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Comprehensive community planning : learning from practice with the Haida Village of Skidegate Babalos, Krystie; Williams, Jessica Jul 31, 2013

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COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY PLANNING:  LEARNING FROM PRACTICE WITH THE HAIDA VILLAGE OF SKIDEGATE   by  KRYSTIE BABALOS  B.Sc., McGill University, 2007  AND JESSICA WILLIAMS B.A., Trent University, 2010  A PROJECT SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF  MASTER OF SCIENCE (PLANNING) and MASTER OF ARTS (PLANNING)  in  THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  School of Community and Regional Planning  We accept this project as conforming to the required standard   .....................................................  .....................................................   THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA July 2013 © Krystie Babalos, Jessica Williams & Haida Village of Skidegate, 2013    2 Acknowledgements  This learning experience would not have been possible without the partnership formed between the Haida Village of Skidegate and UBC’s School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP).  Thank you to the Chief Administrative Officer of the Skidegate Band Council, Barbara Stevens, for your leadership in initiating a partnership with SCARP. Thank you to the Skidegate Band Council: Duane Alsop, James Cowpar, Lyndale George, Remi Levesque, Godfrey Williams, Robert Williams and Billy Yovanovich, for supporting the development of a community-driven comprehensive community plan (CCP). We would like to acknowledge the Skidegate Band Council Administration, including Ruth Gladstone-Davies in Social Development, Sue Wood in Finance, Bonnie Jones in Band Membership, and Trent Moraes in the Housing Department.  Special thanks to Dana Moraes, CCP coordinator, Janine Williams, CCP assistant, and Ryan Barnes, CCP youth mentee, for sharing Haida ways of knowing and planning, connecting us with Elders and community members, and for welcoming us into your home. We would also like to acknowledge other members of the CCP team, including Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development (AANDC) mentor Jessie Hemphill and Marcia Piercey, Manager of Education with the Skidegate Band Council.  We are grateful to community members, knowledge holders and Elders who contributed stories, knowledge and ideas to the CCP. We would also like to acknowledge the following programs and organizations that contributed to this process:  • The Council of the Haida Nation • Gwaalagaa Naay Corporation • Haida Heritage Centre at Kaay’Llnagaay • Xaaynangaa Naay	  Health Centre • Sk’aadgaa Naay Elementary School • Skidegate Day Care • Skidegate Aboriginal Head Start • Skidegate Inlet Adult Day Program • Skidegate Haida Immersion Program  Thanks to Jeff Cook, Indigenous Community Planning (ICP) supervisor and instructor of courses 548T: Field Studio and 548C: Master’s Project, Leonie Sandercock, ICP Chair, and the Indigenous planning community at UBC for your leadership, support and encouragement. Thanks to the Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) for the financial support for student travel.          3 Executive Summary  Haida First Nations have lived on Haida Gwaii, “the Islands of the People” in Haida, since time immemorial and have been actively planning to preserve their language, culture, land and resources. In 2012, the Haida Village of Skidegate received funding from the British Columbia Capacity Initiative (BCCI) to create a Comprehensive Community Plan (CCP) as a road map to greater self-sufficiency and sustainability. They decided to establish a planning process led by and for their community with support from UBC’s School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP) Indigenous Community Planning Specialization. This Masters Project reports on the planning process, outcomes and learnings of SCARP practicum students Krystie Babalos and Jessa Williams that worked alongside the Haida Village of Skidegate.  SCARP’s Indigenous Community Planning specialization promotes partnerships that support Indigenous communities to achieve their own aspirations for sustainable development. The planning practicum is a requirement within the specialization and provides students with the opportunity to gain practical experience planning alongside a First Nation. This report is a marked component of our Masters Project and is a model of how community planning can come together in rich ways, showcasing our approach and reflections as emerging planners and practicum students.   Our overall approach and methodology was one of collaborative planning, where we formed a partnership with the local Haida planning team based on mutual respect, understanding and responsibility. In the past, under the Indian Act and federally mandated planning on Indigenous reserves in Canada, Indigenous community members have generally not been recognized or engaged as active planning leaders in their own planning processes. In this context of collaborative planning, however, it was important that the local Haida team lead the planning process and work with us to create a CCP that is community based, community driven and part of a community owned process.  This partnership was guided by a Mutual Learning Agreement that outlined our mutual vision, objectives, principles, ethics, communication and work plan. A CCP team was formed in January with leadership from Skidegate’s Chief Administrative Officer Barbara Stevens, and included CCP coordinator Dana Moraes, CCP assistant Janine Williams, CCP youth mentee, Ryan Barnes, and SCARP students Krystie Babalos and Jessa Williams, each with our own roles. Our role as planning practicum students’ was to collaboratively plan with the local CCP team by learning from, supporting and contributing to the CCP process design and implementation. Together, our team co-created a six-month planning process with four phases of planning: Preparing to Plan, Planning in Action, Developing a “Living Plan” and Celebrating the CCP and Partnership. Within each phase, we collaborated on a number of tools, techniques and resources with the local planning team.   