to external threats. We performed a SWOT for TPIB (see Table 4, page 28, and refer to Appendix D, for full SWOT Analysis), and the Band staff  and administration chose SWOT to stand for Start With Our Truth. A key to a successful SWOT is acquiring relevant information that will benefit the planning process. Table 4 below summarizes the key strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in TPIB as they relate to the 8 planning themes identified in Table 5 (page 30). This situational assessment represents the community’s truth, and summarizes the substantive issues (weaknesses and threats), strengths and opportunities identified in our community planning work. Our analysis captures where the community is currently at, and where they want to go, which is re-flected in the Tobacco Plains Vision & Values Statement (see page 29). Each planning theme is con-nected to and seeks to fulfill this Vision, by laying out an action strategy for TPIB to follow that will address the issues, needs and concerns identified by the community and represented in this situational analysis. These strategies (see page 29) consist of  the broadest, furthest reaching goal statements (directions) we gathered during the planning process; these then feed into lower, more specific goals (pathways), and finally into the specific actions required that will fulfill those directions and pathways, and ultimately the TPIB Vision itself.Figure 9: TPIB Band Administration and Chief and Council performing a SWOT exercise.27Table 4. TPIB SWOT Summary.TPIB Start (Strengths) TPIB With (Weakness)TPIB Development Corporation runs Duty Free Shop, Sawmill, Campground, Lease lots.Community wants to be included in decision makingTPIB provides fire protection servicesTPIB has high capacity to deliver health pro-gramsTPIB members value family connections very highlyTPIB members are eager to learn and growTPIB has a strong sense of cultural identity and knowledgeable EldersLarge quantities of harvestable timberPotential for hydro-electric powerHigh tourism potentialTPIB economy not integrated with regional economyLack of community engagement and participa-tionLack of funding for infrastructure projects (housing, water)Physical & Mental well-being of membersLack of social gathering spaces on reserveLack of support and opportunities for local skills trainingFew TPIB members speak the language, lack of intergenerational knowledge transferLack of Land Use CodeTPIB Our  (Opportunity)   TPIB Truth (Threats)Regional Economy is strong, employing high number of professionals.Tourism, forestry, mining opportunitiesOpportunity to enter into Impact-Benefit Agree-ments & Revenue Sharing Agreements.New subdivision close to realityTPB can become a designated regional health delivery agentExpanding the band hallPartnerships with industry and trade schools for apprenticeship programsHigh local unemploymentLack of trust and difficult relationship with external institutionsLack of housingLack of money, government program changesLack of housing and jobs forcing families to leaveLack of government supportLack of funding available for cultural programsIndustrial pollution.284.2.7. tobaCCo PLainS draft viSion and vaLueS StatementThe TPIB vision statement is as follow: The Tobacco Plains Indian Band is a self-governing community, dedicated to improving the health, safety, education and financial security of  our people while exercising the right to practice our culture and traditional ways.An external consultant drafted the above version of  the TPIB Vision statements after Chief  and Council’s Strategic Planning Session in March, 2014. Though the process for creating this draft vision statement did not include the community, the Planning Team did attend this session, and delivered an update on the community planning engagement based on our situational assessment of  TPIB. This information was then used and reflected on by TPIB leadership during the strategic planning session as a way to include the community’s voice in the draft vision statement, and the accompanying draft set of  values to guide the community forward: Principles:  1. We live in balance by advancing the following Core Values based on ?Aknumuctilil, our Natural Law. 2. We conduct ourselves with respect for each other, the land and all that the land contains. 3. We protect and nurture our children recognizing their importance in all that we do. 4. We promote honest and ethical behavior, by doing the right things for the right reasons. 5. We each take personal responsibility for our conduct and our obligations. 6. We promote the inclusion of  people, ideas, and perspectives in pursuit of  a safe and healthy community. 7. We effectively steward the land by preserving and protecting our traditional territories.The above draft vision statement will, after being updated and agreed upon by community members, serve as an important guide to all of  the actions undertaken by TPIB as a result of  the community plan (see Appendix B).4.2.8. Community PLanning PrioritieS StrategieS Ultimately, actions and action strategies pursued by TPIB should seek to fulfill the Vision statement, and espouse, respect and practice its values. This section highlights the action strategies that are a result of  our planning process; these actions arise out of  and seek to address or begin to solve the substantive issues in the community, utilizing existing strengths and working towards capitalizing on external opportunities and building resilience towards external threats, ultimately fulfilling the Vision of  TPIB. In total, the eight action strategies contain fifteen pathways, and thirty-three actions (see Table 6, page 32). Planning information gathered from the community’s current and previous planning was categorized into 8 planning themes, and each theme has it’s own action strategy. These strategies start with a  Di-rection, which is the broadest and farthest-reaching objective goal statements relative to each theme that we gathered in the planning process (for a full list of  TPIB’s planning directions, see Table 6, page 32). Within each theme’s direction, we identified relevant pathways – lower order objectives statements – that fulfill the direction within that theme, but are still broad and unspecific. Finally, within each pathway, there are several specific on the ground action-options that fulfill the pathways, directions, and ultimately the TPIB Vision statement. Note, the actions are labeled as action-options, as these have yet to be ranked and prioritized by the community (see “Next Steps”). 29Economic Development Foster local economic development and work towards self-sufficiency.Governance Empower our members, create unity as a Band and as a Nation, and build local capacity to meet the needs of our people.Infrastructure Invest in and improve Tobacco Plains infrastructure.Health Nurture a happy, healthy and prosperous community, to improve and support the health of all membersSocial Encourage & promote social health and inclusion, and build support net-works in the community.Language & CultureRevitalize and celebrate Ktunaxa language & culture.Education Expand educational opportunities to ensure our children are educated and our community members can find meaningful, secure employment.Lands & ResourcesMaximize the value of our lands, for the benefit of all Tobacco Plains mem-bers, present and future generations, and protect our lands.These 8 themes and their strategic directions are deeply interconnected, and the directions, pathways and actions within each theme will, once implementation begins, collaboratively and in parallel help to achieve the vision of  TPIB. Here is a brief  explanation of  what each theme represents, followed by a table of  that themes pathways and actions:1.o Economic Development: This theme represents the various economic entities, institutions, forces and trends that help to sustain the way of  life in Tobacco Plains, provide jobs and income to members, and revenue to the Band to provide critical programs and services. As economic de-velopment generates income and revenue, it is connected to every planning theme, and critical for implementation of  the Community Plan, which will require resources, time and money. The Duty Free Shop, Campgrounds, Saw Mill, and leaseholder opportunities represent key opportunities in the economy of  Tobacco Plains, as well as forming partnerships with external entities (Impact Benefit or Revenue Sharing Agreements, etc.).2.o Governance: This theme represents decision-making and management of  key issues and needs in the community. From a Canadian perspective, Chief  and Council and Band administration form the backbone of  the governing institutions in Tobacco Plains; from a Ktunaxa perspective, it is the Elders, community members and youth who come together to make decisions. A key issue in this planning theme is to bring Chief  and Council, Band administration and community members togeth-er, to work together and make decisions in a more collaborative and participatory fashion.Table 5: Community Planning Directions by Theme. 303.o Infrastructure: This theme represents the critical physical infrastructure needed to keep the community operating on a day-to-day level, such as water, roads, housing, communication, etc. Access to housing is the most critical area of  the infrastructure theme, including housing maintenance and building new homes, as well as maintaining water access and communication infrastructure within each home.4.o Health: This theme includes the programs and services that maintain healthy citizens and address health issues in the community. As a small isolated community, Tobacco Plains is responsible for offering health support services to its members. Issues such as substance abuse, mental and physical well-being, and an aging population are of  concern to Tobacco Plains members.5.o Social: This theme represents the social fabric of  the community, and the identity of  community members through their family and social lives. A key aspect to this theme is the lack of  social gather-ing space, and a lack of  social cohesion or willingness to take part in social gatherings.6.o Language & Culture: This theme forms the backbone of  akink’um?asnuq?i?it identity. The distinct language & culture, and the people who live it, has been on their traditional territory since time immemorial. This theme is intimately connected with and finds a home in all other themes; each theme provides unique ways to bolster the presence of  the Ktunaxa language & culture. Key issues here are lack of  programming spaces and services, and lack of  interest in the language and culture.7.o Education: This theme represents the learning and training needs in the community for both the young and older members. Education is critical for youth to grow up in a safe place and learn about their history and culture; it is also critical for older members to gain necessary skills to enter the workforce and earn incomes for their families, and to gain leadership skills to become future leaders in Tobacco Plains.8.0 Lands & Resources: Everything in the community rests on and lives from the land. All com-munity members expressed a strong connection with their land, as it forms a part of  their Ktunaxa identity. Forestry, mining, hydroelectricity and tourism/recreation represent some of  the potential resource industries that could provide Tobacco Plains with income and revenue. There is a strong push from the community to pursue physical development, while also maintaining a respect for and protection of  the land.31Economic Development Pathways Economic Development Action OptionsPathway 1: Increase capacity and employment, and improve the Economic Development Depart-ment.1. Hire Economic Development Officer and improve the Economic Development De-partment.2. Develop and implement a 5 year economic development plan.Pathway 2: Generate Revenue for the benefit of  our members and future generations by investing in local businesses and encouraging local entrepre-neurship.1. Improve Saw-mill operations2. Improve campground operations3. Improve the Duty Free Shop4. Promote and support local businesses and entrepreneurs5. Increase tourismGovernance Pathways Governance Action OptionsPathway 1: Commit to and formalize inclusive community planning as a basis for decision-mak-ing.1. Integrate community’s voice, skills and knowledge into all planning processesPathway 2: Improve communication and build trust between the band administration and com-munity members.1. Develop a communication and participa-tion strategyPathway 3: Increase administrative accountability, transparency, financial management and leader-ship.1. Create an Accountability System2. Develop a transparency and cooperation protocol 3. Promote Sound Financial Management and LeadershipInfrastructure Pathways Infrastructure Action OptionsPathway 1: Improve access to housing 1. Develop and implement a Comprehensive Housing PlanPathway 2: Develop new and improve existing local infrastructure1. Finalize an Infrastructure and Capital Ex-penditure Plan2. Improve communication systemPathway 3: Increase administrative accountability, transparency, financial management and leader-ship.1. Create an Accountability System2. Develop a transparency and cooperation protocol 3. Promote Sound Financial Management and LeadershipHealth Pathways Health Action OptionsPathway 1: Improve access to housing 1. Increase local control over health 2. Expand local service capacity 3. Support Citizen and Elder care 4. Expand community safetyTable 6: TPIB Action Strategy per Theme.32Continued Social Pathways Social Action OptionsPathway 1: Invest in social services and programs 1. Increase and prioritize funding for social initiatives2. Offer a space for community gath-erings 3. Promote the inclusion of on and off reserve membersLanguage and Culture Pathways Language and Culture Action Op-tionsPathway 1: Promote participation in Ktunaxa language and culture activities1. Increase the number of Ktunaxa speakers, and the presence of our culture2. Encourage intergenerational knowl-edge transfer among membersEducation Pathways Education Action OptionsPathway 1: Invest in and improve our education sys-tem1. Design a culturally relevant and world class education system for chil-dren and youthPathway 2: Provide meaningful, accessible and rel-evant employment training opportunities for our members1. Increase band members employabil-ity, skills and capacityLand and Resources Pathways Land and Resources Action OptionsPathway 1: Encourage physical growth 1. Pursue new resource based oppor-tunitiesPathway 2: Empower our Lands and Re- sourcesDepartment1. Develop Land Management Code & Practices2. Develop Land Tenure Rules and Lease agreements3. Investigate alternative energy proj-ects335.O PROCESS AND PRODUCT PLANNING DELIVERABLES The process undertaken by our Planning Team to achieve the goals of  the Tobacco Plains community plan was guided by a series of  innovative and interactive community focused engagement strate-gies, aimed at achieving our vision of  community engagement throughout the plan. The community engagement strategy and the work plan were integral in the development of  the planning process, method and tools to achieve the desired outcomes. The two documents functioned as a road map to inform the direction to be taken in each phase of  the planning process.  After six months of  commu-nity work, a series of  planning deliverables were achieved and the results have been  incorporated into the final community planning document (see Appendix B). In total, we engaged with 50 members of  Tobacco Plains (see TPIB Community Plan, Appendix B, Acknowledgments). We accomplished this engagement in seven trips to the community, contributing over 800 hours in planning support (see Table 7, page 35). In total, we: • Developed and delivered five community planning sessions (including one off-reserve ses-sion);  • Developed and delivered four youth planning sessions; • Interviewed three elders; • Attended four TPIB sessions (including two Chief  and Council meetings, one strategic   planning session, and one Development Corporation AGM);• Delivered our final practicum presentation at UBC;• Delivered our final community plan presentation to TPIB;• Utilized over thirty planning practice tools & activities34Table 7: Tobacco Plains Community Planning Process and Product DeliverablesTOBACCO COMMUNITY PLANNING DELIVERABLESTOOLS/ACTIVITIES EVENTSCommunication & Participation SurveyCommunity Vision-ing ExerciseOpen house session #1 Community Visioning Session #2Photography con-testYouth Videography WorkshopThemes and Issues Session # 3Ranking and Priority Setting Session # 4Sticky note Shuffle CPAC Questionnaire Elder Interview #1 Elder Interview #2Community Meta-phor DrawingNewsletter Elder Interview #3 Youth Photography Session #1Social Media Up-datesFacebook Updates Youth Visioning Drawing Session #2Youth Photography Session #3Flip Chart Drawings Visual Summaries Youth Video Interviews Session #4Youth Visioning Draw-ing Session #5SWOT Analysis Door-to-door can-vassingOff-Reserve Community Session # 1UBC Practicum Pre-sentationSkype Meetings Phone Meetings Attended TPB Strategic Planning SessionTPIB Final Communi-ty Plan PresentationInterview Transcrip-tionCPAC terms of  ReferenceCPAC meetings Attended 2 Council SessionsEvent Agendas Event Posters Attended TPIB Development Corporation AGMEvent Analysis Event SummariesTrip Reports Past Planning SummaryEvent Report Media managementGiveaway Prizes Data AnalysisData Collection Deliver Community Planning Update to TPB356.O NEXT STEPS The following list of  items has been created in a prioritized and sequential order, relative to their importance in furthering the planning process. These steps are based on the “Next Steps” chapter of  the Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2 (see Appendix B, page 88).Step 1. Implementation Implementation is an integral part of  the planning process, and community members have expressed frustration at the lack of  implementation and follow-through on plans. Our practicum concluded at the end of  the engagement stage of  the phase 3 of  the planning activities, and we have developed in phase 3 lighting the fire some key recommendations to support the implementation of  the Tobacco Plains Community Plan phase four of  the process.1.1 Ranking and Prioritization of  Planning Actions:This is a critical step for TPIB to be able to know which actions should be acted on, and in what order. A tool has been developed by the practicum students to aid in the delivery of  this step (see Appendix B).1.2 Creation of  Annual Implementation Plan (AIP):This step involves the use of  a tool created by the planning team that would link planning items with annual operational work plans, identifying not only key band staff  but also community planning champions to be responsible for implementing and reporting back on planning achievements.1.3 Creating an Implementation Budget and Action Sequencing: Once key actions have been determined, a necessary step will be to examine their feasibility, what resources and capacity are needed to complete the action, and what the realistic time and scope of  the project are. A tool has been developed to complete this stage (see “Next Steps”, page 36).  Step 2. Monitoring & Evaluation  A strong monitoring and evaluation regime is needed to set the targets and indicators within the com-munity that would tell and celebrate with the community when planning actions have been achieved. A key to this stage is asking: how will we know if  we have succeeded? 2.1 Utilize the Plan Indicator/Target setting tool:This tool, developed by the planning team could be used in a community session to lay out all the actions (once they’ve been ranked and prioritized), and determine with the community what would indicate that action was successfully completed.2.2 Monitor for compliance & impact, and evaluate actions:Several tools developed by the planning team (see “Next Steps”) will help to track the progress of  planing actions, including monitoring the compliance of  planning actions within the AIP, monitoring the ongoing impacts of  each actions, and evaluating how the implementation of  those actions can be improved to achieve the targets and goals set by the community.367.O CLOSING REFLECTION This section presents some of  our perspectives of  the opportunities and challenges faced by the Tobacco Plains Band and provide our personal reflection on the process, content, and learning out-comes of  the community planning practicum project.  7.1 MOvING FOrWArDOur planning process not only helped to identify the needs, concerns, issues, and dreams of  com-munity members, but it also shows how the priorities of  both the community members and Chief  and Council are aligned; recognizing and celebrating this could play an import part in rebuilding the trust between community members and Chief  and Council. For example, the Chief  and Council have identified some possible actions that can provide meaningful and positive changes for the community, such as the need to continue their economic development projects, while having strict guidelines to protect and preserve their land, or to improve financial and administrative accountability and trans-parency. Another fundamental step towards aligning the community and TPIB leadership is if  Chief  and Council continually formalizes the role of  community planning, and the voice of  community members plays a key role in decision making on important issues and decisions, such as the Vision & Values Statement developed by Chief  and Council, the structure, roles and responsibilities of  Band administration, and other decisions that will impact the community in significant ways. If  decisions are made in a genuine participatory fashion, community members will regain trust in their leadership. There is also an opportunity to reintroduce traditional Ktunaxa governance practices, such as com-munity decision-making meetings, and Ktunaxa terminology; these actions may help to build unity and community cohesion, making achieving the Vision of  TPIB that much more realistic. 7.2 COMMuNITy ChALLENGEs7.2.1. CommuniCation and CaPaCityCommunication and capacity are significant challenges in the community that affected the planning process. Funding from external governments is limited, revenue generation in TPIB is limited, and knowledgeable and capable community leaders are likely to leave the community in search of  mean-ingful employment or to escape cycles of  abuse in the community. Thus, Band staff  members, in addition to having to deal with frustrated community members, do not have the resources they need to complete projects that they’re already committed to. As a result, a new planning initiative, though ambitious and important, may not have been timed appropriately, and Band staff  participation was also limited in the planning process. Key members of  the Planning Team were often drawn into other areas, affairs or projects in TPIB despite their commitment to the planning process, making it difficult to develop and deliver key planning activities. As outsiders even more removed from the commu-nity, we had difficulty maintaining communication within the Planning Team, particularly when we returned to the Lower Mainland. As a result, the planning process seemed to stall in the community when we were not there, further indicating to us that the timing wasn’t right, that more on the ground capacity was needed, and that the planning process and approach itself  was not aligned with the com-munity’s needs. In consultation with our Instructor, we tried new methods of  engaging community members, with limited success.377.2.2. Community engagementThroughout the process, TPIB Chief  and Council seemed relatively receptive to and encouraging of  the idea of  community planning, and incorporating more of  the community’s voice into the planning process in Tobacco Plains. With that in mind, we assumed that, in combination with Tobacco Plains being a small community, engagement with the community members would be easy. Unfortunately, our engagement was not as participatory as we had hoped. The roots of  the community’s dissatisfac-tion and mistrust with Band leadership run very deep; at Band council meetings and Development Corporation meetings we attended, the community’s anger and frustration was obvious. In our in-teractions with the community, they likely (and in some cases, explicitly) perceived the community planning process as an extension of  the Band’s top-down, disconnected decision-making model of  Chief  and Council, and ultimately this influenced their decision not to participate in the process. To-wards the end of  the process, participation was quite low. When members did participate, they were eager to vent their anger at the Band rather than propose solutions. Furthermore, in the middle of  the community planning process, TPIB was engaged in a separate strategic planning process for staff, administration and Chief  and Council only. Perceiving this separate process may have reinforced community members’ already significant skepticism towards TPIB’s engagement efforts. We were invited to participate in this strategic planning session and to represent the voice of  the community by delivering a community planning update. Again, as outsiders quite removed from the community, this responsibility was beyond our expectations and seemed an inappropriate representation of  the community’s voice. It was also unclear to us how the council’s strategic planning would or could align with the community planning initiative, a fact made more complicated and difficult to navigate due to the limited communication within the Planning team.  Despite attempts to develop and improve the Band’s reputation and accountability within the com-munity, members were not ready to commit to TPIB’s participatory process. Our sense from speaking to the elders and traditional knowledge keepers in the community is that Ktunaxa people and Tobac-co Plains are a deeply communal people, and that historically they valued and practiced community based decision-making. Therefore, a revival and renewal of  traditional language for example might help to reinforce this value in the community; creating a cultural space, honoring the language, and tapping into and honoring cultural processes might be critical to rebuilding trust between commu-nity members and Band leadership, and building community consensus in a culturally relevant way. Examples of  this include the rich winter ceremonies and dances in the community that have always functioned as critical informal planning processes. The critical challenge is to find linkages with or to alter the structure and mandate of  the Western based Chief  and Council system of  governance in order to accommodate and include cultural knowledge and practices.7.2.3. Cultural transitionIn order to be effective, community-planning needs to be formalized into the governance structure of  TPIB to slowly build up confidence and participation, and heal the relationship between the community and TPIB leadership. A fun, creative and engaging approach to planning, using some of  the tools, techniques and capacities developed from the practicum will help to break the cycle of  the Western planning model used historically in Tobacco Plains. Additionally, building transparency into the planning and decision-making process, holding regular community planning meetings, reporting back to the community, setting realistic goals and committing real resources to following through on plans are all cross-cutting themes that could help rebuild trust between members and administration. Additionally, the role of  language, culture and traditional knowledge could play a foundational role in revitalizing a unique, Tobacco Plains planning process. Incorporating traditional decision-making processes, Ktunaxa language and phrases into all planning documents, and setting out a clear role for elders, knowledge holders, youth, etc., could help revitalize and reconcile traditional Indigenous plan-ning with contemporary western planning practices, both necessary processes for the community.387.3 sTuDENT CONTExT7.3.1. “the magiC of PLanning”The uniqueness of  the practicum project and ICP program is the student partnership component; typical academic pedagogy parallels Western capitalistic ideas of  competition over collaboration. The ICP practicum project is an interesting experiment in collaboration that comes with its benefits and challenges. As unique individuals with diverse and different life experiences, we each brought our own strengths, capacities and learning objectives into the practicum. Having similar interests, and both of  us being “slightly” older than the ICP cohort made it easy for us to connect, and have a solid and positive relationship going into the practicum. This was essential in order to work together, particularly in the face of  the many challenges in the community mentioned above. Coming from different backgrounds and cultures was a critical challenge for our student partnership, as we had dif-ferent work habits, different expectations, and different planning capacity and approaches. However, we decided to capitalize on our differences, and be willing to try new things. Out of  this approach was born our idea of  the “magic of  planning.” Originally proposed as a simple icebreaker for our first community session, we brought some simple magic tricks to emphasize the transformative nature of  community planning. This quickly escalated into an entirely new metaphor to planning for us: the magic of  planning. Here, we informally explored the use of  characters and role-playing as a way to tap into and parallel Indigenous storytelling. As a result, we each developed alter magician ego’s – El Mustacho and Senior Barba (Mr. Mustache and Mr. Beard) – that demonstrated magic tricks and re-lated the transformative power of  magic to the intent of  community planning. We emphasized and made fun of  ourselves as outsiders to the community in order to break the tension, and played with language barriers (El Mustacho and Senior Barba spoke predominantly in Spanish). This approach was also a way for us to explore the Decolonization of  formal Western planning practice, by not only being fun and creative, but by breaking down the stereotype of  planning professionals as serious experts. This approach, while fun, ran the risk of  the community being unable to take us seriously. We managed this risk by being adaptive to the temperature of  the audience; we were fun and magical when it was appropriate, but serious and contemplative when needed.7.3.2. reLationShiP and ConneCtionWe have come to understand that Respect and Protocol are two inseparable elements, and that both are integral components of  working with Indigenous communities. We felt that giving people the time and attention to hear their concerns, dreams, and aspirations created a sense of  unity based on authentic interactions and clear intentions. Though in a limited way, having an immersive cultural experience was a critical aspect to the practicum that allowed us to get a sense of  the everyday life, needs, issues and concerns of  the community. The practical and applied aspect of  the practicum was a critical avenue for us to explore and develop our own planning praxis (especially in relation to our five learning pillars: Relationship, Engagement, Facilitation, Research & Analysis, and Documentation & Presentation); this is an opportunity not afforded to all SCARP students, and a critical strength of  the ICP program. Additionally, as students working collaboratively together, this was further practice in developing positive personal and working relationships. We identified early in our practicum that having a positive relationship, in both a student-to-student, student-to-community and student-to-In-structor setting, is key to maintaining project momentum, weathering challenges, and making life long connections. For our project, our positive relationship with the Planning Team was foundational to keeping the process moving, especially as community participation rates dropped, and the momen-tum of  our project seemed to be fading. Critically, having a strong student-to-student relationship helped us maintain a positive attitude towards each other, which was reflected back towards the com-munity and to our Instructor when issues or challenges came up. Important to note is that planning is messy, and challenges and obstacles will arise inevitably; we could not imagine proceeding with this work without having a strong, positive and collaborative relationship. 397.3.3. youth, PhotograPhy and videograPhyWe also explored the use of  photography and videography as a powerful tool to document the pro-cess. Throughout the practicum, we developed short community planning update videos that were posted to social media, and developed and delivered a photography and videography workshop for youth to explore these tools to express their concerns and wishes for their community. This was a fun way to include youth in a relevant way, and to develop some skills and capacity for them. Unfortunate-ly, much of  the data for these projects was lost due to hard drive failure (see section 7.3.3, page 40).7.3.4. reSearCh, data CoLLeCtion, anaLySiS & managementA critical learning objective for both of  us going into the practicum was to learn and practice real re-search methodology, including data collection, analysis and management. Both of  us felt significantly underprepared from our first year in SCARP in terms of  our understanding of  research and analysis, tools, techniques and methods/methodologies. This challenge was compounded by the fact that the practicum project’s purpose and objectives initially seemed unclear, poorly understood and commu-nicated to us by TPIB. Our methodology and approach was developed as the practicum objectives became more clear; the result of  this was that our overall approach to data collection and analysis was not determined into quite late in the practicum timeline. Although we had gathered significant information from the community at the beginning of  the practicum, we didn’t quite know what to do with that information, how to analyze, code or categorize it in an effective way. Understanding the im-portance of  a solid data analysis framework, of  what information you’re hoping to collect, why, and how you’re going to analyze it, is an important area to develop at the beginning of  the planning pro-cess versus at the end. A critical challenge we ran into was a hard drive failure towards the end of  our practicum where a lot of  data, particularly photo and video data, collected from the community was lost. Constant back-ups of  data is highly recommended, and should be built into your work planning!7.3.5. PLanning Pedagogy and deCoLonizationA general feeling of  being poorly prepared and supported from SCARP/ICP was common through-out our practicum, and across other practicums in our ICP cohort. This, we feel, is connected to the training and teaching methodology, or pedagogy, of  SCARP. One of  the most important learning aspects of  our practicum experience was the realization that planning, especially Indigenous planning, is a multi-faceted and complex process that goes beyond any theoretical body of  literature. Theory is a valuable lens from which we analyze and try to make sense of  the world around us, but it does not entirely prepare one for the reality of  Indigenous planning. Furthermore, Indigenous ontology and epistemology, or Indigenous ways of  knowing, being and doing, are underrepresented, if  not entirely absent, from most planning theory lenses. If  one of  the intent’s behind the ICP program is to ‘decolonize’ planning, then it must address where Indigenous planning theory fits into it’s teaching model; where can students understand, develop and practice Indigenous planning theory? How can the practicum be a way for students and communities to explore and combine new and old, Western and Indigenous approaches to planning? In it’s current iteration, the practicum is more a chance to practice comprehensive community planning, a very specific approach to planning. The overall the-ory, process, approach and intention behind CCP seemed unclear, though it seems that all Practicum projects followed the same overall structure. Ideally, there would be more space to practice and ex-plore methods, tools, processes, and attitudes decolonizing of  planning. At best, decolonizing planning is something that we as individual students can think about and reflect on in our personal planning practice and our future careers. For us, this largely means building and committing to meaningful relationships with Indigenous community that respect and honor the pro-cesses, protocols and perspectives of  community members, having a sense of  humility, and asking, in a culturally respectful way, what Indigenous planning looks like. 40Ultimately, we both also feel that the school needs to improve its support to students. As bridge-build-ers between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous world, we are placed at a difficult crossroads of  a complex, politically and racially charged collision of  world views. Not only is this work emotionally, physically, mentally and spiritually taxing, it is an immense responsibility for students new to the plan-ning arena to take on, and there are few people in SCARP or at UBC who can empathize with us or offer guidance. ICP and other SCARP faculty need to have a better sense of  where students are at during the practicum; we make deliberate efforts to be flexible and adaptive to the changing circum-stances of  the community’s we work with, and they are likewise flexible for us; SCARP needs to show it’s students the same courtesy. This flexibility is particularly needed with other classes in SCARP that must be taken during the practicum, which requires us to be away for significant and unpredictable periods of  time and miss classes. ICP faculty must collaborate with other Instructors at SCARP and determine a better design for the ICP specialization, and it’s incorporation into the broader SCARP curriculum. Linking core courses and assignments directly to the practicum where feasible would be logical, but would require significant more collaboration amongst SCARP faculty.ICP faculty need to understand where students are at in terms of  what they already know and under-stand of  Indigenous issues as they enter SCARP and the practicum. Many of  us began the journey of  decolonization and unsettling long before entering SCARP, and were familiar with many issues that were covered in the core courses (such as the legal context, and many philosophical concepts in the ICP course) and were thus ready to dive deeper into what decolonization means in practice; unfortunately, the school was not ready for us. Many of  the core courses did not seem to be helpful in our journey to become Indigenous planners, and we recommend the school make more significant attempts to create space for Indigenous issues in the core courses. 7.3.6. timing and SCoPeThe practicum project is an incredible learning opportunity, but the scope is somewhat large and overwhelming given the limited time and capacity of  students. Our practicum didn’t begin until late October, and it took us until December to figure out what it was really about, what we needed to do, and to finish assignments for class that, ideally, could be completed before the bulk of  the planning work begins (i.e. Learning Agreement & Work Plan). Aiming for practicums to get moving early enough for students to be able to meaningfully contribute to a community planning initiative, and develop their learning and planning capacity in a less stressful, and more supportive environment would be ideal. This might mean identifying multiple practicum communities ahead of  time, perhaps as the ICP program grows, so that students can easily transition from year 1 into and prepare for their practicum projects during year 2. Another option is to hand more responsibility to students to identi-fy communities and find their own practicum projects during their first year, or even as they apply to SCARP-ICP (identifying a master’s project is a core responsibility given to most other graduate stu-dents in SCARP, and the rational for taking it away from ICP students was never made clear). Again, linking this responsibility to one of  the core first year courses, such as Qualitative Research Design, could allow students and SCARP to make better use of  the limited time and resources of  the school, and to include students in identifying community partners long before the practicum begins. In this way, the transition in to the practicum might be less overwhelming. Another option would be to con-sider the model used in classes like PLAN 548F (Sustainable Planning & Governance Approaches to Whole Region Change), where the instructor identifies one single organization, institution or commu-nity in need of  planning capacity, and the class works on different aspects of  the initiative in groups, according to their interests and capacity, and collaborates in the documentation of  a planning project. 417.3.7. SChooL, Work and LifeThe deepest disappointments and frustrations during the practicum came not from the planning work in the community, which for the most part was enjoyable and interesting, and very challenging, but at the interface between student, work and personal life. In terms of  understanding and practic-ing Indigenous Planning, this is where the school has an opportunity to learn some big lessons and principles from Indigenous communities. For our practicum, the general enthusiasm and support from the people of  Tobacco Plains was heart warming. Overall the community was happy we were there, and was very flexible and supportive of  our needs. We looked forward to traveling to the com-munity every time we went, and connected deeply with the culture, landscape and people of  Tobacco Plains. At the same time, our relationship with SCARP seemed to sour over time. We do recognize the immense privilege and honor of  being able to work with indigenous communities as part of  our graduate degree; however an element of  decolonizing SCARP should mean incorporating Indige-nous methodologies –  and more Indigenous faculty – into the school. Finally, the lack of  funding in SCARP meant that we had no choice but to work during school; the resulting frustration, lack of  time and support negatively our health, our learning and our connection to the school. 428.O FINAL CONSIDERATIONS  In this final reflection, we would like to offer our considerations for future students and community partners within the field of  Indigenous Community Planning. As we have noted, the first essential element of  any collaborative work is based on a strong positive relationship, between the students, instructor, and community partner. There were times when these relationships were stressed. Honoring these relationships means committing to clear, consistent and concise communication; have daily, weekly and monthly check-ins. For us, failing to check-in regularly would result in the drafting of  large emails, or organizing meetings with large agendas to catch-up, which sometimes frustrated our process, and that frustration led to more delay in communication. Having more frequent check-ins keeps everyone on the same page and feeling confident in the pro-cess. Communication is critical for a healthy relationship, which acts as a strong foundation when chal-lenges arise in the practicum-planning process. There are many different types of  relationships in the practicum, and within the community, that you will form. You will have relationships with your planning team, with Chief  and Council, with community members, elders and youth, your practicum partners and Instructor. Understanding how to communicate with different people is a delicate skill. Speaking to your Instructor, or a crowd of  graduate planning students is much different than speak-ing to a community, to an Elder or to youth. Be aware of  communication protocol in the community, especially with Elders and knowledge keepers. As outsiders, we are not privy to every aspect of  the community; be respectful of  what you can and cannot know. One of  the key practicum assignments, the Learning Agreement, represents your relationship with the community in written form. It is important to remember that relationships cannot rest solely in or arise from a written document. A document can only be a limited expression, though an important process guide, for any relationship. Ultimately, they must be a lived and real process. Our Learning Agreement was largely drafted by us, in-between our visits to TPIB and without enough consultation or collaboration with our partners. Despite our efforts to do so, we crafted not only our own learning objectives, but also the mutual and community learning objectives on behalf  of  the community. The same can be said about the Student Partnership Agreement; not knowing what exactly the practicum was about made it very difficult to draft a document outlining how our relationship should function. The nature of  our personalities meant that we didn’t rely on this document anyways; we simply start-ed on the assumption that we are both whole and complete individuals, and to respect that about one another, and to generally support each other’s learning.  Be prepared to spend a lot of  time with one another, this means patience, and follow through on your commitments in a timely manner! Ensure the relationship is alive, not just written down formally, and that everyone’s voice is present and ac-knowledged in your interactions on and off  paper, on and off  line, etc.  Some kind of  clarification of  expectations should be in place as soon as the practicum begins; this is essential for time management, process readiness, and the completion of  key documents (Learning Agreement, Work Plan and Student Partnership Agreement).  Start the learning agreement and work plan as soon as possible and reflect on and clarify the purpose of  the project you will be doing. What type of  information are you trying to collect, and why? What data collection and analysis process can you design before hand to make the information gathering meaningful and efficient? How will you code and organize community information, and why? What is your methodology? Who’s informing your methodology? What are the Western theoretical, epistemological and ontological assumptions made in your methodology? Indigenous? 