The Haida Village of Skidegate’s CCP process had many strengths; it was community based, culturally appropriate and two-way capacity driven, with the plan having the goal of enabling sustainable development. It did face the challenge of being constrained in time and resources by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s (AANDC) British Columbia Capacity Initiative (BBCI)’s funding cycle. Nevertheless, the CCP team continues to plan beyond this funding cycle. They are extending the CCP into the next phases of planning so as to gather all relevant information, plan in action, document a living plan with clear priorities and an action plan, establish a monitoring and evaluation system and celebrate as a community.    4 Future practicum students and communities who hope to complete a partnership together should consider the practice of collaborative planning and the importance of developing relationships of respect, cross-cultural awareness, clear communication, mutual responsibility and co-learning, while respecting the pace, rhythm and culture of the community.                                5 Table of Contents  1. Introduction 1.1  The Haida Village of Skidegate…………………………………………………………..6 1.2  UBC SCARP………………………………………………………………………...……7 1.3  The Practicum Partnership…………………………………………………..…….……...8 1.4  Purpose………………………………………………………………………..…….…….8  2. Approach & Methodology  2.1 Forming The Student-Community Partnership.....…….………….………………………9 2.2 Supporting Community Planning Needs…………..…….………………………………10 2.3 Comprehensive Community Planning Process………………………………………….11  3. Planning Actions 3.1 Preparing To Plan…………..……………………………………………………………13 3.2 Planning In Action & A Community Driven Process…………..…………………….…14 3.3 Developing A Living Community Plan…………..……………………………………..17 3.4 Celebrating The Plan & Partnership…………..…………………………………………18  4. Outcomes…….……………..………………………………………………………………….19  5. Community Planning Next Steps..……...……..……………………………………………….20  6. Closing Reflections 6.1 Community Planning Context……………..………………………………………….…21 6.2 Student Context………………………………………………………………………….22 6.3 Principles For Future Practicum Partnerships…………………………………………...24  7. References……………………………………………………………………………………...26  8. Appendix 8.1 Learning Agreement……………………………………………………………………..27 8.2 Student Workplan………………………………………………………………………..31 8.3 2005-2012 Community Plan Summary………………………………………………….33 8.4 Planning Inventory………………………………………………………………………46 8.5 Facilitation Toolkit………………………………………………………………………57 8.6 Community Factbook……………………………………………………………………74 8.7 Participation Plan…………………………………………………………………..……88 8.8 Gud Ga Is (CCP) Summary Booklet…………………………………………………….89 8.9 Gud Ga Is (CCP) Draft and Graphics…………………………………….……………..96            6 1. Introduction  In October 2012, UBC’s School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP) began developing the idea of a learning partnership with the Haida Village of Skidegate to develop a Comprehensive Community Plan (CCP). CCP is “a holistic process that enables a community to build a roadmap to sustainability, self-sufficiency and improved governance capacity” (INAC et al. 2006). CCP is a planning process steered by the community and uniquely adapted to their culture and traditions (ibid). This approach to planning is a tool used by Indigenous communities to identify existing challenges and opportunities, and to establish visions, values, principles and actions for the future.  The Haida Village of Skidegate has been actively planning to preserve their language and culture, build better governance, improve community health, wellness and infrastructure, manage resources sustainably, and enhance local economic development. In 1997 and 2004, the Skidegate Band Council and administration completed two plans, a physical land use plan and comprehensive community development plan, with support from consultants David Nairn and Associates (DNA). In 2012, they received funding from the British Columbia Capacity Initiative (BCCI) to review and update their CCP. This time, they decided to establish a planning process led by and for their community with support from SCARP’s planning practicum program. The practicum program is a requirement within SCARP’s Indigenous Community Planning Specialization, providing students Krystie Babalos and Jessa Williams with the opportunity to gain practical experience working alongside the Haida Village of Skidegate on their community plan.  1.1 The Haida Village Of Skidegate  The Haida First Nation has lived on Haida Gwaii, meaning “Islands of the People” in Haida, since time immemorial. Haida Gwaii is an archipelago of over 150 islands located in the Pacific Northwest, between 50-130 kilometers off the coast of mainland British Columbia. The Haida Village of Skidegate, meaning “child of red chiton” in Haida, sits in Rooney Bay on Graham Island. It became a center of Haida culture after drawing descendants from traditional villages displaced by colonization and diseases introduced by settler society. Today the village consists of descendants from most traditional southern villages, each members of clans with their own chiefs, crests, stories and histories (Moraes 2013). The Skidegate Band Council (SBC) plays a role in governing the community and providing policies and programs in the areas of culture, capital, education, membership, health, social assistance and socio-economic development. Eleven reserves of land are associated with the community, with 736 registered band members living on reserve and 847 living off reserve (Jones 2013).   The Haida Village of Skidegate has many assets. It has a Xaaynangaa Naay	   Health Centre, a water treatment plant, garbage and sewage treatment plant, an Elders’ centre tied to the Skidegate Haida Immersion Program (SHIP), a Nursery, Sk’aadgaa Naay Elementary School and community garden. Skidegate residents have also revived their Haida language and customs surrounding food gathering, potlatching, ceremony, songs and dance (Moraes 2013). Hereditary Chiefs and matriarchal family clans also continue to govern the community alongside the Skidegate Band Council and Council of Haida Nation, a council that unites Haida people under one political entity and protects and asserts their rights.     