43For us, these questions were asked and answered too late; having them figured out would have helped our process design immensely and reduced stress, anxiety and frustration throughout the project. You must be flexible and adaptable during the practicum. Be ready for unexpected events, roles and responsibilities. Having an adaptive approach is key to navigating challenging and unexpected situa-tions. For example, when preparing to deliver a community presentation, you may not always follow your agenda; circumstances could call for an unexpected shift in your plan! Or, on a larger scale, your process may shift depending on circumstances in the community. Be aware of  your own biases and assumptions, as they might be keeping you locked in a certain mode of  thinking and behavior. For example, do not assume your Instructor knows or will show you what you need to do. Clarify with ICP how and where you can take license in the planning process, and don’t be afraid to challenge faculty and the status quo. Likewise, do not expect that the community you will be working with will tell you what they need; in fact, it may be up to you to figure that out, or to challenge them on what the planning process needs to be. For example, TPIB would consistently hire daycare and babysitters to watch all of  the kids during a community session. We didn’t think this was necessary. Clarify and ask questions early on; generally they understand that we are students and are there to learn! In the end, it took us almost three months to determine the real objective of  the practicum, as the first few events were about launching the event, preparing to plan, and doing background research. This left us with about half  of  our practicum to do the bulk of  the work. You will be bringing a ton of  new and likely needed ca-pacity into the planning process, and you will need to make decisions that will influence your learning and the community’s needs, so be confident!You need both internal and external support to help you get through the practicum. Remember to ask for help from families, friends, and colleagues when you need it and make sure to make space to share your challenges with other students, especially in ICP, that may be facing similar issues. Also, remem-ber to have meaningful conversations with our school faculty, and UBC staff  about the things that are not working for you. SCARP and UBC don’t know how to support you unless you tell them. Ad-ditionally, SCARP is just an infant when it comes knowing, honoring and practicing the true meaning of  Indigenous planning; so help SCARP along. If  you have to work to make ends meet, as we did, the school will not be supportive of  you, as it wasn’t for us. Be prepared to fight for your right to work! Don’t ask for permission to work during the practicum, because you won’t get it. Do what is right for you; you’re paying to be at SCARP, and it’s your degree. Your colleagues will understand and support you, but your faculty and supervisors may not.  Be respectful of  your commitments in the community, at school and at work; again, communicating and planning ahead is essential, but it is also important to be confident and recognize your own personal sovereignty as a living being on this Earth. Finally, enjoy the practicum because it is a once in a lifetime experience! You will make life-long con-nections and gain life-long wisdom. Know what you need to do to decompress and de-stress on your down time; rely on your support networks to stay healthy and well during this time because you will sacrifice a lot to complete this project. 44APPENDIX A: Practicum Documentation  I. Learning Agreement  II. Work Plan III. Students Partnership Protocol IV. Trip Reports                     45	  LEARNING AGREEMENT FOR SCARP STUDENT PRACTICUM AT TOBACCO PLAINS           	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	    	  Stephen McGlenn and Wilson Mendes December 12th, 2013 Vancouver BC Canada 46	  1. Background 	  In 2012, the School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP) launched a new specialization called Indigenous Community Planning (ICP). The major focus of this new specialization is to provide ICP students with meaningful, practical and field-based learning opportunities. In their 2nd year, ICP students are paired up and placed with a First Nation community to support a collaborative planning process to complete a Comprehensive Community Plan (CCP) over 6 to 8 months. In September of 2013, Wilson Mendes and Stephen McGlenn (the students) were paired together and sent to the Tobacco Plains Indian Band of the Ktunaxa Nation (the community), in present day Southeast British Columbia.   The traditions and culture of the Tobacco Plains Band (TPB) are more than 10,000 years old and are embodied in the distinct Ktunaxa aboriginal language. The TPB is one of 7 Bands of the Ktunaxa Nation,  and is located in the southeast corner of the Province of British Columbia in the general area known as Grasmere. The combined area of the traditional territory of the Ktunaxa Nations covers roughly an area of 50,000 acres of land. The Band is active in agriculture, forestry and commercial activities contributing to the Grasmere economy. Based on AANDC information, the population of TPB membership is 199, with 95 of those living on reserve and 104 living off reserve.    Although the TPB has completed a number of community planning and economic development planning projects over the past ten years, the community has recently secured funding from the British Columbia Capacity Initiative (BCCI) to undertake a process to build on its Phase 1 CCP completed last year, over the next six months.   2. Vision for the Practicum  Our vision is to experience an enduring trustful relationship between the TPB and SCARP Practicum students to support a community-based process to achieve the planning goals as set out by the Tobacco Plains Indian Band to complete its CCP.   3. Approach   Our approach to the learning partnership is based on four themes:  Solidarity – We want to work in solidarity with the people of TPB; keeping in mind the history of Canadian & First Nations relations, and aiming to promote collaboration for a broad goal of reconciliation. Transparency – to have an open and accountable process whereby the work produced by the students and the TPB planning team is open and accessible to the community and staff, and is reflective of the community’s needs.   Collaboration – to share in the strengths and experiences of both the students and community, to enrich each others’ perspective and experience with community planning and in doing so, foster a collaborative and positive relationship. Capacity Building – to contribute to both the students and community’s understanding and practice of community-based planning and action. 47	  4. Principles and Values  The principles that will guide our learning partnership are as follows:  v Respecting traditional knowledge, history & intellectual property rights. v Respecting protocol and Elders  v Respecting community values and perspectives v Listening well and maintaining respectful and clear communication v Respecting Ktunaxa traditional planning practices  Research and Ethics:  v Appropriate use and storage of knowledge data: All information retrieved from community sessions will be used according to the community’s wishes and in accordance with the requirements of the community planning process only. All confidential information will be kept under lock and key, and digitally stored in an encrypted hard drive. v Respect the TPB rights to access, ownership, and copyright of all materials as defined by TPB.  5. Purpose The purpose of this learning agreement is to support an inclusive, participatory process that integrates local values, priorities and community participation in order to produce a long-term community plan that serves as a roadmap for the community into the future and for future generations. Learning Objectives 	  6. Core Learning Objectives  6.1. Student Objectives  The core student learning objectives are as follow:  v Relationship: Develop and practice long-term relationship building skills between the students and the community. v Community Engagement: Practice collaborative planning, learning how to respectively include and promote a broad range of community perspectives to inform the planning process. v Facilitation: Build skills and capacity for facilitating community engagement sessions, such as public speaking, developing and employing a variety of facilitation tools, event planning, public relations,  v Research and Analysis: Integrate theory and knowledge into a practical and participatory planning process. Develop technical skills, methodologies and analytical tools and techniques to acquire, analyze and summarize knowledge and data gathered from the community planning process.  48	  v Documentation: Document the community planning process according to the needs of the community, Council and Band staff.  6.1 Community Objectives   The core community learning objectives are as follows: v Community Process: Launch a collaborative community planning process that is accessible, fun and meaningful; commit to the planning process. v Community Involvement: Support community engagement and local planning sessions in ways that maximize participation. v Respect Knowledge: Honor local planning and traditional knowledge, incorporating local Tobacco Plains wisdom, values, preferences and cultural knowledge into the process and decision-making.  v Document Results: Document the results of the process into a comprehensive community plan in ways that are accessible and practical.   6.2. Mutual Learning Objectives   Our mutual objectives are as follows:  v Develop Planning Capacity: Facilitation tools and strategies to promote and support community engagement and strategic planning process.   v Maintain Personal communication: Engage in reliable communication between students, instructor, and community partner.  v Commit to Relationship Building: Create and maintain meaningful relationships with the Tobacco Plains community and with other people involved in the community planning process. v Practice Cultural sensitivity: Honor, respect and understand the respective cultural perspectives of everyone involved in the planning process. Work Planning 	  7. Work Plan Scope  Based on our student work plan (see attached) our planning contribution is based on five pillars of planning activities:  1) The first pillar, Relationship, concentrates on building meaningful relationships between the students and the Tobacco Plains community.  2) The second pillar, Community Engagement, focus on community engagement in order to maximize community participation in the planning processes.  3) The third pillar, Facilitation, concentrates on developing specific strategic facilitation plans to engage with different segments of the community in order to determine and prioritize relevant planning issues and actions.  4) The fourth pillar, Research, aims to research and undertake an analysis of the information gathered; and 49	  5) The fifth pillar, Documentation, involves documenting and communicating the community planning process.    8.     Deliverables  Based on our contribution of time of 350-400 hours per student (4-6 visits to the community over 4-5 days each visit), we expect to complete the following deliverables:   Ø CCP Work Plan: This tool will outline an overall planning process strategy, and contain major planning activities, projects, deliverables and outcomes; weekly work plans will subsequently be developed for each visit to outline main activities and deliverables for each visit. Ø Engagement Strategy: Design and implement an engagement strategy: this tool will build the capacity of TPB to engage its community members and provide an overall framework to guide the engagement of the community over the course of the community planning process. Ø Plan and deliver community sessions: including on & off reserve community sessions, youth & elders meetings. Ø Design, deliver and analyze community survey (s): this tool will provide insight into the community’s preferences and priorities, informing the engagement strategy and goals, objectives and priorities listed in the final community plan. Ø Promotional tools such as posters, newsletters, social media, etc: these tools will aid in promoting the community planning process as fun and exciting, and encourage TPB community members to attend and participate in the process. Ø Community Planning Documents: Summary of Planning History: this tool will summarize the previous planning documents completed by TPB, and will be used to honor and incorporate those efforts already made by TPB members and staff into the planning process. Ø Community Profile: this tool will provide a current situational assessment of TPB, including demographic and economic trends, as well as the cultural history of TPB, in an easy and accessible format for community members to take pride in their community, and for outsiders (such as investors, people wishing to start a business on TPB, or outside community members wishing to return to TPB) to gain a quick understanding of the important features and trends of the community. Ø Meeting Summary Results: this tool will help organize knowledge and information gathered from sessions to analyze later in the process. Ø Community Planning Document: this tool will state the vision, mission and values as well as identify high level goals and objectives for the Tobacco Plains Band. Approximately 50-70 pages in length. Ø Community & UBC Presentation: this a final presentation to TPB and to UBC-SCARP will summarize the challenges, successes and outcomes of the TPB community planning process, the experiences and key learning of the students, and to express gratitude to the community for participating in the practicum partnership. 50	   Roles and Responsibilities 	  7. Roles and Responsibilities The Community Planning Team is responsible for the overall execution of the community planning process to complete a CCP. The following is a list of the key people involved in the planning process and their main roles and responsibilities: Vickie Thomas & Tania Brewer (Band Manager & Executive Assistant) Overall project guidance: Ø Ensure project stays on time and on budget Ø Ensure project follows correct procedures as identified by Council Ø Ensure project meets funding criteria set by AANDC Ø Provide approval of Project direction, expenses. Ø Provide  input on overall project planning Ø Ensures access to equipment and resources (i.e. workspace, information technology, etc.) Ø Provides conflict resolution and decision making authority when necessary Ø Provides feedback and evaluation to Planning team and practicum students. Jeff Cook Ø (Practicum Instructor) Ø Provide instruction, guidance and feedback to Practicum students Ø Provide input and suggestions on planning process, methodology, activities, tools and planning documents Ø Assist to maintain strong working relationships and support conflict resolution if necessary. Anna Morigeau (Community Planning Coordinator) Lead role on the execution of the CP process Ø Guide community process  Ø Develop key messaging  Ø Organize outreach activities and event planning to community members, both on and off-reserve (door to door visits, social media, cold calls, events) Ø Organize, coordinate and chair meetings and workshops Ø Facilitate events Ø Track event attendance  Ø Reports to Band Manager/Executive Assistant   Stephen McGlenn and Wilson Mendes  (Practicum Students) Support role on the execution of the CP process Ø Pre-Planning Research: Pre-planning research  51	  Ø Compile Inventory and summarize relevant planning documents Ø Strategy Development: Develop an Engagement Strategy for ongoing and future planning activities. Ø Facilitation: Provide support to CP Coordinator Ø Undertake event planning  Ø Co-facilitation of events Ø Document processes and events Ø Research & Analysis: Collect, summarize, analyze and report on community planning data (i.e. survey data, responses from engagement sessions, themes, quotes, etc.) Ø Plan Development & Documentation: Summarize planning activities in a concise and well put together planning document Ø Include community factbook/profile in the community plan. 7.1 Check-ins & Communication  Ø It is important to maintain strong communication and feedback to maintain a healthy learning relationship. Together we will commit to the following:  Ø Weekly updates over email. Ø Conference call between students and community at least once per month. Ø Weekly check-ins over Skype between students and instructor. Ø Informal check in over text messages as needed. Ø Respond to high priority emails within 24 hours (“high priority” must be indicated on the subject line). Outcomes & Evaluation 	  8. Outcomes  The Tobacco Plains Band Community Plan (TPBCP) is an inclusive document that aims to reflect and represent the voices of the Tobacco Plains community. The major goal of the TPBCP is to document and promote a long-term community vision to guide the Chief and Council in meeting the needs and aspirations of the Tobacco Plains community. The TPBCP document will also:   Ø Identify community priority areas for Band staff, Council to follow. Ø Develop trust for ongoing engagement and consultation between community and Band staff, Council. Ø Ensure Elder involvement for cultural guidance, adherence to protocols, cultural revival. Ø Promote Youth involvement to gain perspective of youth, and to focus the process on long-term, sustainable planning for future generations. Ø Develop planning capacity for practicum students, project lead, Band and community. Ø Contain videos and pictures of the process. 9. Evaluation  Ø Weekly calls between students and CP Project Coordinator to evaluate progress 52	  Ø Monthly conference calls between students, supervisor, CP Project Coordinator and TB General Manager to evaluate progress made, and to reassess the direction of the planning process, methods, and outcomes. Ø Mid (January) and Final (April) Evaluation report of students performance and to identify areas of improvement, based on input from CP Project Coordinator, TB Band Manager and student supervisor. Signature of Agreement   We agree to the above to maintain a strong and successful work ethics and truthful relationship throughout the CCP. This document is hereby signed and ratified:  THIS AGREEMENT made the  day of  , 20 13 BETWEEN ___________________________                    ______________________________        Stephen McGlenn                                                         Wilson Mendes  ____________________________                  ______________________________  Tobacco Plains General Manager                              CCP Project Coordinator  ____________________________       Student Supervisor               53	          STUDENT PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT 	       Written by Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn    School of Community and Regional Planning |UBC October 18, 2013  Vancouver BC  Canada 54	  1.0 Context and Background In 2012 the School of Community and Regional Planning launched a new specialization called Indigenous Community Planning (ICP). The major focus of this new specialization is to provide ICP students with meaningful learning opportunities. In the 2nd year, in the course of eight months, ICP students are pared up and placed with a First Nation community to undertake a collaborative planning process. Our partnership stems from this opportunity that allows us to work collaboratively with each other and the partnership organization. For the next eight months we will be undertaking a collaborative community planning process with the Tobacco Plains First Nation as part of our required practicum. 2.0 Vision for Partnership The vision of our partnership is to co-create an interpersonal relationship based on respect, honesty, solidarity, understanding, and transparency in order to support both our personal growth, professional development, and foster a meaningful connection to the Tobacco Plains community. 3.0 Approach In order to follow through with the tasks and activities of our practicum, our overall approach will be to nurture our connection, partnership and individual needs by: 4.1 Frequency of Meetings: Aim to have weekly meetings. If this isn’t possible, quick check-ins through email or text message to see how we are doing. These meetings and check-ins will take precedence after we travel to Tobacco Plains. 4.2 Personalized Approach: Nurture our appreciating for music and food by playing music and having dinner together. 4.3 Spirituality: Reconnect with Mother Nature and the Creator by spending time in the woods together and/or by ourselves, as needed. Maintain our spirituality by creating a space that we can pray together and attend sacred ceremonies. 4.4 Decision-Making: Our decisions will be based on a consensus approach. However, we will aim to have a firm understanding of each other’s expectations, skills, as well as our collective capacity, so that in the event that one of us has to make a decision individually, we do so in an informed way. 4.6 Conflict Resolution: We will aim to communicate our needs and concerns to each other as often as we can. We 55	  commit to finding the middle path if any conflicts arise. We will give each other space (depending on the issue) in order to rethink the issue. Some potential conflicting issues may arise concerning equitable work sharing, decision-making, and personality conflicts. As part of our conflict resolution process, we commit to viewing conflict through a Decolonizing lens, to recognize that we are spiritual beings, and to not let the expectations of any institution or individual guide or influence how we feel towards one another as spiritual brothers who share in a once in a lifetime experience. Thus, music, nature and Ceremony will play a vital role in our conflict resolution process. If push comes to shove, and we hold opposing viewpoints, we will try to think objectively about each position, and to grade each point of view on its costs and benefits. Costs and benefits would include how the decision would affect the spiritual and emotional connection within our partnership, the impact on the community, our development as Indigenous planners, and the effectiveness of the decision as a planning tool/skill/method for the community. Each perspective will be weighted according to this framework if the need arises. If we are unable to reach a positive resolution in process, then, we will reach out to our classmates and academic supervisor for support. 4.0 Principles The principles of our partnership are based on our shared fundamental values and willingness to learn from each other that includes: 3.1 Awareness of Power Dynamics: Be aware of power dynamics within the interactions of our partnership, with our instructors, with our school and other institutions, and with the community that may interfere with our personal and professional lives. Stand firm in our self- confidence, and rely on each other. Be mindful of our communication while interacting with each other and others. 3.2 Mutual Respect and Co-Creation: Listen to each other with curiosity and reflect on ideas in order to develop a real and meaningful relationship to help guide our journey together, to develop applicable and practical skills of real benefit to Tobacco Plains and to future Indigenous communities. 3.3 Support: Ask questions of each other and share stories that focus on previous experience, remind us why we’re here, what we’ve already done and what we hope to achieve. 3.4 Build confidence: Commit to work and follow through but be flexible enough to allow for unknowns; expect the unexpected. 3.5 Collaboration: Work with other planners, experts, community members, and institutions to develop comprehensive, broad and groundbreaking planning practices and philosophies. 56	  5.0 Objectives of the Partnership The objectives of our partnership are based on the above principles of co-creation, collaboration, and mutual support in order to foster our process of becoming Indigenous planning practitioners. 5.1 Practicality Ensure that the practicum experience benefits the community. We commit to place the needs of the community of Tobacco Plains as a foundational driver in the direction of our practicum, the tools and planning tools we embrace, the skills we develop, and our overall growth as Indigenous Planners. 5.2 Division of Labor Develop an understanding of the type of work ethic necessary to work collaboratively in planning. Our intention is to organize and divide our work based on our strengths, but also noting when engaging in new types of work is necessary to challenge each other or develop our skills. We will keep an equal workload, understanding that outside influences/factors (work & family) may influence our ability to do some tasks and maintain this equity. Bereavement, sickness or other unforeseen circumstances will be dealt with on a case-by-case basis, with an underlying emphasis on healing when needed. 5.3 Decolonize Planning Maximize our previous experiences with Indigenous community, our capacity, philosophy, practice and pedagogy, to step into our role as Indigenous Community Planning Practitioners. Our hope is that through collaboration and adherence to Indigenous spiritual and epistemological principles, and by challenging mainstream assumptions and historic practices in Western planning, our partnership will serve as an act of Decolonizing mainstream planning practice. By holding to Indigenous spirituality and connecting meaningfully to each other, we will withstand the pressures and challenge the divisive and competitive nature of capitalist, academic, colonial, and economically, politically, socially and environmentally destructive planning practices. 5.4 Maximize Experiential Learning We will take advantage of the magnificent opportunity given to us to connect to the community of Tobacco Plains and to experience and learn from the real challenges of this community. This incredible lived experience will benefit and parallel our learning from in-class and from our readings, and develop and guide our understanding of Indigenous Community Planning. 5.5 Indicator Table Develop an indicator table as the partnership and practicum progresses to guide our process and further our understanding about our collective capacity. 57	  Indicator Wilson Stephen Strengths   Weaknesses   Vulnerability   What to Avoid   Assets    6.0 Outcomes It is our utmost hope that our partnership will result in tangible benefits to the people of Tobacco Plains. 6.2 Collaborative Work Ethic As a result of this partnership, we hope to have developed a work ethic that will help us in future collaborative planning practices. 6.3 Decolonized Planning Practice As a result of this partnership, we hope to have further developed our perspectives on decolonizing planning, and will have contributed to other students and planning practitioners understanding of this important need in Canadian and planning society. 6.4 Greater Self-Awareness and Confidence as Planners As a result of this partnership, we hope to have built on each others strengths, developed new skills and tools to aid us in our continuing journey as Indigenous community planning practitioners. This Student Partnership Agreement was written by and between Wilson Mendes and Stephen McGlenn ___________________________                                _____________________________                 Wilson Mendes                                                             Stephen McGlenn 28th of October, 2013 Vancouver 58STUDENT	  PRACTICUM	  WORK	  PLAN  Pillar 1: Getting Ready to Plan          59	  Pillar 2: Community Engagement                      60	  Pillar 3: Facilitation               61	  Pillar 4: Research & Analysis                62	  Pillar 5: Documentation & Presentation   63	  Tobacco Plains Planning Practicum Progress Report. April 2014.  Stephen McGlenn and Wilson Mendes Meeting of Objectives and Obligations v Learning Agreement Objectives:  Ø Our first three trips were focused more on our first three pillars, (relationship building, community engagement and facilitation). As set out in our work plan, as the practicum moves ahead we have moved into the final two pillars: Research & Analysis and Documentation. We have developed matrices that analyze and combine the information we have gathered from the community with the previous planning documents. Key next step is putting together the plan framework. Ø Through event design and facilitation, our engagement and participation strategy (community, youth and elders), we feel that we are attempting all means possible to create a community-based process. Despite our efforts, community involvement is lower than hoped, which could be due to factors beyond our control. We are also unsure as to the intent of TPB administration to follow the community’s wishes. Many community members and staff have expressed that the community may not be ready for this type of planning.  v Learning Agreement Outcomes: Ø Priority areas and themes have been preliminarily identified through our community engagement. Significant gaps exist in the depth of data (specific issues, actions, and priority setting for actions). Ø Engagement is now complete. Ø Videos and pictures are being taken and compiled. v Work Plan Product Deliverables: Ø Learning Agreement; Student Work Plan; Engagement Strategy Draft; survey, questionnaire and priority setting tool designed, delivered and analyzed; preliminary planning history completed, visualized & presented to community; data analysis matrices designed and populated; several engagement sessions (community, youth, elder, off-reserve) completed; agendas, meetings minutes, trip reports, session reports. v Key Accomplishments: Ø Launch of CPAC; signing of Learning Agreement; establishing meaningful relationship with community; using a fun and creative approach to facilitation.  v Feedback & Evaluation: Ø Communication between students and planning team has been an ongoing issue. Feedback from Partners has been limited, and our sense is that they simply want to complete the plan, regardless of the genuineness or authenticity of the engagement with the community.  Summary of Time and Activities per visit and pillar:   Trip 1: Oct. 20-24: Relationship – 40 hours; meeting community members, band staff and council. Community Engagement – 10 hours; touring community, discussing planning with community members, attend council meetings to listen to community issues. Facilitation – 12 hours; facilitate meetings, prepare for community engagement sessions Research and Analysis - 0 64	  Documentation - 0 Total Hours, Trip 1: 62 hours Trip 2: Nov. 4-9 Relationship – 14 hours; form meaningful connections with community members Community Engagement – 30 hours; preparing for and hosting community, youth and elder sessions, attend council and DevCo meeting, posting social media updates Facilitation – 10 hours; facilitate meetings and events Research and Analysis – 12 hours; compile and analyze survey data Documentation -  Total Hours, Trip 2: 66 hours Trip 3: Dec. 9-12 Relationship – 11 hours; spending time with and meeting new community members Community Engagement – 20 hours; door-to-door visits, hosting community, youth, elder and off-reserve sessions Facilitation – 20 hours; facilitate meetings and events Research and Analysis – 9 hours; compile and analyze vision statements, review survey data Documentation – 24 hours; documenting engagement strategy, learning agreement and work plan Total Hours, Trip 3: 84 hours Trip 4: Jan. 29 – Feb 6 Relationship – 24 hours; spending time with Anna and Vickie, meeting new community members, attending traditional ceremony. Community Engagement – 12 hours; Community, youth and elders engagement, CPAC meeting Facilitation – 30 hours; planning events, facilitating events, meetings and brainstorming sessions Research and Analysis – 32 hours; reviewing and summarizing documents, analyzing survey data, summarizing events.     Documentation -- 12 hours; SWOT analysis, Engagement Strategy, CPAC Terms of Reference; videography, flip chart & visual displays for meetings, sign Learning Agreement. Total Hours, Trip 4: 110 hours Trip 5: Mar.23 – Mar. 25 Relationship – 6 hours. Driving and having supper with Vickie. Community Engagement – 0 hours.  Facilitation – 8 hours. Facilitating SWOT Analysis and Community update. Research and Analysis – 20 hours. Preparing community update, analyzing community information. Documentation – 20 hours. Preparing visualization piece for community update. Total Hours, Trip 5: 54 hours.  Trip 6: April 15 – April 18 Relationship – 6 hours. Driving with Vickie. Spending time with Tania, Dawn, Roberta and other community members. 65	  Community Engagement: 12 hours. Two community sessions (limited turnout); door to door visits.  Facilitation: 8 hours. Two community sessions (limited turnout). Research and Analysis: 20 hours. Matrices development; combining community and planning history data.  Analyzing community data. Documentation: 10 hours. Putting priority tool together, summary of themes, directions, pathways, and actions. Documenting results. Preliminary plan framework. Total Hours, Trip 6: 54 hours. Time and Activity in-between visits: Facilitation: 40 hours; facilitating meetings (conference calls, CPAC), check-ins (texting, conference calls, etc) and Skype calls. Research & Analysis: 200 hours; analyzing planning documents into matrices, analyzing community information. Combining community and planning history. Documentation: 75 hours. Compiling information into presentable graphics; documenting and creating tools. Putting together preliminary plan framework. TOTAL HOURS:  747 hours Total Hours (approximate percentage of total time) & degree of completion (percentage) per pillar according to Work Plan: v Relationship – 101 hours (19%); complete (100%) and ongoing. v Community Engagement – 80 hours (14%); complete (100%). v Facilitation – 128 hours (22%); complete (100%) and ongoing. v Research and Analysis - 153 hours (26%); moving strong (75%) and ongoing. v Documentation –  96 hours (17%); just beginning (35%) and ongoing.  Number of Meetings, including meeting community members, attending band meetings, Skype and phone calls, Planning team meetings and community engagement sessions: 65 Number of Community Engagement Sessions, including community, youth, elder, door-to-door visits, 0ff-reserve session, and CPAC meetings: 19 Number of Communications Tools, such as visual drawings, surveys, questionnaires, newsletters, video and social media updates, door-to-door canvassing, facilitation activities: 25 Number of Research Tools: including matrices, visual drawings, and visual summaries: 10           66	  Tobacco Plains Planning Practicum Progress Report. May 2014.  Stephen McGlenn and Wilson Mendes Meeting of Objectives and Obligations v Learning Agreement Objectives:  Ø Our first three trips were focused more on our first three pillars, (relationship building, community engagement and facilitation). As set out in our work plan, as the practicum moves ahead we have moved into the final two pillars: Research & Analysis and Documentation. We have developed matrices that analyze and combine the information we have gathered from the community with the previous planning documents. Key next step is putting together the plan framework. Ø Through event design and facilitation, our engagement and participation strategy (community, youth and elders), we feel that we are attempting all means possible to create a community-based process. Despite our efforts, community involvement is lower than hoped, which could be due to factors beyond our control. We are also unsure as to the intent of TPB administration to follow the community’s wishes. Many community members and staff have expressed that the community may not be ready for this type of planning.  v Learning Agreement Outcomes: Ø Priority areas and themes have been preliminarily identified through our community engagement. Significant gaps exist in the depth of data (specific issues, actions, and priority setting for actions). Ø Engagement is now complete. Ø Videos and pictures are being taken and compiled. v Work Plan Product Deliverables: Ø Learning Agreement; Student Work Plan; Engagement Strategy Draft; survey, questionnaire and priority setting tool designed, delivered and analyzed; preliminary planning history completed, visualized & presented to community; data analysis matrices designed and populated; several engagement sessions (community, youth, elder, off-reserve) completed; agendas, meetings minutes, trip reports, session reports. v Key Accomplishments: Ø Launch of CPAC; signing of Learning Agreement; establishing meaningful relationship with community; using a fun and creative approach to facilitation.  v Feedback & Evaluation: Ø Communication between students and planning team has been an ongoing issue. Feedback from Partners has been limited, and our sense is that they simply want to complete the plan, regardless of the genuineness or authenticity of the engagement with the community.  Summary of Time and Activities per visit and pillar:   Trip 1: Oct. 20-24: Relationship – 40 hours; meeting community members, band staff and council. Community Engagement – 10 hours; touring community, discussing planning with community members, attend council meetings to listen to community issues. Facilitation – 12 hours; facilitate meetings, prepare for community engagement sessions Research and Analysis - 0 67	  Documentation - 0 Total Hours, Trip 1: 62 hours Trip 2: Nov. 4-9 Relationship – 14 hours; form meaningful connections with community members Community Engagement – 30 hours; preparing for and hosting community, youth and elder sessions, attend council and DevCo meeting, posting social media updates Facilitation – 10 hours; facilitate meetings and events Research and Analysis – 12 hours; compile and analyze survey data Documentation – 4 hours; compiling trip report Total Hours, Trip 2: 70 hours Trip 3: Dec. 9-12 Relationship – 11 hours; spending time with and meeting new community members Community Engagement – 20 hours; door-to-door visits, hosting community, youth, elder and off-reserve sessions Facilitation – 20 hours; facilitate meetings and events Research and Analysis – 9 hours; compile and analyze vision statements, review survey data Documentation – 24 hours; documenting engagement strategy, learning agreement and work plan, and trip report. Total Hours, Trip 3: 84 hours Trip 4: Jan. 29 – Feb 6 Relationship – 24 hours; spending time with Anna and Vickie, meeting new community members, attending traditional ceremony. Community Engagement – 12 hours; Community, youth and elders engagement, CPAC meeting Facilitation – 30 hours; planning events, facilitating events, meetings and brainstorming sessions Research and Analysis – 32 hours; reviewing and summarizing documents, analyzing survey data, summarizing events.     Documentation -- 16 hours; SWOT analysis, Engagement Strategy, CPAC Terms of Reference; videography, flip chart & visual displays for meetings, sign Learning Agreement, trip report. Total Hours, Trip 4: 114 hours Trip 5: Mar.23 – Mar. 25 Relationship – 6 hours. Driving and having supper with Vickie. Community Engagement – 0 hours.  Facilitation – 8 hours. Facilitating SWOT Analysis and Community update. Research and Analysis – 20 hours. Preparing community update, analyzing community information. Documentation – 20 hours. Preparing visualization piece for community update, trip report. Total Hours, Trip 5: 54 hours.  Trip 6: April 15 – April 18 Relationship – 6 hours. Driving with Vickie. Spending time with Tania, Dawn, Roberta and other community members. 68	  Community Engagement: 12 hours. Two community sessions (limited turnout); door to door visits.  Facilitation: 8 hours. Two community sessions (limited turnout). Research and Analysis: 20 hours. Matrices development; combining community and planning history data.  Analyzing community data. Documentation: 40 hours. Putting priority tool together, summary of themes, directions, pathways, and actions. Documenting results. Preliminary plan framework. Writing draft community session, CPAC, youth and elder reports. Total Hours, Trip 6: 86 hours.  TOTAL Trip Time: 470 hours Time and Activity in-between visits: Facilitation: 40 hours; facilitating meetings (conference calls, CPAC), check-ins (texting, conference calls, etc) and Skype calls. Research & Analysis: 200 hours; analyzing planning documents into matrices, analyzing community information. Combining community and planning history. Documentation: 100 hours. Compiling information into presentable graphics; documenting and creating tools. Putting together preliminary plan framework. Finalize session reports.  TOTAL Time, in-between visits: 340 hours TOTAL HOURS:  810 hours Total Hours (approximate percentage of total time) & degree of completion (percentage) per pillar according to Work Plan: v Relationship – 101 hours (12%); complete (100%) and ongoing. v Community Engagement – 84 hours (10%); complete (100%). v Facilitation – 128 hours (16%); complete (100%) and ongoing. v Research and Analysis - 293 hours (36%); moving strong (75%) and ongoing. v Documentation – 204 hours (25%); just beginning (35%) and ongoing.  Number of Meetings, including meeting community members, attending band meetings, Skype and phone calls, Planning team meetings and community engagement sessions: 65 Number of Community Engagement Sessions, including community, youth, elder, door-to-door visits, 0ff-reserve session, and CPAC meetings: 19 Number of Communications Tools, such as visual drawings, surveys, questionnaires, newsletters, video and social media updates, door-to-door canvassing, facilitation activities: 25 Number of Research Tools: including matrices, visual drawings, and visual summaries: 10  Core next steps: v Continue with relationship and capacity building v Continue with research and analysis Ø Summarize planning documents into annotated bibliography Ø Analyze, summarize & document themes, issues, objectives and actions into priorities. 69	  v Community Engagement and Facilitation Ø Prepare for final presentations, May 21 & June 21 (approximate) v Work Plan Ø Finalize tasks and timeline v Documentation Ø Complete all necessary reports and data compilation Ø Finalize CCP Framework & Table of Contents Ø Begin populating CCP table of contents  Ø Submit draft CCP to Vickie (and Dana) for review and documentatio                 	  	  	   	         70	  PRACTICUM WORK PLAN  Table 1: Relationship building activities by Trip.    Trip 1: October 20-24th Trip 2: November 4-9th Key Relationship Building Activities: Key Relationship Building Activities: • Meeting community members in the band hall, tour community • Spending time with and meeting members in the Hall • Meeting the planning team, envisioning our process • Meeting and conversing with members at the Open House • Attending Chief and Council session, introducing project • Attending Development Corporation AGM Total Hours on Pillar: 40 Total Hours on Pillar: 14 Trip 3: December 9-12th  Trip 4: January 29th-February 6th  Key Relationship Building Activities: Key Relationship Building Activities: • Spending time with and meeting planning team members in the Hall • Spending time with planning team, planning advisory committee and community members  • Meeting and conversing with members at the Open House • Attending traditional ceremony • Meeting youth and elders • Going door to door to invite community members to attend our event. Total Hours on Pillar: 11 Total Hours on Pillar: 24 Trip 5: March 24-26th   Trip 6: April 15-18th   Key Relationship Building Activities: Key Relationship Building Activities: • Spending time with Band staff while travelling to and during the TPB strategic planning session in Eureka, Montana • Spending time with Band staff while travelling to, from and within Tobacco Plains for planning activities. • Going door to door to conduct ranking and prioritization Total Hours on Pillar: 11 Total Hours on Pillar: 24 Trip 7, June (TBD): Anticipated Hours on Pillar: 20  Total community hours dedicated to relationship building: 144 Hours  71	  Table 2: Community Engagement Summary by Trip.              Trip 1: October 20-24th Trip 2: November 4-9th Key Community Engagement Activities: Key Community Engagement Activities: • Tour the community • Hosting the Open House Planning Launch, delivering survey • Discuss planning project informally with community members • Hosting youth session & camera workshop • Conduct elder interview • Attending Chief and Council session • Attending Council meeting & Development Corporation AGM Total Hours on Pillar: 10 Total Hours on Pillar: 30 Trip 3: December 9-12th  Trip 4: January 29th-February 6th  Key Community Engagement Activities: Key Community Engagement Activities: • Door to door visits • Hosting community planning visioning and metaphor session • Host Community session • Host youth video workshop • Host youth visioning session • Conduct elder interview • Conduct elder interview • Host and attend CPAC meeting Total Hours on Pillar: 20 Total Hours on Pillar: 12 Trip 5: March 24-26th   Trip 6: April 15-18th   Key Community Engagement Activities: Key Community Engagement Activities: • N/A, attending Chief and Council’s Strategic Planning Session • Door to door visits • Hosting event for planning actions ranking and prioritization Total Hours on Pillar: 0 Total Hours on Pillar: 12 Trip 7, June (TBD): Anticipated Hours on Pillar: 5  Total community hours dedicated to engaging the community: 89 Hours 72	  Table 3: Facilitation Summary by Trip.   Trip 1: October 20-24th Trip 2: November 4-9th Key Facilitation Activities: Key Facilitation Activities: • Facilitating pre-planning meetings • Facilitate and host the Open House Planning Launch • Delivering survey • Presenting planning history to community • Preparing planning team for engagement sessions • Facilitating youth session & camera workshop • Facilitating elder interview • Facilitate planning team meetings Total Hours on Pillar: 12 Total Hours on Pillar: 10 Trip 3: December 9-12th  Trip 4: January 29th-February 6th  Key Facilitation Activities:: Key Facilitation Activities: • Planning and organizing events and planning activities • Facilitating visioning and metaphor building activities • Planning and organizing events and planning activities • Facilitate youth video activity • Facilitating youth visioning activity • Facilitate elder interview • Facilitate elder interview • Facilitate planning team meetings • Facilitate CPAC discussion • Facilitate planning team meetings Total Hours on Pillar: 20 Total Hours on Pillar: 12 Trip 5: March 24-26th   Trip 6: April 15-18th   Key Facilitation Activities: Key Facilitation Activities: • Facilitate SWOT Analysis for Strategic Planning Session • Facilitate Community update activity for strategic planning session Total Hours on Pillar: 8 • Facilitate ranking and prioritization tool    Total Hours on Pillar: 8 Trip 7, June (TBD): Anticipated Hours on Pillar: 5   Total community hours dedicated to facilitation: 75 Hours            73	  Table 4: Research and Analysis Summary by Trip.   