7           Many challenges also exist in the Haida Village of Skidegate, many of which are a direct result of the negative effects of colonialism, such as residential school. Of the 736 band members living on reserve, most if not all speak English with only 19 people fluent in Haida, 5 people comfortable speaking or understanding Haida, and 5 people in the process of learning Haida (Moraes 2012). Xaaynangaa Naay Health Center used the Community Wellbeing Index (CWB) in 2001 to measure the community’s overall wellbeing in terms of income, education, labor force activity, and housing conditions. The Haida Village of Skidegate has a CWB score of 78, higher than other BC First Nations with an average score of 70 and lower than non-First Nation BC communities with an average score of 85 (Xaaynangaa Naay Health Center 2007). Drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, sexual abuse and suicide are some of the major challenges in the community. Commercial fishing and logging, once the main sources of employment, are also being replaced by smaller industries of ecotourism and cultural-related work.  1.2 UBC SCARP  SCARP’s Indigenous Community Planning specialization is designed to attract Indigenous and non-Indigenous students who want to work with Indigenous communities. The specialization promotes partnerships that support Indigenous communities to achieve their own aspirations for sustainable development. The Planning Practicum is a requirement within the specialization and provides students with the opportunity to gain practical experience planning alongside a First Nation. The practicum is based on two components: (1) A Field Studio, graded according to a Learning Agreement (see Appendix 8.1) and Work Plan (see Appendix 8.2) established with a First Nation, a planning journal and a final reflection paper, and; (2) A Masters Project, graded according to class participation, community contributions and presentations.    Image 1. Map of Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands) Image 2. Map of the Haida Village of Skidegate   8 1.3 The Practicum Partnership  From October 2012 to May 2013, the Haida Village of Skidegate partnered with UBC’s SCARP to develop a comprehensive community plan (CCP). The partnership was officially formed by the Skidegate Band Council in December 2012 after receiving funding from the British Columbia Capacity Initiative to renew their community plan. The partnership was premised on a local planning team, CCP coordinator Dana Moraes and CCP assistant Janine Williams, leading the process while collaboratively planning with two practicum students, Jessa Williams and Krystie Babalos, to develop a community-based, culturally appropriate, two-way capacity driven plan with the goal of being sustainable. The overall approach and methodology was one of collaborative planning, where the partnership formed was based on mutual respect, understanding and responsibility.   1.4 Purpose  This Masters Project is a model of how community planning can come together in rich ways, showcasing our approach and reflections as emerging planners and practicum students. The purpose of this Masters Project report is to share our understanding of collaborative planning in the context of the Haida Village of Skidegate’s Comprehensive Community Plan (CCP) and to examine the planning approach, protocols, cultural learnings and quality and quantity of our contributions to the CCP. This is by no means a comprehensive treatment of the CCP process, as it is still ongoing and the working relationship continues. Nevertheless, this Masters Project report does aim to provide some critical insights and reflections upon collaborative planning in action with a First Nation in British Columbia.                  9 2. Approach & Methodology   2.1 Forming The Student-Community Partnership   The student-community relationship was formed during our first visit to the Haida Village of Skidegate in December 2012. There, we were introduced to Barbara Stevens, Chief Administrative Officer, Marcia Piercey, Manager of Education, the Skidegate Band Council and Haida Elders. Based on initial conversations about the vision, goals, objectives, principles and ethics of the relationship, we drafted a Mutual Learning Agreement (see Appendix 8.1) to formalize the collaborative nature of our partnership. We also supported the creation of a CCP team and community advisory committee. During our second visit in January 2013, we met and began to form a relationship with the newly hired CCP team CCP coordinator Dana Moraes and CCP assistant Janine Williams. In February 2013 the Mutual Learning Agreement was signed.  The vision of our Learning Agreement and student-community relationship was to work together with the Haida Village of Skidegate to develop a community-driven plan which would contribute to the health, vitality and planning capacity of Skidegate, as well as to our own planning knowledge and capacity. The Learning Agreement also highlighted our mutual objectives, principles, workplan and guidelines for communication, feedback and evaluation.  The learning objectives of our relationship, as outlined in the Learning Agreement, were: to develop working relationships of trust, mutual understanding and learning; to promote an open, inclusive and collaborative process to complete the CCP; to learn and include Haida culture, knowledge, language, planning protocols and traditions in the process, and; to increase our planning knowledge, capacity and skills in order to work with First Nations.  We also established principles to honor each other as guiding ethics for our student-community relationship. One of our core principles was that the partnership would be based on respect for the Haida culture, knowledge, customs and preferences, and that Haida practices would be utilized in the planning process whenever possible. Another core principle was that we would work with the local CCP team to build a spirit of cooperation, collaboration and trust through cross-cultural understanding, mutual listening, honest communication and regular feedback.  In terms of feedback and evaluation, our Learning Agreement indicated written or oral feedback would be provided to us by the local CCP team once a month. Most often this feedback was provided during debrief sessions after events or meetings, and during conference calls. The Learning Agreement also outlined that we would provide reflections, feedback and updates to the local team during each visit or by email once a month. Most often this feedback was provided by email, during conference calls, in meetings, or while planning in action.          10 2.2 Supporting Community Planning Needs   From December 2012 to May 2013, we collaborated with the Haida Village of Skidegate’s CCP team to develop their vision of a community-driven CCP. The CCP planning team consisted of Barbara Stevens, the Skidegate Band Council Chief Administrative Officer, who provided leadership, guidance and budgetary allowances to Dana Moraes, CCP Coordinator, Janine Williams, CCP Assistant, a community advisory committee consisting of 10 community members. Dana Moraes was working closely throughout this process with Jessie Hemphill, an Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) CCP mentor. As practicum students, we were also part of the extended CCP team and received regular guidance and feedback from our Indigenous planning instructor and supervisor, Jeff Cook.   The roles and responsibilities of our planning team were as follows.  Barbara Stevens, Dana Moraes and Janine Williams were responsible for:   • Leading the design and implementation of the CCP process; • Mentoring and working collaboratively with us by offering learning opportunities to challenge and support our professional development and understanding of Haida culture, and; • Working collaboratively with Jessie Hemphill to access CCP resources and tools • Communicating with the Skidegate Band Council, staff and community about the CCP.  We traveled to Skidegate five times, for one-week each month, and were responsible for:  • Working collaboratively with Dana Moraes and Janine Williams to design and implement the CCP process, and to co-plan future phases of planning;  • Working with our supervisor Jeff Cook, who travelled to Skidegate three times; • Taking initiative on planning activities that Dana Moraes needed support with; • Communicating regularly, openly and honestly about planning activities and issues, and; • Engaging with the community and getting involved in community planning events.                      11 2.3 Comprehensive Community Planning Process  We worked collaboratively with the local CCP team to design and implement four-phases of the Haida Village of Skidegate’s CCP. The process was as follows:   Phase 1: Preparing to Plan: Relationship Building, Form Planning Team, CCP  Launch, Building Planning Capacity and Tools, Planning to Plan and  Conducting Baseline Research   Phase 2: Planning in Action: Developing a Community-Driven Plan, Planning  Tools,  Questionnaires, Participation Plan and Media Tools, Community  Engagement, Information Gathering and Analysis   Phase 3: Creating a “Living Plan”: Identifying Community Vision, Values,  Principles, Issues and Assets and Action Ideas, Recording and  Documenting  Information in a CCP  Plan and Communicating the Plan to the Broader  Community and Skidegate Band Council   Phase 4: Celebrating the CCP and Partnership: Feasting with Community and  Skidegate Band Council  During Phase 1 “Preparing to Plan,” we met with the Skidegate Band Council and Administration, Haida Elders and broader community groups to discuss and assess the nature of the CCP. At an Open House, over 100 community members were also surveyed to uncover their preferred approaches to planning and communicating the CCP. Overall, the community envisioned a community based, community driven and community owned CCP process.  We thus worked with Barbara Stevens and Jessie Hemphill to hire a local CCP coordinator, CCP assistant and a volunteer-based community advisory committee to guide the process. Once the local team was hired, we worked closely with them to design a community-based CCP, visually mapped out on a calendar for January – May 2013 and accompanied by a Participation Plan (see Appendix 8.7). The overall goals of this Participation Plan were to include Haida-based approaches to honoring the culture and voices of the community; empowering the community to have ownership over the CCP; and collaborating with government and community groups to take responsibility for the CCP. Based on these goals, the CCP team designed and implemented the following steps to community engagement:    Figure 1. ‘Salmon Cycle’ CCP path diagram. The image was created by Robert Volgstad and the graphics were developed by the CCP team (see Appendix 8.9). The CCP phases are as follows and extend beyond our practicum partnership: (1) Phase 1 – Spawning and Preparing to Plan, (2) Phase 2 – Hatching, Discovering and Planning in Action (3) Phase 3 – Journey to the Ocean and Creating a Living Plan, (4) Phase 4 – Swimming the Ocean and Taking Action and (5) Phase 5 – Returning Home, Monitoring, Evaluation and Celebration.    Our Planning Path  1 Phase 1 – Spawning, Getting Ready Form team and community advisory committee, introduce our plan and prepare community-based approach to planni g 2 Phase 2 - Hatching, Discovery, Community Engagement and Communication Develop planning tools, participation plan and training for workshops, launch CCP, develop questionnaires and media tools, host meetings, workshops and interviews, a d e sure culturally responsive approaches to engagement and communication  3 Phase 3 - Journey to the Ocean, Vision, Values and Principles Identify community’s vision, guiding principles, values, and action ideas. Analyze community information and data. Document process and plan and report back to the community.   