Trip 1: October 20-24th Trip 2: November 4-9th Key Research & Analysis Activities: Key Research & Analysis Activities: • N/A, focus on community relationship building • Compile and analyze survey data • Research and summarize planning history Total Hours on Pillar: 0 Total Hours on Pillar: 12 Trip 3: December 9-12th  Trip 4: January 29th-Febru.ary 6th  Key Research & Analysis Activities: Key Research & Analysis Activities: • Review survey data • Compile and analyze vision statements • Reviewing and summarizing planning documents • Reviewing and analyzing survey data  • Summarizing planning events Total Hours on Pillar: 9 Total Hours on Pillar: 32 Trip 5: March 24-26th   Trip 6: April 15-18th   Key Research & Analysis Activities: Key Research & Analysis Activities: • Analyzing SWOT Analysis results for Strategic Planning Session • Summarizing and analyzing Community update activity for strategic planning session  Total Hours on Pillar: 20 • Developing matrix analysis tools • Combining community information with planning history information • Analyzing Community Data.  Total Hours on Pillar: 8 Trip 7, June (TBD): Anticipated Hours on Pillar: 50 Total community hours dedicated to Research & Analysis: 143 Hours                  74	  Table 5: Documentation and Presentation Summary by Trip.   Trip 1: October 20-24th Trip 2: November 4-9th Key Documentation & Presentation Activities: Key Documentation & Presentation Activities: • Compile trip report • Document planning meeting minutes • Document planning history • Compile trip report Total Hours on Pillar: 4 Total Hours on Pillar: 8 Trip 3: December 9-12th  Trip 4: January 29th-February 6th  Key Documentation & Presentation Activities: Key Documentation & Presentation Activities: • Documenting Engagement Strategy • Documenting CPAC terms of reference • Documenting Learning Agreement and Work Plan • Compile Trip Report • Documenting Planning Team SWOT Analysis • Documenting Engagement Strategy • Documenting CPAC terms of reference • Videography  • Flip charts and other visual displays • Compile trip report Total Hours on Pillar: 24 Total Hours on Pillar: 16 Trip 5: March 24-26th   Trip 6: April 15-18th   Key Documentation & Presentation Activities: Key Documentation & Presentation Activities: • Preparing visual display for community update • Documenting SWOT Analysis • Compile trip report     Total Hours on Pillar: 20 • Developing priority and ranking tool • Summarizing planning themes, issues, strengths, directions, pathways, actions • Developing preliminary plan framework • Begin compiling session reports • Compile trip report  Total Hours on Pillar: 40 Trip 7, June (TBD): Anticipated Hours on Pillar: 100 Total community hours dedicated to Documentation and Presentation:  212 Hours    75	  Time and Activity in-between visits:  Facilitation: 40 hours; facilitating meetings (conference calls, CPAC), check-ins (texting, conference calls, etc) and Skype calls. Research & Analysis: 200 hours; analyzing planning documents into matrices, analyzing community information. Combining community and planning history. Documentation: 200 hours. Compiling information into presentable graphics; documenting and creating tools. Putting together preliminary plan framework. Finalize session reports.  TOTAL Time, in-between visits: 340 hours TOTAL HOURS:  810 hours Total Hours (approximate percentage of total time) & degree of completion (percentage) per pillar according to Work Plan: v Relationship – 101 hours (12%); complete (100%) and ongoing. v Community Engagement – 84 hours (10%); complete (100%). v Facilitation – 128 hours (16%); complete (100%) and ongoing. v Research and Analysis - 293 hours (36%); moving strong (75%) and ongoing. v Documentation – 304 hours (25%); just beginning (35%) and ongoing.  Number of Meetings, including meeting community members, attending band meetings, Skype and phone calls, Planning team meetings and community engagement sessions: 65 Number of Community Engagement Sessions, including community, youth, elder, door-to-door visits, 0ff-reserve session, and CPAC meetings: 19 Number of Communications Tools, such as visual drawings, surveys, questionnaires, newsletters, video and social media updates, door-to-door canvassing, facilitation activities: 25 Number of Research Tools: including matrices, visual drawings, and visual summaries:  	  76	  	  TRIP REPORTS  Trip Report | Oct 20-24, And 29 Stephen McGlenn And Wilson Mendes  Sunday, Oct. 20: • Arrival in Calgary, 1:30pm • Stop at Staples to pick up supplies, and stopped at Superstore to pick up gifts for community • Drive to Fernie w/Jeff, check-in, briefing Tobacco Plains planning situation, and discussing our Planning approaches, principles, and details • Arrive in Fernie, check in to Hotel, have supper. Monday, Oct. 21 • Breakfast; stop to get Groceries for the week • Debrief while travelling from Fernie to Tobacco Plains • Arrive at Tobacco Plains @ 9am. Meet Vickie, Anna and band office staff. • Introductions with Anna and Vickie. 9-10am. • Strategy session with Jeff, Anna, Steve and Wilson. Flip chart notes on Planning approaches, principles, survey questions, open house agenda, etc. • Lunch, 12:30-1pm. • 1-4pm: continue with strategy session. • Attend Chief and Council swearing in Ceremony, supper, 5-7:30. Introduction and CCP presentation, 7:30-8. • Travel back to Fernie; debrief with Jeff. • Transpose flipcharts onto computer, 8:45-10:00pm Tuesday, Oct. 22. • Breakfast and brainstorming w/Jeff. Travel to Tobacco Plains. 8-9:00am. • Arrive in Tobacco Plains. Brainstorming with Jeff and Anna re: Open House agenda, strategy, etc. • Jeff depart at 10:30. Continue strategizing with Anna. • Lunch 12:30-1pm • Tour of community with Dan (councilor) and Anna, 1-4pm. • Travel to Fernie w/Anna. Supper @ pub. Wednesday, Oct. 23 • Breakfast and travel to Fernie w/Anna, 8-9am. • Meeting with Anna to set-priorities for the day. • Anna participating in facilitation workshop all day. • Steve and Wilson worked on tasks (poster design, open house agenda, survey design, work-planning, learning agreement) • Travel back to Fernie, supper 4:30-6:00pm • Brainstorming youth engagement strategy, 6:00-9:00pm. Thursday, Oct. 24 77	  • Breakfast and travel to Fernie w/Anna, brainstorming youth ideas. 8-9am • Arrive at Tobacco Plains, meeting with Sarah re: cameras, youth engagement, 9-10am.  • Meeting with Anna re: pre-planning for Open House (agenda, topics, strategies), 10-12pm. • Lunch, Ktunaxa language appreciation day. 12-1pm. • Worked on Poster and survey design, learning agreement, begin review of past Community planning projects, 1-4:30pm. • 4:30 – say goodbye to everyone, dealing with Wilson’s flight being cancelled, take Steve to Elko to be picked up by family.                               	  78	  Trip Report | Nov 4-8  Stephen McGlenn And Wilson Mendes  Nov 4 • Fly out of Vancouver, 9am pst. • Arrive in Cranbrook, 11:15am mst; go to Staples to buy paper, markers, stickers and tape. Drive to superstore to get lunch. • Drive to Tobacco Plains, arrive at 1:00 pm mst • Meet and greet with Dan, Tania; • Meet with Zoe to discuss billeting situation; 1:20-1:25 • Meeting with Anna, 1:30pm: discuss door-to-door visits last week. Anna visited 19 houses, most of them were home. Most people said ok, we’ll be there. A handful of people (5) she talked to for 20+ minutes. Some preliminary feedback from residents (i.e. recreation centre). Discuss Survey questions, redesign, clarify and simplify some questions. • Magic show with Wilson, 4:00-4:30 • 5pm, Jeff leave for Fernie, Wilson and Steve go to Zoe’s house. • 6pm-8pm: work on planning summaries • 8-9pm: visit with Zoe and Dave (fiancé) Nov 5 • Had breakfast at Zoe’s, discussed her history a little bit. • Arrive at band office at 9am, work on planning summaries and open house activities until 12pm • Lunch, 12-1 • Prep for Open house, 1-4 • Steve, Wilson and Anna do dry run thru agenda, 4-4:30 • Steve go with Jeff to get instruments, 4:30-4:45 • Open House, 5:30-8:00pm. Supper at 6pm at Band Office. Nov 6 • Breakfast at Zoe’s, 8:30am • 9-10am: Meeting with Jeff, Wilson, Anna and Steve to debrief about Open House.  • 10-12: Steve work on compiling Survey results from Open House, Wilson worked on social media. • 12-1: lunch at Band office • 1-3: DevCo AGM • 3-4: prep for youth engagement. Get cameras ready. • 4-6: youth engagement event with cameras. Nov 7 • 9am: Arrive at Band Hall, have breakfast at band hall. 79	  • 9-12am: Steve work on survey results; Wilson work on social media update from Open House. • 12-1pm: lunch at band office. • 1-4: Steve work on survey analysis, Wilson and Anna work on interview for social media; interview with Elizabeth (elder). • 4-5: Travel to Duty Free Store, pick up Anna’s kids • 5-7:30pm: Attend Council meeting to listen to communities concerns. Anna and Steve update on CP process. • 6pm: supper at council meeting. • 7:30-9pm: work on open house report.  Nov 8 • 8:30am: Wilson and Anna travel to US to get mocassins • 9am: Steve and Zoe arrive at Band office. Steve has breakfast at band office. • 9am-?: Steve work on journal until Wilson and Anna return.            	  	  	  	  	  80	  Trip Report | Dec 9 – 12 Trip  Stephen McGlenn And Wilson Mendes  Monday, December 9 9am – depart from Vancouver via YVR airport 11:30am – arrive in Cranbrook airport 11:30am-12pm – lunch 12:30-1:30pm – travel to Tobacco Plains with Anna, discuss engagement strategy, planning committee, work plan, and door-to-door messaging 1:30-4pm – door-to-door canvassing; event promotion 4-4:30pm: travel to RiverLodge, Eurika MT. Border crossing; check-in at Lodge. 4:30-5:30pm: Get groceries for stay at RiverLodge and supplies for events (refreshments). Anna departs for TPB. 5:30-6:30pm: supper 6:30-12:00am: Work on Planning Committee Terms of Reference, Event agenda (Steve) and Engagement Strategy (Wilson). Tuesday, December 10 8:30am: Depart Riverstone Lodge, go through Canadian customs 9:00am: Arrive at TPB Band Hall 9:00am-12pm: review notes from last phone call, review survey results and event agenda. Create one page survey results handout for Event. Conference Call with Jeff to discuss event. 12-12:30pm: Lunch 12:30-3:00pm: Plan activities for event, draw out maps and create hand-outs. Meet with Vickie to review event plan. 3:00-5:00pm: set-up event. 5-7:15pm: Event. 7:15-8pm: clean-up 8pm-9pm: Depart TPB, go through USA customs, go shopping with Anna and return to River Lodge. Wednesday, December 11 8:30am: Depart Riverstone Lodge, go through Canadian customs 9:00am: Stop in at Duty-free shop to pick up mocassins; chat with Deborah (Duty-free manager, DevCo manager) about planning project, campgrounds and economic development on TPB  10:00am: Arrive at TPB Band Hall; review vision documents from previous night agenda. 11:00am: Travel to Fernie with Anna to pick up Elk meat for prize give-away; discuss Vision statements from last night and begin planning for youth event. 12:00pm: Lunch, return to TPB. 12:30pm: Prepare for and interview Chief Mary (audio only) 2:30pm: Plan youth event agenda and activities 4:00pm: Youth event 81	  6:00pm: Depart TPB, go through USA customs, and return to River Lodge. Debrief with Anna. 6:30pm-11:30pm: Work on CPAC terms of reference and Learning Agreement Draft,  trip report, preparations for leaving tomorrow. Thursday, December 12 8:30am: Depart Riverstone Lodge, go through Canadian customs 9:00am: Arrive at TPB Band Hall. Begin planning for Off-reserve session in Cranbrook. Re-work Survey from Nov 5 session for Off-reserve members. 10:00am: Compile & analyze vision statements from Tuesday session. Work on poster for CPAC.  11:00am: Work on 1 minute video summary of Tuesday event.  12:00pm: Lunch 12:30pm: Work on 1 minute video summary (editing), work on draft Learning agreement. Prepare materials for off-reserve session. 2:00pm: Skype call with Jeff. 2:30pm: Travel to Cranbrook, purchase meal for evening. 3:30pm: Arrive at KNC Band Hall, set-up for evening. 5:00pm: Facilitate Off-reserve session. 7:00pm: Help set-up TKL session  7:30pm: Debrief with Anna and Vickie regarding week’s events. 8:00pm: Travel to Cranbrook airport. 9:00pm: Depart for Vancouver.          	  	  	  	   82	  Trip Report | Jan 29 – Feb 6  Stephen McGlenn And Wilson Mendes   10:30-11:30am: Skype with Jeff,  Wilson prepare agenda for conference call with TPB. 4:00pm: Conference call with TPB - CANCELLED Wednesday, January 29 2:00-3:30pm: Travel to Magic store (Granville Island) to pick up supplies for TPB 3:30:4:30pm: Head to Vancouver Airport, check-in @ Air Canada. 6:00pm: Depart Vancouver for Cranbrook. 8:30pm: Steve and Wilson arrive in Cranbrook; pick-up by Anna. Stop to get gas. 9:30pm: Cross Montana Border, check-in at Riverstone Lodge. Thursday, January 30 8:30am-10:00am: Depart Riverstone Lodge with Anna, stop at Stein’s Groceries to get supplies for Wilson and Steve for the week, drop off groceries at Lodge. 10:00am-10:30am: Go through Canadian customs; Stop to pick up mail for TPB; arrive at TPB Band Hall. 10:30am-11:00: Check-in with Jeff over email; move supplies from building to hall. 11:00am-12:00pm: Review documents sent by Urban Systems; begin compiling CCP Table of Contents (Wilson); put together work plan (Steve) and begin documenting work activities (Steve). 12:00pm-12:30pm: Lunch 12:30-2:30: Plan activities for community event.  2:30-5:00pm: SWOT Analysis  5:00pm: travel through US customs to Riverstone Lodge with Anna 5:30-6:00pm: Check-in 7:00pm: Skype call with Jeff 7:45-10:00pm: Work on event summary, weekly schedule, planning committee workshop design, trip report. Friday, January 31st 8:00am-9:30am: Work on Event summary and Survey data. 9:30am: Travel through US customs, arrive at TPB Band office. 9:30am-10:00am: Assist Roberta in cleaning out band office for event later this evening. 10:00am-12:00pm: Event planning, survey analysis and event summarizing 12:00-12:30pm: Lunch 12:30-5:00pm: Event summarizing, event planning, summarizing Community Energy Plan. 5:00pm-3:00am: Ceremony 83	  Saturday, February 1st Personal daySunday, February 2nd Work on Engagement Strategy Prepare for Committee Meeting Reflection re: student partnership Review Urban Systems Community Energy Plan Monday, February 3rd 8:45am: Depart Riverstone Lodge, go through Canadian customs, arrive at TPB Band Hall at 9am. 9:00am: draft work agenda for the day 9:30am: draft agenda for CPAC committee meeting 10:00am-12:00pm: Work on Engagement strategy and Terms of Reference 12:00pm-1:00pm: Lunch and filming practice (Wilson’s new camera) 1:00pm-3:00pm: continue working on CPAC Terms of Reference, determining what items to review and how to review them at the CPAC meeting. 3:00-5:00pm: Summarize Urban Systems Community Energy Plan, compile summary. Set-up planning visuals (flip charts and visuals from previous sessions) in Band Hall. 5:00pm-5:30pm: Set up Band Hall for CPAC Meeting. 5:30-7:00pm: CPAC meeting; CPAC launched! 7:00-7:30pm: Travel thru US customs, arrive at Riverstone Lodge.  9:00pm: Skype with Jeff. Tuesday, February 4th 8:45am: Depart Riverstone Lodge, go through Canadian customs, arrive at TPB Band Hall at 9am. 9:00am: draft work agenda for the day 9:30am: Review questions for Elder interview (Liz Gravelle); rescheduled for tomorrow. 10:00am-11:00am: set-up camera and projector for youth session; assist TPB staff with moving furniture and boxes out of furnace room for renovations. 11:00am-4:00pm: Discuss youth session, plan agenda and youth filming activity, “The Warrior’s Arch”. Develop workshop for youth to fill-out script for video project. Set-up projector screen for interviews and practice with Anna. 4:00pm: Set-up room for youth event. Go for a walk. 5:00-7:00pm: TPB youth session. 7:00-7:30pm: Travel thru US customs, arrive at Riverstone Lodge. 8:00pm: Food Wednesday, February 5th 8:45am: Depart Riverstone Lodge, go through Canadian customs,  9:00am: Arrive at TPB Duty Free Shop; discussion with Deborah 9:45am: Arrive at TPB Band hall; draft work agenda for the day, check-in with Jeff re: flights. 10:00am-4:00pm: Planning and rehearsing activities for event, set-up. 84	  4:00pm: Jeff arrives 5:30-7:30pm: TPB Community session 7:30-8:30pm: Clean-up, check-in with Anna. 8:30pm: Travel thru US customs, arrive at Riverstone Lodge. Thursday, February 6th: 8:30am: Depart Riverstone Lodge, go through Canadian customs. 9:45am: Arrive at St. Eugene’s Resort in St. Mary’s. Meet with Vickie and Anna. 11:00am: Arrive at café in Cranbrook; check-in with Jeff. 1:30pm: Arrive in Vancouver.  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  85	  Trip Report | Nov 4-8  Stephen McGlenn And Wilson Mendes  Sunday, March 23 2:00-4:00pm: Arrive in Cranbrook, meet with Vickie. Drive to US border, check in at hotel. 4:00pm-6:00pm: Supper with Vickie. 6:00-12am: Data Analysis for community presentation,  prepared SWOT analysis tool. Monday, March 24 7:30am: Pick up by Vickie, go to Resort and set-up for presentation. 8-8:30am: Meet with Dan George (facilitator) to discuss plan and order of presentations. 8:30-4:30pm. TPB Strategic Planning Session. Facilitate SWOT tool from 10-12; answer questions about community information throughout day. 4:30-5:00pm: travel back to Eureka with Vickie. 5:00-6:00pm: Supper. 6:00pm-2am: Data analysis and documentation (preparing canvass and bubbles) for community presentation. Tuesday, March 25 8:30am: Pick up by Vickie, travel to Resort. 9am: Strategic planning Session Resumes. 10:00am-12:00pm: Wilson and Steve community presentation. 12-12:30: lunch 12:30-4:00pm: Strategic planning activities. Steve and Wilson provide input into strategic planning based on community info. 4-5:00pm: clean-up. 5-6:30pm: Travel back to Cranbrook with Vickie. Check-in. 6:30pm: Arrive at Cranbrook airport, await flight. 8:00pm: Depart Cranbrook. 9:30pm: Arrive in Vancouver, go home and sleep!          86	  	  APPENDIX B: Tobacco Plains Community Planning Documentation  	  I. Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2 II. Tobacco Plains Community Engagement Strategy III. Tobacco Planning Advisory Committee Terms Of Reference  	                	  87T O B A C C O  P L A I N S F I R S T  N A T I O NCOMMUNITY  PLAN PHASE 2 Ju n e 2014AKINK’UMŁASNUQŁI?IT88The 2014 Tobacco Plains communiTy Plan Phase 2Tobacco Plains Indian Band Phone: 250 - 887 - 3461 PO Box 76Grasmere, BCV0B 1R089ExEcutivE SummaryThe Tobacco Plains Indian Band (TPIB) is a small, rural First Nation in Southeast BC, along the bor-der of  Montana. Part of  the Ktunaxa Nation, TPIB has roughly 140 members, about half  of  which live on reserve (see “Who We Are”). The Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2 was completed over a period of  9 months starting in October 2013, and completed in June 2014.  TPIB received funding from the British Columbia Community Initiative (BCCI) to complete the second phase of  their comprehensive community plan (CCP). An external consultant completed the first phase of  CCP in 2011. For this current phase of  the CCP, TPIB partnered with the School of  Community and Regional Planning (SCARP), at the University of  British Columbia (UBC), to bring two practicum students to lend their capacity and develop their learning as part of  a new masters degree specializa-tion in Indigenous Community Planning at SCARP.  BCCI funds were used to hire a Community Planning Coordinator, who, along with the Band Ad-ministrator, Administrator’s Assistant, the two UBC practicum students and their Instructor, formed the core Planning Team. After identifying and determining the approach, principles and process to the Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2, the Planning Team initiated their community engage-ment process. The word ‘comprehensive’ was dropped, to foster a more inclusive process. Overall, the Planning Team engaged 50 members, including 15 youth and 3 elders, through seven community events, three youth events, three elder interviews, and one off-reserve session, formed a Community Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC), and gathered the issues, needs, concerns and vision of  the community through the use of  various tools, methods and techniques (see “Planning Outcomes”).Planning information was gathered from three distinct areas: Past planning history, community ses-sions, and Chief  and Council’s Strategic Planning Session. Information was gathered, recorded, ana-lyzed, documented and presented by the Planning Team.  Information was placed into a framework that highlighted TPIB’s pressing issues, it’s strengths, it’s overall planning themes, strategic directions, pathways and actions. Continuing with the framework from CCP phase 1 in 2011, information fit into 8 planning themes: Economic Development, Governance, Infrastructure, Health, Social, Lan-guage & Culture, Education, and Lands & Resources. Within these 8 themes, the Planning Team identified 8 strategic directions, 15 pathways and 33 action-options (see “Planning Themes”). The TPIB community planning process is not yet complete; key actions are needed in terms of  implementing, monitoring and evaluating actions within this plan. The Planning Team put together several important tools to help with implementation, monitoring & evaluation (see “Next Steps”). Following these steps will help to solidify community planning as an important decision-making tool, to build accountability and transparency, and to help TPIB realize it’s Vision for the future!90 OUR VISION The Tobacco Plains Indian Band is a self-governing com-munity, dedicated to improving the health, safety, educa-tion and financial security of our people while exercising the right to practice our cultura and traditional ways.91OUR VALUES1.o We live in balance by advancing the following Core Values based on ?Aknumuctilil, our Natural Law.2.o We conduct ourselves with respect for each other, the land and all that the land contains.3.o We protect and nurture our children recognizing their importance in all that we do.4.o We promote honest and ethical behavior, by doing the right things for the right reasons.5.o We each take personal responsibility for our conduct and our obligations.6.o We promote the inclusion of people, ideas, and perspectives in pursuit of a safe and healthy community.7.o We effectively steward the land by preserving and protecting our traditional territories. 92acKNOWLEDGEmENt    The Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2 CCP was created by many hands and shaped by many voices of  the Tobacco Plains community members. The Community Planning Team, on behalf  of  Chief  and Council, wishes to first thank all the Tobacco Plains community members who donated their personal time, knowledge and energy to make this community-driven planning process a reality. A special thanks goes to Aiyana Twigg, Ann Hall, Ashlyn Brewer, Barbara Fisher, Bob Luke, Brook-lynn Scout, Cindy Currie, Cohen Gravelle, Dan Gravelle, Danielle Barr, Darlene Trach, Dave Clark, Dawn Mahseelah, Elizabeth Ignatius, Eric Gravelle, Eva Gus, George Gravelle, Jackie Gravelle, Jeor-gina Gravelle, Joana Barr, Jonathan Brewer, Jordan Scout, Kyla Tailfeathers, Leah Sieler, Leanna Gravelle, Lovna Tait, Makayla Taylor, Maria Sieler, Marty Williams, Michael Sieler, Ryan Sieler, Ro-berta Gravelle, Samantha Sielen, Sarah Gravelle, Shayden Brewer, Trene Andrews, Tyson Morning Child, Vickie Thomas, Wanda Lee Dorion, Zoe Gravelle.The Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team also would like acknowledge and thank the Tobacco Plains Elders for sharing their knowledge and wisdom in our community process. A special thanks goes to the Community Planning Committee for their help and insights in our community engage-ment. Finally, a special thanks to Chief  and Council, and the Band Administration for supporting this process, and for their leadership role in continuing to engage community members in future community planning processes.  The Tobacco Plains Phase 2 Community Plan was co-facilitated by the Tobacco Plains Indian Band and the School of  Community and Regional Planning (SCARP), from the University of  British Co-lumbia (UBC). Special thanks are extended to the hard work, commitment, and dedication of  all the members of  the Tobacco Plains Planning Team:* Vickie Thomas (Tobacco Plains Indian Band Administrator)* Anna Morgeau (Tobacco Plains Planning Coordinator)* Tania Brewer (Tobacco Plains Community Planning Executive Assistant)* Wilson Mendes (School of  Community and Regional Planning Practicum Student)* Stephen McGlenn (School of  Community and Regional Planning Practicum Student) * Jeff  Cook (School of  Community and Regional Planning Practicum Instructor)             93TABLE OF CONTENT Greetings             Our Vision              Our Principles            Acknowledgment            1.o INTRODUCTION             1.1  Community Planning BaCkground     1.2  our Student PartnerShiP                                                 1.3  our PaSt Planning            1.4  our Planning team           1.5  our Planning ProCeSS overview and aCtivity       1.6       Community Planning rePort StruCture       2.o  “WHO WE ARE”           2.1  our hiStory            2.2  our land            2.3 our language           2.4  our governanCe            2.5 our Community          3.o  TOBACCO PLAINS COMMUNITY PLANNING PROCESS     3.1 the Planning team            a. Formation oF the Planning team   B. oPeration oF the Planning team   C. Planning team roleS & reSPonSiBilitieS 3.2 Planning aPProaCh          3.3 PaSt Planning           3.4 our PartiCiPation viSion         3.5  Planning aPProaCh          3.6 toBaCCo PlainS Community Planning ProCeSS overview    4.0 PLANNING METHODOLOGY          4.1 data analySiS           4.2 Planning ProCeSS doCumentS           94__________taBle oF Content Continued ___________5.o  PLANNING OUTCOMES          5.1 toBaCCo PlainS Community Planning reSultS      5.2 StrategiC direCtionS SummarieS        5.3 Community and ChieF & CounCil Planning direCtionS     5.4 Planning themeS             eConomiC develoPment           governanCe            inFraStruCture            health             SoCial               language & Culture           eduCation            land & reSourCeS         6.O NEXT STEPS            1.o imPlementation           1.1 aCtion Prioritization & ranking          1.2 develoP a Funding Strategy         1.3  Creation oF annual imPlementation Plan       1.4 aCtion aSSeSSment            2.0 monitoring & evaluation         7.0 CONCLUSION                v. Appendices    COMMUNITY PLANNING CONSULTATION PROCESS    COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SESSIONS      1st Open House Report       Event Agenda       Questionnaire & Results      2nd Visioning Session Report       Event Agenda       Survey & Results      95 ___________Table of Content Continued_________________      3th Cranbrook Of  Reserve Session        Event Agenda       Survey & Results*       4rd It Matters Session Report       Event Agenda       Activity Results      5th Prioritization Session Report       Event Agenda       Prioritization Tool & Result      6th CPAC Report       Terms of  Reference       Event Agenda                     Questionnaire       7th Chief  and Council Strategic Planning Report          SWOT Analysis Results           YOUTH SESSIONS      1st Camera Project Report       Photos      2nd Visioning Session Report       Drawings      3rd Interview Session Report       Interview Questions & Results    ELDER SESSIONS      1st Hilly Gravelle Report       Interview Transcript      2nd Maria Report       Interview Transcript      3rd Liz Gravelle Report       Interview Transcript    COMMUNICATION       Community Planning Update       Tobacco Plains Engagement Strategy      SWOT Analysis & Planning Update Agenda       News Letter      Posters      Facebook Updates961.O iNtrODuctiON Our Tobacco Plains Phase 2 Community Plan (TPCP2) is the continuation of  a long history of  previous planning/capacity-building initiatives our community has undertaken during the past 20 years. The TPCP2 builds upon the information and knowledge gathering from these past community development plans. It is designed to represent the many voices of  our people, honor our needs, and collectively envision the future of  our community.This section introduces the Community Planning  purpose, past planning history, outlines the partnership agreement between the Tobacco Plains Indian Band and the University of  British Columbia’s School of  Community and Regional Planning (UBC SCARP), introduces the Planning Team, and outlines the Tobacco Plains situational assessment.971.1 cOmmuNity PLaNNiNG BacKGrOuND In 2013, we secured funding from the British Columbia Capacity Initiative (BCCI) to undertake Phase 2 of  our community plan. Intending to promote an inclusive and participatory community process, our Tobacco Plains Planning Team designed an engagement process in consultation with our members aimed at including our Elders, Youth, and Community Member’s cultural, spiritual, and traditional values and priorities. This was done in order to produce a long-term community plan that can function as a roadmap for our community decision making today and into the future.In November 2013, following the acquisition of  BCCI funding, our Chief  and Council under the lead of  Vickie Thomas Band Administrator entered a partnership with the University of  British Columbia’s School of  Community and Regional Planning (SCARP) to host two practicum students to join our local planning team and assist with our community planning process.   1.2 Our StuDENt PartNErShiP In September 2013, UBC-SCARP accepted an invitation from Chief  and Council to enter into a mutual learning partnership. An agreement was formed with two students to assist us with our community planning process. The intent of  this agreement was to create an enduring and long-lasting relationship between our Band and SCARP - based on trust, solidarity, transparency, collaboration, and capacity building.981.3 Our PaSt PLaNNiNG It is important to note that our community has engaged in planning since time immemorial. Within the context of  contemporary history – after the arrival of  Europeans – the Tobacco Plains Indian Band has carried out a series of  planning initiatives which produced important directions, information and policies that have subsequently informed and guided our Community Planning process, and findings. The key past planning documents our Planning Team analyzed included our: (1) Tobacco Plains Strategic Plan 2006-2011; (2) Comprehensive Community Plan Phase 1; (3) Five Year Community Economic Development Plan and Implementation; and (4) Community Energy Plan.  1.4 Our PLaNNiNG tEam Our planning team was composed of  Vickie Thomas, Band Administrator; Anna Morigeau, Planning Coordinator; Tania Brewer, Executive Assistant; Stephen McGlenn and Wilson Mendes, Practicum students from UBC SCARP with support from Jeff  Cook, SCARP Instructor (see “Approach & Methodology” for more info).1.5 PLaNNiNG PrOcESS OvErviEW aND activitiES The Planning Team worked over a period of  8 months to design and deliver the community plan-ning process through a four phase planning process to update our community vision, directions, pathways, and potential actions to guide the health and well-being of  TPIB membership. Our ap-proach was participatory, community-based, hands-on, fun, and interactive. Some of  the activities and projects the Planning team used were the youths’ camera and video project, Elder’s interview, magic show, live music performance, community-youth drawings, video updates, etc.Fig. 1.o: Community Methaphor Activity. Fig. 2.o: Visioning Session. Fig. 4.o: Youth Video Project.Fig. 3.o: Guest Speaker. 991.6 Our cOmmuNity PLaNNiNG rEPOrt StructurEThis report highlights our Community planning Phase 2 process, results and outcomes. This report is divided into the following five section:   1.o The first section introduces and outlines some of  the background and context of  our planning process history. 2.o The second section defines and introduces our Community, and presents a short overview of  our history, our traditional lands, our governance model, our community demographics, our ancestral language,  and other relevant cultural traditions of  our people.  3.o The third section explains our approach and methodology of  the planning process, including a description of  the planning team, principles of  planning, our vision for participation, as well as our planning framework and methodology.  4.o The fourth section presents the results and outcomes of  the planning process, including our community vision and values, planning areas, directions, pathways and actions identified by the community.  5.o The fifth section proposes some key next steps, including implementation, monitoring and evaluation, to ensure the continuity of  community planning process and plan.  6.o The last section contains all of  the appendices which includes background data, reports from the planning sessions and activities from our community engagement process; and data analysis used to compile the results of  our Phase 2 Community Plan.1002.O  “WhO WE arE”2.1 Our hiStOryWe are the Ktunaxa people of  the akink’umłasnuqłiʔit (Tobacco Plain Indian Band), and we are one of  the six community members of  the Ktunaxa Nation. Our people are known as Akan’kunik: people of  the place of  the flying head. Our identity remains closely tied to the distinctive traditional lands, language, and culture inherited from our Ktunaxa ancestors. Tradit ional Ktunaxa territory has been occupied exclusively and continuously by our people since time immemorial. Our traditional lands extend well east of  the Rocky Mountains, and south into present day Montana, Idaho, and Washington states (shown in the inset map in Figure). The beautiful landscape of  our lands is dominated by the rich valleys of  the upper Columbia and Kootenay River systems, and by the green woody slopes and peaks of  the Rocky Mountains and the adjacent mountain ranges to the west.Our lands are alive with the traditional history of  our people and our relatives. Within the borders claimed by Canada and British Columbia, our unceded and unsurrendered traditional territory covers approximately 70,000 square kilometers (27,000 square miles) of  mountains, valleys, and rivers in the Kootenay region. The lands, waters, animals and plants that have supported our people for thousands of  years are part of  our identity; they are directly linked to our existence as a Nation.Fig. 7.o: Tobacco Plains Reserve Map.Fig. 5.o: Ktunaxa Territory in Relation to the world. Fig. 6.o: Ktunaxa Territory Location B.C.101 2.2 Our LaNDS Our community is located in the Tobacco Plains Valley in  the East Kootenay region of  British Columbia. Our reserve encompasses 10,680 acres of  land and it covers the Canada/USA border to the south, the Koocanusa reservoir, Baynes Lake to the west, and the Waterton Lakes National Park to the East. (see map figure 1.0)Our territory possesses four main bodies of  water: Edward’s Lake, Shottanana Lake, Willies Lake, and Horseshoe Lake. Additional waterways also include several small intermittent creeks, which drain onto the reserve and into Lake Koocanusa. The climate of  the Tobacco Plains area is the mildest of  all the Ktunaxa Bands, averaging 317 days per year with a maximum temperature greater than zero degrees Celsius. The majority of  the lands are flat and open grassy low-lands, suitable for agricultural activities. Our lands also include some rolling hills along with some steep sloping lands. Land formations include marshy areas along the river and lakeshore, steep valley walls, and relatively level fields in the grassy low-lying/land areas. The elevation of  our lands range from 2,625 feet above sea level to 4,100 feet along the steep valley wall in the extreme north-eastern corner of  the reserve. The main road access to our community is through the Highway 93, which dissects the reserve in the north/south direction. 2.3 Our LaNGuaGE The traditions and culture of  our Ktunaxa Nation are more than 10,000 years old and are embodied in our distinct traditional Ktunaxa language and cultural artifacts such as the Kootenai Canoe. Our traditional language is widely recognized as a unique language that does not share a common parent language with any other indigenous languages.Fig. 8.0: Ktunaxa Member. Fig. 9.0: Teepee Tobacco Plains Valley.Fig. 1o: Lake Koocanus.aFig. 11: Traditional Ktunaxa Sturgen-nosed Canoe.Fig. 12: Ktunaxa Elder & Sturgeaon-nosed canoe.Fig. 12: Ktunaxa Members on Sturgeaon-nosed canoe.1022.4 Our GOvErNaNcE ʔaknumu¢tiŧ is our word for the law, given to the Ktunaxa by the Creator. Our law is grounded in the fact that all things are connected and must be kept in balance. It is also the foundation of  our spirituality – that of  being humble in our limited understanding, of  being respectful of  our role within nature and with other creatures, and of  being respectful and acknowledging the Creator and our ancestors. The law of  the land - ʔaknumu¢tiŧiŧ - is the law for our survival. The law protects the values inherent in the land. The land gives us the resources to survive, and in return, we uphold our covenant with the Creator to protect and not overuse the land. (Ktunaxa Nation 2010) Our governance structure is composed of  a Chief  and five custom-elected band members, whom together comprise the Band Council. Elections are held every two years, with staggered terms of  4 years per council member to ensure continuity in our governance structure. Our mandate is to create a clear vision for the future of  our people, incorporating community health, language, culture, and economic sustainability of  our lands, in order to secure a brighter future for our community.1032.5 Our cOmmuNityOur community has a strong cultural heritage with knowledgeable members. Members of  our community are continuously practicing the traditional knowledge of  our ancestors, such as hunting, fishing, harvesting traditional medicines, and practicing spiritual ceremonies on the land. We have always been able to come together to help one another in times of  challenges that is how our communities have survived since the arrival of  the Europeans. Fig. 17: TPIB Elder Interview 1.Fig. 14: Youth Visioning Session.Fig. 15: Visioning Session.Fig. 19: TPIB Elder Interview 2.Fig..2o, Teepee, TPIB cultural heritage Fig. 16: TPIB Village Site.Fig. 18: Lake Koocanusa.104The following table summarizes the registered population as of  January 2014, including those living on-reserve and off-reserve, and it is also broken down by gender within each category (see table 2.1 as reported by the Tobacco Plains Indian Band). Trends indicate that there are more men or re-serve, more women off  reserve, and that the majority of  the population is over the age of  30.aGE ON rESErvE Off rESErvEMale Female Male Female0-4 4 3 2 05-9 6 2 1 010-14 6 6 0 015-19 3 2 0 020-24 4 0 0 025-29 5 3 4 230-34 3 2 2 735-39 3 1 3 540-44 1 1 2 545-49 8 0 8 650-54 2 1 6 955-59 1 5 3 360-64 7 1 2 365+ 6 6 0 9Total 59 33 33 49Source: Tobacco Plains Indian BandTable 1.o: Tobacco Plains Population StatisticsOur community’s population is growing and we will need to accommodate this changing demographic on our lands. There has been a slight increase in our community membership over the past 8 years. Today, our community has approximately 144 members. Our membership is increasing at the rate of  about 1.25% annually. Current population levels vary from 135 to 145 members with an estimated population increase of  25 people over the next 16 years (See population projection table 1.0).Fig. 13: Tobacco Plains Population Projection.105The Tobacco Plains community plan phase 2 (TPBCP2) brings together three central processes into one: community engagement and information gathering, past planning, and Band staff  and Council strategic planning. Diagram 1 below illustrates these three processes coming together. By bringing these processes together, our intention is to collect the current issues, needs, concerns and vision of  the community, to honor and build on what planning has already been done, and to align the community, and to link the outcomes of  the community and past planning with the Band and Council’s strategic planning. Youth EngagementElder EngagementCommunity EventsVisioning Session December 10, 2013Themes and Actions & CPAC Launch  February 5, 2014 Priority setting & ranking April 16 & 17, 2014Past Planning Review and SummaryYouth  photography project,  November 6, 2013Youth Visioning December 12, 2013Youth Video Project February 7, 2014Elder Interview November 7, 2013Elder Interview December 11, 2013Elder Interview February 8, 2014CPAC Questionnaire February 24, 2014TPB Alternative Energy Study, 2011TPIB Strategic Plan, 2006-2011TPIB Economic  Development  Strategy, 2011TPIB Comprehensive Community Plan, Phase 1, 2011TPIB & Council Strategic Planning  Session, March 24 & 25Open house Launch November 5, 2013Final Community Plan Presentation,  June 20, 20143.O tOBaccO PLaiNS cOmmuNity PLaNNiNG PrOcESSDiagram 1.o: Tobacco Plains Community Planning Timeline, 2o13 - 2o14.Tobacco Plains Community Plan Phase 2, 20141063.1 thE PLaNNiNG tEamThe Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team was comprised of  5 individuals both within the Band administration and from outside the community.Formation of  the Planning TeamTobacco Plains Indian Band applied to and received funding from the British Columbia Commu-nity Initiative (BCCI) to complete our community plan, starting in the fall of  2013. Money from this fund was put towards hiring a Community Planning Coordinator. During this time, discus-sions also began with the University of  British Columbia’s School of  Community and Regional Planning (SCARP), which had recently launched it’s Indigenous Community Planning program. Two students from SCARP were invited to complete their practicum project, and a learning partnership began between Tobacco Plains and SCARP to have these stu-dents join the Planning Team and to support us in the completion of  our community plan.   Oversight of  the Planning Team was done by the Tobacco Plains Band Administra-tor and the Administrative Assistant. Anna Morigeau, the Planning coordinator, and Wil-son Mendes and Stephen McGlenn, the UBC practicum students, worked together to do the pre-planning research that informed the needs of  the planning process, and to de-velop the engagement strategy and principles of  the planning process. The Planning Coordinator provided overall guidance on the community process, insuring that community voices were heard and respected, including the design and facilitation of  tools, activities and events. The Planning Team worked together in developing the key messag-ing  and purposes of  planning activities, coordinating outreach methods and  tracking prog-ress  and  attendance. The  UBC  practicum  students also co-facilitated the events and ac-tivities within the planning process, worked on the research, analysis and documentation of  knowledge  and information collected from planning events, under the guidance of  their Instructor. Planning Team Roles and ResponsibilitiesThe key roles and responsibilities of  the planning team were as follows:  Vickie Thomas (Band Manager) & Tania Brewer (Executive Assistant)Overall project guidance.  Anna Morigeau (Community Planning Coordinator) Lead role on the execution of  the Community Planning Process. Stephen McGlenn & Wilson Mendes (UBC Practicum Students) Supporting role on the execution of  the Community Planning Process.Jeff  Cook (UBC SCARP Instructor)Supporting and mentorship role throughout the Practicum and planning process. Operation of  the Planning Team1073.2 PLaNNiNG aPPrOach Our Guiding PrinciplesThe Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team met early in the process and agreed upon the following key principles and approaches to guide the planning process in Tobacco Plains:High Community Engagement &ParticipationInvolve the Elders and honor our CultureCelebrate Past PlanningEmpower our YouthThe need to include the community’s voice, including on and off  reserve members, into the planning process was identified as a high priority, both as a way to determine the community’s present needs, issues, concerns, and to build trust and heal the relationship between the community, band staff  and Council. Special efforts were made to include our Elders into the planning process and to incorporate our Ktunaxa lan-guage and culture into the plan. This was done by open-ing our planning sessions with a prayer, by interviewing our elders, and by incorporating Ktunaxa words into the plan.Much planning work has already been done by Tobacco Plains members. In order to honor and build on this plan-ning work, the Planning Team reviewed and summarized key planning documents in order to update and compare with the current perspectives and needs of  the community.A Community Designed ProcessThrough surveys and participatory planning, the commu-nity’s participation and communication preferences were identified and honored as a way to meaningful engage in the planning process. A participation and engagement strategy was also designed to guide our process. The legacy of  the planning we do now will impact our future generations and the kind of  community they live in. A key approach for our planning was to include the voices and visions of  the youth in the community.Fig. 21: Planning team facilitating the Tobacco  Plains Community Session in February 2014.Fig. 22: Use of fun and creative visuals represen-tations of  planning processes and findings at the Band Hall. Fig. 23:Youth drawings of  how they envision the future of  their community. December, 2013.108Tobacco Plains Comprehensive Community Plan - Phase 1 (2011): Summary: The first attempt at community planning in Tobacco Plains, this plan set the stage for our current community planning process by identifying and prioritizing, through surveys and questionnaires, the 8  planning themes outlined in this document Summary: Initiated by the need to generate revenue and employment opportunities for band members, this plan assesses available econom-ic  development opportunities within Tobacco Plains and provides a 5 years implementation plan, including relevant policies  and procedures.Tobacco Plains Community Energy Plan: Supporting Community Based Energy Projects (2013):Summary: In recognition of the opportunity to reduce reliance on conventional fossil fuels, and to explore renewable energy proj-ects, this plan provides a baseline understanding of the key energy development opportunities available to the community, and actions that Tobacco Plains can pursue to achieve energy independence. 3.3 Past PlanningIn order to honor and build on the previous planning work undertaken in Tobacco Plains, the Planning Team reviewed key planning documents and processes undertaken by the administration in previous years. Information from these plans was presented back to the community and incorporated into the data analysis at the end of Planning Phase 2. See Appendix (C) for the full summaries. Tobacco Plains Strategic Plan, 2006-2011:  Summary: This document assesses the strengths, weakness, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of the band administration, as well as the key strategic objectives, and sets out a 5 year plan (2006-2011) to achieve those objec-tives.Key  Docume nt sTobacco Plains 5 Year Community Economic Development Plan and Implementation (2012):1093.4 Our ParticiPatiON viSiONCommunity participation is the highest priority in the TPB community planning process. The TPIB Community Plan will be founded on strong, authentic and genuine community engage-ment that allows the planning team to better understand the needs and concerns of  the com-The planning team envisioned a participatory process where the planning results offered a genuine view of  the community’s issues, needs and concerns. A survey was designed and delivered at the beginning of  the planning process to help us understand the community members participation preferences, the results of  which helped us to develop our participation and engagement strategy (see Appendix X).Participation Methods Our participation methods were as follows:i. Band Hall events for community, youth and elders. ii. Community Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC) iii. Newsletters, social media, phone calls.iv. Door to door visits.v. Surveys & questionnairesParticipation Objectives & OutcomesOur participation objectives and outcomes were as follows:i. Strong involvement - community members are informed of  the planning process, planning re-sults, and have a say in how planning process decisions are made.ii. Accurate Information - data is collected accurately, analyzed thoroughly, and communicated ac-curately back to Tobacco Plains members. iii. Effective Consultation & Engagement - using a fun, creative and interactive approach, com-munity members share their values, concerns, issues, and vision of  the future.iv. Ongoing Collaboration - the planning team and the community work together to complete the planning process, and build momentum and interest in continuing with community planning into the future.v. Empowerment - planning team and community members work together to build planning capac-ity, leadership, skills and knowledge, and revitalize what planning means and looks like for Tobacco Plains.Participation Tools Our participation tools were as follow:(see Appendix X for full list)i. Surveyii. Questionnaire iii. Event activities iv. Youth photography and video projectv. Elder interviews vi. Implementation tools Fig. 26: Magic Show.Fig. 27: It Matter Session.Our Participation Vision:Fig. 24: Youth Camera Project1103.5 PLaNNiNG PhaSESOur planning process was based on four key phases of  planning (see Table 2.0, pg 17 ), each of  which was guided by key questions:           1. Gathering the Fire Wood: Preparing to Plan            Key questions: What do we need to get ready to plan? Who will plan, how and why?           2. Knowing where we came from, and where we are going: Engaging the Community            Key questions: Where is our community now, and where do we want to go?           3. Lighting the Fire: Creating and Implementing the Plan            Key questions: How do get to where we want to go?           4. Empowering the Community: Monitoring & Evaluation            Key questions: Have we arrived? How are we progressing?1113.6 tOBaccO PLaiNS cOmmuNity PLaNNiNG PrOcESS OvErviEWStage 1  “Gathering the Fire wood ” Preparing to PlanStage 3 “Lighting the Fire” Creating & Implementing the plan Stage 4 “Empowering the community” Monitoring & EvaluationThe first stage in the Community Planning process is called “Gather-ing the Fire Wood”. In this stage, we gathered the necessary fuel to light the fire of community plan-ning in Tobacco Plains! This in-volved the pre-planning research necessary to begin planning the planing process, including identi-fying existing resources, strengths, and planning capacity within To-bacco Plains, identifying the peo-ple and time-line to carry out the plan, and determining our prin-ciples, values and approaches to planning.This stage involved engaging the com-munity, and honoring our heritage and our connection with our territory. By speaking with our Elders we heard sto-ries about our past, and gathered in-formation about where we’ve been as a community; by engaging with youth and community members, we defined what community planning means for Tobacco Plains, and came to a better understanding of the current state of Tobacco Plains. We also gathered in-formation about the planning that has already been done in the community, to recognize and build on the work of the past. By looking at our current situation and identifying strengths, issues, needs and concerns we created a vision of where we need to go. Our vision to direct our strategic actions is expressed in our vision statement, set of principles, eight core directions and supporting pathways.Once the fire of community planning is lit and Implementation has begun, thelast stage is to ensure that our plan is headed in the direction we intend, andto monitor the results according to our targets. The purpose of this stage is tomonitor and report progress based on those targets set in Stage 3, to evaluatethe process and results of community planning and to adapt our strategy toensure ongoing success, and to celebrate all of the successes and achievements ofour planning actions. A critical aspect of this stage will be to determine the futureprocess of community planning in Tobacco Plains, and to dedicate resourc-es to continue that process.Once we’ve gathered the fire wood, and understood we come from, where we are and have a vision of where we want to go, it is time to “light the fire” of community planning in Tobac-co Plains! This stage involves looking at the actions that were identified by the communi-ty in stage 2, and prioritizing and ranking the actions that will best achieve our vision and goals. This stage also includes establishing community plan-ning champions from both the band staff and community members to assist and take a leading role in implementing the actions identified in the plan, as well as setting targets to best measure our success.Stage 2  “Knowing where we came from, and where we’re going” Engaging the Community112Timeline Project Phase Key Activities and Results StatusSeptember, 2013Phase 1: Gathering the Fire Wood - Preparing to Plan• Apply to BCCI for funds to complete a  community plan• Hire a community planning coordinator• Formalize relationship with UBC planning  practicum students• Research and develop a community based  approach to planning• Attend council meetings, introduce processCompleteOctober, 2013 - March, 2014Phase 2: Knowing we came from, and where we’re going -  Engaging the Com-munity• Invite community members to Open House launch, design community based engagement strategy• Gather information and envision the future though community, off-reserve, youth and elder  sessions• Create a Community Planning Advisory  Committee• Analyzing, documenting and communicating resultsCompleteMarch - Sep-tember, 2014Phase 3: Lighting the Fire - Creating and Implementing the Plan• Present community findings to Band and Council’s strategic planning session• Present draft plan to Community, final revisions• Adopt plan through Band Council resolution• Workshops with Band staff, Council and community to identify, prioritize and rank actions from the Plan• Develop an Annual Implementation Plan (AIP)• Identify community members and band staff as com-munity planning champions• Identify targets and timeline for actionsOngoingSeptember, 2014 and  onwardsPhase 4:  Empowering the community -  Monitoring &  Evaluation• Implementation of actions• Identify criteria and measures of success to monitor targets• Communicate results to community and celebrate achievements, adjust AIP as needed. Not  startedTable 2.o: Tobacco Plains Community Planning Process Overview.1134.O PLANNING METHODOLOGY4.1 Data aNaLySiSA key step in the planning process was gathering and analyzing information. A frame-work was developed by the Planning Team to organize information received during the planning process. A key step was first determining what planning areas or themes were relevant in the community (i.e. economic development, governance, infrastructure), which allowed us to further categorize data. At the beginning of  the process, it was identified that 8 planning theme areas had been used in previous planning processes, so the planning team continued with that framework. For each theme (i.e. Economic Development), a matrix was created to further break down informa-tion within that theme into various categories. The first category, “Issues” (i.e. not enough economic development) helped the planning team understand why that theme mattered, and what challeng-es need to be addressed within the plan. The next category, “Strengths” (e.g. forestry opportuni-ties), helped us determine what strengths could be celebrated, built on, and incorporated into the strategy of  moving forward in that theme. The “Directions” category included the broadest state-ments of  what the community wanted to achieve within that planning area based on the issues and strengths (e.g. “Foster economic development and work towards self-sufficiency”), while the “Pathways” category referred to more specific paths to achieve that direction (e.g. “Generate reve-nue by investing in local businesses and encouraging local entrepreneurship”). Finally, the “Actions” category outlines the specific actions (e.g. “offer business loans and support services”) within the pathway. See the chapters “Planning Outcomes” to see the results of  this tool within each theme. Issues Strengths Directions Pathways ActionsThemesEconomic  DevelopmentGovernanceInfrastructureHealthEducationSocialLanguage & Cul-tureLands &  ResourcesTable 3.o:  Analysis Matrix Table.1144.2 Planning Process DocumentsOur community’s journey through this planning process has been captured in several import-ant reports that capture that detail the activities and analysis of  the key planning sessions. These reports are provided in the Appendix (X) and serve as a memory of  the key ses-sions for the Tobacco Plains community planning, as well as a framework for future reports to be written when the planning reaches Phases 3 & 4. The following reports were compiled by the Tobacco Plains Planning team following key community planning events and activities: 1. Open House (Nov. 5) Community Planning Launch Summary Report2. Visioning Session (Dec. 10) Summary Report3. It Matters! Community Session (Feb. 5) Summary Report4. Band and Council SWOT Analysis and Community Update (March 24 & 25) Summary Report5. Community Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC) Summary Report6. Action Priority Setting & Ranking (April 16 & 17) Summary ReportFig 28: Example title page of a Summary Report (see Appendix).  Tobacco Plains Community Planning  Community Report: Open House Launch, November 5th, 2013.               Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team  By  Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn [Practicum Students]  For Tobacco Plains Indian Band     … University of British Columbia!1155.O PLaNNiNG OutcOmES5.1 tOBaccO PLaiNS cOmmuNity PLaN rESuLtS Over 6 months of engagement, our Planning Team gathered the responses from 50 community mem-bers, including 15 youth and 3 elders (see “Acknowledgments” page iv). In total, the Planning Team hosted 7 events, and delivered 8 tools and planning activities. This information was then gathered and analyzed  according  to 8  key  planning    areas   or    themes (Economy, Governance, Infrastructure, Health, Social, Education, Language & Culture, and Lands & Resources) and combined with data from past planning history and Chief and Council’s Strategic Planning Session to create an overview vision framework. “Community planning will help our community focus on the future”  Community Member.In the  following  pages,  the  results  of  our  community   engagement    and  analysis  of  data  are presented.   First, a summary of  our strategic directions is shown (pages 22). Next, this chapter illustrates how the Chief  and Council’s 5 strategic goals fit into the framework of  the Tobacco Plains com-munity plan’s 8 strategic directions. This is then followed by a summary of  each Direc-tions, including the issues, strengths and action pathways that are a result of  our analysis. From November 2013 to April 2014, the Planning Team conducted Stage 2 of  the Tobacco Plains community planning process (see Approach & Methodology, page 12). Stage 2 was about engaging with the community members, youth, and elders of  our community to determine their values, issues, needs and concerns, and to better understand the current situation of  the community, where we want to go as a community.Fig. 29: Commuity Sharing Food Together Before Session. Fig. 28: Visioning Session. Fig. 30: Youth Drawing SessionFig. 31: Banner Displaying Community Planning Results According to 8 Major Theme Areas.116The Tobacco Plains Indian Band is a self-governing  community, dedicated to  improving the health, safety, education and financial  security of  our people while exercising the right to  practice our culture and  traditional ways.5.2 StratEGic DirEctiONS SummaryThrough our community engagement and review of  the previous planning history, 8 themes were identified as broad planning areas within our community plan (see Approach & Meth-odology, page 7). These themes are highly interconnected to each other and to the broad-er Vision for Tobacco Plains as outlined in the previous page. Diagram 2.o  below  summariz-es this interconnectedness, as well as the core strategic direction within each theme. (See Appendix X, “Table X, List of  tools, events, activities” to see a list of  the tools, events and activ-ities used to gather community members issues, needs, concerns, and their visions for the future).Economic Development:Foster local economic development and work towards self-sufficiency. Governance:Empower our members, create unity as a Band and as a Nation, and build local capacity to meet the needs of our people. Health:Nurture a happy, healthy and prosperous community,  to improve and support the health of all  members  Social:Encourage & promote social health and inclusion, and build support networks in the community Infrastructure:Invest in and improve Tobacco Plains infrastructure.Language &  Culture:Revitalize and celebrate Ktunaxa language & culture. Lands &  Resources:Maximize the value of  our lands, for the benefit of all Tobacco Plains members, present and future generations, and protect our lands. Education:Expand educational opportunities to ensure  our children are educated and our community members can find meaningful, secure employment.Diagram 2.o: Community Planning Themes.117Community members, band staff  and Chief  and Council all expressed a strong desire to work together for the betterment of  the community and future generations. This section demonstrates how this shared perspective fits together.  Table 1 below summarizes the strategic goals developed by the band administration and Chief  and Council at the Tobacco Plains Strategic Planning Session, March 24 & 25, 2014 (see Appendix, “Strategic Framework”, page X), and how they connect to the identified values and action-pathways used in this community planning framework. Chief and Council’s Strategic Goals: Where it fits in the community plan:Social and Education:To facilitate opportunities that allow our members to gain the education and skills to position them for  success.“Social” theme & direction (see pages 14 & 15): Pathway 1: Invest in social service and programs.Governance:To lead with transparency and to provide  accountability for the prosperity of our community’s future.“Governance” theme and direction (see pages 7 & 8): Pathway 2: Improve communication and build trust between the band administration and community. members.Health:To create the conditions for our members to achieve improved health, safety and social wellness.“Health” theme and direction (see pages 12 & 13):Pathway 1: Invest in localized health and safety.Land & Economic Development:To protect and preserve our environment and  traditional territories for the use & enjoyment of  current and future generations.“Lands & Resources” theme (and direction see pages 20 & 21):Pathway 2: Empower our Lands and Resources De-partment5.3 cOmBiNiNG Our cOmmuNity’S DirEctiONS With chiEf aND cOuNciL’S “We need to bring the people together” - Community Member.Fig. 32: An “issues-bubble” used to convey to the Tobacco Plains Band administration and Chief  and Council’s Strategic Planning Session the community values gathered in the community planning process.Table 4: Merging Chief  and Council’s Strategic Goals with the Community’s Strategic Directions.118Community Planning Directions Council Strategic Planning GoalsSocial and Education:To facilitate opportunities that allow our mem-bers to gain the education and skills to position them for success.Governance:To lead with transparency and to provide ac-countability for the prosperity of  our commu-nity’s future.Health:To create the conditions for our members to achieve improved health, safety and social wellness.Land & Economic Development:To protect and preserve our environment and traditional territories for the use & enjoyment of  current and future generations.Housing & Infrastructure:To ensure that we have the  necessary water, sewer, roads, and housing available to promote healthy individuals, fami-lies and community.The Tobacco Plains Indian Band is a self-governing community, dedicated to improving the health, safety, education and financial security of our people while exercising the right to practice our culture and  traditional ways.Our VisionEconomic Development:Foster local economic development and work towards self-sufficiency.Governance:Empower our members, create unity as a Band and as a Nation, and build local capacity to meet the needs of our people.Infrastructure:Invest in and improve Tobacco Plains infra-structure.Health:Nurture a happy, healthy and  prosperous community, to improve and support the health of all  membersSocial:Encourage & promote social health and inclusion, and build support networks in the communityLanguage & Culture:Revitalize and celebrate Ktunaxa language & culture.Education:Expand educational opportunities to ensure our children are educated and our commu-nity members can find meaningful, secure employment. Lands & Resources:Maximize the value of our lands, for the benefit of all Tobacco Plains members, present and future generations, and protect our lands.While the community planning process was taking place, band administrators and Chief  and Council undertook a strategic planning workshop on March 24 & 25, 2014. Both of  these planning processes resulted in a set of  core directions relative to the planning areas in the community. The community directions are based on 8 themes identified in previous planning processes, and the strategic planning of  the Band was based on 5 core areas, reflecting the current structure of  the administration. The chart below shows the connections between these core directions. Diagram 3.o: Interconnectivity Between Community Planning Directions and Chief  &  Council Strategic Direction.1195.4 PLaNNiNG thEmES Summary: We heard that economic development is of  primary concern for Tobacco Plains com-munity members. Employment rates on our reserve are quite low compared to the regional average, and with high cost of  living and a need to pay for critical infrastructure and social services, there is a strong need to create jobs for our members and to generate revenue for the Band.  Issues: Through our community planning tools, we received 75 responses from  community members indicating a variety of  issues and concerns regarding Economic  Development in Tobacco Plains (Appendix X for more detail), that are summarized here:Need for  improved  economic  governance (13)Lack of Jobs, need for  economic development (54) Lands and  resources not being efficiently used (4) Need for  improved  infrastructure(1)Need to improve and support  local businesses (3)Strengths: Key economic strengths identified by community members include the following:• Duty Free Shop, Campground and other local businesses bringing revenue to the community• Potential for Tobacco Plains to harvest our own timber• High number of  regional employers looking for skilled professionals• Our region has abundant resources and high tourism potential• We’re close to the US border, to Lake Koocanusa, to Cranbrook and Fernie “Ensure that community members have the opportunity to grow and advance, and support our families” Need for jobs and economic  development Lack of moneyImpacting social sector Impacting Health Impacting Educa-tion Internal governance challenges resulting in weaker economy Issues resulting from weak relationship with BC and Canada gov-ernments Lack of participation in regional economyRemoteness of  Tobacco PlainsLack of owner-ship regimeLack of irrigation on agricultural landsNeed to improve Edwards Lake  campground  Need to improve the Duty Free ShopNeed to improve the Saw millLow investment in local infra-structureE c O N O m i c  D E v E L O P m E N t120Pathway 1: Increase capacity and employment, and improve the Economic Development DepartmentPathway 2: Generate revenue for the benefit of  our members and future generations by investing in local businesses and encouraging local entrepreneurship.Action Options: 1. Hire economic development officer and improve the economic development department  2. Develop and implement a 5 year economic development plan: (1) prioritizes finding funding for longer term work contracts; (2) increases opportunities for education and training for all community mem-bers; (3) schedules and offers regular economic development workshops; and (4) explores new mechanisms to increase government revenue (taxes, fees, impact-benefit agreements).  Action Options:  1. Improve Saw-mill Operations: (1) hiring an RPF to determine the value of  current assets and to de-termine the composition of  existing wood supplies; (2) building better relationships with external forestry companies and logging operations; (3) developing a Sawmill business plan.2. Improve Campground Operations: (1) investigating upgrade options to Big Springs and Edwards lake campgrounds; (2) developing Big Springs and Edwards Lake Development Feasibility Studies; and (3) developing campground business plans. 3. Improve the Duty Free Shop by developing a business plan: (1) investigates options to increase sales, such as on-line sales, improved access and departure points, traffic control; (2) establishes a traffic counter to determine the number of  vehicles traveling through and stopping at the Shop; and 3) study the relation-ship between traffic capture and net income. 4. Promote and support local business and entrepreneurs: (1) publishing local business information on the Tobacco Plains website; (2) publishing a newsletter in the community with local business informa-tion; (3) offer business loans and planning support services. Pathways Action OptionsPathway 1: Increase capacity and employment, and improve the Economic Development  Department.1. Hire Economic Development Officer and improve the Economic Development Department.  2. Develop and implement a 5 year economic development plan.Pathway 2: Generate Revenue for the benefit of our members and future generations by investing in local businesses and encouraging local  entrepreneurship.1. Improve Saw-mill operations 2. Improve campground operations 3. Improve the Duty Free Shop 4. Promote and support local businesses and  entrepreneurs 5. Increase tourismDirection: Foster local economic Development anD work towarDs selF-suFFiciencyEconomic Development Pathways and Action Options:121G O v E r N a N c ESummary: Community members feel disempowered and yearn to feel connected and respected, and have a voice in the decision-making process of  Tobacco Plains Indian Band. There is a clear need to build capacity and training for Band staff, for improved transparency, for improved rela-tions with external entities (such as AANDC and industry) and for an improved tax structure. Issues: Through our community planning tools, we received 41 responses from community members indicated a variety of  issues and concerns regarding Governance in Tobacco Plains (Ap-pendix X for more detail), that are summarized here:Need to build personal and administrative capacity(10)Community members feel disempowered (15) Need to improve relationship with external entities(6)Need for  more effective policies and  procedures  (5)Need to im-prove account-ability and  transparency  (5)Strengths: Key governance strengths identified by community members include: • We can tax through the FSMA and collect GST through FNGST• We are developing a Financial Administration Law• We have completed many planning documents and processes• We are currently developing a new planning framework• We have the opportunity to enter into various agreements (i.e. Impact-Benefit Agreements) with external entities and industries.“We need to bring the community together, and help us focus on the future.” Broken expecta-tions & lack of trust   Lack of planningTension between on and off reserve issuesLack of commu-nity cohesion and unity Limited planning capacity and fol-low through  General lack of  capacity, knowl-edge, and over-worked staffManagement  efficiencyLack of funding from external sourcesChanges and  cutbacks at AANDCTreaty process has failed  Unknown Canadian & American regula-tionsNepotismConflicts of in-terest in decision making processesPolicies are unclear and inflexible  Lack of effective pol-icies, such as Devel-opment Cost Charge Bylaw and Local Improvement TaxTax money is not  properly used122Direction: Empower our members, create unity as a Band and as a Nation, and build local capacity to meet the needs of  our people.Pathway 1: Commit to and formalize inclusive community planning as a basis for decision-makingAction Options: 1. Integrate community’s voice, skills and knowledge into all planning processes by: (1) hold-ing regular community planning sessions; (2) gathering information from the community in a re-spectful way, (3) employing local knowledge and skills for community based work; and (4) linking community planning and community decision-making with all Band staff  departmental, strategic and operational planning.Pathway 2: Improve communication and build trust between the band administration and community membersAction Option: 1. Develop, in consultation with community members, a communication and participation strategy that: (1) honors and respects the communication and participation needs and preferences of  community members; (2) explores a diversity of  communication techniques and methods to try and reach and engage all community members, such as family dinners, workshops, information sessions, etc.; (3) sets out clear and respectful speaking and listening protocols for all community meetings; (4) formalizes a schedule of  regular community planning information sessions; (5) sets out a policy of  inclusion for elders, and recognizes their role as cultural guides in the planning process; (6) sets out a policy of  inclusion for Youth; and (7) is inclusive of  off-reserve members.Pathways Action OptionsPathway 1: Commit to and formalize inclusive community planning as a basis for decision-making1. Integrate community’s voice, skills and  knowledge into all planning processesPathway 2: Improve communication and build trust between the band administration and community members1. Develop a communication and participation strategyPathway 3: Increase administrative accountability, transparency, financial management and leadership.1. Create an Accountability System 2. Develop a transparency and cooperation  protocol3. Promote Sound Financial Management and LeadershipGovernance Pathways and Action Options:123Pathway 3: Increase administrative accountability, transparency, financial management and leadership.Action Options: 1. Create an accountability system by: (1) committing to following through on plans by desig-nating a task manager to track responsibilities under the Plan and monitor progress; (2) identifying and prioritizing short, medium and long-term objectives and actions within the Plan, and targets to achieve; (3) assigning community members and Band staff  as “Planning Champions” with specific roles and responsibilities for specific areas and actions within the plan; (4) organizing committees composed of  community members to help oversee plan related decision-making, and (5) monitoring, evaluating, publishing and celebrating results and achievements of  the Planning process.2. Develop a transparency and cooperation protocol within Tobacco Plains and with external entities by (1) adopting a community defined decision-making model; (2) adopting policies and pro-cedures that establish and enforce formal rules and regulations for all departments, staff  and Chief  and Council to follow; (3) reviewing with community members and off-reserve members all policies related to Tobacco Plains; (4) making changes and updates to policies in a timely manner; (5) notify-ing members when changes are made; and (6) publishing all policies and procedures on-line for Chief  and Council and Development Corporation to follow, and for outside entities to access important policies and regulations.Governance, continued 3. Promote a sound financial management and leadership system by: (1) adopting a (3) creating a Development Cost Charge Law; (4) negotiating Impact Benefit Agreements with In- dustry; (5) developing Import/Export Regulations; (6) developing property and other taxes; (7) cre- ating and publishing a Development Approval process; (8) revising the Elections Code and (9) hold- ing mandatory governance training workshops. Financial Administration Law; (2) developing a Local Infrastructure Improvement Service Tax Law;124i N f r a S t r u c t u r ESummary: Lack of housing in general was the most commonly heard issue in regards to infra-structure, which community members noted has strong connections to community health, social cohesion and the development of the community. Administrative challenges were also listed as a concern in regards to infrastructure.  Issues: Through our community planning tools, we received 37 responses from community mem-bers indicated a variety of issues and concerns regarding Infrastructure in Tobacco Plains (Appendix X for more detail), that are summarized here:Administrative challenges  (4)  Housing (27)Health impacts associated with infrastructural challenges(3)Economic development hindered by  infrastructure (1)  Social impacts associated with Infrastructural challenges (2)Strengths: Key infrastructural strengths identified by community members include the following:• We have a new health van to transport our members• We have a cookshack• We have a new fire truck and are building a new firehall• We have the duty free shop and other facilities• We have our own sawmill• We have a radio tower “We need to house all the people”Lack of HousingNeed for mainte-nance and renova-tions  programsHousing needed for people with dis-abilities and single people  New housing loca-tions neededLack of  communication on housing and  infrastructure issuesLack of funding for infrastructureSlow pace of changeLack of facilities to promote health and wellnessInfrastructure does not accom-modate  accessibility issuesFamilies are forced to leave to find housing, or can-not move backLack of trans-portation for our members  Lack of infrastruc-ture and need for improved infra-structure is slow-ing or hindering economic growth125Pathway 1: Improve access to housingAction Option: 1. Develop and implement a Comprehensive Housing Plan that (1) fosters inclusion and trans-parency in housing decision-making processes; (2) develops and schedules regular housing and water maintenance programs; (3) develops housing renovation and maintenance programs; (4) prioritizes investment in new housing projects; (5) develops and implements a home health assessment pro-gram; and (6) examines the feasibility of  building our own homes using local resources, knowledge, skills and capacity. Pathway 2: Develop new and improve existing local infrastructureAction Options: 1. Finalize an Infrastructure and Capital Expenditure Plan that (1) increases road maintenance; (2) establishes cleanliness standards for the village; and (3) examines the feasibility of  expanding or building a new Band hall and a community/youth recreation centre.2. Improve communication system by (1) developing reliable broadband Internet service; (2) equipping all homes with computers and telephones; (3) designing and publishing a new Tobacco Plains website; and (4) building mailboxes for every home on reserve.Pathways Action OptionsPathway 1: Improve access to housing 1. Develop and implement a Comprehensive  Housing PlanPathway 2: Develop new and improve existing local infrastructure1. Finalize an Infrastructure and Capital Expenditure Plan2. Improve communication systemPathway 3: Increase administrative accountability, transparency, financial management and leadership.1. Create an Accountability System 2. Develop a transparency and cooperation  protocol3. Promote Sound Financial Management and LeadershipDirection: Invest in and improve infrastructure.Infrastructure Pathways and Action Options:126h E a L t hSummary: A main concern is in regards to the physical and mental well-being and happiness of  our members, with issues such as an aging population, substance abuse and lack of  government funding all contributing to the lack of  wellbeing in Tobacco Plains.  Issues: Through our community planning tools, we received 26 responses from community members indicated a variety of  issues and concerns regarding health and well-being in Tobacco Plains (Appendix X for more detail), that are summarized here:Physical & men-tal well-being of our member(22)Government cutbacks (4)Strengths: Key health strengths identified by the community include the following:• We have a flexible health team• We offer individual health planning• We include and focus on our Elders in our health planning and implementation• No more smoking in buildings• Our new van offers transportation to members• Nurse visits the community “When we’re all happy and healthy people.”Need to improve the physical and mental health, safety, happiness and well-being of our membersConcern with an increase in services needed to serve our aging populationNeed to address substance abuseTobacco Plains acts as the sole service provider for our areaGovernment cutbacks, lack of funding, and changes to government programs and servicesNeed to break cycle of dependency on Federal and Provincial governmentsAlternative care is too far away127Pathway 1: Invest in localized health and safetyAction Options:1. Increase local control over health: (1) becoming a designated regional health delivery agent; (2) improving our relationship with the BC Interior Health Authority (including NIHB, Interior Health, KNC); and (3) setting up a health dedicated fund to assist band members with health care costs.  2. Expand local service capacity: (1) conducting a home health assessment; (2) implementing a tele-health system; and  (3) hiring a nurse practitioner.3. Support Citizen and Elder care: (1) offering health related programs and education to learn how to care for one another; (2) offering nutritional information to community members; and (3) offering alternative and culturally based health care options. 4. Expand community safety: (1) setting up community neighborhood watch programs; and (2) creating an outreach program to improve our relationship with the RCMP.Pathways Action OptionsPathway 1: Invest in localized health and safety 1. Increase local control over health2. Expand local service capacity3. Support Citizen and Elder care4. Expand community safetyDirection: Nurture a happy, healthy and prosperous community, to improve and support the health of  all members. Health Pathways and Action Options:128S O c i a LSummary: The community members indicated that social issues such as inclusion, and lack of  having a community gathering space, were of  concern to them. Many families and individuals are forced to leave the community due to lack of  housing and employment.  Issues: Through our community planning tools, we received 12 responses from community members indicated a variety of  issues and concerns regarding Social is-sues in Tobacco Plains (Appendix X for more detail), that are summarized in the follow-ing issues-bubbles (the number in brackets indicates the number of  responses from the Off-reserve &inclusion (4)Dependency on welfare(4)Funding & infrastructure issue (4)Strengths: Key social strengths identified by community members include the following:• We are a highly social community • We value healthy and respectful relationships within our community and with outside communi-ties• We have a strong rural lifestyle• We value strong connections between each other“Families need to come together, for the good of  our  community and for our kids future.”Dependency on welfareFamilies are forced to leave the reserve to find work or housing, and are unable to move backOur cultural identity is in jeopardyUnhealthy people conditions impacts our social wellness.Lack of involvement of off-reserve membersLack of community-building focus in our communicationsNeed to re-introduce and refocus our community newsletterLack of participation and involve-ment due to poor communication.Lack of funding towards social services and infrastructure for social inclusionHouses are built too close together, lack of privacyLack of social and cultural gathering spaces129Direction: Encourage & promote social health and inclusion, and build support networks in the community. Pathway 1: Invest in social services and programs Action Options: 1. Increase and prioritize funding for social initiatives.2. Offer a space for community gatherings by (1) building a youth centre/recreational complex; (2) acquiring the Grasmere school; (3) increasing the size of  the band hall; (4) offering interactive community focus programs; (5) offering language training and cultural programs; and (6) dedicating a space to hold community and family gatherings and dinners.3. Promote the inclusion of  on and off  Reserve members by (1) using the internet to improve communication and share information on how to access all programs; (2) continuing to publish a community newsletter with regular updates and information on events and gatherings, and ensuring access and readership; (3) improving access to housing; (4) updating all contact information of  com-munity members, and (5) ensuring all community members have communication access (internet, phone, mail).Pathways Action OptionsPathway 1: Invest in social services and programs 1. Increase and prioritize funding for social initiatives2. Offer a space for community gatherings3. Promote the inclusion of on and off reserve mem-bersSocial Pathways and Action Options:130L a n g u a g e  &  C u l t u r eSummary: Our language and culture underlies all that we do, and can be incorporat-ed into all areas of  our community, including planning. There is a strong need to revi-talize, practice, promote and preserve our language and culture, in order to pass on our knowledge to future generations. Issues: Through our community planning tools, we received 16 responses from community members indicated a variety of  issues and concerns regarding Language & Culture in Tobacco Plains (Appendix X for more detail), that are summarized here:Challenges with maintaining and renewing our Tradi-tional  Knowledge  (12)Capacity challenges(4)Strengths:  Key strengths in our language & identified by community members include the fol-lowing:• We have a proud tradition and connection to our land since time immemorial• We have fluent elders who are teaching and preserving our language and cultural practices• Learning resources are available (i.e. computer, Ktunaxa dictionary and Ktunaxa smartphone application) “Having a strong culture will build the community for many generations.”Our language & culture needs revitalization  We have few eldersLack of interest in practicing and preserving our language & culture. Lack of language training programsLack of money for language & culture initiativesFamilies are not inspired to learn the language, and don’t know about or don’t have access to training pro-grams and facilitiesEnglish is used more than KtunaxaNeed to learn to communicate in both English and Ktunaxa131Direction: Revitalize and celebrate Ktunaxa language & Culture.  Pathway 1: Promote participation in Ktunaxa language and culture activitiesAction Options: 1. Increase the number of  Ktunaxa speakers and presence of  culture by (1) develop-ing and delivering language, culture and traditional knowledge programs in consultation with our Elders; (2) using Ktunaxa words and protocols in our governance and administrative docu-ments and processes; (3) opening all meetings, including Council, with a prayer; (4) placing Ktu-naxa signage throughout our community; and (5) implementing community cultural days.  2. Encourage intergenerational knowledge transfer among members by (1) involving our Elders in all activities; and (2) developing a mentorship program for elders and youth.Pathways Action OptionsPathway 1: Promote participation in Ktunaxa lan-guage and culture activities1. Increase the number of Ktunaxa  speakers, and the presence of our culture2. Encourage intergenerational knowledge transfer among membersLanguage & Culture Pathways and Action Options:132E D u c a t i O NSummary: Education is a critical area within our community; culturally relevant education is needed to provide our children and youth with a strong foundation while growing up in our com-munity, and more training and professional development is needed for our community members to be able to enter and stay in the workforce. Issues: Through our community planning tools, we received 10 responses from community mem-bers indicating a variety of  issues and concerns regarding Education in Tobacco Plains (Appendix X for more detail), that are summarized here:Lack of  educational op-portunities(8)Impacts to social and health issues (2)Strengths: Key educational identified by community members include following:• We have a learning centre at the Band office with computers and resources• There is interest in online programs and in post-secondary education• There is interest in an upgrading programs and training programs when they are available• Our children are able to go to school in Eureka, Montana• There is a need for educated, skilled workers in our regional economy “We need to raise money and prioritize education for our community members.”Need to improve our education and knowledgePoor internet quality impacts our learning opportunitiesLack of investment in local and post-secondary educationLack of training in the tradesLack of education leads to challenges with employ-ment, lack of confidence and mental health issuesEducated members are forced to find work off re-serve, which breaks up our families133Direction: Expand educational opportunities to ensure our children are educated and our community members can find meaningful and secure employment. Pathway 1: Invest in and improve our education systemAction Option: 1. Design a culturally relevant and world-class education system for children and youth by (1) prioritizing funding for education; (2) investing in and offering youth and community scholarships; (3) increasing training opportunities for youth; (4) influencing local curriculum; (5) offering language training; (6) offering cultural and environmental stewardship camps; and (7) reviewing and updating our Education Committee’s Terms of  Reference. Pathway 2: Provide meaningful, accessible and relevant employment training opportunities for our membersActions: 1. Increase Band members employability, skills and capacity by (1) offering resume and cover letter writing workshops; (2) partnering with local learning institutions to offer apprenticeship and trade training programs (3); offering fire and disaster preparation courses; (4) offering technology training programs; (5) providing a listing of  distance and community education resources; and (6) setting up delivery of  distance and online community education.Pathways Action OptionsPathway 1: Invest in and improve our education system1. Design a culturally relevant and world class  education system for children and youthPathway 2: Provide meaningful, accessible and rel-evant employment training opportunities for our members1. Increase band members employability, skills and capacityEducation Pathways and Action Options:134L a N D S  &  r E S O u r c E SSummary: Our community has a strong connection with our lands and resources, going back since time immemorial. The land and the living entities on it cannot speak for themselves, so we have a duty to protect these lands and the wildlife that lives on it that sup-ports us. We also want to explore responsible physical development on the land in or-der to maximize our land use and provide benefits to our community, now and into the future. Issues: Through our community planning tools, we received 12 responses from community members indicating a variety of  issues and concerns regarding Lands & Resources in Tobacco Plains (Appendix X for more detail), that are summarized here:Governance issues (5)Land Use issues (7)Strengths: Key strengths identified by the community the following:• We hold are proud of, hold a high level of  respect towards and have a strong connection with our lands and resources• We want to preserve our lands• We have community members have direct access to hunting and fishing areas on the land• We have opportunities in forestry, hydro power, agriculture, tourism, wildlife and conservation, mining and construction• We have leaseholders on our land, and potential lease revenue of  over $5 million. “We need to utilize our land to help our future generations, and to help protect our environment.”Community members, band administration, and Chief and Council have differing views around development and protection of the landTobacco Plains is not registered under the First Nations Land Management Act (FNLMA), and has not passed any land management lawsTobacco Plains has not published its Development approv-al processWe don’t use the land to its maximum valueLeaseholders lack long-term tenure security on their leasesOur lease rates are well below market valueThere are a lack of irrigation and water rights on reserve135Direction: Honor our connection with and protect our land, and maximize the value of  our lands for the benefit of  all  Pathway 1: Encourage physical growthAction Options: Pursue new resource based opportunities by: (1) have mapping that illustrates developable parcels of  Band land available to all departments and Chief  and Council; (2) explore forestry opportunities; (3) develop an ownership scheme to own property; (4) develop a mutual interest based negotiations strategy with KNC; (5) seeking resources to participate in negotiations with industry to negotiate Impact-Benefit Agreements; and (6) expand and support local businesses and entrepreneurs. Pathway 2: Empower our Lands and Resources DepartmentPathways Action OptionsPathway 1: Encourage physical growth 1. Pursue new resource based opportunitiesPathway 2: Empower our Lands and Resources Department1. Develop Land Management Code & Practices 2. Develop Land Tenure Rules and Lease  agreements  3. Investigate alternative energy projectsAction Options: Develop Land Management Code/Practices by: (1) apply under the First Nations Land Manage-ment Act Schedule; (2) develop a Zoning Bylaw; and (3) adopt a Development Approval processes.Develop Land Tenure Rules and Lease agreements to reduce uncertainty for leaseholders by (1) investigating 99 year residential leases; (2) securing long-term, fully pre-paid leases on the eight unoccupied lots at Edwards Lake; (3) investigating and developing draft model leases for commer-cial, industrial and agricultural leases; and (4) securing leasehold title to cottages at Edwards Lake.  