4 Phase 4 - Swimming the Ocean, Action Develop implementation strategy that describes how to move ideas to action, including prioritizing values that require immediate actions, medium and long term actions, phasing actions, creating budgets and assessing capacity needs and partnerships.  5 Phase 5 – Returning Home, Results, Reflection, and Celebration  Watch and look at our results, adjust our plan, celebrate successes and share wisdom on challenges and begin our new planning cycles.   12 1. Develop A Community-Based Approach To Planning • Collect information at the Open House on how best to honor the voices in the community  • Create a community advisory committee to co-design the CCP • Identify community members and groups with a stake in the CCP • Identify the best engagement approaches for each community group • Set planning timeline and milestones • Collect preliminary information on the community’s hopes, fears, strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities  2. Engage the Community  • Communicate the CCP purpose, process and event dates/times to on and off-reserve members via posters, social media, newsflashes and at events • Facilitate planning meetings, workshops, interviews, feasts, celebrations and other activities • Where possible, translate events/materials in Haida  • Invite the community to weekly community hall gatherings to consult on the CCP • Work with the advisory committee and organizations to host group-specific workshops, round tables, meetings, feasts and interactive small group discussions • Value the community’s time and insight by following protocols and customs, “meeting people where they already are,” listening, and reporting back contributions • Use a variety of participation activities   3. Document Process and Voices  • Identify community’s past and present state, and vision, values, objectives, principles, issues and assets, and action ideas for the future • Record, document and report back all community input shared • Oral testimonies, stories, and songs recorded by audio and videotaping events, interviews, and note taking. Written information collected by surveys, drawing paper, Facebook messages, letters and e-mails, comment box submissions, photography and other mediums • Code and analyze data   4. Reflect and Celebrate the Process • Determine the milestones in the CCP process to evaluate  • Celebrate milestones completed  • Seek ongoing feedback from the community                13 3. Planning Actions  This section outlines in detail the specific actions we took in collaboration with the local CCP team within each phase of planning.  3.1 Preparing To Plan  During our first visit to the Haida Village of Skidegate, we began to develop relationships of trust with the Skidegate Band Council, Hereditary Chiefs, Matriarchs, Elders and broader community members in order to better understand their unique history, culture, language and social circumstances. Ensuring a community-driven CCP also entails the inclusion of Haida worldviews, beliefs, and customs in the process and final plan. Therefore, we spent time getting to know our community partners and the felt impacts of colonization to their socio-ecological systems. This was an important step in fostering our awareness of, sensitivity to and competence in planning with the Haida Village of Skidegate and we did so by participating in community meetings, gatherings and informal meals. We attended the Council of the Haida Nation swearing in ceremony, the Elder’s holiday dinner, and shared a meal with Elders at the Skidegate Haida Immersion Program.  Under the leadership of the Chief Administrative Officer Barbara Stevens, we also helped launch and introduce the CCP to the community at the Haida Village of Skidegate’s annual winter Open House. There we hosted a CCP booth, delivered a CCP survey and engaged with band council departments, community organizations, and community members. We assessed the nature of the CCP and our partnership by formally meeting with the Skidegate Band Council and Chief Administrative Officer Barbara Stevens. Based on these conversations, we co-developed a Learning Agreement (see Appendix 8.1) and preliminary work plan to formalize the collaborative nature of our partnership and to guide the CCP process, as well as our contributions and actions.  An important component of our first trip to the Haida Village of Skidegate was helping to form a local CCP team and community-based CCP process. We discovered the need for a local CCP coordinator and community group to guide the CCP process rather than us. Thus we worked with Barbara Stevens and Jessie Hemphill to recruit a CCP coordinator, assistant and community advisory committee by writing and posting job descriptions in a local newspaper. The CCP coordinator and assistant were hired by the Skidegate Band Council in January 2013.  During our second visit, we engaged in two-way capacity building with the newly hired local CCP team. We informally assessed the team’s planning capacities and skills, learned Haida-based approaches to planning and mutually shared planning resources, tools and ideas. For instance, the local CCP team requested resources on participatory approaches to planning so we developed a Facilitation Toolkit (see Appendix 8.5) to support them in implementing their community engagement process. We also collaboratively worked with the local CCP team to design the CCP Image 3. Skidegate Open House in December 2012.  Photograph taken by Krystie Babalos.   14 process, with all of its phases, on a visual calendar and in a meta work plan, allowing for changes based on community and advisory committee input and feedback. We also spent time defining the CCP area as encompassing not only the 11 reserves of land associated with the Skidegate Band Council, but also the broader traditional territories associated with the Haida Village of Skidegate. Throughout this time, we continued to build relationships and learn about the community through meetings at the Skidegate Inlet Adult Day Program, Xaaynangaa Naay Health Centre, Skidegate Aboriginal Head Start, Skidegate Daycare, Skidegate Haida Immersion Program and the Haida Heritage Centre at Kaay’Llnagaay.   