Investigate feasible alternative energy projects by (1) completing an Alternative Energy Feasi-bility Study; and (2) developing solar, wind and hydro technologies to support our community and protect our lands.Lands & Resources Pathways and Action Options:1366.O NExt StEPS LiGhtiNG thE firENow that the values, issues, needs and concerns of  the com-munity have been gathered, we must continue on the journey of  community planning. Keeping our vision of  a self-gov-erning, healthy and prosperous community at the forefront, we need to prioritize and implement the action items in this plan, and monitor, evaluate and celebrate our progress. The following pages provide some recommendations on the key next steps required to ensure that strategic actions are iden-tified and taken, monitored, evaluated and celebrate with the community.1.O imPLEmENtatiON Target date: September, 2014Summary: Implementation is one of  the most critical steps of  planning; it means determining and following through on key actions, and turning our community plan into a reality in order to achieve the results as identified by our common vision. This section outlines some of  the key next steps in implementing the plan, and highlight some im-portant tools (see Appendix X) to aid in the implementation of  the plan. Action prioritization and ranking, is a first key step to inform Chief  and Council and Band ad-ministration on the planning area and action priorities of  our community. This will help to inform and frame important decisions that will impact our community. This section summarizes the most commonly heard issues in the community and what actions might be taken to help to resolve those outstanding issues, as well as an example tool that can support the community in determining its priorities for action. A part of  this step is to perform an action assessment, which involves  scoping, budgeting and sequencing actions. This stage involves several steps, including identifying the scope, cost and feasibility of  each action, and determining the appropriate timeline to have it completed. An example tool has been developed to determine the sequencing of  planning actions.The next step is to develop a funding strategy. This will help identify and secure the critical resourc- es needed to pay for and develop the skills and capacity needed to deliver the planning actions iden-tified by community members and to continue our planning processes. This section outlines some important steps and considerations to make for developing a funding strategy.The last step, creating annual implementation plans, will serve to link the action priorities identified by the community with the operational work planning of  Band staff, so that real and tangible re-sources are committed to achieving our community vision. An example tool is listed to help develop these annual plans.137Our plan sets out 33 broad actions that Tobacco Plains can take to address the needs and concerns of  our community members. Based on the outcomes of  our community engagement, the plan-ning areas that we heard the most about are Economic Development (75 responses, see “Planning Outcomes”, page 4), Governance (41 responses, see “Planning Outcomes”, page 6), Infrastructure (37 responses, see “Planning Outcomes”, page 9), and Health (26 responses, see “Planning Out-comes”, page 11). Although this does not necessarily indicate the priorities of  the community, it does demonstrate where many community members have strong concerns, issues and needs. Ac-tions such as increasing support for local businesses and entrepreneurs, integrating the community’s voice into all planning processes, or developing and implementing a comprehensive housing strat-egy could be key actions of  our community members. However, further engagement is needed to determine these priorities.  1.1 Action Prioritization and Ranking  Target date: September, 2014A funding strategy is essential to finding the resources and developing the skills and capacity in our community to follow through on our members priorities. Developing a funding strategy requires time, knowledge and research. Breaking away from unreliable and uncertain government funding sources will also require creativity and seeking new collaborative partnerships. Some essential ele-ments in developing a funding strategy are as follows:• Form a funding committee: this committee could be composed of  key staff  in relevant departments in Tobacco Plains, and outline clear roles and responsibilities for those involved; i.e. who will research funding opportunities, who will apply for funding, who will identify the funding needs based on the community plan, what resources are available, etc.• Research funding agencies, grant programs, and other opportunities: government pro-grams, financial institutions, credit unions, NGO’s, and the private sector all offer potential sourc-es of  funding, depending on their focus. Some important information to keep in mind when seek-ing funding is to know the mandate of  the organization and whether or not your project aligns with that mandate, the eligibility requirements of  the grant (what is and is not funded by the grant organization), the timing of  the notification and distribution of  grant money, any reporting requirements, and whether or not you will be eligible for future funding.• Host annual grant writing workshops: Hosting a grant writing workshop can provide staff  with basic training on what grant agencies are looking for, what they are assessing in grant appli-cations, how to follow-through on grant reporting requirements, etc. This can provide Tobacco Plains with increased capacity to write more successful grant applications and secure more fund-ing for planning projects. 1.2 Develop a Funding Strategy  Target date: December, 2014138• Review current programming: Current programs and services should be evaluated based on the needs and priorities of  the community once they’ve been established. This can help Tobac-co Plains determine if  funding needs to be allocated or prioritized in certain areas, based on the priorities of  the community. • Develop communication tools: Key to applying to grants and seeking new partnerships is hav-ing a solid communication toolkit, from which all staff  can refer to keep messaging consistent and based on similar facts, findings, values, mandates, etc. Formally adopting this community plan is a key step and important tool for communicating the issues, needs, visions and values of  the community.  Another important tool could be developing a new website that features local information and relevant policies and procedures for both community members and outside entities interested in partnering or working in Tobacco Plains. Other tools include a commu-nity newsletter, social media updates, and developing new branding/marketing and media campaigns & strategiesWorking together to achieve our community directions. By bringing together the entire community, including our members (on and off  reserve), our elders, youth, the band administration, Chief  and Council, we can ensure that decisions regarding our future will be made with everyone’s concerns and perspectives heard, acknowledged, and considered. Our community has expressed frustration that too many planning documents do not result in tangible actions or results. To ensure follow through on actions in our plan, we can create Annual Implementation Plans (AIP). A tool  has been developed by the Planning Team that can be used as a basic element to an AIP (to see this tool, as well as a description on how it can be used, refer to Ap-pendix X, page X). Using this tool, an AIP would outline the specific activities needed to implement a set of  actions related to our planning themes, as well as who from the community, band staff  and Council is responsible for the activities, what resources are needed, a timeline for completion, a communication strategy, and a target to indicate completion of  the action. AIP’s would be helpfulto sequence short, medium and long term projects, as well as to track and evaluate what actions were committed to, and if/how they were successfully completed.  1.3 Creation of  Annual Implementation Plan (AIP).   Target Date: December, 2014.Funding Strategy, continued The table in the next page lists all 33 action-options identified in this community plan. Each of  these action-options contains subsequent actions, though just the action heading has been listed here (see “Planning Outcomes” for action details). These 33 action-options consist of  9 program based actions, 11 project based actions, and 13 policy based actions. In order to complete the rank-ing and prioritization of  these actions, a tool has been developed (see Appendix X, page X to see an example of  the tool and how it is used) to better determine our communities priorities 139Annual Implementation Plan, continued as we move forward. It should be noted that a preliminary prioritization and ranking tool was developed and delivered to the community, but due to low participation and insuffi-cient data, no strong conclusions could be made about the community’s priorities. Please note that the numbers that follow each action does not represent order of  priority. Table 4.o: Summary of  Community Planning Action-Options.Actions (red = program actions; blue = project actions; green = policy actions)1. Hire Economic Development Officer and improve the Economic Development Department.2. Develop and implement a 5 year economic development plan.3. Improve Saw-mill operations4. Improve campground operations5. Improve the Duty Free Shop6. Promote and support local businesses and entrepreneurs7. Increase tourism8. Integrate community’s voice, skills and knowledge into all planning processes.9. Develop a communication and participation strategy10. Create a Governance Accountability System11. Develop a transparency and cooperation protocol12. Promote Sound Financial Management and Leadership in Governance13. Develop and implement a Comprehensive Housing Plan14. Finalize an Infrastructure and Capital Expenditure Plan15. Improve communication system16. Create an Infrastructure Accountability System17. Develop a transparency and cooperation protocol18. Promote Sound Financial Management and Leadership in Infrastructure decisions19. Increase local control over health20. Expand local service capacity21. Support Citizen and Elder care22. Expand community safety23. Increase and prioritize funding for social initiatives24. Offer a space for community gatherings25. Promote the inclusion of on and off reserve members26. Increase the number of Ktunaxa speakers, and the presence of our culture27. Encourage intergenerational knowledge transfer among members28. Design a culturally relevant and world class education system for children and youth29. Increase band members employability, skills and capacity30. Pursue new resource based opportunities31. Develop Land Management Code & Practices140Once the implementation stage is underway, the planning process can move into the fourth stage, monitoring and evaluation. This will be a critical stage of  task management, progress monitoring and evaluating results, and communicating results and celebrating achievements with community members. Theme and Pathway Scale Cost Annual Implementation Plan  Year 1 (months)AIP 2AIP 3AIP 4AIP 5# Action S M L L M H 3 mths6 mths9 mths12 mthsEconomy: Pathway 2: Generate Revenue by investing in local businesses and encouraging local entrepreneurship1 Improve Saw-mill oper-ationsX X X2 Improve campground operationsX X X3 Improve the Duty Free ShopX X X4 Promote and support local businesses and  entrepreneursX X X5 Increase tourism X X XCritical to implementation is having a clear understanding of  the scope, feasibility, cost, timing and sequencing of  actions. Actions that are program based will have much different requirements than actions that are project or policy based, so determining and assessing the feasibility of  each specific action requires time and commitment, but is essential in order to best allocate resources and capacity. Table 5.o, bellow, explains an implementation tool developed by the Planning Team that can be used to assess the scale, cost and timing of  planning actions.Scoping actions refers to understanding the overall scale and impact of  the action; actions can be scaled as small, medium or large, based on the amount of  staff  time, resources, and overall impact an action might have or require.Costing actions is another important step in determining when, where and how to allocate resources. Some essential costs to think about when assessing an action’s feasibility is design costs, planning costs (staff  time and resources, outside consultant fees), implementation costs (staff  time, resources), and project management costs.Table 5.o: Action Assessment Tool. 1.4 Action Assessment: Scoping, Budgeting and Sequencing   Target Date: March, 2015.141Empowering the Community _ Monitoring & Evaluation Target date: September, 2015 To ensure that our community plan is working effectively to meet the needs of  our members, we need to accurately monitor, track and evaluate the progress of  our implementation efforts. This in-cludes communicating our progress to community members. Monitoring and evaluation are important aspects of  our community planning process because they enable us to assess the quality and impact of  our decisions concerning our Vision, Directions, Path-ways and Actions we have identified.  Listed below are three tools that the Planning Team has devel-oped that can be used to monitor and evaluate our planning progress: a Compliance Monitoring tool, an Impact Monitoring tool, and an Evaluation tool. Each of  these tools will help in a specific aspect of  Monitoring and Evaluating our progress, and will help us realize our core planning objectives.The Compliance Monitoring tool (see table 6.o), helps to tracks the staff, departments and resources that were committed to specific planning actions, not just the themes/directions, in the Implemen-tation planning section, i.e. the Annual Implementation Plan. The annual Impact Monitoring Tool (see table 7.o) is designed to measure the actual impact that our strategic directions are having in the community on a yearly basis, based on our baseline and target setting that would have been done in the Implementation phase of  our planning process.  The first column after the strategic directions in this tool shows what indicators we might use to measure the progress of  each strategic direction. The next column monitors the prioritization of  each strategic direction, and determines if  TPIB Band staff  and administration have been prioritizing each strate-gic direction in the same way as was determined in the Implementation phase. Next, this tool lists the baseline data for each indicator (for example, the number of  unemployed members in TPIB), and lists the target set for the end of  the current year, and the actual results, for the next five years. The Evaluation Tool (see table 8.o) can be used to document and analyze if  a project is completed, if  and how much of  the project is left to complete, and any comments or lessons learned during the implementation and delivery of  the project. See the three examples of  the tools in the next page.             2.O mONitOriNG & EvaLuatiON “Have we arrived? How are we progressing?”142Table 6.o: Compliance Monitoring Tool.STRATEGIC WORK PLAN OVERVIEW THEMESSTRATEGIC DIRECTIONPHASECOMPLETION RATE (0-100%)Project (s)Department (s)Project Phase 1Project Phase 2Project Phase 3year 1year 2year 3year 4year 5Comments EconomyFoster economic developmentImprove saw-mill operationsEconomic DevelopmentGovernanceEmpower local participation in decision makingCreate a governance accountability system Chief & Coun-cilInfrastructure Improve Infrastructure Develop and imple-ment a comprehensive housing plan Land & ResourcesHealthDiversify health programsSupport citizens and Elder careHealth Social Promote social inclusion Promote inclusion of on and off  reserve membersSocial Language & CultureCelebrate Ktunaxa culture & language Create intergener-ational education programsEducation and CultureEducation Increase education levels of membersDesign a relevant Ktunaxa cultural based education Education and CultureLand & Resources Maximize land valueDevelop landmanagement code &practicesLands & Re-sources 143IMPACT MONITORING TOOLTHEMES   STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS   ACTIONS & DIRECTIONS                                                      TARGETS        Priority (L/M/H)Baseline  CP2014Actual TargetActual.................2015Target Actual.................2016Target Actual .................2017Target Actual..................2018Target Actual .................2019TargetEconomyFoster economic de-velopmentEmployment levels, unemployment rates, labor force, N of local business, individual annual income, $ invested in the local economyAnnual ReportGovernanceEmpower local par-ticipation in decision makingDecision making participation rate, N. of community meetings, community input, governance workshopsAnnual ReportInfrastructure Improveinfrastructure N. of members who own house in the reserve, N. renters, N of annual proj-ects, N of housing improvementsAnnual ReportHealthDiversify health programsCommunity wellbeing indicator index, N of heath programs, N of doctor visitsAnnual ReportSocial Promote social inclusion N of community events, N of commu-nity meetings, N sharing circlesAnnual ReportLanguage & CultureCelebrate Ktunaxa culture & language N of members who speak ktunaxa, N of cultural programsAnnual ReportEducation Increase education levels of membersLiteracy rate, N of students graduating from high school, university pro-grams, trades programs. Annual ReportTable 7.o Impact Monitoring .144 Lessons  CommentsCompleted (Y/N)   Progress Report (%)                                      Year 1                                Year 2                                Year 3                                 Year 4                                Year 5                      Time frame                Department (s)                        Officer (s)  Actions & Directions          Strategic  Directions EVALUATION TOOL Employment levels, unem-ployment rates, labor force,  individual annual income, $ invested in the local econ-omyFoster Economic DevelopmentDecision making participation rate, commu-nity input, governance workshopsEmpower local par-ticipation in decision makingNumber of members who own house in the reserve, number rent-ers, number of annual projects, number of hous-ing improve-mentsImprove InfrastructureCommuni-ty wellbeing indicator index, number of heath pro-grams, numberof doctor visitsDiversify health programsNumber of community events, num-ber of com-munity meet-ings, number sharing circlesPromote so-cial inclusionNumber of members who speak Ktunaxa, number of cultural programsCelebrate ktunaxa culture &languageLiteracy rate, number of students graduating from high school, university programs, trades programsIncrease education levels of membersDevelopment land code, number of investment in energy proj-ects, number of physical growth projectsMaximize land valueTable 8.o: Evaluation Tool.145The Tobacco Plains Community Plan has been created through participatory community engage-ment, through past planning research, and through bringing together the directions of  the com-munity with the goals of  Chief  and Council, and determining where they do and do not align. The Planning Team’s analysis and presentation of  the community issues, needs, vision of  the future, and action strategies can serve as an important tool to build community cohesion, and to solidify the process of  community-based decision making for Tobacco Plains Indian Band.  Once this CCP is adopted by Chief  and Council, it can begin acting on the key steps identified in this plan, and working towards fulfilling the vision and values set out by the people.  The Community Advisory Committee should be revised and it’s terms of  reference updated, so that community plan-ning champions can be identified, and Band staff  and Administration can work with the community in identifying and implementing the action-options proposed in this document. By working together, and incorporating traditional knowledge and language into the planning and decision-making process, we can revitalize and empower our community to realize it’s Vision of  a self-governing community. 7.o Conclusion 146	  	  TOBACCO	  PLAINS	  COMMUNITY	  ENGAGEMENT	  STRATEGY	  	  FEBRUARY	  3,	  2014	  	  VISION Our vision for the Tobacco Plains engagement strategy is for community participation to be the highest priority in the TPB community planning process. The TPB Community Plan will be founded on strong, authentic and genuine community engagement that allows the planning team to better understand the needs and concerns of the community. Purpose The Tobacco Plains engagement strategy plan defines a vision, approach and set of activities to support direct community participation and involvement in the community planning process. The purpose of the engagement strategy is to provide a framework to guide the Tobacco Plains planning team to ensure inclusive engagement based on informed community members. The planning activities serve as a road map for the Tobacco Plains community to provide knowledge, input and directions on local issues and needs throughout the planning process. The foundation of the engagement strategy is based on five pillars, which are intrinsically connected to five major guiding principles as followed:  Engagement Strategy Pillars 1. Strong Involvement Include and maintain community members’ involvement in the decision-making process and appropriately inform them about when and how they can participate in the engagement process on an ongoing basis. Action: Work directly with community members throughout the planning process to maximize community participation and ensure that community members’ concerns and aspirations are considered and included in the planning process. Form a planning committee to maintain community members engaged in the community planning process 2. Accurate Information  Summarize and communicate information about data, issues, strategies or plans that may direct or indirectly affect community members.  Action: Provide community members with the Tobacco Plains past and present planning information and assist them in understanding the planning history. Constantly update community members on where the planning process is at. 3. Effective Consultation & Engagement Seek and share direct knowledge, opinion and information from community members through a variety of methods and tools. Respond to the preferences of members. Fun, interactive, respectful, etc  Action: Ask community members for feedback on the planning process. 147	  	  4. Ongoing Collaboration Work together and in partnership with community members Action: Maintain active community engagement and participation throughout the process, i.e., during the development of planning alternatives and in the identification of preferred solutions.  5. Empowerment Foster a sense of empowerment within the community members to build the confidence, momentum and leadership of members and staff, and seed the commitment of the community to the implementation of the community plan.  Action: Honor community needs as a fundamental right to enable them to assume a formal place in local governance and direct access to Chief and Council. Engagement Strategy Principles  	  1. Inclusiveness, Diversity & Representation Facilitate a diverse set of methods, tools and activities to gain a broad representation of views when undertaking engagement processes. Recognize that there may be a number of community members who have particular engagement needs and preferences and requirements, and strive to have their full participation in the community engagement sessions and decision-making processes throughout the planning process. To be responsive to the diverse needs of Elders, youth, parents, etc.  2. Informed Decision-Making and Documentation  Strive to provide easy and accessible information to ensure community members are given the opportunity to provide informed input to the community planning process. Ensure information follow-up with community members concerning their ideas, visions, issues of interests, challenges, and outcomes that they care about. 3. Adhere to Timeframe Adhere to and respect the March 31st deadline of the BCCI Funding; to provide TPB Chief and Council the results of the planning process to inform their future decisions on planning, policy, and related community issues. 4. Promote Transparency  The community planning team is committed to a transparent community engagement process to enable a meaningful and inclusive community planning process that results in meaningful decision-making. 5. Community Direction and Focus  Provide a clear roadmap to guide the community engagement process with a clear focus of direction as determined by the priorities, which are understood by all community members. 148	  	  Engagement Methods Based on the survey completed on November, the following methods will be used to carry out our process: o Large group workshops & events (community and family-based)  o Door to door surveys  o World café Youth forums…etc  o Door to door visits o Summary brochures, newsletters, social media (Facebook) o Planning committee  o Video updates  Outcomes of Engagement 1. TPB Planning Team understands the needs of the community, the youth and the elders. 2. Issues and concerns are summarized and categorized and prioritized into meta-themes to be including in the TPB Community Plan. 3. Potential actions and projects within each theme are identified by the community and prioritized within the plan.  4. The TPB Plan identifies how the community will be involved in the plan implementation. 5. Community supports the TPB Community Plan.  Indicators of Successful Engagement 1. Quantitative  o Number of participants in Youth, Elder, and community sessions.  o Number of door-to-door visits  o Number of newsletters, social media updates o Number of community planning sessions feedback  o Number of community sessions    149	  	  2. Qualitative  o Comment card feedback o Survey responses o Event summaries   o One to one interviews Engagement Strategy Event Guidelines  1. Event Planning: 1. Define purpose and expected outcomes of event based on Engagement Strategy Outcomes. 2. Determine budget for event. 3. Draft agenda, define activities and gathering necessary materials (how each activity will inform the purpose and outcome of the event, and also the timing of each activity). Assign roles and responsibilities (who will be doing what activity, etc.). 4. Ensure that all the steps have been taking in announcing the event to the community. 5. Confirm venue, date, time, set-up, catering, etc.   2. Event Implementation: 1. Make the venue an inviting, welcoming, inclusive space that accommodates all the needs of the community members.  2. Review the agenda at the beginning of the session. 3. Establish ground roles (speakers time limit and list, respect and depersonalize issues)  4. Honor, acknowledge and follow local protocol. 5. State how information will be used and protected. 6. Ensure to take accurate notes. 7. Commence and terminate the event according to the schedule. 8. Announce next community session. 3. Event Evaluation: 1. Event report  o Number of participants  o Comments and other feedbacks o Compile notes  o Filling the event evaluation template (see below) o Email the report to the planning team o Phone/Skype update with Steve and Wilson   	  	  150	  	  	  TOBACCO PLAINS BAND COMMUNITY PLANNING ADVISORY COMMITTEE  TERMS OF REFERENCE Last updated: Monday, February 3rd, 2014.Name The committee shall be known as “The Tobacco Plains Band Community Planning Advisory Committee” or CPAC (herein referred to as the Committee). Background The Tobacco Plains Band (TPB) has completed a number of community planning and economic development planning projects over the past ten years. The community has recently secured funding from the British Columbia Capacity Initiative (BCCI) to undertake a process to build on the Phase 1 comprehensive community plan (CCP) completed in 2012. This will occur over the next four months, concluding on March 31st. Using this funding, TPB has hired a Community Planning Coordinator to direct this planning process. TPB has also partnered with the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP); as a result of this partnership, two practicum students will assist the TPB Community Planning Coordinator through the TPB Planning Team, which will administer, coordinate, facilitate and document the planning process up until March 31st.  Community Planning Definition The community of Tobacco Plains has defined the process of community planning as engaging the community members of TPB to determine their vision, direction and goals to achieve the community they want in the future. Role/Purpose of the TPB Community Planning Team The Planning Team consists of the Community Planning Coordinator, and the two UBC-SCARP Practicum students, with oversight from the TPB Band Manager. The roles and responsibilities of the Planning Team involve strategizing the overall planning process, including the overall work plan and engagement strategies needed to complete a Community Plan by March 31st, 2014. The Planning team is also responsible for designing and facilitating events according to these strategies, recording and analyzing planning relevant information, and documenting the results and priorities in a community plan.  Role/Purpose of the TPB Community Planning Advisory Committee The purpose of the committee is to support and assist the TPB Planning Team with engaging the community members of TPB during the community planning process (November 2013 – March 2014). The committee will organize community engagement sessions and providing summary notes to the TPB Community Planning Team. After completion of the community planning process in March 31st, 2014, the committee will review its mandate and determine what ongoing role it will play. 151	  	  Relationship with TPB Planning Team Direction and guidance will be received from the TPB Planning Team to build the momentum of the committee; i.e. to aid in design events and activities, recording notes, and achieving objectives. Upon completion of the planning process in March 2014, the Planning Committee will review its mandate and determine what role it will play in the community. Remuneration Members of the committee shall be given a $75 honorarium per meeting/event cycle for their efforts.  Qualifications Preference will be given to members of the community who are not TPB staff or council members, and who have experience or strong interest in community planning.  Goals The goals of the Committee are:  1. To advise and assist the TPB Community Planning Team in the completion and implementation of the TPB Community Plan.  2. To engage the community (as per the Community Engagement Strategy) to determine the issues, priorities, and other planning actions to fit into the TPB Community Plan.  3. To continue engaging the community members of Tobacco Plains during and after implementation of the Plan to ensure the Plan remains updated and valid, according to the community’s interests and needs.   Process Deliverables The Committee is expected to: 1. Learn about the previous planning that has been done, and the benefits, purpose, and need of completing a community plan in TPB.  2. Organize 3-5 community engagement sessions by March 20th, based on the direction of the TPB Planning Team and the Engagement Strategy, providing written summaries (using the Event Evaluation Template) to the TPB Planning Team for analysis and inclusion in the Community Plan. 3. Plan implementation, monitoring and evaluation: Organize an Annual Community Planning Review meeting to update the community on the implementation of the plan, and to revisit and update the Community Plan, Engagement Strategy, and other relevant planning documents as needed and directed by community/TPB. Meetings & Reporting The Advisory Committee will commit to three meeting/event cycles; the meeting will meet biweekly (Mondays) and organize biweekly events (Wednesdays) during the course of the community planning process, which is expected to last approximately 4 months concluding on March 31st, 2014.  The date and times for the meetings and events are as follows:  Cycle 1: 152	  	  Meeting 1: Monday, February 3  Event 1: Wednesday, February 5    Cycle 2:  Meeting 2: Monday, February 17  Event 2: Wednesday, February 19  Cycle 3:  Meeting 3: Monday, March 10th   Event 3: Wednesday, March 12th  1. The advisory committee will be responsible for creating and following meeting and event agendas, taking accurate notes at each meeting and event, and creating a notes summary to be shared with the Planning Team no later than a week after each session (using the Event Evaluation Template provided by the Planning Team). 2. The Advisory Committee, acting as a conduit for public input to the Community Planning process, will debrief and provide feedback to the Planning Team after each event they organize and host through Skype or telephone conferences, no later than a week after each event.  All meeting minutes shall normally be prepared and distributed within one week of any meeting. Roles and Responsibilities The Planning Advisory Committee shall be comprised of at least 3 individuals as listed below: 1. Community Plan Coordinator – Coordinates the Committee, provides main facilitation at engagement sessions, compiles notes from each session and reports to the Planning Team. Liaison between Planning Committee and Planning Team; provides overall administration, coordination and budgeting of planning committee’s activities. 2. Community Member (Elder) – assists organizing engagement events, co-facilitating and takes notes during sessions, providing cultural guidance. 3. Community Member (youth) – assists organizing engagement events, co-facilitating and takes notes during sessions, representing youth voice. 4. Community Member - assists organizing engagement events, co-facilitating and takes notes during sessions, assists in the report writing, event evaluation, debrief of events, etc.  Membership Selection The Planning Team will advertise at the next community engagement session, requesting interested individuals to volunteer on the Committee.  Posters will be placed at the TPB Band Hall and information will be sent out in the next newsletter. Timeframe The first stage of the committee’s work (community engagement) will occur during the community planning process, including from the creation of the committee until the completion of the planning project (March 31st, 2014).  Terms Committee members shall sit on the committee until March 31st, 2014. 153	  	  Quorum & Decision Making Decisions made by the Committee must be made by at least 2/3 of active committee members. Issues will generally be decided based on consensus, but will go to a vote (simple majority) when necessary. Advisory Committee will seek to achieve consensus on decisions. Recommendations are “carried” if supported by a simple majority. On issues where consensus is not reached, the alternative points of view will be described and the reasons for those differing points of view will be explained and provided as part of the information forwarded to those being advised.   A quorum of half the membership plus one is required for the Advisory Committee to make decisions or make its formal recommendations. However, it will not prohibit meetings from occurring or inhibit discussions to continue to move the agenda along. Meetings will not normally be postponed due to the lack of quorum unless the meeting is specifically identified as a special decision making meeting.   Only resolutions as they appear in the adopted Minutes may be considered as officially representing the position of the Committee.  Resources and Budget The Committee will have access to the Planning Team’s capacity, resources and budget to plan events and engagement activities. The Planning Coordinator will determine the appropriate budget for events.  Amendment, Modification or Variation Once the community planning process is complete and there is no more Community Planning Team, the terms of reference for the committee shall be updated to continue the work of implementing the TPB Community Plan.            154	  	  APPENDIX C: Community Session Reports  I. Open House Report  II. Visioning Session Report III. It Matters Session Report IV. Prioritization Session Report V. Community Planning Advisory Committee Report VI. Chief And Council Strategic Planning Report VII. Youth Session Reports VIII. Camera Project Report IX. Youth Visioning Session Report X. Interview Session Report XI. Elders Session Report         155	  	  Tobacco Plains Community Planning  Community Report: Open House Launch, November 5th, 2013.              Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team  By  Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn [Practicum Students]  For Tobacco Plains Indian Band     … University of British Columbia  School of Community and Regional Planning  [SCARP   156	  	    Executive Summary “Community planning will help our future generations and environment.” – Survey respondent The intent of this trip was to launch the community planning process through community, youth and elder engagement, to determine the communication and participation preferences of the community, and to gain an understanding and definition of community planning from the community’s perspective. Community from the perspective of Tobacco Plains members refers to the people, places and nature within the area of the Tobacco Plains reserve. Planning refers to a community driven process aimed at achieving realistic goals, for the purposes of self-governance.  Introduction On November 5th, from 5:30-7:30pm at the TPB Band Hall, the TPB Planning Team held the Community Planning Open House to officially launch the Tobacco Plains Community Planning initiative. Prior to this event, the Planning team met several times to determine our approach and principles of planning in Tobacco Plains; we also met with the Band Manager and presented to Chief & Council. These meetings identified the goal of having a community-driven and participatory process, where as much as possible of the decision-making and framing of issues would be community led.   Process & Activities “Community planning would help the community focus on the future” – Survey respondent.  Purpose: A Community driven event using surveys, fun and creative approaches, audio/video tools and interactive engagement to get Tobacco Plains members excited about and willing to participate in the planning process.  Process & Activities: Preliminary meetings were held in the weeks prior to this event to determine the approaches and principles the Tobacco Plains planning team would take (see trip report). The need for an authentic and genuinely community-driven process was identified, as well as the goals to empower and build capacity in the Tobacco Plains community. It was decided that the initial name of the planning process “Comprehensive Community Planning” would be changed to “Community Planning”, as it was identified that the word “comprehensive” may be too restrictive or exclusionary. As this was the open house launch for the entire process, the TPB planning team wanted to get things started on the right foot.   A culturally relevant process was identified as being needed to encourage meaningful participation in the planning process. The Open House began with a prayer in Ktunaxa and a meal. Following that, Vickie Thomas, TPB Band Manager, provided an introduction to the community planning team. The planning team also wanted a prize give away regime to create excitement about the process; prior to the event, money was allocated to purchase a Tipi as the grand prize, as well as numerous other smaller prizes to encourage participants to attend (more attendance meant more entries in the prize give-away!). The prizes giveaways began during the meal and continued throughout the evening.   157	  	  The Planning team wanted to employ a fun and interactive approach to the community event; Stephen & Wilson (UBC Practicum students) provided music and a magic show as an icebreaker after the meal, and facilitated the event using flip chart and strong visuals that were accessible to the community. This would later become a key feature in community sessions! The planning team did a thorough review of the Tobacco Plains Planning history, in order to better understand where the community is currently at, how they got there, and how these documents propose TPB moves into the future (as a comparison to how the community wants TPB to move forward). The team provided an overview to the community of this planning history (insert picture of the planning timeline?), in order to build capacity of planning knowledge, and also to be accountable to the type of work the team is hoping to achieve.  The team also designed an activity to gauge how the community understood the words “community” and “planning”; this was done to further promote the community’s perspective and direction in the process, and to build capacity and discuss what community planning could help achieve for Tobacco Plains. Lastly, a survey tool was identified and created to determine the communication and participation preferences of the community, in order to engage them according to their needs. The survey was also used to determine some preliminary concerns, experience with planning and to gauge the community’s interest in community planning (see Results and Appendix). The survey was tied to the prize give-away (completing the survey was another opportunity to get entered into the grand prize give-away). The event ended with a review of the next steps we proposed.  Results Planning History Review – Planning documents (see appendix for summaries): • TPB Demographics Report (title?) • TPB Strategic Plan (2006-2011) • TPB Housing Subdivision Feasibility Study • TPB Economic Development Strategy • TPB Comprehensive Community Plan Phase 1 • TPB Community Energy Plan  Definitions of “Community” and “Planning”. See appendix X for original pictures of activity.  Planning: According to the community, planning is a community driven (people make the plan, planning for ourselves,) and dedicated process, aimed at determining (layout), committing to, and achieving realistic goals (language and culture, self-governance, health, inventory, money, water, food, jobs, communication, accountability, capacity building, individual training plans, self-sufficiency) for community members in the present and future. Community: According to Tobacco Plains members, community is defined as the people who live here (elders, youth, disabled, middle aged, toddlers, children) and the outside and transient community (Grasmere, summer tourists); the people in the community value inclusiveness, strategic engagement, stability, community health and support for families. Community includes the physical infrastructure (housing, water, industry), and the geographic location provides opportunities for recreation and a resource-based economy, which provides for self-sustaining economic development.    Results of Survey: (see appendix X for more extensive summary and raw data) 17 Surveys completed; 11 female, 6 male; majority of respondents (65%) were over the age of 35. Preferred ways of communicating with TPB members include phone calls, one on one meetings and 158	  	  the band newsletter; participation preferences included info sessions, community workshop and small group discussions. 2 or 3 hour sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday nights are preferred. Many respondents indicated some previous planning experience, but expressed frustration at the lack of accountability and implementation after the plans. All respondents indicated community planning would benefit TPB. Jobs and Housing were two common concerns expressed in the Survey, and training for youth, increasing the size of the band hall, language revitalization and job creation were some of the most commonly identified projects to focus on.   Next Steps • Analyze Survey results • Take Survey results to design engagement strategy (i.e. set dates for next session according to Survey results re: communication & participation preferences) • Planning team continue with reviewing previous planning documents • Next community session dates identified for early December. 	    	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  159	  	  Tobacco Plains Community Planning  Community Planning Process Report No 2 Visioning Session , December 10th, 2013.              Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team  By  Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn [Practicum Students]  For Tobacco Plains Indian Band     … University of British Columbia  School of Community and Regional Planning  [SCARP]   160	  	    Executive Summary On December 2013, the Community Plan Team launched its second community planning session on Visioning and Metaphors (Cultural relevant symbols to use in the Planning process). The event started with an introduction and guest speaker from St. Mary’s, who highlighted how community planning has benefited that community. The session continued with a strength-based activity where participants were asked to list strengths within each of the proposed themes (these themes were originally proposed in the CCP Phase 1 document). For example, for the “Health” theme, strengths were listed as having flexible health staff, and having a community nurse. For the “Lands & Resources” theme, a strong respect for a healthy environment was listed as strength. For the “Economy” theme, strengths listed were the Development Corporation, and Band run businesses such as the Duty Free Store and the campgrounds (see Results below for a more detailed summary and Appendix A for the raw data). The Vision activity had less cohesive results; it demonstrated that community members were challenged with the Vision statements found in past planning documents. Participants did not seem to agree with any of the vision statements and expressed frustration. Some members proposed new vision statements, but there was a general lack of consensus around a unified Tobacco Plains Vision Statement. In spite of these challenges, participants identified three metaphors in the last activity (Tree, Fire, and Tipi) to symbolize in a culturally relevant way the unique Tobacco Plains approach for to planning. The event ended with an introduction of the Community Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC), and a call for volunteers to join, as well as some next steps in the planning process.    Introduction “What do Tobacco Plains Band members want the local community to be like in the future?”  On December 10th, from 5:30-7:30pm, the TPB Planning Team led the second community engagement session at the TPB Band Hall. The intention of the session was to engage community members to fully participate in the planning process by inviting them to make decisions regarding the future of their community. The session was divided into four interconnected sections. The first section presented a situational assessment in order to identify the strengths and areas of improvement in the community. The second section was designed to re-introduce, re-evaluate, and revise all the TPB Vision statements and compared them against the results from section one. The third section identified metaphors to be used as culturally relevant symbols in the community plan. Finally, the forth section introduced the concept of the community planning advisory committee (CPAC) to the TPB members.    Process & Activities  Purpose: The purpose of the visioning session was to invite TPB community members to participate in the crafting of a strong vision statement for TPB that speaks to the desired future of the community and establishes core values and principles that are central to the needs and aspirations of TPB members. Continuing with the community-driven process and the intention to 161	  	  empower and build capacity within the Tobacco Plains community, the TPB planning team designed a Visioning Session in which community members were invited to re-evaluate the past TPB vision statements and co-create a new Vision that represents their values within the TPB and builds hope for future generations.   Introduction & Guest Speaker: At the beginning of the session, Anna welcomed all the community members present at meeting, explained the door prizes and agenda of the evening (vision statement and planning committee). An opening prayer by Elder Hilly Gravelle and a dinner followed the introduction; this was done to promote the over-arching goal of cultural relevance, honoring and including Ktunaxa language, and guidance from elders,. After dinner, the Planning Team introduced their guest speaker, Martin from the St. Mary’s community, who presented a review of St. Mary’s recently completed CCP process and implementation, and outlined the successes and challenges of St. Mary’s plan.  Community Planning Update: with the intention to build continuity and accountability with the TPB planning process, Wilson and Steven presented a brief overview of the activities from the previous session to inform the TPB members about the progression of the TPB community planning process.     Situational Assessment: The Planning Team provided to the participants a very short (one page long) list of themes that were taken from the CCP Phase 1 document produced by Urban Systems (Themes: Health, Land and Resources, Infrastructure, Governance, Language and Culture, Economy, Education, and Communication), and asked participants to fill in the form and identify their preferences and named the strengths they see under each category (see Results, below, and Appendix A for data).   The purpose of this activity was to celebrate successes, present a positive outlook for participants, and to get them thinking about what matters to them most within their community. The second idea was to build and identify the community preferences within the themes and 162	  	  finally compared them with the TPB vision statement to see if the past visions represent the TPB current situation.   Visioning Exercise: In the next activity of the evening, the Planning Team guided a Visioning exercise with a breakout session that involved 3 small groups of about 5-6 members.  The task of each group was to respond to 2 questions related to strengths and areas of improvement in some TPB/KNC Vision statements; after all the groups were finished they would compare their responses to TPB Vision statements outlined in previous planning documents, for renewal, revision, approval. (See Raw Data in Appendix B).     Metaphor: The Planning Team next asked participants to imagine a symbol that best describes and represent the TPB community and the community planning process. Participants continued working together on teams of 5-6 members. By the end of the exercise, the community had drew, color and embellished three major figures that they found best describes the Tobacco Plains community planning process (see images in Appendix C).   Planning Committee: The planning team introduced the idea and purpose of the Community Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC), that work had begun on the CPAC terms of reference, and sought volunteers from the community to join the CPAC.   The event ended with a review of the next steps. Results Community Strengths: According to the results from TP community members, there are a number of strengths within the community that the participants were proud of.  TP community values their unique language, fluent Elders, Ktunaxa dictionary, and the learning resources available to them (computer, online learning resource, training programs computers, learning center, tutor, and post-secondary program). Also, the community members feel that they have a health system in place that has the capacity to support them when they need it, such as individual health plans, nurse visits every second week, a flexible health team, and a new van to transport them whenever needed.   Land  and resources were identified as an important part of their identity and their way of life as they have high level(s) of respect for their lands, they care about their environmental ( lake, campground). Their lands hold an abundance of game and fish, and provide a natural environment that allows them to maintain their traditional practice of hunting and fishing.  All of 163	  	  that is directly intertwined with their economic development strategy based on various enterprises such as the TB DevCo, duty free shop, and campgrounds, saw mill (potential), and tree cutting. The community identifies infrastructure in place that supports their safety and allows them to work with one another, such as the cook shack, playground, campground, arbor, fire hall, and new housing.  TP Chief and Council, and the development corporation board are two of their governance structures they identify that they are proud to have as part of their community (please see appendix A).   Vision statements: Many community members felt like the present tense grammar within the vision statements was inaccurate; for example, in the TPB Vision Statement (2006), the phrase “we have created strong and healthy citizens” felt inaccurate to some, because the community is still working on that issue. Many felt that the vision statement should include statements such as “we are working towards” strong and healthy citizens, for instance.  In general, the community did not seem to agree with any of the vision statements and expressed frustration. Some people proposed new vision statements, but there was a general lack of consensus around the TPB Vision. Please refer to the Excel Spreadsheet document “Vision and Theme Analysis_Dec 10”, which will be included in the Appendix.  Metaphor: The activity went very well; community members engaged with the topic at hand and enjoyed the creative expression and the group work. Three main metaphors were designed: Fire metaphor, Tipi Metaphor and Tree Metaphor. These metaphors combine to tell a unique story that will be incorporated into the planning documents and used as powerful and culturally appropriate symbols to represent the Tobacco Plains planning process. For example, the tree’s represent the community, the people, capacity and potential resources. Wood from the trees is collected and added to the fire, which represents the heart of the community and the collective work being done; however smoke from the fire can cloud the process of decision making. The fire ultimately provides warmth and energy to the community, which is represented in the Tipi (which is also made from the trees!). See pictures in Appendix C. Next Steps v Where are we going? Next session: January or February (to be determined). v Christmas survey/final validation of vision/mission statements. v Community Planning Advisory Committee: draft of Terms of Reference; volunteers and tasks to be assigned! CPAC to be present at future planning events. v Planning tasks: working towards a CP Framework (table of contents).          164	  	  Tobacco Plains Community Planning  Community Session Report February 5th, 2014              Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team  By  Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn [Practicum Students]  For Tobacco Plains Indian Band     … University of British Columbia  School of Community and Regional Planning  [SCARP]  165	  	  Executive Summary Using a fun and creative approach, the planning team in this event attempted to gather more in-depth information from the community. Having identified some of the main issues in previous planning activities, the planning team needed to dive deeper into the issues to try and determine what specifically within those issues was of concern to the community, what was influencing or causing that issue, and what would the community be like if that issue or need was solved or being met. Identified issues, such as language and culture, housing, and jobs were reiterated as main concerns by the community members who attended, while more detail was added, including the need to protect, preserve and practice the language through programs, the need to offer housing maintenance programs and funding, and the need to create long-term jobs in the community.  Introduction On February 5th, the planning team held it’s third community session in Tobacco Plains. The event involved an update on the planning process, as well as an activity to review and update the 8 planning themes as needed (see Appendix A). Lastly, the planning team organized an activity called “It Matters - the Sticky Note Shuffle” where community members were given questions about the issues and concerns that have, and were asked to write them down on colored sticky notes and place them on a large sheet at the front of the room. Finally, they were asked to cluster their papers on the large sheet based on how close their responses were to each other (see “It Matters: the Sticky Note Shuffle” Summary, Appendix B). Process & Activities Purpose: The purpose of this event was to review the planning process and the 8 themes with the community, and to hold a fun and engaging session where community members could share what matters to them, why it matters, what factors influence that issue, and what the community would look like if that issue were resolved.  Process & Activities: The event started with a prayer and a meal, and a magic show hosted by “El Moustacho” (the Moustache) and his assistant, “El Barba” (the Bearded One). The planning team then reviewed the planning process (see Figure 1) with the community members, via a large drawing/visualization placed on the Band halls western most wall. The Planning team then led a brief activity to celebrate the strengths of the community, with the intention of getting the participants into a positive frame of mind to begin work on the next activity.   A hand out with the 8 planning themes (see Appendix A) was passed around to those in attendance to review and accept the 8 planning themes and offer any feedback (none Figure	  1:	  The	  Planning	  Process	  visual	  drawing	  in	  the	  Band	  Hall. 166	  	  was provided). After reviewing the 8 themes, the planning team facilitated a brief discussion on what are some of the main issues or concerns the community had. These were written down on flip chart paper. Finally, the planning team led the participants through the final activity, the Sticky Note Shuffle. Here, the participants were given three colors of sticky notes, and three questions to answer (one color per question); after answering each question, they were asked to come up to the front of the room with the answers to each question, and to place them on the sheet provided strategically. The questions were meant to gather more in-depth information on the issues and concerns of the community. The strategy involved was to determine, in pairs, whether or not the answers they had both written were similar and related or not. If they were similar and related, they were to place the sticky notes closer together; conversely, if they were not similar, they were to place the sticky notes further away from each other.  The questions asked were as follows (in order): (Red sticky notes) After reviewing the issues and concerns listed in the previous discussion, please choose one, and explain “Why is this an issue or concern for you?”  Blue sticky notes) What factors contribute to this issue? (Green sticky notes) What would tell you that this issue or concern had been addressed, or that your need was being met? Results The community was pleased with the 8 themes handout, and had no suggestions to make on adding, editing or removing any of the 8 themes. For the celebrating successes activity, the community echoed many of the items the planning team heard in the youth session on February 4 (see Youth Engagement Report), and listed the lands & resources and natural capital of Tobacco Plains as one of the main positive aspects of the community to celebrate. The sticky note shuffle produced 22 colored papers, each with a number of responses on them (a total of 55 responses were gathered from the sticky notes).  The issues that mattered to the community, as presented in the Sticky Note Shuffle Question 1, were almost evenly split between all themes, with the exception of any issues related to Governance being absent. Lack of funding (5), housing (4) and jobs (3) were listed as the primary factors that influence the issues listed, as well as other factors, such as social support, education, and governance (Chief and Council). For question 3, participants indicated that an increase in communication (4), increase in jobs and economic growth (4), better access to housing (2) and other indicators, such as increased health and wellness and improved governance, would tell them that their needs were being met. See Appendix B & C for a full description of the results and summary of the Sticky Note Shuffle.  Next Steps • Analyze the results of the Sticky Note Shuffle in an ends-means-actions matrix, and combine that data with previous planning data to quantify the issues, needs and concerns of the community, and determine what actions will meet the ends-means objective identified in the data. • Host a community session to rank and prioritize the identified actions within each theme. • Propose a framework and table of contents for the Tobacco plains Community Plan and begin populating with data. 167	  	     Tobacco Plains Community Planning  Priority Setting & Ranking Session Report April 16 & 17, 2014              Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team  By  Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn [Practicum Students]  For Tobacco Plains Indian Ba  … University of British Columbia  School of Community and Regional Planning  [SCARP]   168	  	  Executive Summary Due to low turnout, the ranking and priority setting event held on April 16 & 17 did not go ahead as planned. Instead some door-to-door visits were made and conversations had in the homes of community members. However, only ten tools were completed with very mixed results, and were not included here, pending further analysis. As ranking and priority setting is a key aspect to community planning, it is highly recommended that this tool, or a variation of it, be used again in a future planning cycle to determine the action ranking and priorities of the community, to foster an inclusive process.  Introduction Now at the end of the engagement process, the planning team invited the community to do ranking and prioritization of the actions that had been identified through the planning team’s data analysis. Given the lower turnouts at previous planning sessions, a different approach was taken to try and get new people to attend. Unfortunately, very few people made it to this event, and the data for ranking and prioritization is very limited. It is strongly suggested that in the next phase of community planning that Tobacco Plains use the tools developed by the planning team to bring the community together and continue ranking and prioritizing actions, and to determine an appropriate implementation plan for those actions.  Process & Activities Purpose: The purpose of this event was to update the community on the identified directions, pathways, and actions within each theme (see Appendix C), and to rank and prioritize the actions using a ranking tool questionnaire (see Appendix A).   Process & Activities: A poster was drafted to advertise for this event (see Appendix B) and placed around the Band Hall. The event was designed as a two day open house, where community members could come and go as they pleased, and do as many activities as they were able and interested in. After the first day of the open house, where there was no turn out, the planning team decided to alter it’s approach and go door-to-door. A number of gift cards were taken as an incentive to complete the ranking tool. The planning team went through the village and stopped at almost all the houses on the reserve, sometimes spending only a few minutes at each place, or over two hours, depending on the level of interest from the community members. Additionally, ranking tools were left at the Band hall with instructions for band staff to complete them, and the planning team will be able to analyze those and include them in the data analysis at a later time.  169	  	  Results: The results of the ranking and prioritization tool are very mixed; due to the very low turn out it is not advisable to use the findings from the tool; rather, the tools presented in Appendix A can be used in a future priority setting session in a future cycle of community planning at Tobacco Plains, once the community is ready to engage in that level of planning. Next Steps • Await to receive the final ranking tools from Band staff and analyze their results. • Determine if and how the results from the ranking tool can be incorporated into the TPB Community Plan. • Re-work tool to be more accessible to the community, and recommend it be used in future planning cycles to rank and prioritize actions.  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   170	  	  Tobacco Plains Community Planning  Community Planning Advisory Committee: December, 2013-April, 2014              Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team  By  Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn [Practicum Students]  For Tobacco Plains Indian Band     … University of British Columbia  School of Community and Regional Planning  [SCARP]   171	  	  Executive Summary “I live here, am raising my son here, and want it to be different when he grows up.”  From December to February, the community of Tobacco Plains with the community planning team organized a community planning advisory committee (CPAC) with the intent of building planning capacity in the community, and to aid the planning process, including implementation, in Tobacco Plains. The terms of reference for the CPAC were created in November and December by the planning team, and the concept of the committee was first introduced to Tobacco Plains members at the Community Planning session held in the band hall on December 10th, 2013.   Recruitment continued throughout January, and the CPAC held it’s first formal meeting at the band hall on February 3rd, 2014 (see Appendix C) and again at the band hall and over Skype on February 19th (see Appendix D). CPAC consists of young and old, men and women from Tobacco Plains, working together to gather information and identify actions for the long-term benefit of the community. After first reviewing the CPAC terms of reference (see Appendix A), the committee reviewed a planning questionnaire (see Appendix E) developed by the planning team, and decided on a way to deliver the questionnaire in order to gain further information from the community regarding their issues, concerns, and ideas for the future of their community. The committee has not met since successfully delivering the questionnaire, though it is still operating, and represents a critical potential for the community to keep the planning process moving forward, to build and foster relationships, skills, and knowledge, and build capacity to implement and make planning decisions for the community of Tobacco Plains. Introduction Throughout the early stages of planning at Tobacco Plains, the idea of a community based committee was identified by the planning team as a simple and effective tool to accomplish multiple objectives: foster community involvement and create buy-in to the planning process, to include community members in the design and delivery of key planning activities, to build collective capacity within the community and to begin fostering a sense of responsibility and commitment to following through and implementing the community plan upon its completion later in the planning cycle. The terms of reference (see Appendix A) for the committee were created throughout November and December of 2013, describing and explaining the structure, roles and responsibilities of the CPAC in its current form. The nature and structure of the committee will need to change upon the completion of the current planning cycle, as the planning coordinator for the community planning process, who also plays a key role in facilitating and hosting CPAC meetings, will not continue passed March 31st, 2014.  Likewise, the planning team’s UBC students will complete their practicum in June, thus a need for an increased and reimagined role for the CPAC.  Process & Activities “I want to be involved and know what’s going on, so I can go home and bring back what I learn and try to get my family involved.” – CPAC committee member.   Purpose: A Community based committee consisting of 5-8 community members representing a diversity of opinions and a commitment to the planning process, to further build community enthusiasm, engage with community members and gather important opinions, needs and concerns, 172	  	  and to build local capacity and commitment to planning through the use of surveys, fun and creative tools and interactive engagement.  Process & Activities: Preliminary meetings were held throughout November and December to determine the purpose, structure and terms of reference for the Tobacco Plains community planning advisory committee. The need for an authentic and genuinely community-driven process was identified and expressed by the Tobacco Plains community. While developing the terms of reference, an announcement was made by the planning coordinator at the planning session in December 2013, that the planning team was looking for volunteers to serve on the CPAC. An honorarium was offered to community members who were willing to attend CPAC meetings and assist in the development and delivery of planning tools and events in Tobacco Plains.     Recruitment for CPAC occurred through announcements at planning sessions, the placement of posters throughout the community (see Appendix B), and phone calls and door-to-door visits to community members by the planning coordinator. The first and only CPAC meeting was held on February 3rd, 2014 at the Tobacco Plains Band Hall, while members of the planning team were able to Skype in from outside of the community (see CPAC Meeting Agenda and Notes, Appendix C & D). During this meeting, the terms of reference were approved, and the CPAC reviewed and prepared for delivery to the community a questionnaire (see Appendix E) developed by the planning team. Honorariums were given to all members who attended. A total of 12 questionnaires were delivered to community members by the CPAC and returned to the planning team for analysis (see below). Results “We need to take care of the needs of the people” – Questionnaire respondent. “Let’s bring back our families.” – Questionnaire respondent.   12 questionnaires were delivered to Tobacco Plains community members by the CPAC throughout the month of February, the full results and analysis of which have been entered into an Excel spreadsheet (too large to include here), and can be found in the “Raw Data” binder given to the Band Administrator and saved in the Band’s hard drive.   Results of questionnaire: 12 Surveys were completed and analyzed Culture, economic development, housing, language, education, health and jobs were almost equally listed as the main issues and concerns in the community, with lack of funding (5), housing (3), education (4) programs (4), and jobs (4), being the leading factors that contribute to these issues. The community members envisioned their community as being more inclusive, communicative, healthy, with housing, jobs and financial support contributing to better infrastructure, a thriving culture with successful governance.   Next Steps • The Questionnaire answers will be entered into a matrix tool to be further analyzed for the community issues, strengths, directions, pathways and actions, and compared to similar data from previous and ongoing planning tools.  • Honour and celebrate the contributions of the CPAC members at the next community session. • Organize a future meeting with CPAC to discuss their role in the next planning session, as well as what their ongoing role in the implementation phase of the planning cycle might  173	  	   Tobacco Plains Community Planning  SWOT Analysis and Community Update Report March 24 & 25, 2014              Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team  By  Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn [Practicum Students]  For Tobacco Plains Indian Band     … University of British Columbia  School of Community and Regional Planning  [SCARP] 174	  	  Executive Summary “Our respect for the land and natural resources that is within our territories” – SWOT response.  The planning team delivered a SWOT analysis and community planning update to the Tobacco Plains Strategic Planning session on March 24 & 25, 2014. The SWOT analysis produced 54 responses from band staff and counselors. The responses included the strengths, areas of improvement, opportunities and challenges within each of the 8 identified planning themes (Economy, Governance, Lands & Resources, Infrastructure, Education, Language & Culture, Health, Social). The community planning update involved a review of all of the planning tools and activities undertaken by the planning team with the community, as well as a review of the most frequently heard issues and concerns within the 8 theme  Introduction “We have a strong language & culture base” – SWOT response  The Planning team was asked to attend the Tobacco Plains Strategic Planning Session on March 24 & 25, 2014 in Eureka, Montana, to facilitate a SWOT analysis for the Chief and Council and band administrators, and to give them an update on the community planning process. These activities were added into the agenda of the facilitator (Dan George, Four Feathers), who engaged the band administration in its strategic visioning and goal setting.  Process & Activities  Figure 2 Band administration and Chief and Council participating in the SWOT analysis. At the request of the Band Manager, a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) tool and community update presentation was designed and proposed by the planning team (see SWOT & Community update proposal, Appendix A) with an inclusive and participatory approach, to 175	  	  be delivered to Chief and Council and band administrators on March 24 & 25. With the intention of paralleling the community planning process, the planning team designed the SWOT around 8 themes that were developed and employed in previous planning documents and planning processes and had subsequently been used by the planning team, and confirmed by the community throughout the planning process. Each of the themes was briefly introduced, and then participants were given 4 colored note pads (each color corresponding to a Strength, Area of Improvement, Opportunity and Challenge) and asked to write their ideas, relative to each theme, on the correct notepads. These were then placed within the corresponding theme, resulting in 8 themes, each with a list of Strengths, Areas of Improvement, Opportunities and Challenges (see Appendix B, “SWOT Summary”).   The following day, the planning team delivered a community planning update to Chief and Council and band administration (see Community Update summary and photos, Appendix C). Like the SWOT tool, this update revolved around the 8 themes used in previous planning processes. Using a creative approach, the communities issues, needs, concerns and directions were written within paper circles, or “issues bubbles” and placed on a large canvass within one of 8 larger, hand drawn circles (each titled as one of the 8 themes). Issues were gathered throughout the current planning process (November 2013 – February 2014) using a variety of tools, such as surveys, questionnaires, community sessions, activities and discussions (for a list of community tools, see Appendix C). All of the information gathered from each of these tools was analyzed in a matrix individually, and then combined into one final matrix showing an aggregate or summation of all the issues (see Appendix C). The size and color of each “issues bubble” indicated the frequency or amount of times the planning team heard about that issue, such that the most frequently heard issues, such as ‘lack of housing’ and ‘lack of jobs’ were written on larger, green “issues bubbles”, as compared to issues which were heard less, such as “revitalize language and culture” or “road maintenance”, which were written on smaller, yellow and orange bubbles, respectively.  Purpose: The purpose of the SWOT analysis tool was to acquire the band staff and Chief and Council’s opinions and understanding of their organization, and to get them to think about the strengths, areas of improvements, opportunities and challenges within the organization. The data from the SWOT were organized according to the 8 themes, and then compared with the corresponding issues and concerns from the community.  The purpose of the community planning update was to update Chief and Council and Band staff on the planning process and key findings up to this point, and to provide and ensure the community’s voice was represented in the Band’s strategic planning process. Figure	  3"Issues	  Bubbles"	  used	  in	  the	  community	  update.	  Here,	  Housing	  is	  listed	  as	  a	  main	  issue	  within	  "Infrastructure".	  176	  	  Results “Community involvement in determining our goals and working together to achieve them!” – SWOT response  Results of SWOT & Community Update: In total, 54 note pads representing the Strengths, Areas of Improvement, Opportunities and Challenges were collected from the Band staff and Chief and Council for the SWOT opportunity. Each note pad contained multiple points, and those responses were distributed along the 8 themes as follows: Economic Development (32); Governance (30); Lands & Resources (23); Education (15); Language & Culture (13); Social (11); Health (10); Infrastructure (7) (for a summary of the SWOT, see Appendix B).  Similarly for the community update, the planning team presented the issues and concerns brought forward by the community, and organized them within the 8 planning themes. Based on the information gathered from the community in the current planning cycle (November – February), the distribution of the number of times an issue came up within each of the 8 themes is as follows: Economic Development (88); Governance (88); Infrastructure (74); Social (39); Health (36); Language & Culture (34); Education (28); Lands & Resources (18). For a more indepth analysis of the specific community needs within each theme, see Appendix C.   Although this is not a technical ranking or prioritization, Table 1 below compares the responses from the SWOT with those of the community as a source of interest and as a comparison against future ranking and prioritization tools. Both the community and band administration indicate that economic development and governance are important themes to be addressed in the community plan. Lack of jobs (economic development), the need for more inclusive and community based decision making and planning process (governance), and a critical lack of housing (infrastructure) have been voiced the most frequently by community and staff. The disparity between the other themes highlights the need to determine if and how best to combine the information from the community with the information from Band administration.   Comparison of SWOT and Community responses (frequency of responses relative to each theme) SWOT analysis Community Responses Economic Development (32) Economic Development (88) Governance (30) Governance (88) Lands & Resources (23) Infrastructure (74) Education (15) Social (39) Language & Culture (13) Health (36) Social (11) Language & Culture (34) Health (10) Education (28) Infrastructure (7) Lands & Resources (18) Table 1. Comparison of responses from Band staff and community regarding the 8 planning themes.   As a result of this presentation, band staff and administration experienced the facilitation of the planning team, were updated on the community planning process, and had an opportunity to incorporate the community’s issues and needs as presented by the planning team into its strategic planning.  177	  	  Next Steps • Determine if and how to combine Band staff information obtained from SWOT analysis with the information obtained from the community through the various planning tools. The risk with combining these two datasets is that the community may not agree with the findings and information gathered from band staff and Chief and Council, and might see this as an example of Band administration taking over the community planning process.  • Complete analysis of all data • Develop framework and table of contents for Tobacco Plains Community Plan • Begin populating the plan with the information gathered                                  178	  	  TOBACCO PLAINS COMMUNITY PLANNING Community Planning Report: YOUTH ENGAGEMENT SESSIONS 1,2,3                Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team  By  Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn [Practicum Students]  For Tobacco Plains Indian Band  … University of British Columbia  School of Community and Regional Planning  [SCARP] 179	  	   “In 15 years I envision my community to be self-sufficient.”                                                                                                                       Youth Participant … Executive Summary  In 2013, the Tobacco Plains Band (TPB) in collaboration with the University of British Columbia’s School of Community and Regional Planning launched the Tobacco Plains Community Planning Phase 2. The tobacco plains planning team developed an engagement strategy based on three pillars of the community: Youth, Elders, and Community Members at Large. The intention was to promote an inclusive and participatory process that integrates local values and priorities in order to produce a long-term community plan to serve as a roadmap for the community and for future generations.  The focus of this report is the youth engagement process and its intention is to describe in detail three youth engagement sessions, looking at their purpose, process and activity, and findings. The first session asked the youth to photograph areas of their community that were meaningful to them, whereas the following session was focused on drawing on paper what their vision was for TP community, and the last session was concerned to know what matters to the youth, and how they envision the future of their community. The results show that TP youth are proud of their land, the animals, lakes, and mountains, their cultural traditions, and their care for the well-being and safety of their community. On the other hand, the youth identify the need for more housing, jobs, and infrastructure. They also wish to see a larger population on the reserve, and a place for family and community gatherings and cultural celebrations.   I. INTRODUCTION  In the process of creating and developing the TPB engagement strategy, the TP community planning team identified the youth as an important part of the community who need to be consulted, honored, and included into the Tobacco Plains Community Plan (TPCP). Between November 2013 and February 2014, three youth engagement sessions were completed with the purpose of gathering direct input on local issues and needs of the youth, identifying the strengths of the community, and finding out what the youth envision for the Tobacco Plains community in the next 10 years. The three youth sessions were the following: 1) The Camera Project; 2) The Visioning Session; 3) The Interview Session. As a result, these three youth sessions helped the planning team to outline the youth’s main concerns and aspirations.  Thus, the intent of this report is to outline the purpose of all the youth sessions, describe their processes, and present their results to inform the community and the planning team with future directions to be included in the community planning process.  180	  	   “I care about the health and safety on my community.”                                                                                              Youth Participant II. YOUTH SESSIONS  This section of the report describes each individual youth engagement session with its respective purpose, and process and activity. The outcomes from all the sessions are presented in result section of this paper.  1.o The Camera Project Session 1.1 Purpose The main purpose of this early session was to inform the youth about the Tobacco Plains Community Plan and encourage their involvement in the development of the plan. The activity of the session was designed to creatively engage the youth to photograph meaningful places in the community that the youth were proud of and interested in.1.2 Process & Activity In the pre-planning stage the planning team identified the need to use creative ways to engage the Youth to come forward and participate in the TP community planning process.   The planning team bought 20 digital cameras that were used by the youth with the intention to photograph places of the community that were meaningful to them. The Camera Project session was held at the Tobacco Plains Band Hall on November 6th, 2013 from 4pm-6pm. A light meal was provided for the youth upon their arrival. 12 youth between the ages of 8 and 16 attended and participated in the session. At the beginning of the session the planning team explained to the youth the purpose of the activity in the context of the community planning process. The planning coordinator, Anna Morgeau distributed the cameras to the youth and explained the activity. Then the youth participants were divided into three small groups and each member of the planning team, Anna Morgeau, Stephen McGlenn, and Wilson Mendes, were responsible for taking their assigned group into the community for the activity. Upon returning to the TP band office, the youth returned their cameras, and all the pictures taken were downloaded and stored on an external hard drive at the Band office. (See results on pg. 6, photos appendix A). Cameras were returned to the youth at the end of the planning process.  181	  	  2.o Visioning Session 2.1 Purpose  This second session was designed to build on the first one, as well as to further engage the youth by asking them to think about what they value about their community, and how they wish to see their community in the near future.  2.2 Process & Activity The session was held at the Tobacco Plains Band Hall on December 11th, 2013, from 4pm-6pm. A light refreshment was also provided to the youth before the beginning of the session. Eleven youth between the ages of 8 and 16 attended and participated in the session. The planning team explained to the youth the purpose of the activity and related it to the community planning process at the beginning of the session. Then the youth were asked to visualize in their own way how they see their community in the near future. After a brief discussion about the activity, the planning team provided few examples to illustrate the task at hand, and ask the youth to draw on a piece of paper what their vision looked liked. Next, the youth proceeded to draw their vision for the community. Finally, a discussion followed, were youth outlined various elements of the Tobacco Plains culture that they cared about and had depicted in their drawings. (See results on pg. 6, drawings appendix B).  3.o The Interview Session  3.1 Purpose This session was also designed to build on the first and second engagement sessions, and to identify the issues and concerns the youth face, and how they want their community to look in the next 15 years.   3.2 Process & Activity  The interview session was also held at the Tobacco Plains Band Hall on February 4th, 2014, from 4pm-6pm. The session had a low turn-out compared to the two previous ones, and only four youth between the ages of 14 to 16 attended. Food was served prior to the session. At the beginning of the session, the planning team explained to the youth the purpose of the activity and related it to the community planning process. Digital video cameras were given to each youth as part of the activity and the planning team outlined the basic steps about how to conduct a video interview, and gave instructions on the usage of the video cameras.  In the second part of the session the youth were presented with few questions to guide them during the interview process. The questions asked the youth to identify some of strengths in the community they were proud of, the challenges they have encountered in the community, and what they want to see in the next 15 years. Two of the youth decided to interview each other, while the other two were interviewed by the planning team. The interviews were recorded on video and the raw footage is to be given back to the Tobacco Plains Indian Band at the end of the planning process. (See results on pg. 6, interview responses appendix C).   “I want to see more jobs and housing in my community”                                                                                                                 Youth Participant 182	  	  III. RESULTS In total sixteen youth between the ages of 8 and 16 participated in the youth engagement sessions, 12 in the camera project, 11 in the visioning session, and 4 in the interview session. The interview engagement session had the lowest participants among the three sessions.    1.o The Camera Project The camera project session two major themes emerged: natural scenery and playground. In the natural scenery theme, the youth show their appreciation of their homeland: the Kooteney mountain range, trees, rocks, animals, the Edward Lakes, and the forests surrounding the reserve, were their main choices of photos. The playground located at the inactive school grounds, was also a primary photographic choice. Which suggests this to be an important place for many youth (See photographs in appendix A)   2.o The Visioning Session  The purpose of the visioning session was to engage the youth into thinking about what they value about their community, and how see their community in the near future. According to the results of this session, the drawings illustrate the areas the youth value, and how they see the Tobacco Plains community. The illustrations correlate with some of the places and spaces that were photographed by the youth in the first youth engagement session. However, one prominent and unique theme that came out of this exercise was the depiction of houses in almost all of the drawings. In the debriefing of the exercise, the youth identify the need for housing to accommodate their own, and their family’s future needs. (See drawings in appendix B).  3.o The Interview Session The results of the interview session identify some of the areas in the community that the youth care about, the challenges they see in their community, and what they wish to see in 15 years. For question one, the youth voiced that they are proud of the Tobacco Plains natural settings, the lakes, wild life, hunting, hiking, and they care about the health and safety of their community. For question two, the youth said that they wanted to see more housing, a bigger population, cleaner lakes, and more family and community gatherings. For question two, the youth expressed similar answers as for the second question, restating that 15 years from now, they want to see: more housing and jobs; a larger population on the reserve; a community center for hosting community gatherings; and see their community becoming self-sufficient. The responses provided by the youth resembles the needs and concerns of other TPB members. Housing, jobs, health, safety are the building block for any community to increase their population and maintain their health connection with their natural environment. (See appendix C for interview responses). Appendix A: Camera Project Youth Photos   	  	   183	  	  TOBACCO PLAINS COMMUNITY PLANNING Community Planning Report: Elder’s Session 1,2,3               Tobacco Plains Community Planning Team   By  Wilson Mendes & Stephen McGlenn [Practicum Students]  For Tobacco Plains Indian Band  …  University of British Columbia  School of Community and Regional Planning  [SCARP]  184	  	  “I think my dream will be that everybody get along together. This will make them stronger” – Tobacco Plains Elder  I. ELDER’S INTERVIEW CONTEXT    In 2013, the Tobacco Plains Band (TPB) in collaboration with the University of British Columbia’s School of Community and Regional Planning launched the Tobacco Plains Community Planning Phase 2. From the beginning, the TPB community planning team recognized that Elders are an important part of the community who need to be consulted, honored, and included in the Tobacco Plains Community Plan (TPCP). The intention was to promote an inclusive and participatory process that integrates local values and priorities in order to produce a long-term community plan to serve as a roadmap for the community and for future generations.  