Once a meta-workplan had been formed, we began to conduct background research and to develop planning tools. To start, we summarized the Haida Village of Skidegate’s previous Comprehensive Community Development Plan (CCDP) in an accessible booklet (see Appendix 8.3), and evaluated its success by conducting one-on-one interviews with the Chief Administrative Officer, band councilors, and program staff from the Housing Department, Social Development Department, Xaaynangaa Naay	   Health Centre, Gwaalagaa Naay Corporation and Skidgeate Haida Immersion Program. We developed an inventory of the Haida Village of Skidegate’s past and present community plans to provide the local CCP team with a list of plans to integrate into the CCP (see Appendix 8.4). We did so by requesting relevant plans, policies and strategies from Skidegate Band Council departments and community organizations. These requests were made in person in January and February 2013, as well as by email. Collecting past plans was a challenge, as most staff were unable to locate digital copies or were inaccessible by email. Another tool we developed was a Community Factbook (see Appendix 8.6) that compiled existing quick facts about the Haida Village of Skidegate to accompany the value-based information gathered from the CCP community engagement process. This Factbook is also meant to support the local CCP team in conducting a baseline assessment of their community and to better inform strategic decision-making.   3.2 Planning In Action   In this phase, we worked with the local CCP team to lead a community engagement process with the goal of engaging all community members living on and off reserve in the CCP. The first planning action we undertook was to co-create a Participation Plan (see Appendix 8.7). Our participation planning session and plan involved identifying key stakeholders to be engaged and how best to engage them in the process. We reviewed a range of possible engagement methods to engage and elicit community members to articulate issues of concern and to share local knowledge in planning for the future. The final approaches we adopted to elicit qualitative data on Haida values involved weekly community hall meetings, weekly community advisory committee meetings, and workshops, dinners and interviews with specific groups and individuals such as Elders at the Skidegate Haida Immersion Program, children at the Sk’aadgaa Naay Elementary School, youth at the Youth Centre, families at the Xaaynangaa Naay Health Centre, and mothers and babies at the Skidegate Aboriginal Head Start program. This choice of methods was Image 4. CCP Youth Workshop in February 2013. Photograph taken by CCP team.   15 based on the preferences of the community as well as pragmatic considerations of available time and resources. The focus of the CCP engagement process was on facilitating activities that would identify the community’s baseline state, and vision, values, objectives, principles and action ideas for the future. Photographs and notes were also taken at each event to record and clarify areas and items of importance.  This phase involved over 25 community gatherings, workshops and interviews, drawing anywhere between 1 and 200+ people, with a total of 244 community members engaged in the process, 100 of which were under the age of 18. We supported the CCP team in preparing for and facilitating some of these community engagement sessions. Our activities varied from creating agendas for meetings and gathering resources to co-facilitating 8 gatherings and recording events. Following the meetings, our team would give each other feedback, share our learnings and record meeting notes and community insights.   Throughout this phase, the community gatherings were conducted in culturally appropriate ways; respecting the pace of the community, and incorporating Elder-led prayers, feasting, storytelling, singing, and table discussions organized around clans and families. The meetings incorporated the community’s preference for planning in action, inviting participants to not only discuss issues, assets, values and principles, but also pragmatic catalysts for change. Community participants were vocal in their preference for community hall gatherings and feasting over formal CCP workshops because of its inclusiveness, scope and ways in which sensitive information could be managed around table discussions with families and clans. Participants also valued the opportunity to talk about their values and needs, having felt neglected by previous comprehensive planning processes. This phase of planning is not yet complete as the local CCP team wishes to reach out to the other 492 members living on reserve and 847 members living off reserve.  Quantitative information on the community’s baseline state, as well as plans for the future was gathered through 17 themed questionnaires. While the local CCP team developed the questionnaires, we contributed to the framework for data organization and analysis. This involved helping the local team to set up a FluidSurveys system, hire a local youth mentee Ryan Barnes to input data, identify and classify sources of information as either internal CCP data or external support data and set up a coding system. Internal data was collected at CCP meetings, workshops and interviews from the questionnaires and facilitated activities. External support data included plans, policies, strategies and reports gathered at workshops and meetings with government departments and community organizations. Given the short timeframe for data analysis, the local CCP team prioritized analyzing the internal CCP data first, while using external data as support documents. A data coding system was then co-created by Dana Moraes and Jessa Williams, specific to the internal data collected.   