Between November 2013 and February 2014, the three(?) Elders of the Tobacco Plains community were interviewed. Engagement sessions were completed with the purpose of honoring their place in the community by seeking their guidance in gathering information about the community’s past, and also to learn what they envisioned for the future of the Tobacco Plains Band.   II. RESULTS     The results from the interview shows the Elder’s concerns and advocacy for a strong sense of culture among Tobacco Plains members; more housing to house their on- and off-reserve members; increase in community participation; shared decision-making, transparency, and accountability by local government; and finally, their hope for a better future for the community and new generations to come.   Language and Culture  According to the Elders there is a need to maintain their cultural tradition by supporting the youth and teaching them their language and culture. Through the stories they shared, the Elders spoke much about self-sufficiency and said that “hunting and gathering still a big part of the community.” They express that by saying that “old people would go out hunting and picking their own winter supplies, and all that stuff that they came up with. They used to tan hides, do beading, blankets, [and] that was how they made their living.” They stress the need for the youth to learn about “their genealogy, to know where we are from.” They identify that traditional practices of the old people still being carried on by a few Elders in the community, and there is a need to pass these traditional practices onto the young generation. The Elders think that “maybe the future generation will get back to it.”   Infrastructure  Lack of housing was identified as one of the major reasons Band members leave the reserve. According to one Elder, “for the last two generations, there’s no housing” and “everyone needs to have their own house.” Lack of housing in Tobacco Plains has been 185	  	  identified as the main priority by the community after the final results of the community engagement process.     Governance  The Elders spoke about having a transparent governance system like the old days, where traditional styles of governance were transparent and responsive to community needs. They remembered that when “ something came up […] the Chief would call a meeting and everybody would go, and decide what [they wanted to] do… everybody had a say, so nobody complained” and “people get along and helped each other whenever they could.”  They identify that “today [the community] drifted away from that way of living, style of sharing”.   …                         186	  	   APPENDIX D: Tobacco Plains Community Plan Activities Results I. Open House Session Survey Summary Results II. Visioning Session Situation Assessment III. Community Planning Off-Reserve Survey IV. Tobacco Plains Theme Areas Analysis V. Sticky Note Shuffle Results VI. Sticky Note Shuffle Summary VII. Community Planning Ranking Results VIII. TPIB Themes, Directions, Pathways And Actions Map IX. CPAC Questionnaire. X. CPAC Themes/Issues Questionnaire XI. SWOT Summary XII. TPIB Community Update Summary XIII. Youth Video Interview Questions XIV. Youth Video Interview Session Responses XV. Elders Interview Transcripts #1,2,3 XVI. Figures 	  	  	  	  	  	   187	  	  OPEN	  HOUSE	  SESSION	  SURVEY	  SUMMARY	  RESULTS	   COMMUNITY PLANNING SURVEY  The Tobacco Plains Band wants to work with the community to create a new community vision and plan over the next five months.  We appreciate the effort of our community members and look forward to your involvement!   The purpose of this survey is to ask community members about community planning, how members would like to be involved in the planning process, and to begin learning about our community priorities (concerns, needs, opportunities)  The answers from this survey will: 1) provide guidance to the community planning team in setting up a great process to build community participation; and 2) help understand the collective vision and goals of our community. The information you share is confidential and will be used for our planning process.   Thank you for helping out and contributing to the wellbeing of the community!  Personal  Name (Optional): _________________________________.    Male (  ); Female (  )  1. Age (Please Check): 0-16 yrs (  ); 17-25 (   ); 26-35 (  ); 36-50 (  ); 51-60 (  ); 60+ (  )  2. Do you have a home computer? Yes (  ); No (  )  3. Do you have access to Internet?  Yes (  ); No (  )  4. How Often Do You Use the Internet? Never (  ); Once a Month (  ); Weekly (  ); Daily (  )  5. Are you on Facebook? Yes (  ); No (  )   Community Planning   6. Have you ever been involved in community planning?  Yes (  ); No (   )  If yes, please describe? (when and what for)  	  188	  	  _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 7.  If yes, what did you like or dislike about that process? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________   8.  Do you feel a community plan would benefit Tobacco Plains? Yes (  ); No (  ) Please explain (e.g. how can a community plan help or not help our community?): _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Community Participation   9.  What is the best way to communicate with you? Please check all that apply:  Email (  ); Phone (  ); One-to-one meeting (  ); Mail Out (  ); Newsletter (  ); Facebook  (  );    Other ____________________________________________  10.  What is the best way for you to participate in our planning process? Please check your TOP three: Information session  (   )  Questionnaire/Survey (   ) Community workshop   (   )  Facebook                          (   ) Family Circle                          (   )  Small Group Meeting    (   )   One on one Interview          (   )  Video                                  (   )  Other:____________________(   )     189	  	  11.  What day of the week and time of day is most convenient for you to participate in a community engagement session?   Monday            (  )    9-12 noon Tuesday           (  )    12- 3pm Wednesday     (  )    3-6pm Thursday         (  )    5-8pm Friday               (  )     Other (_________________________) Saturday          (  ) Sunday             (  )        12.  How long should our sessions last for?        1- 2 hours (  );  2 – 4  hours (  );  Other times (____________________________________) 13. What are your concerns about getting involved, if any (e.g. time commitment, confidentiality, health, transportation, daycare, etc)?  _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________   14.  What is the best way to involve the on and off-reserve community members?   _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  Planning Priorities   1. What are some strengths of the community of Tobacco Plains? (e.g. close to the US border, lots of tourism, strong culture, connection to the land)  _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. What are the most pressing issues you would like to discuss?  (e.g. not enough housing, not enough jobs, no local school) 190	  	  _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3. What are some projects the community of Tobacco Plains should focus on? (e.g. training for youth, increasing the size of the Band Hall, forestry, language revitalization, etc.) _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  12. Is there anything else that you would like to share?  ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  191	  	  TOBACCO PLAINS COMMUNITY PLANNING NOV 5 OPEN HOUSE SURVEY RESULTS:  17 Surveys completed on Nov 5 Open House Community Planning Launch. Gender distribution: 11 of 17 respondents were female, 5 were male, and 1 was not indicated. Demographics: 6 respondents were in the 26-35 age range, 4 were in the 36-50 range, 4 in the 51-60 range, and 3 in the 60+ range. While the 26-35 range had the most exclusive respondents, the combination of the other age groups meant that the majority of respondents were over the age of 35. Internet and Computer use: 10 of 17 people indicated having a computer at home, while 12 indicated having access to the internet; only 6 out of 17 indicated they use Facebook. 9 out of 17 respondents indicated using the internet on a daily basis, while 2 indicated never using the internet. Community Planning experience: 12 of 17 respondents indicated having some sort of past planning experience. Types of planning experiences varied from infrastructure, planning events, community hall planning sessions, and general planning activities. Most expressed frustration at the lack of accountability and implementation after the plans were completed. All 17 respondents indicated that they thought community planning would benefit Tobacco Plains, and expressed bringing all the community members together to define the community’s long term goals, to increase self-sufficiency, future generations, etc. would be of primary benefit. Communication preferences: Members ranked Phone calls, one on one meetings and the band newsletter as the most preferred ways of communicating to them. Here are the results in order of highest rank to lowest rank: Phone (10), one-to-one meeting (9), newsletter (8), Mail out (7), Email (7), and Facebook (4).  Participation preferences: Info sessions, community workshop and small group discussions were ranked as the most preferred ways to participate in community planning. Here are the results ranked from highest to lowest: Community workshop (14), Info session (13), small group discussion (10), questionnaire/survey (8), one-on-one interviews (6), Facebook (3) video (1) and family circle (0). Date and time preference: Tuesdays from 5-8pm is the best option for community engagement sessions. The ranking for days is as follows: Tuesday (9), Wednesday (7), Monday (6), Thursday (5), Friday (5), Saturday (2), and Sunday (1). The ranking for time is: 5-8pm (12), 12-3pm (4), 9-12 noon (3), 3-6pm (3). Length of session was strongly preferred as being between 1-2 hours in length (13), versus 2-4 hours (4). Some comments were to keep the session lengths maxed at 1, 2 and 3 hours. Concerns about getting involved: respondents indicated their concerns as time commitment (3), transportation (1), confidentiality (1) sticking with the plans until the end (1), and feeling hopeful (1). How to engage on and off-reserve members: Mail outs (6) was the most common answer, followed by a variety of other options, including, info sessions, newsletter, using social media, and a telephone survey. Planning Strengths: Connection to land (5) and Language and culture (3) were the most common responses to this question, followed by a variety of responses including: being close to the border (2), community involvement, having strong, smart members, educated people, lots of tourism, and being close to Lake Koocanusa. Most pressing issues: Jobs (11) and housing (9) were both the most common answer to this question. Other pressing issues included not enough money in health, not enough support for post-secondary students, self-sustenance and language and culture revitalization. 192	  	  Projects to focus on: Education/Training/training for youth (7), increasing the size of the band hall (6), Language & culture revitalization (6) Forestry (3), solar and wind projects, a youth centre complex, fire and disaster preparation, and jobs creation were identified as projects to focus on. Additional comments:  o “Yes, I hope something will be done this time.” o “Families coming closer together for the good of our future and our kids future.” o Way to go Anna! You rock! It didn’t take me 11 minutes lol.” o “This was a good turnout. This is what we need for the community so we can make us stronger.” o “I am interested in helping in any way possible.                              193	  	  Visioning	  Session	  Situation	  Assessment	  	   ACTIVITY SUMMARY   According to the results from TP community members,  there are a number of areas of strengths within the community that the participants were proud of.  TP community values their unique language, fluent Elders, Ktunaxa dictionary, and the learning resources available to them (computer, online learning resource, training programs computers, learning center,  tutor, and post-secondary program). Also, the community members feel that they have a health system in place that has the capacity to support them when they need it, such as individual health plans, nurse visits every second week, a flexible health team, and a new van to transport them whenever needed.   Land  and resources were identified as an important part of their identity and their way of life as they have high level(s) of respect for their lands, they care about their environmental ( lake, campground). Their lands hold an abundance of game and fish, and provide a natural environment that allows them to maintain their traditional practice of hunting and fishing.  All of that is directly intertwined with their economic development strategy based on various enterprises such as the TB DevCO, duty free shop, campgrounds, saw mill (potential), and tree cutting. The community identifies infrastructure in place that supports their safety and allows them to work with one another, such as the cookshack, playground, campground, arbor, firehall, and new housing.  TP Chief and Council, and the development corporation board are two of their governance structures they identify that they are proud to have as part of their community.   Vision statements: Many community members felt like the present tense grammar within the vision statements was inaccurate; for example, in the TPB Vision Statement (2006), the phrase “we have created strong and healthy citizens” felt inaccurate to some, because the community is still working on that issue. Many felt that the vision statement should include statements such as “we are working towards” strong and healthy citizens, for instance.  In general, the community did not seem to agree with any of the vision statements and expressed frustration. Some people proposed new vision statements, but there was a general lack of consensus around the TPB Vision. Please refer to the Excel Spreadsheet document “Vision and Theme Analysis_Dec 10”.  Metaphor Activity seemed to go well; they enjoyed the creative expression and the group work. Three main metaphors were designed: Fire metaphor, Tipi Metaphor and Tree Metaphor. See pictures for more details.  	  194	  	  COMMUNITY SESSION SUMMARY Activity #1: Vision Statements Comparison (see summary, below; results and information on the spreadsheet attached)   Activity # 2: Small Group Break-out Community members were asked to work in groups, discuss and write down the strengths they believe exist in the community under each of the following themes: Community Themes Strengths   Health  Transportation, nurses visit community, no more smoking in building, flexible health team, individual health plan goals, implementation of Elders into our planning.  Land and Resources High level of respect for lands and the environment, land preservation, a lot of room for development, a lot of hunting and fishing, campgrounds, playground, hunting, lakes.  Infrastructure  Cook shack, firehall, new housing, duty free, radio tower, mill, arbor, new health van, plans to expand admin and housing.  Governance Chief and Council, membership gaining interest,  development and corporation board  Language and Culture Elders, computers, Ktanaxa dictionary, strong interest, fluent Elders, learning resource available  Economy  DevCO, duty free, campgrounds, potential mill, tree cutting  Education  Upgrading program, training programs (when available), computers, learning center,  tutor, online learning interest, post-secondary program  Communication  Newsletter, phone, computers, bulletin boards.      195	  	  CROSS ANALYSIS OF VISION STATEMENT ACTIVITY   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  196	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	                   197	  	  New Vision Statement Proposals & Ideas: #1. "As part of the Ktunaxa Nation, we strive to build a strong cultural and spiritual foundation;  celebrating our language, lands and resources to keep our history strong. To do so we need to  build our youth and members to focus on the economy, to achieve self-sufficiency." #4. "We as a nation are striving to work together to care and manage our lands.      #5. "Prepare planning with a lot of organizing"        #6. Translate/publish vision statement in Ktunaxa."        #10. "Clean up the village and tear down the old Buildings or restore old buildings."       REWORKED STATEMENT: "As a community, we work to manage our lands and resources. Many more community members have moved back to the community because it is a great place to live and raise their families.”          REWORKED STATEMENT: As a community we have created strong and healthy citizens many of whom speak our languages and celebrate who we are and our history in our ancestral homelands. Our community members work closely together to manage our lands and resources. Many more community members have moved back to the community because it is a great place to live and raise their families.          	  	  	  	    198	  	  COMMUNITY PLANNING OFF-RESERVE MEMBERS SURVEY	   The Tobacco Plains Band wants to work with the community to create a new community vision and plan over the next five months.  We appreciate the effort of our community members and look forward to your involvement!   The purpose of this survey is to ask the off-reserve community members about community planning, how members would like to be involved in the planning process, and to begin learning about our community priorities (concerns, needs, opportunities).  The answers from this survey will: 1) provide guidance to the community planning team in setting up a great process to build community participation; and 2) help understand the collective vision and goals of our community. The information you share is confidential and will be used for our planning process.   Thank you for helping out and contributing to the wellbeing of the community!  Personal  Name (Optional): _________________________________.    Male (  ); Female (  )  6. Age (Please Check): 0-16 yrs (  ); 17-25 (   ); 26-35 (  ); 36-50 (  ); 51-60 (  ); 60+ (  )  7. Do you have a home computer? Yes (  ); No (  )  8. Do you have access to Internet?  Yes (  ); No (  )  9. How Often Do You Use the Internet? Never (  ); Once a Month (  ); Weekly (  ); Daily (  )  10. Are you on Facebook? Yes (  ); No (  )   Community Planning   6. Have you ever been involved in community planning?  Yes (  ); No (   )  If yes, please describe? (when and what for)  _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 	  199	  	  _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 7.  If yes, what did you like or dislike about that process? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________   8.  Do you feel a community plan would benefit Tobacco Plains? Yes (  ); No (  ) Please explain (e.g. how can a community plan help or not help our community?): _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Community Participation   9.  What is the best way to communicate with you? Please check all that apply:  Email (  ); Phone (  ); One-to-one meeting (  ); Mail Out (  ); Newsletter (  ); Facebook  (  );    Other ____________________________________________  10.  What is the best way for you to participate in our planning process? Please check your TOP three: Information session  (   )  Questionnaire/Survey (   ) Community workshop   (   )  Facebook                          (   ) Family Circle                          (   )  Small Group Meeting    (   )   One on one Interview          (   )  Video                                  (   )  Other:____________________(   )  11.  What day of the week and time of day is most convenient for you to participate in a community engagement session?   Monday            (  )    9-12 noon Tuesday           (  )    12- 3pm Wednesday     (  )    3-6pm 200	  	  Thursday         (  )    5-8pm Friday               (  )     Other (_________________________) Saturday          (  ) Sunday             (  )        12.  How long should our sessions last for?        1- 2 hours (  );  2 – 4  hours (  );  Other times (____________________________________) 13. What are your concerns about getting involved, if any (e.g. time commitment, confidentiality, health, transportation, daycare, etc)?  _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________   14.  What is the best way to involve the on and off-reserve community members?   _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  Planning Priorities   4. Would you move back to Tobacco Plains? If yes, why? If no, why not? _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 5. What are the most pressing issues facing Tobacco Plains that you would like the community plan to address?  _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 6. What are some projects the community of Tobacco Plains should focus on? (e.g. training for youth, increasing the size of the Band Hall, forestry, language revitalization, etc.) ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________201	  	  _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  12. Is there anything else that you would like to share?  __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________    	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   202	  	  TOBACCO PLAINS COMMUNITY PLAN: PLANNING AREAS Talking points: Background: These 8 key planning areas/themes have been identified in previous planning documents and processes that Tobacco Plains has gone through.  We’re asking residents if they think these planning areas are relevant and need to be updated.  Questions to ask resident:  Read themes or show them to resident. Do you think these themes are appropriate to include in the Tobacco Plains Community Plan? Are there other themes you’d like to see included in the planning discussions?  Are there specific topics within each theme that you’d like to see included in the planning process?  Planning Areas: Ø  Health (E.g., access to health programs, community health objectives, etc.)  Ø  Lands and Resources (E.g., Sustainable Forestry, TPB Land Use Code, etc.)  Ø  Governance (E.g., Community based decision-making, Accountability, etc.)  Ø  Economic Development (E.g., Sawmill, Recreation & Tourism, etc.)  Ø  Education (E.g., Local schools, Post-secondary funding/support, etc.)  Ø  Infrastructure (E.g. Housing Subdivision, Water tower, etc.)  Ø  Social Development (E.g., Food security, crime prevention, Building Community Identity, etc.)  Ø  Traditional Knowledge and Language (E.g., Ktunaxa language programs, Cultural & Ecological knowledge programs, etc.)   	  203	  	  	  IT	  MATTERS	  –	  STICKY	  NOTE	  SHUFFLE	  RESULTS	  Tobacco Plains Community Session It Matters!  Why is this an issue or concern for you?                  Red Stickers  1. Language and Culture: We need to teach and learn as much as we can, so we can pass the knowledge onto our children and grandchildren, so they can continue with the teaching.  2. We need to preserve, protect, practice and promote our language and culture, so we don’t lose it!  3. Language Language matters to me because its being forgotten  4. Housing  Members would like to move home but due to the limited housing they are unable.  4. Jobs and Economic Development  With more development will come jobs that will provide our members opportunities to move back home.   4. Culture  Having culture as a major factor will build the community for many generations   5. Health   If you have a healthy community, then you are able to get the most out them. “A healthy community is a strong community”   6. Employment   Is important to me because we don’t have much work here for our people, we have to leave just to find work  6. Housing Because we don’t have enough housing for our people  6. Education and Health  We need our people to get more education so we are able to take care of ourselves   7. Economic Development  We need to have this in place. Ones this is in place it would bring in revenue that could be put towards goals of the band, housing, more jobs, education, $, community building, etc. 204	  	   8. Self worth, acceptance, positive out look. These aspects of life affect a persons every day out look in the community due to short comings, opinions, and personal decisions one makes on a daily or whenever basis. It affects all aspects, family, values, support network  What factors contribute to the issue?            Blue Stickers  1. Housing   Although it would be great to house all the people who need the housing, we must make due with what we get. Housing maintenance is the real issue, assistance to keep up with what there is and support what there is to be in the future.   2. Employment  Remoteness, challenging to travel to work in different communities  3. Funding! No designated Ec.Dev worker. Interest on ideas from people   4. Employment  It’s hard to live without money so that’s why we need more jobs, I fell lack of education or just don’t care from our chiefs and council. Same with Housing. I feel Chief and Council are not doing their jobs to their fullest knowledge and ability.  Over all we need to make sure our children are educated.  5. Funding Lack of funds, and participation and involvement. Mostly funding.  6. Ec.Dev and Housing Funding   7. Housing, employment, new building, recreation facilities, programs, ec.dev, health, funding, financial resources.  What would tell you that your need was being met?  Green Stickers  1. Steps being taken to plan for the future. First stages of development in housing, Ec.Dev., growth of interest in culture, etc.  2. New programs, facilities, info sessions, action!  3. Communication, band meetings are not always a venue to receive info  4.When our community is 100 percent with jobs and housing and we all happy, healthy people. 205	  	   5. All the jobs that were available were filled. That everyone in the community …was able to  (make/move???), that there would be nobody needing financial support, everyone was happy.  6. When all the community is conversing and participating in the cultural activities   7. Seeing business start up with community in turn seeing the money rolling in. Seeing data showing majority of members are working and unemployment nearly gone. Having excess of revenue within the band that can be used on projects or goals of community.  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  206	  	  	  IT MATTERS: STICKY NOTE SHUFFLE SUMMARY 	  	  	         Why is this an issue or concern for you   Percentage of Responses Culture 3 15.00% Economic Development 3 15.00% Housing 3 15.00% Language 3 15.00% Education 3 15.00% Health 3 15.00% Jobs 2 10.00%     TOTAL RESPONSES 20     What Factors contribute to this issue?   Percentage of Responses Funding (Money, Finances, etc) 5 31.25% Housing 3 18.75% Education 1 6.25% Support 1 6.25% Chief and Council (Governance) 1 6.25% Jobs 4 25.00% New Buildings (Infrastructure) 1 6.25%     TOTAL RESPONSES 16  What would tell you that your need was being met?   Percentage of Responses Communication 4 21.05% Health (Happiness) 2 10.53% Housing 2 10.53% Jobs 3 15.79% Financial Support (income, funding) 1 5.26% Infrastructure 1 5.26% Culture 2 10.53% Economic Development 2 10.53% Governance 1 5.26% Success Indicators (Monitoring and Evaluation) 1 5.26%      TOTAL RESPONSES 19   207	  	  COMMUNITY PLANNING RANKING RESULTS   208	  	    209	  	    210	  	    211	  	    212	  	  TPB THEMES, DIRECTIONS, PATHWAYS AND ACTIONS MAP	  Tobacco Plains Community Planning:  Themes 1-4, Directions (Ends-Objectives), Pathways (Means-Objectives) & ActionsEconomic  DevelopmentGovernanceInfrastructureSocialFoster local economic development, increasing employment and generating revenue for the Band, working towards VHOIVXIÀFLHQF\Attract new business opportunities and diversify our economy.Offer and seek meaningful, long-term work opportunities.Improve existing Economic Development DepartmentInvest in local opportunities and encourage local entrepreneurshipAlign with the regional economy, improving our relationship with big business and reducing the cost of doing business in Tobacco Plains, and increasing competitiveness with regional businesses, municipali-ties, Regional Districts, and other First Nations for private investment.Fund longer work terms Hire Economic Development Worker Increase training and education opportunities Investigate ways to increase gov’t revenue (taxes)Upgrade Duty Free, Campgrounds, Saw Mill, etc.Assist members with businesses-funding, capacity.Invest and promote local businesses Collect and publish relevant investor material Review and revise corporate structure Publish an Investor CodeStudy feasability of logging operation, campground expansion, recre-ation programs  Empower our members through commu-nity participation in planning and decision making, creating unity as a band and as a Nation, and building our capacity to meet the needs of the people.Improve Band Leadership, Accountability,  Transparency & Financial ManagementEngage in inclusive community planning, and integrate the community’s voice into all decision-making.Focus on Implementation of PlansCommit to an open, transparent process.3URPRWHVRXQGÀQDQFLDOPDQDJHPHQWWKURXJKSROLFLHVE\ODZVtaxes, regulations and agreements.Improve communication and promote cooperation between and from Chief and Council, the Development Corporation, and com-munity members.Empower our Leadership to promote and communicate local issues.Formalize Community decision making processFormalize link between Community Planning,  Strategic Planning and Operational Work plans.Designate Task Manager to ensure tasks are completed. Establish monitoring and evaluation of plan outcomes. Publish and review all relevant policies and procedures.Avoid Nepotism.Adopt FInancial Administration Law. Develop Local Infrastructure Improvement Service Tax Law.Create a Development Cost Charge Law.1HJRWLDWH,PSDFW%HQHÀW$JUHHPHQWVZLWK,QGXVWU\Develop other tax programs, development approval processes.Explore other ways of communication, not just through Band meetings.Develop and adhere to speaking/listening rules at all meetings. Develop and publish relevant policies and procedures online. Share important updates and information online Find funding for everyone to do their jobs Leaders be open-minded regarding community issues. Invest in and improve Tobacco Plains infrastructure, including housing and other community facilities.Improve access to housing.Develop and improve existing infrastructure.Develop new infrastructure.Improve communication within Tobacco Plains and between  Tobacco Plains and external entities.Invest in new housing projects.Finalize capital implementation plan.Implement home health assessment.Develop housing and water maintenance programs.Avoid nepotism in housing decisions.Develop housing renovation program. Clean up the old village. Maintain our roads. Increase the size of the Band Hall.Equip homes with computers and telephones.Build a community/youth recreation centre. Build a new Band Hall. Build a new Fire Hall.Build our own homes.Develop broadband services in Tobacco Plains.Design and publish TPB website.Encourage and promote social health and inclusion, fostering strong community spirit and building support networks in the community.Establish a social meeting space for families and friends, with  activities for adults and kids. Increase Tobacco Plains members interaction and involvement, and encourage healthy, respectful community-minded conversations.Promote inclusion and involvement of off-reserve members.Build a community/youth recreation centre.Use the internet to promote social programs.Find funding for social initiatives.Find funding for people to do their jobs. Host more community dinners.Design interactive community focus programs that bring community members together.Promote family gatherings.Continue to publish newsletter with regular updates and information on events and gatherings. Pay attention to off-reserve issues. Improve access to housing. Improve communication with off-reserve members. 213	  	   Tobacco Plains Community Planning:  Themes 4-8, Directions (Ends-Objectives), Pathways (Means-Objectives) & ActionsHealthLanguage & Culture EducationLands &  ResourcesSet up a health dedicated fund to assist band members.Promote elder care.Support and promote alternative care.Conduct home health assessment.Develop a nutrition program.Implement tele-health.Establish a nurse practitioner.Provide education on how to care for each other.Become a designated regional health delivery agent.Finalize Occupational Health and Safety Manual. Maximize the value of our lands, for the EHQHÀWRIDOO7REDFFR3ODLQVPHPEHUVpresent and future generations. Protect our lands.Determine what lands are available for what uses.Pursue new resource based opportunities and encourage physical growth. Investigate feasible alternative energy projects.Develop Land Management Code/Practices.'HYHORS/DQG7HQXUH5XOHVDQG1HZ/HDVH$JUHHPHQWVUHGXFHuncertainty for leaseholders.Improve the Health of the Land.'HVLJQDQGLPSOHPHQWLQWHQVHODQJXDJHSURJUDPVDQG7UDGLWLRQDOKnowledge programs.'HYHORSFXOWXUDOSURJUDPVWKDWUHÁHFWRXUFXOWXUDOWUDGLWLRQV3URPRWHDQGUHFRJQL]HWKHLPSRUWDQFHRIKXQWLQJDQGÀVKLQJDevelop Ktunaxa signs for our community.Implement community cultural days.Elders must be respected and involved in all activities.Develop a mentorship program.$OOPHHWLQJVLQFOXGLQJ&RXQFLORSHQZLWKDSUD\HUIncrease and expand education levels and opportunities to ensure children and members are properly trained and edu-cated.Invest in our youth, and offer more education options. Incorporate Ktunaxa language & culture into our education pro-grams and curriculum.5DLVHPRQH\IRUHGXFDWLRQLQ7REDFFR3ODLQVInvest in and offer scholarships. Offer training for youth.Increased training for all ages.2IIHUÀUHDQGGLVDVWHUSUHSDUDWLRQWUDLQLQJOffer trade training for members.Promote inclusion: listen to each other no matter the level of education.Offer technology training.Setup delivery of distance and community education.Offer online training.5HYLHZ(GXFDWLRQ&RPPLWWHH·V7HUPVRI5HIHUHQFH2IIHU*RYHUQDQFH7UDLQLQJImprove community health by nurturing a happy, healthy and prosperous communi-ty, and empower and support the health of all members.Invest in local health and develop an outstanding local health care system.Empower individual self-esteem through a commitment to the band and families.,PSURYHUHODWLRQVKLSVEHWZHHQ7REDFFR3ODLQVDQGLQWHULRUKHDOWKDXWKRULW\LQFOXGLQJ1,+%,QWHULRU+HDOWK.1&Have mapping illustrate developable parcels of Band land available to all departments, and Chief and Council.Explore forestry and tourism opportunities.Develop an ownership scheme to own property.'HYHORSDQHJRWLDWLRQVVWUDWHJ\ZLWK.1&VHHNUHVRXUFHVWRparticipate in negotiations with industry.Expand campground facilities, improve saw mill operations.Develop solar and wind technologies to support our community.$SSO\XQGHUWKH)LUVW1DWLRQV/DQG0DQDJHPHQW$FW6FKHGXOH'HYHORS=RQLQJ%\ODZDQG'HYHORSPHQW$SSURYDOVInvestigate 99 year leases and alternative lease models.Prevent over-grazing by horses.(QVXUH73%PHPEHUVKDYHDFFHVVWRKXQWLQJ DQGEHUU\SLFNLQJJURXQGV5HYLWDOL]HDQGFHOHEUDWH.WXQD[DODQ-guage & culture: protect, promote & practice our culture to strengthen our FRPPXQLW\DQGSDVVRXUNQRZOHGJHRQWRfuture generations. Increase and promote participation in Ktunaxa language DQGFXOWXUHDFWLYLWLHV7HDFKDQGOHDUQRXUODQJXDJHDQGculture and honor our family values. (QFRXUDJHLQWHUJHQHUDWLRQDONQRZOHGJHWUDQVIHUDPRQJRXU PHPEHUV(OGHUVDQG\RXWK214	  	   	  TPB CPAC MEETING. FEB.3.2014. Agenda:  1. Welcome & Intro a. Anna introduced the CPAC; need to get the process moving towards our March 31st deadline. Meeting /event every other week; CPAC members be a part of those meetings and help support Anna. Anna brought the KNC Plan – 5 issues; propose to the community that we focus on these 5 issues and see what everybody thinks? b. Wilson asks why everyone is interested in being part of CPAC. i. Sarah: I live here, am raising my son here, and want it to be different when he grows up. ii. Jackie: I want to be involved in my community, to know what’s going on more; there’s a lot going on right now for our Nation; a lot of changes, and I think because I’m getting older, I’m starting to be more concerned with what’s happening, what’s going to happen; I want to be involved and know what’s going on, so I can go home and bring back what I learn and try to get my family involved.  iii. Leanne: To be involved in the community, help us  move forward rather than stay still and be stuck in the past.  2. What is Planning? a. Straight forward 3. What is CPAC? a. Review of Engagement Strategy Outcomes i. Clear as mud b. Review TPB T.o.R. i. Clear as mud c. Check-in i. Leanne ok; Sarah ok; Jackie ok; Cindi ok (may try to find a community member to replace her); Dawn ok! 4. Tentative Upcoming Sessions Wednesday Monday, Feb 17th @ 6:30pm.    	  	  	  	  	  	  215	  	  TPB CPAC Meeting, Wednesday Feb 19 Steve Skyped in @ 4:30 for 25 minutes.  CPAC QUESTIONNAIRE.  In attendance: Everybody is there!  Steve’s talking notes for Skype call:  Explain a bit about why the questionnaire is needed. The purpose:  -start by thinking broadly about what are the main issues that people want to see chief & council focus on, i.e. housing, infrastructure, health, economic development., and then dive into those issues with as much detail and specifics as possible. Ultimately if our plan just lists the themes, it won’t be effective. We need to know what about each theme needs to be done; i.e. Housing, we need maintenance programs. Governance, we need better consultation from chief and council, etc.  Go through each question on the questionnaire, explain it’s purpose and see if anyone has questions.  Question 1 asks people to identify about what issues matter to them. Starting broadly.  -question from Sarah: her sister is considering moving back, she thinks she’ll have some valuable input. Can she interview her over the phone. Anna: yes.  -question from Lorna: can we interview over the phone? Anna: yes.  -off-reserve mail-out, including the rest of the members.  Can we come up with a similar tool for the off-reserve members? Anna: yes.  Question 2: think specifically about the issues; why is it important to them? This is where we really want to get as specific as we can! If the issue is housing, what about housing matters to you? Is it housing maintenance? Maybe there are some maintenance programs that the Band could or should be offering. Maybe the issue is Governance, and maybe it matters to them because their voice isn’t being heard, or they aren’t consulting the community on decisions that are important to TPB.  Question 3: this one is where we’re asking participants to think about what is causing the issue. For example, Housing, is it money? Is it lack of leadership? Is it infrastructure?  -question from Lorna: Has this been brought to Council? Is there any guarantee that Council will take this and do anything with this info?  -Sarah: what is the next steps? Anna mentioned after the Plan is done, it will be up to the community to decide how to implement. Steve talked about Chief and Council; it’s in their best interest to fulfill what’s in the plan, as it’s a community process and could affect them at the next election. Next steps re: the planning, if you have ideas, let us know! We want it to be a community driven process. Talked about the upcoming theme nights, the priority session and implementation.   216	  	  Question 4: What would your community look like if the issue was dealt with? I.e. if the issue was governance, you’d have regular community planning sessions, an active Planning Committee, strategic planning, etc.   Last minute thoughts:  -Question 1 we just want the issues. Question 2, 3, 4, try and get to the specifics as much as you can. Ask follow-up questions, i.e. ask them to explain a bit more about housing, or governance. What specifically about that issue is impacting your life in the community?  -Don’t worry about making mistakes! If there’s time tonight, split into partners, do a questionnaire for each other as a practice run.  -Wilson, Steve and Anna could put a 3-question evaluation form together to see how CPAC liked doing the questionnaire, how it went (after doing the first questionnaire with a community member). We come together and evaluate how it went, and then we can go out and do the rest of them. Anna: Probably not enough time for that, we may start doing interviews tomorrow.  -Need to assign someone to do the transcribing! Anna: Will get back to you tonight.  -Thank everyone for volunteering on CPAC and for the great work they’re going to be doing, it’s going to help tremendously and we really appreciate it!                         217	  	  TOBACCO PLAINS COMMUNITY PLANNING CPAC THEMES/ISSUES QUESTIONNAIRE Introduction The Tobacco Plains Community Planning team has put this activity together for the Community Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC) to carry out in the community.    The Planning team is hoping that each member of the CPAC will be able to fill out this questionnaire with at least 5 members of Tobacco Plains, in an attempt to reach people who haven’t attended a community planning session.    The information from this activity will help the CPAC in designing the next community engagement session. The questions in this activity are based on the last community session in Tobacco Plains, on February 5th.    The purpose of this activity is to first find out the broad issues, needs and concerns of Tobacco Plains Band (TPB) members. Secondly, this exercise asks participants to dive into those issues to see how that issue specifically affects them, and how Tobacco Plains as a community would be different if that issue was addressed or the need was being met. Please read through this carefully! Timeline February 14th: TPB Planning Coordinator finalizes activity (editing,  dates, printing, etc); gets in touch with members of CPAC; assigns each member of CPAC an area of Tobacco Plains with the goal of filling in 5 of these questionnaires.  February 19th: CPAC members return filled in questionnaires to TPB Planning Coordinator; TPB Coordinator enters data for each questionnaire on computer and emails it UBC Practicum students for analysis. Conference/Skype call between CPAC members and UBC practicum students to discuss how the questionnaire delivery went, and common themes and issues in the community.  February 21st: UBC Practicum students return summary and analysis of data to TPB Planning Coordinator; planning begins for next community session (March 12) based on questionnaire results.        218	  	  Activity Read each question out to your participant; and write down their answers with as much detail as you can. After you’ve written down their answer, read it back to them and ask them if they think what you’ve written is accurate or needs to be changed.  Member’s Name: Date: Question #1:  Thinking very broadly, what matters to you in Tobacco Plains?  (Or, what would you like Chief and Council to focus on? What would you like to see change in Tobacco plains?)   For example: Housing, Economic Development, Language and Culture, Health, Infrastructure, Governance, Social Programs, Lands and Resources).   If they list more than one item, ask them if they would mind ranking which of the items are their top 3 priorities. (most important, second and third most important). Response:                   Question #2: Why specifically does this issue matter to you? How is this issue(s) affecting you or your family? Please be as specific as possible!   (For example, if the issue is Housing, there may not be enough housing for their family, or there may be an issue with lack of housing maintenance; or, if the issue is governance, they may feel like their voice isn’t being heard or considered by Chief and Council.)   If they listed more than one issue in Question 1 (for example, Housing, Economic Development, and Language and Culture), ask them to discuss their most important issue first, and then move on to the second and third most importance issues. Response:                   219	  	  Question #3: What are some of the influences, factors, or other issues that are impacting this area, or causing it to be an issue?  Please be as specific as you can!  (For example, if the issue is Housing, some influences or causes could be lack of financing, lack of water infrastructure, lack of political will or human resources. If the issue is Education, causes could be lack of funding, lack of resources, etc.).   If they listed more than one issue in Question 1, please start with the most important issue first, and, if you have time, go back to the second and third most important issues  Response:                     Question #4: How would your community be different if this need were being met?   (For example, if the issue was Housing, their community would have more houses, their family might return from off-reserve and benefit the community in some way).   Discuss in as much detail as they are comfortable! Response:                       	   220	  	  SWOT SUMMARY Economy (32 responses) Strengths (1 response) Ø Location of reserve, opportunity to build business and generate economic growth (1) Areas of Improvement (4): Ø Utilize our resources and existing knowledge base (2) Ø Community involvement in implementing economic development (1) Ø Follow-through on decisions (1) Opportunities (23 responses): Ø Create economic growth & development, growth opportunities, careers and long-term jobs (6) Ø Seasonal tourism (2) Ø Self-sufficiency (1) Ø Improve housing and infrastructure (1) Ø Trade jobs (1) Ø Revenue-Sharing Agreements (1) Ø Less Dependence on Government handouts (1) Ø Specific opportunities: Tim Horton’s (1); Broadband internet (1); Sawmill (1); Energy projects (1); Forestry (1); Agriculture (1); Gym (1) Ø Research (1) Ø Access grants for renewable energy projects (1) Ø Exploit border location (1)  Challenges (4 responses): Ø “Old minds” scared to move forward, unwilling to change with the times (2) Ø Bringing ideas to life (1) Ø Action (1) Governance (30 responses) Strengths: (3 responses) Ø New, young council (1) that is pro-development (1) and putting together a work plan (1). Areas of improvement: (11 responses) Ø Community involvement (3): listening to and respecting band members’ opinions and ideas (1) and getting band members involved (2) Ø Communication (2) Ø Language (1), health (1), drugs & alcohol (1)  Opportunities: (4 responses) Ø Provide more structure to the community (1) Ø Give confidence to members about their government (1) Ø Improved governance will allow for unity and community growth (1) 221	  	  Ø Opportunity to become our own municipality to house health programs, protective services, e.g. fire, welfare (1). Challenges (12 responses): Ø External government policy & regulation changes (3) Ø Funding (2) Ø Relationship with Indian Affairs/AANDC (1) Ø One reporting model for First Nations across Canada, no flexibility (1) Ø Need a bigger office for employees, programs and services (1) Ø Need for employment training (1) Ø Need to follow our own policies (1) Ø Attitudes and stereotypes from local governments and populations (1) Ø Small population, hard to deal with all issues (1) Lands & Resources (23 responses): Strengths (13 responses): Ø Ecological diversity and quality of our land & territory (4) Ø Traditional knowledge and respect for the land (2) Ø Community’s access and ability to live off the land (2) Ø Community holds on to our right to the land (1) Ø Court decisions recognize our rights to the land (1) Ø Revenue sharing from Industry & Government (1) Ø Proximity to Flathead and Lake Koocanusa (1) Ø Potential for agricultural opportunities (1) Areas of Improvement (2 responses): Ø Overgrazing (1) Ø Invasive plant removal (1) Opportunities (6 responses): Ø Tourism & guiding (2) Ø Hunting (1) Ø Forestry and logging operations (1) Ø Tanning hides (1) Ø Butcher shop (1)  Challenges (2 responses): Ø Lack of funding (1) Ø Lack of knowledge to acquire funding (1) Education (15 responses): Strengths (0  responses)  Areas of Improvement (6 responses): Ø All positions in the administration need high education (1) 222	  	  Ø Provide training and education for our people (1) Ø Be clear about our intentions (1) Ø We need to take responsibility of getting educational information to the community (1) Ø Having answers to the community members questions (1) Ø Getting people motivated to seek more training and education (1) Opportunities (7 responses): Ø Education has potential to expand and grow economic development (3) Ø Reach the young (1) Ø Pass on our traditional knowledge (1) Ø Customize our teaching methods (1) Ø Betterment of our members (1) Challenges (2 responses): Ø Lack of funding (1) Ø Lack of trade training (1) Language & Culture (13 responses): Strengths (10 responses): Ø We have a strong cultural base and knowledgeable elders (6) Ø All members harvest their own food through hunting and fishing (1) Ø We feed our visitors good (1) Ø In a crisis we come together (1) Ø Chief and Council (1) Areas of Improvement (2 responses): Ø Need to focus on language & culture, who we are (2) Opportunities (0 responses) Challenges (1 response): Ø Lack of cultural awareness & identity (1) Social (11 responses): Strengths (0) Areas of Improvement (1 response): Ø Need nurses and doctors (1) Opportunities (4 responses): Ø Acquire the Grasmere school building (2) Ø Implement language in office (1) Ø Potential for growth in social areas (1) Challenges (6 responses): Ø Funding (3) Ø Jobs (1) Ø Lack of team work (1) Ø Getting an answer on the purchase of the Grasmere school (1) 223	  	  Health (10 responses): Strengths (6 responses): Ø Health department, resources, knowledgeable people and health education is helping the community (4) Ø Governance (1) Ø We’re far ahead in our health plan (1) Areas of Improvement (0) Opportunities (2 responses): Ø Have our own emergency services coverage for the community (1) Ø Build a health center to serve the whole Grasmere community, not just the reserve (1) Challenges (2 responses): Ø Remoteness (1) Ø No R.N. professional services (1) Infrastructure (7 responses): Strengths (0) Areas of Improvement (6 responses): Ø Band building & office space (2) Ø Staff professional development (2) Ø Lack of equipment (1) Ø Community housing (1) Opportunities (0) Challenges (1 response): Ø Funding for building (1)     	  	  	   	  224	  	  TPB COMMUNITY UPDATE SUMMARY  On March 25th, the planning team presented a summary of the planning team’s findings to Band administrators and Chief and Council. To begin, the planning team outlined the planning process, what tools and activities were used to gather information from the community. The 8 themes were presented again and the most frequently heard items within each theme were presented using a unique and creative approach.       Table 1. List of planning teams’ tools, events and activities used to gather community information Tool/Event/Activity Date Open House Launch November 5, 2013 Communication and Participation Survey November 5, 2013 Youth event and photography workshop November 6, 2013 Elder interview November 7, 2013 Community Visioning and Metaphor Event December 10, 2013 Visioning exercise December 10, 2013 Metaphor drawing December 10, 2013 Youth visioning December 11, 2013 Elder interview December 12, 2013 Community Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC) Launch February 3, 2014 Youth camera and videography workshop February 4, 2014 Community Session February 5, 2014 It Matters – Sticky Note Shuffle Activity February 5, 2014 CPAC Questionnaire  February 20, 2014               225	  	   Using these tools, activities and events, the following issues, needs and concerns were compiled within each of the 8 themes and presented to Band administrators and Chief and Council on March 25, 2014 (see Table 2, below).  19 people indicated that lack of jobs and long-term employment was a critical issue in Tobacco Plains. Similarly, 18 people noted that a lack of housing was of concern. 10 people indicated that mental and physical well-being needed to be addressed in the community, and 9 people indicated a need for improved governance (better communication, avoid nepotism, focus on community planning).    Table 2. Summary of communities issues, needs and concerns within each theme* Theme Main issues, needs and concerns Economic Development (88 responses) Lack of jobs & long-term employment (19); Need for economic development (8); Other (high cost of living, being forced to leave to find work, etc) Governance (88 responses) Nepotism (4); Lack of respect between community and Chief and Council (2); Need for improved communication with community (2); Need for community planning. Infrastructure (74 responses) Lack of housing (18); need for renovation & maintenance programs (3); lack of facilities (1); poor internet quality (1). Social (39 responses) Welfare (1); off-reserve members (1); families have to leave to find work (1); lack of participation and involvement (1) Health (36 responses) Mental and Physical well-being of community (10); Safety (1); Lack of funding (1); Drugs & Alcohol (1) Language & Culture (34 responses) Need for revitalization, programs (1) Education Lack of education & knowledge (2); educated members forced to leave (1); lack of support for post-secondary (1) Lands & Resources (18 responses) We’re not utilizing the land (4) 226	  	  *Taken from excel spreadsheet “TPB Community Tools matrix_uninterpreted and interpreted_April 11”  Figure 4 Community Issues bubbles. Green indicates more frequently heard items, while yellow and orange indicate less frequently heard items   Figure 5. Community update canvass, with 8 themes and issues bubbles within each theme    227	  	   	   !Tobacco&Plains&Community&Planning&Video&Exercise!Instructions!to!complete!a!community!planning!video:!1. Review!the!questions!below!with!your!partner,!!and!fill!in!your!responses!for!the!movie!script.!Practice!answering!them!in!front!of!the!camera!before!you!film!!2. Find!a!quiet&space!with!good&lighting!and!film!each!other’s!responses.!3. You!should!have!2!videos,!each!about!1E3!minutes!long.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Responses!for!Interview!#1.!Introduce!yourself:!“My!name!is!____________________”,!I!am!____!years!old,!and!I!come!from!Tobacco!Plains!First!Nation”!What!things!in!the!community!are!you!proud!of!or!do!you!care!about?!“The!things!I!care!about!in!my!community!are….”!!!!!!What!is!one!wish!you!have!for!your!community?!“One!wish!I!have!for!my!community!is….”!!!!!!!What!would!you!like!your!community!to!look!like!in!15!years?!“In!15!years,!I!would!like!my!community!to…”!!!!!!228	  	  YOUTH VIDEO INTERVIEW SESSION RESPONSES Interview #1 Interviewer: Wilson Mendes (TP Planning Team) Interviewee: Ayanna Twigg (TP youth)  Wilson Mendes: “What things in the community are you proud of or do you care about?” Aiyanna Twigg: “The things I care about in my community are the heath and safety of my community.” Wilson Mendes: “What is one wish you have for your community?” Ayanna Twigg: “One wish I have for my community is more housing and community activities.” Wilson Mendes: “What would you like your community to look like in 15 years?”  Ayanna Twigg: “In 15 years, I would like my community to have more jobs, a big population, and a community center for people.”  Interview #2 Interviewer: Samantha Sielen (TP Youth) Interviewee: Maria Sieler (TP Youth)  Samantha Sielen: “What things in the community are you proud of or do you care about?” Maria Sieler: “I am proud of the animal population, and that the landing is available for hunting purposes and hiking.” Samantha Sielen: “What is one wish you have for your community?” Maria Sieler: “One of my wishes for the community is to have a cleaner lake to swim in.” Samantha Sielen: “What would you like your community to look like in 15 years?” Maria Sieler: “In 15 years, I would like my community to a bigger population.”  Interview #3 Interviewer: Wilson Mendes (TP Planning Team) Interviewee: Ryan Sieler (TP Youth)  Wilson Mendes: “What things in the community are you proud of or do you care about?” Ryan Sieler: “The things I care about in my community are the natural settings and the wildlife.” Wilson Mendes: “What is one wish you have for your community?” Ryan Sieler “One wish I have for my community is more housing and larger community.” Wilson Mendes: “What would you like your community to look like in 15 years?” Ryan Sieler: “In 15 years, I would like my community to be self-sufficient.”  Interview #4 Interviewer: Maria Sieler (TP Youth) Interviewee: Samantha Sielen (TP Youth)  Maria Sieler: “What things in the community are you proud of?” Samantha Sielen: “I enjoy the lakes and the wildlife.” Maria Sieler: “What is one wish you have for your community?” Samantha Sielen: “One wish I have for my community is to have cleaner lakes and community gatherings.” 229	  	  Maria Sieler: “What would you like your community to look like in 15 years?” Samantha Sielen: “In 15 years, I would like my community to have a community center for people everybody to gather together and more houses for people to live in.”              	     	  	  230	  	  ELDERS INTERVIEW  TRANSCRIPT #1 TPB Community Planning: ELDER HILLY GRAVELLE Location: Tobacco Plains Band Office  Date: November 7th, 2014 Interviewer: Anna Morgeau (TPB Planning Coordinator) Interviewer assistant: Wilson Mendes and Stephen McGleen (UBC Students) Interviewee: Elder Hilly Gravelle  Anna Morigeau: “Good Afternoon Hillary. Thanks for coming in today. We would like to do an interview with you today, and just seeing, hearing your perspective on what do you think about the community planning project, hearing a bit about yourself as a member growing up in TPB.”  Anna Morigeau: “Can you share with us your name?”  Elder Hilly Gravelle: “First introduced herself in Tkanaxa language (no translation). I was born here, and I never went anywhere, I was just staying here all my life, so…”  Anna Morigeau: “How long have you lived in TPB?”   Elder Hilly Gravelle: “77 years and then I went to school, I've been living on here for 66 years or so.”  Anna Morigeau: “What was like growing up in the community?”  Elder Hilly Gravelle: “When I was a little kid, I was raised over here and then when I was 10 years old they took me down to the Saint Eugene’s school. I was there for 12 years, and I left when I was 15, and from there I started to stay around here. I was raised with one parent, with my mother, my father passed away in 1943. A lot of things changed. When I came to meetings I asked somebody what  they meant, what they talked about…”  Anna Morigeau: “So, seeing the community now, as opposed to 40 years ago, you say it has changed a lot, do you thing this changes are for the better of the community?   Elder Hilly Gravelle: “Yes, for the better. In the old days, there was nothing going on and then around the 60's, 70's they started to take this entire people into working... I think that's what I mean by changing the...culture changed by the better and its not too... in my time I never used to… it was never any work, anything. But anyways, back then old people would go out hunting and picking their own winter supplies, berries, bitter roots, and all that stuff that they came up with. Huckleberries, Saskatoon, (scomocu), chokecherries, and soap berries, the one that they make indian ice-cream...”   Anna Morigeau: “Do you still make, or do you know anyone that makes it?” 231	  	   Elder Hilly Gravelle: “I don’t know, but I think there is soap berries out there but nobody look for it (laugh).”   Anna Morigeau: “So, you were at our community session the other night and we would like to know if you think the idea of bringing the culture and the language into this whole planning process is a good idea? Incorporating the language into the project?”   Elder Hilly Gravelle: “You mean that the ancient language? I am one of them that speaks it that you and a few of us get together and we start teaching the kids...”  Anna Morigeau: “If you were like somehow transform all this paper work behind you into the Tkanaxa language, do you thing that is going to be a good idea?”   Elder Hilly Gravelle: “Yes.”  Anna Morigeau: “Perhaps have you come and meet with the youth. Last night we had a youth session and we want to engage them into the culture and language and with the idea of community planning process, so would that be an idea for you?”  Elder Hilly Gravelle: “Yes, we used to do that, Leanne, Robert, and a few of us used to come in and listen to the kids speak and then when we didn't understand them, we would correct their pronunciation.”  Anna Morigeau: “The vision of the community, the vision of TPB, how do you see the vision in the future? How would you like to see your community looking in the future?”  Elder Hilly Gravelle: “Its hard to say. Keep going at it, get it going…”   Anna Morigeau: “Beside yourself, how many people speak the language in the community?” Elder Hilly Gravelle:  “There is Teresa, Marie , Liz (Marcella ?), and Roberta and Leanne. Yes, five of them.” Anna Morigeau: “How many Elders are left in the community?” Elder Hilly Gravelle:  “There is a few. Liz Gravelly, Teresa, and my brother and me. And some others out there...” Anna Morigeau: “Can you write it as well?”  Elder Hilly Gravelle: That's what I tell everybody that I never really write it. I speak it and they have to write if for me, and still, I don’t know how to pronounce it. It was how I was raised, you know, just by hearing it and speaking it. Anna Morigeau: “How many brother and sister did you have?”   232	  	  Elder Hilly Gravelle: “There were 12 of us, and now there is only two of us left. Me and my brother.” Anna Morigeau: “And did you all leave in this area?” Elder Hilly Gravelle: “Yes, they were all over here. Two or three of them were married into another reserve. One of my sisters got married at the Columbia Lake, my other sister got married in Eureka. So it was just like that and my brother and I was just single.” Anna Morigeau: “Living on the boarder of Canada and the USA, how was that for you growing up?” Elder Hilly Gravelle: “When I used to go across the border some border customs used not to ever bother to ask for anything from me. They say, "You go ahead". One time there was a customs officer that worked at a border, he was " halfy" , he used to talk to us in Tkanaxa when we go and come back.  One time, there was a couple that went to Eureka, and on the way back they didn’t know that the customs officer spoke Tkanaxa.  When they were asked if hey had any liquor the couple spoke in Tkanaxa but the border custom smiled away, and then he turned to the woman and respond to her in Tkanaxa. The couple were smuggling liquor across the border. They came down to our house and told all of us about it that there was one officer that spoke Tkanaxa. He’s name was...can’t remember it right now… He was really good at that. He would make us laugh when we go that way...” Anna Morigeau: “What about Big Springs, did you swim in Big Springs when you were young?”  Elder Hilly Gravelle: “Fishing, the boys used to go there...I don’t like fishing, but I like to clean it! (laugh)”  Anna Morigeau:” Do you do hides as well?  Elder Hilly Gravelle: “Yes, used to tan hides but not right now. I would yet but it’s hard for me right now. We are teaching other kids how to do it, so.”  Anna Morigeau: “Is there anything else would you like to add?” Elder Hilly Gravelle: hummm...no Anna Morigeau: “So, we just want to get some Elder views, hear some stories… So, would you like to participate more in some of the projects in the next couple of months? We want to meet some more with the Elders.” Elder Hilly Gravelle: “Yes, sit in and listen...” Anna Morigeau: “Okay, thank you!”  Elder Hilly Gravelle:” Yeah...okay.  233	  	  ELDERS  INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT #2 TPB Community Planning: ELDER MARIA MAHSEELAH                    Location: Tobacco Plains Band Office  Date: December 11th, 2014 Interviewer: Wilson Mendes and Stephen McGleen (UBC Students) Interviewee: Elder Maria Mahseelah   Wilson Mendes: “Thank you for being here with us today. Would you mind introducing yourself?”  Maria Mahseelah: (Brief introduction in Tkanaxa language) “ My name is Maria Lucy and I was born here in Tobacco Plains. What little I remember of the stories told to me by my parents is that when I was three years old, the time when people get along, I remember of a man who I was scared by him. I used to bring milk to him because my grandparents had cows and he used to share whatever he had. So, I used to bring a gallon of milk to the family and I was always scared of that man. He was tall and had a big voice when he spoke. Later when I look through my mom journals, I found out that that man died when I was three years old.  I remember at that time that when people get used to gather up after church and they used to play games. The reason why I remember that is because a lady wanted me to join in and I was hiding underneath a table. At that time, people were building a house for him and he was helping. What I remember is that at that time people get along and helped each other whenever they could. And today we drifted away from that way of living, stile of sharing whatever… Few of young people that sometimes they come and spend time with me, I know that from my stories I let them know how things used to be. They try to be like that when they go out hunting whatever they share with other people. The first kill of the year they give that way. I think it will take time but I think that maybe the future generation will get back to it. Hunting and gathering still a big part of the community.”  Stephen McGlenn: “Do you know where the name of Tobacco Plains comes from?”  Maria Mahseelah: “They didn’t have the Tobacco Plantation here, it was in the States, and I think that’s where it came from. I think all of this supposed to be all Tobacco Plains until the 49 parallel so they separated so that we have US Tobacco Plains and Canadian”. Stephen McGlenn: “ So, do they grew tobacco here for ceremonial purposes?  Maria Mahseelah: “ I supposed, I don’t know. I have not knowledge of that because I don t know the stories that far back.”  Wilson Mendes: “Based on your story you shared with us about the time you were young, what do you think were the changes that happened between that time and now?”   234	  	  Maria Mahseelah: “Part of it is education maybe. People went out there and good education and forgot about their upbringing whatever. I know that they have education today but they need to use it in the way that help them in both ways, the white man way and their own culture. It is good to know both. I think the most important thing is that people know their genealogy but lots to them don’t. I think that is where the separation is. I think that is where we need to get back together and we need to know where we are from.”  Stephen McGlenn: “From your perspective why do you think this connections are important?”  Maria Mahseelah: “They would get along better. And they would joining in whatever is being plan and make it happen instead of being one group there and another group there and it make it harder for the people who are really trying to make a difference in the community if a group doesn’t go into put their input.”   Stephen McGlenn: “Do you have any suggestion to how we can incorporate and encourage that sense of connection and relationship?”  Maria Mahseelah: “We have a lady that comes in and she does a genealogy chart, and she found out that is hard…We used to have a community gathering ones a month, we used to have dinner and whatever. We are trying to bring that back and how it will work. And there is even suggestions that we go further and have a movie night, game night, and that will be in the new year and see how that will be.”  Wilson Mendes: “In which way do you think we ought to work with the youth in the community?”  Maria Mahseelah: “I think the youth is easy to work with no matter what. You bring that up and they are interested. Get them away from their games, TV, and whatever. Get them something different.”  Stephen McGlenn: “If you were to image the community into the future, ideally what would you like to see in the community?”  Maria Mahseelah: “I think my dream will be that everybody get along together. This will make them stronger and get more things happening in the community as opposed to people saying that nothing happens in the community, but they don’t come into the office to find out that there is things’ happening. I think we have a lot of things happening.”  Stephen McGlenn: “Is there anything else would you like to share with us?”  Maria Mahseelah: “ Long time ago, the ones you call the Elders long time ago, they used to tan hides and all, I know that it was what my mother did and most of all the ladies in the village. That is how they made their living. Today there is a few of them that still know how to do the hides and whatever, and very few do the beading work. They are mostly in doing blankets and sowing things. People who used to do that kind of work one lady pass way with cancer so there is very few in this reserve that does that.” 235	  	    Stephen McGlenn: “How long have you been the Chief?”  Maria Mahseelah: “Since 1999”.  Stephen McGlenn: “Is it challenging to be in that role?”  Maria Mahseelah: “It’s very much.”  Stephen McGlenn: “Do you work with the Tkanaxa Nation as well, and if so how is the Treaty process going on?”  Maria Mahseelah: “Yes, it’s very slow and we will never know if it will come to an end and if it will ever happen”.  Stephen McGlenn: “What are you hoping to get out of the Treaty out of those negotiations.”    Maria Mahseelah: “Our biggest hope is to get out of the Indian government we are under.”  Wilson Mendes: “As you mentioned earlier the TPB is working towards bringing in community members together so that they can start working collaborative with one another again. So, what do you think the community process we are working on?”  Maria Mahseelah: “I was surprise to hear how many people show up last night, that was awesome! You must be doing something right.”   Wilson Mendes: “ Thank you very much we appreciate your time.”           236	  	  ELDERS  INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT #3  Location: Elder Liz Gravelle’s Residency  Date: February 5th, 2014 Interviewer: Anna Morgeau (TPB Planning Coordinator) Interviewer assistant: Wilson Mendes and Stephen McGleen (UBC Students) Interviewee: Elder Liz Gravelle.   Anna Morgeau: “You’ve been around for quite a while!”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea, I have been.”  Anna Morgeau: “You’re tired of seeing the same thing…over and over.”  Liz Gravelle: “Same thing!”  Anna Morgeau: “We’ve been doing a lot of work not only with the community members that come to the meetings but as well we’ve done two other Elder interviews, and we’ve held youth sessions as well, so we’re trying to incorporate as much of the community as we can. Plus we’ve done an info session for the off-reserve members, and we’ve sent out notices so we keep people informed of what we’re doing.”  Liz Gravelle: “That’s another thing that bothers me. Our people are living off the reserve paying rent. They discriminate against them; where else would they live, there’s no housing?”  Anna Morgeau: “That’s a big issue that we’ve heard, even the youth have said that.”  Liz Gravelle: “For the last two generations, there’s no housing. I can describe this reserve with three words: expectation, then you wait with anticipation. Then you’re anticipation turns to Anger, then you just don’t care anymore because you don’t see any changes. Why go to meetings when they never listen to us? Or they never come to us and ask us, there’s this money, how should we spend it? They never! How many years has Denice been here? Her and I have never had a conversation….I’m hoping that Vickie can get things going.”   Anna Morgeau: “That’s the kind of relationship that’s happening between the employees and the members….I think from what I’ve seen about Vickie.”  Liz Gravelle: “Everybody likes her. A lot of times Denice was gone all the time. People would come to work for 15 minutes and they’d be out smoking already.”  Anna Morgeau: “Vickie has implemented new rules that no one necessarily agrees with; they don’t necessarily disagree but they’re just getting used to how she runs things.”  237	  	  Anna Morgeau: “So, we just wanted to start by thanking you for letting us come in here, and sharing your story with us and letting us record the interview. The information we gather from you we’re gonna use for the final video. We did a youth video project last night which turned out really well, so what we’re going to do is tie it all together at the end. Because we only really got 6 weeks until this project is done, we’re trying to get as much info from as many members as we can, which is why we came to you today. We’d like you to use the language as well as English. If you want to start by introducing yourself in your Ktunaxa name. Do you have a Ktunaxa name?”  Liz Gravelle: “No I don’t” (Laughter).  Anna Morgeau: “Ok we’ll skip that one. Have you lived in Tobacco Plains for the majority of your life?”   Liz Gravelle: “Yes I was born on the reserve.”  Anna Morgeau: “Was that Flagstaff or Flagstone?”  Liz Gravelle: “I was born just over the hill here. At that time Flagstone was over here, so everybody used that address, the post office was there.”   Steve McGleen: “Flagstone was a town that used to be here?”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea, it’s under water now.”   Anna Morgeau: “So, did you have to go away for school? Were you put into Residential School or did you stay out here?”  Liz Gravelle: “Yes I was. My parents didn’t belong on the reserve, we lived off the reserve. I just come and spent time with my grand-parents here. We lived up there, up on the side hill there, a couple miles down the road. I started school there, there was a school in Roosville; that’s where I first started school, I went there for a year.  After that we had to move to the other end of the valley. So that’s when we got sent to the Mission.”  Anna Morgeau:  “So there was a Roosville school just up the road?”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea, there was the one down here in Grasmere, but you have the Priests they used to threaten your parents, you know you gotta send your kids (to the Mission).”  Anna Morgeau: “How many people lived around here to attend the Roosville school at that time?”  Liz Gravelle: “It was just the white people, their children went to that school.”  Anna Morgeau: “So growing up in the area, when you were younger, how was growing up out here in the valley?”  238	  	  Liz Gravelle: “Well as I remember it was pretty good. I was 14 when I quit going to the Mission then I finished going to school outside. Yea, things were different. The community was all like one, there was no color. It was one, you know. The reserve, there was no welfares….”  Anna Morgeau: “So people actually worked.”  Liz Gravelle: “Yes, and those people then, they ran the reserve better than the ones that have got machinery and stuff. Every spring the men got together, they went up the Creek. Clair Creek, that was the reserve…they’d go up there with their picks and shovels, then get the water running down so they could have water down there and it went passed the village.  Two waters; this creek here and that one.”  Anna Morgeau: “They did it by hand?”  Liz Gravelle: “By hand! And they didn’t get paid, they just got together and did it.”  Anna Morgeau:  “They knew they had to do it in order for the community to have water.”  Liz Gravelle:  “Yea. I was telling them. Nowadays people just sit around and expect people are gonna hand everything to them. Those people worked hard. There was no jobs, the men had to go out and find work. And the woman stayed home and they tanned their buckskin and made stuff you know, to raise money to live on.”  Anna Morgeau: “Plus the men probably had to hunt.”  Liz Gravelle: “ Yea. When they hunted…you know game was scarce in that time. You had to go up into the mountains, it’s not like it is today. Somebody gets something, they made sure the old people got some, everybody got some. The youth, the first animal they got they had to share with everybody. I always remember because my grandson he says, put the neck aside, they say “what are you doing that for” and he says “that’s for my grandma” (laughter) cause I like the meat around the neck.”  Anna Morgeau: “So the actual neck?”  Anna Morgeau: “Yea they just cut it up…that’s what I got! (laughter).”  Anna Morgeau: “And then berry picking?”  Anna Morgeau: “Berry-picking, o yea! That was a big thing here. Everybody had horses then, and you had to go over the mountain, up, there’s the road there, it was just a trail. Families went up, you had strings of pack-horses, they went up there and they picked berries, the men fished and hunted, hen they had enough berries they’d dry em, and some would bring them home and put em away.  They made several trips you know.”  Anna Morgeau:  “And was that for huckleberries and chokecherries?”   239	  	  Anna Morgeau: “Huckleberries, there’s a lot of chokecherries down here. Huckleberries were, oh they were all over.”  Anna Morgeau: “And the Saskatoon berries?”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea. Yea this year they were just loaded. Chokecherries, Saskatoon, nobody picked em!”  Anna Morgeau: “Do you still use chokecherries and Saskatoon berries?”  Liz Gravelle: “I use Saskatoon berries; my mom and this lady who owned the store; she used to have my girls pick choke cherries, they made syrup out of it.”  Anna Morgeau: “You were talking a little bit earlier; you were mentioning you haven’t seen much of a change in the community.”  Liz Gravelle: “At that time there was a lot of old people. And like I said, each family took care of their own. That’s why I say today, people, these young people, they don’t get married anymore. You need a family life, to teach your children right from when they’re little, how to live. Now they’re…especially my granddaughter…you need a man in the house to discipline the kids. When I was growing up and we raised our kids, we all had to have breakfast with the family and dinner in the evening.”  Anna Morgeau: “So the whole family unit as one, and that’s how you learn your ways.”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea. That was the time when they told on one another” (laughter).  Anna Morgeau: “How many children did you have?”  Liz Gravelle: “I had ten.”  Anna Morgeau: “Wow, that’s a big family!”   Liz Gravelle: “I had two, and then my husband went to war; he was gone over three years, he was overseas. And that’s another thing; when he got discharged. His nephew stole all his medals. I had to write to the archives at the army and they sent me a whole new set. He had 5 medals; they sent me a clasp, I’ve got it.”  Anna Morgeau: “Last time I was here you had them out.”  Anna Morgeau: “Yea. Nobody ever recognizes him as being, you know…He was a scout, a sniper. He would go behind enemy lines and report where the enemy were.  Sometimes he’d get stuck on that side for days without food, and they wouldn’t get back to their own.”  16:20-17:15 (Dog is eating candy)  240	  	  Anna Morgeau: “Did you ever know how to make cradleboards? I know you knew how to make the bunting bay” (spelling?)  Liz Gravelle: “Yes. I made cradle-boards and I have a big picture of my mom holding one that her and I made together, she was teaching me how to make one. We made one for the museum. And Tipi’s, she showed me how to, both her and I made a big tipi, showing me how to put it together.  And then we made a small one…we used to put it in the parade. When Denise first came she borrowed it, and I’ve never seen it again.”  Anna Morgeau: “For the future of the community, what would you like to see, change-wise? What we would like to do, the planning book that we’re putting together, in order for us to have the support of the community, we also need the community to help implement the changes that need to be done. Once we get the book completed, a copy is gonna go out to each household, the onus will be on the community members to make sure that changes are gonna be made or implemented. From your perspective what do you want to see change, such as more housing, for example. Everybody’s expressed that concern.”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea, my boys are all grown up, and George finally got his own trailer.”  Anna Morgeau:  “Especially with a big family, everyone needs to have their own house.”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea.”  Anna Morgeau: “Especially now-a-days too, so housing is a big issue as well.”    Liz Gravelle: “I think, in the old days you know, the people were more, like, there was the church. Everybody went to church.  Whether or not there was priest there on Sunday or not, they went to church and prayed together. After church, in the summer time they always had something going. Some game where everybody could get involved. People talked; and when there was a meeting, everybody went. Whoever was there, they’d say, this is what’s come up, we have to make a decision. Everybody would have a say. They’d talk back and forth, and they’d decide on which way to go, so that’s how they did things then. Now we don’t even get asked if there’s anything. We don’t even have a say, and they wonder why people don’t go to meetings. When you bring something up, they say it’s not on the agenda.   When my husband, when he got back from overseas, they made him Chief. That’s how Chief’s were picked, you picked somebody that had something. He was a good chief, he looked after everybody. We were the last ones ever to get a house at that time. When he was gone over the three years, I built my own house. I bought a house from someone who had to move out; I bought this house from this one guy and had it moved up, and had my Dad put the brick chimney in. My brothers, he there was an old mill down there. When people moved there was all kind of bricks. My brothers and I used to go down and collect the bricks until my Dad and I could build the chimney. So I had my own house.”   Anna: That you built together on your own?  241	  	  Liz Gravelle: “Yea! That’s when I was telling them too; they had the mill here, I asked them, why are you guys buying timber off the reserve when we’ve got timbere here and you’ve got the mill there? They said our timber wasn’t worth as much as theirs. I told them you know, everybody needs housing. You guys have a mill here, why don’t you cut that into lumber? People could take courses and build your own.”  Anna Morgeau: “Timber framing courses, you can take them at the college.”  Liz Gravelle: “When I was little I drew a map. There used to be 17 homes down at the village. Half of them were log houses. That’s how people were in them days. If people needed a home, they got together and did log building together.”  Anna Morgeau: “Sounds like back in the day we were more self-sufficient.”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea they were! I got to telling them that. And Denise asks me, well who’s going to pay them. And I just said, they donated their work!”  Anna Morgeau: “Knowing that people need housing, they did it!”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea. And they had gardens, some had cows, pigs, there was a couple of barns there. And they grew vegetables and these were people that never went to school. And today when you go down to that village, it used to be clean. Now garbage. You could go there and throw down a blanket and have a picnic, that’s how good it was. That’s what people did after church on Sundays. They stayed and brought their picnics. All afternoon there was either grass-hockey, men against women, or foot races, always something, you know!”  Anna Morgeau: “Some kind of family activity going on?”  Liz Gravelle: “Everybody was involved. Or else the woman made vests and gloves, and when they had enough they’d have a rodeo, and that’s what they gave out as prizes instead of money. Clothing, buckskin, you know. And they used to draw a crowd!”  Anna Morgeau: “So utilizing the land in a healthier way back then as well, and not only just one family, it’s the whole community coming together. And everybody travelled by horse and buggy?”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea. In the winter time, we had to go through Flagstone or Newgate in a sleigh.”  Anna Morgeau: “Was there lots of snow back then?”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea, winters were cold back then. There was a lot of snow.  They tell me, oh it’s cold. I said it’s not cold, it’s just back to normal! (Laughter). This guy that owns the mill down the road, Doug MacDonald, him and I went to the same school, when we were little, so we talk about the old days. The old rumble seats; the kids sit there, parents used to put big rocks on the stove over night and wrap them up to keep your feet warm. Most of the times you had just the sleigh horse to go get your groceries.” 242	  	   Anna Morgeau: “I feel like I’m taking a lot for granted, just hearing your story. Moving out here I have to chop wood.”  Liz Gravelle: “And the roads too.  The other day, Lisa and I were on our way to Fernie the other day, there was nothing wrong with the roads, a few ruts and this, and she was complaining about the roads. I said, you know this is good. When I was growing up we had to go Fernie, one of my kids was born on the way at the tunnel. We had to go around back of the village, down to this little wander pound (Sp?) it’s all under water now, come back out at Elko. And the roads weren’t ploughed, you were on your own when you go to the highway. So I don’t complain, I said, this is good! (laughter). After my husband died in 1979, I kept working in Cranbrook, and I had to get to work. In the morning it was dark, when I left it was dark when I got home. No matter what the weather was.”  Anna Morgeau: “You had to do what you had to do.”  Liz Gravelle: “The thing I remember too. Something come up, if someone wanted to put grazing or anything on the reserve, or do anything, the Chief would call a meeting and everybody would go, and we gotta decide what we’re gonna do. That way everybody had a say, so nobody complained (Anne: because everybody was there and sharing).”  Anna Morgeau: “I can say I’ve been to some meetings out here and I haven’t seen much community engagement. From the sounds of it, a lot of it has to do with, one, there hasn’t been any change, and two, members don’t feel like they’re being heard anyways.”  Liz Gravelle: “Well that’s what I say, you get your expectation, then you wait and nothing happens, turns into anger and all that. Three words can describe it.  My husband when he was Chief, that’s how he ran things. When something goes wrong; not one person made that decision, it was (Anna: collective, everyone agreed on that).”  Anna Morgeau: “What is this here? (lloking at a book with Liz’s interview).”  Liz Gravelle: “That’s stuff I said then, it’s all pretty much the same now.”  Anna Morgeau: “Oh so you did this thirty years ago. Is there any other information that you’d like to share with us?”  Liz Gravelle: “What else would you like to know? When I came to this reserve, I did a lot. I was the first Indian women chief, I got elected, it was all over the news. I ran for chief and I got it. Kathy and I…when he passed away…Jim was his name, they still had the agency in Cranbrook. They brought me a box with papers for the Reserve here. When I looked through them papers…they were getting paid for that. That box had letters that were never opened. I started opening them…I found this letter with grants to bands. The agent came, I asked what’s this all about? He said why don’t you go find out. So we went to Vancouver, that was when they were getting money to run your own band offices. We both applied for it; she opened up Columbia Lake band and bought a trailer. I got all the filing cabinets and desks and set it up. They came 243	  	  and spend one day with me, showed me how to file, everything. I never got called to explain something; we got cancelled cheques, I stapled the invoice and put it all in order. When I took my books in for audit, no problem.”  Anna Morgeau: “How long did you hold a position as Chief?”  Liz Gravelle: “Until I got asked to work with Larry on the language, cause he knew I could speak the language. And I could ask my mother for help on…work with the dictionary. We used to drive and go to all the reserves and meet with the people, especially the older ones. If three people agreed that one words was the same (three people from different reserves). I had a whole cassette full of tapes (Anna: so you’d listen to the recordings). Now I’ve got only 20 tapes left, someone would steal them. I was working with a linguist from Edmonton, Professor what’s his name, he moved to New York. He used to come on weekends and help me with the language. He told me in the letter that his wife had witnessed a murder so she was under witness protection. They were scared.”  Anna Morgeau: “By the time he as finished working with you he could write in Ktunaxa?”  Liz Gravelle: “That’s why I can’t see why people can’t learn. I got a letter last year from Shane (sanchez) he wrote in the bottom in Ktunaxa. The way he said and spelled it was perfect, as if I had done it.”  Anna Morgeau: “So it’s possible for people to be able to learn.”  Liz Gravelle: “Like Don, he didn’t always, but look at him.”  Anna Morgeau: “So are you doing a language workshop next week?”  Liz Gravelle: “No no; Paul from University (UBC) we were talking about it. They wanna use my living room; there’d be ten people for a meeting in my living room.”  Anna Morgeau: “You’re still pretty busy hey?”  Liz Gravelle: “Yea, I have more work at home. Wayen was sitting there the other day. You know, he works over there. We’re never gonna get the language right. There was people there at Columbia Lake, St. Mary’s, etc. They had their own way of saying things. (Dog interrupts). Because when we write words, it goes to them, they say oh this is wrong, cause they have different ways of saying it. So no one is agreeing. So it’s never gonna…”  Anna Morgeau: “How do you pronounce River Otter?”  Liz Gravelle: “A-kow-kaahs” (spelling?).  Anna Morgeau: “That’s my daughters name. I’ve been trying to remember it. White Grizzly Robe I think is Kale’s name, he got it from my grandpa but I need to find out how to say that too.”  244	  	   Liz Gravelle: “White Grizzly?” (Pronounces in Ktunaxa).  Anna Morgeau: “Is there anything else?”  Liz Gravelle: “I was supposed to have dinner with the Queen and I stood her up. She may be queen over there but I’m Elizabeth over here! That’s the time she came to Vancouver in January; I wasn’t gonna go there in January!”   Anna Morgeau: “Thank you for sharing with us!”  Liz Gravelle: “You’re welcome, I left off some steam!”  Anna Morgeau: “That’s fine, we’re definitely here to listen to you.”                    	      245	  	  TPIB Community Planning Engagement Pictures                                                                                    Fig.	  1.	  The	  landscape	  pictures	  showing	  bellow,	  and	  next	  page,	  were	  taken	  by	  the	  youth	  during	  the	  camera	  project.	  They	  were	  asked	  to	  photographs	  areas	  in	  their	  community	  that	  they	  care	  about.	  	  246	  	            247	  	       Fig. 2.The drawings bellow are from TPB youth during the youth envisioning  planning session, they were asked to envision how they see their community in the next 15 years.  	  248	  	                         	           Fig. 4. Open House Session: flipchart shows the definition of Community by TPB memebrs.  	  Fig. 3. Open House Session: flipchart shows the definition of Planning by TPB members during the community planning open house. 	  249	  	                   Fig. 4. TPB Community members draw teepee as a metaphor to be used as a cultural symbol to guide the community planning process. 	  Fig. 5. TPB Community members draw fire to symbolize the strength of their community during community planning activity.  250	  	        Fig. 6. Community Event Poster template used during the community plan process. 	  251	  	  	  Fig. 7. Clockwise: Youth drawing during envisioning session, Youth sharing meal during youth session, Community members during planning sessions, Youth during camera project.  	  252	  	  Fig. 8. Clockwise: Guest speaker presenting during planning session, TPB member drawing a metaphor  for the planning process, Anna  Morgeau and Stephen McGlenn facilitating planning  session ,  magician performing planning session, members during planning session.  253	  	  Fig.	  9.	  Clockwise:	  Youth	  during	  video	  workshop,	  youth	  taking	  a	  photo	  during	  camera	  project,	  Youth	  drawing	  during	  visioning	  session,	  	  youth	  during	  	  camera	  project,	  	  Anna	  Morgeau,	  Stephen	  McGlenn,	  and	  Wilson	  Mendes	  meeting	  	  strategizing	  planning	  session.	  	  254	  	   Fig.	  10.	  Clockwise:	  Stephen	  McGlenn	  &	  Wilson	  Mendes	  during	  open	  house	  session,	  Vickie Thomas speaking during planning session, Magician interacting with community members. 	  255

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