Results from the qualitative and quantitative data collected are in the process of being written up as a CCP (see Appendix 8.9). Results from the preliminary investigation were presented to the Skidegate Band Council by Dana Moraes to inform them of the community’s general objectives, principles and requirements for future development in the value areas of governance, food security, community, healing, education, land, language and culture, and economy. Please see ‘the CCP Values’ table below for example objectives and preliminary action ideas identified for each of the value areas at the time of writing:        16 Figure 2. Preliminary CCP findings Value Sub-Value Objectives Action Idea Haida Language and Culture 1. Haida Language 2. Culture 3. Spirituality 4. The Way Things Were 1. Restore, revitalize and preserve the Haida language and culture of our ancestors 2. Support success of Haida Gwaii Heritage Center 3. Maintain community connection to the land, ocean, sky and supernatural 4. Maintain traditional laws and protocol 1. Secure multi-year funding for Skidegate Haida Language Immersion Program and establish a language committee 2. Create tourism strategy, beginning with encouraging cultural events, and offering training courses that teach traditional values and skills, etc. 3. Create educational and mentorship opportunities for young people to learn supernatural stories and create a connection with the creator and mother earth 4. Promote, incentivize and organize traditional food gathering, hunting and feasting events and activities Healing 1. Healing 2. Traditional Medicine 1. Maintain current health care systems and promote holistic models of healing (body, mind, heart, spirit) 2. Maintain the teachings of traditional medicine 1.  Support local health service organizations and health hub to maintain funding sources. Promote participation in and actions of the community wellness committee, etc. 2.  Develop promotional and educational materials and programs that teach our young people lessons from Sgaaga and traditional medicine Community 1. Family 2. Elders 3. Youth 4. Safety and Security 5. Gathering Together  1. Promote family values and interconnectedness 2. Ensure all Elders (65 years +) are looked after 3. Meet the needs of youth in terms of healing, education, recreation and employment 4. Be prepared for emergencies 5. Promote and support existing ways community members support each other when in need 1. Develop a strategy to increase family time and activities 2. Increase homecare for Elders 3. Provide post-secondary education opportunities, community-based mentorship and job-skills training, etc. 4. Develop emergency preparedness plan and an active emergency preparedness committee 5. Promote, incentivize and organize annual family/clan dinners Education 1. Education 2. Life Long Learning  1. Promote learning as a life long journey, in and out of school 1. Develop education strategy, starting with more “on-island” education programs  Food Security 1. Traditional Food Gathering 2. Gardening 3. Local Markets 4. Ocean   1. Promote the value of gathering, preserving traditional food, and sustainable practices 2. Promote the value of gardening and composting 3. Promote locally grown and harvested food 4. Protect the quality of the ocean and Haida ways of life connected to the ocean 1. Promote and organize opportunities for Elders to share traditional knowledge of food gathering 2. Organize in-school gardening and composting program  3. Organize markets/fairs for local fish, processed fish, vegetables, etc. 4. Protect and sustain salmon runs Land 1. Land Development 2. Housing 3. Energy 4. Recreation 5. Island Protection  1. Promote sustainable land development practices 2. Design and develop affordable housing for all 3. Improve community’s energy self-reliance 4. Create new recreation opportunities for all ages 5. Protect land from tsunami debris, over-logging, commercial fishing and Enbridge pipeline 1. Explore opportunities to develop a mini-village complex 2. Explore housing strategy, starting with larger housing designed according to traditional living with extended family 3. Promote and incentivize alternative energy options for community members 4. Create a recreation strategy that will explore feasibility of outdoor activities, recreation programs and adult role models 5. Support existing efforts and activities of the Haida Gwaii Watchmen Economy 1. Economy 2. Business Development 3. Employment  1. Regain and promote economic control over our lives and resources 2. Promote and support local and home-based businesses 3. Support existing Social Development Programs 1. Research the feasibility of new businesses and create a human resource bank to link employers with employees 2. Support Gwaalagaa Naay Corporation in generating revenue from community development projects  3. Support Skidegate Social Development program, including financial assistance and life skills training Governance 1. Communication  1. Advance the management, communication and leadership of the Skidegate Band Council  1. Organize monthly meetings to increase transparency on finances, and to be accountable for portfolios and to review reports   17 3.3 Developing A Living Community Plan  The fourth phase aimed to create a “living” community plan, entitled Gud Ga Is Kuuniisii Gan Yahguudang KunGasda Tll llgihl, meaning “being together to talk, honoring the past and shaping our future” in Haida. For the Haida Village of Skidegate, a “living” plan entails a user-friendly document to commemorate the community based and driven nature of the plan, and to inspire a community owned implementation process that can be observed, revised and celebrated. The core planning action we were involved in was co-creating a framework for organizing, documenting and communicating the CCP. The Gud Ga Is framework was developed by Dana Moraes with our support over several community visits. Jessa Williams supported Dana in developing an initial framework that identified eight values the community would like to base all planning actions on: governance, land, economy, language and culture, education, healing, food security and community. It was also identified that within each value, guiding principles, issues, assets, resources and preliminary action ideas would be highlighted.  The Gud Ga Is framework was further refined by Dana Moraes and Krystie Babalos when the CCP was organized into a Summary Booklet (see Appendix 8.8) to update community members and funders alike on the progress of the CCP. Dana Moraes, with support from Krystie Babalos, developed the CCP Summary Booklet and added a temporal element, including a summary of the community’s past and present state and vision for the future, organized around the eight core values and underlying principles, information and action ideas.  During the final community visit, we both supported Dana Moraes in drafting the final CCP by providing feedback and ideas, and collaborating on visual graphics, such as a historical timeline, influence diagram, ‘salmon cycle’ planning path diagram, governance circle, and Skidegate Band Council organizational chart. The final CCP entitled Gud Ga Is (see Appendix 8.9) is still incomplete and a draft in progress. When finalized, the CCP will consist of a description of the community’s history and present state, and vision, principles, values, objectives and action ideas for the future. The plan does not include a systematic analysis of the challenges and opportunities (baseline analysis), nor does it articulate specific policy directions and bylaws. Instead it will be a visionary document that lays out the community’s core values organized around eight thematic ‘value’ headings, with underlying objectives, information and action ideas. The hope for the CCP is that it can be used as a summary tool to guide the completion of the CCP in the next phases of planning. The hope is also that Chief, Band Council, staff, community members and allies will be able to use the document as a source of guidance and inspiration for development projects, knowing that what has been identified in the CCP is supported by a broad cross-section of the community.   During this phase of planning our CCP team also participated in a CCP ‘next steps’ strategy session with Jeff Cook, where Jeff shared insights about structuring, organizing and sequencing a CCP framework to integrate results from the community in a coherent way. During this session, we collaborated with Dana on the next steps of planning, including sustaining the CCP team and community advisory committee, engaging all community members, continuing to collect and Image 5. CCP Summary Booklet.   18 analyze facts and values, and developing an implementation strategy. The action priorities that will support the vision, principles and values identified in the implementation strategy will be determined in the next phases of planning.  3.4 Celebrating the Plan and Partnership  The fourth phase focused on celebrating the planning process and partnership. Our CCP team planned and hosted a celebratory feast with ~30 community members. During the event, Dana updated the community on the progress of the CCP by sharing the CCP summary booklet and draft Gud Ga Is. Our student-community partnership was celebrated once again at our final presentation to the Skidegate Band Council and Administration where we shared our learnings and reflections on the CCP process and outcomes.  We presented once again alongside the local CCP team to the UBC SCARP community in May 2013. The purpose of this presentation was to share the story of our student-community partnership and the lessons learned that inform other Indigenous community planning partnerships. The event was hosted by UBC SCARP on the traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Musqueam Elder Larry Grant opened the ceremony with a prayer. This was followed by a welcome speech by Indigenous Community Planning Chair Leonie Sandercock and instructor Jeff Cook. Our presentation was opened by Barbara Stevens and Dana Moraes when they shared a Haida prayer and Peace song. We then co-presented on the collaborative nature and scope of our partnership, the outcomes of the CCP process, and our learning reflections.             Image 6. Presentation to UBC SCARP Community in May 2013. From left to right: Jessa Williams, Krystie Babalos, Dana Moraes, Kynan Moraes and Barbara Stevens. Photograph taken by Jessie Hemphill.   19 4. Outcomes   The nature and scope of our contributions to Skidegate’s CCP process are as summarized:  Figure 3. Outcomes of our student-community planning experience  Timeline Planning Phases Activities Contributions 2012 Dec-Jan Phase 1: Preparing to Plan  • Meet with Skidegate Band Council • Meet with Elders at Skidegate Haida Immersion Program • Meet with Skidegate Band Council Chief Administrative Officer, CCP staff and AANDC mentor   • Form CCP planning team • Meet with broader community  • Launch CCP at Open House: organize, prepare and deliver survey, and station CCP booth  • 4 meetings notes  • Learning Agreement • 2 Job Postings: CCP coordinator and community advisory committee • Photo documentation of Open House             • 1 Open House Survey • Open House Raffle notes  • Work Plan 2013 Feb-April Phase 2: Planning In Action  • Phone conferences with CCP team • Meet CCP coordinator and assistant and co-develop CCP process  • Assess CCP team capacity and needs  • Gather planning history and outcomes of past plans, interview staff • Build relationships with community members, programs and groups  • Support Dana and Janine to implement community engagement and questionnaires • 5 notes from CCP team phone conferences • Meta Workplan • Participation Plan • Facilitation Toolkit • 7 staff interviews • 2005 CCDP Summary • Planning Inventory • Community Factbook • Co-plan and facilitate 7 community gatherings, and workshops • Help gather 17 questionnaires and community meeting notes • Data coding system 2013 April-May Phase 3: Develop A “Living Plan”  • Analyze community data  • Develop Gud Ga Is (CCP) framework • Write Gud Ga Is Summary for community and AANDC • Contribute to complete Gud Ga Is  • Develop implementation framework • Code 17 sets of data from questionnaires • Gud Ga Is (CCP) Summary • Partial Gud Ga Is (CCP) • 1 meeting and notes on Implementation Strategy • CCP visuals: Organizational chart, Governance diagram, Influence diagram, Historical timeline and Planning “salmon cycle” process  2013 April-May  Phase 4: Celebrate  • Present CCP contributions and reflections to Council, staff and CCP team • Present drafts of Gud Ga Is (CCP) to community at celebratory community feast • 1 Powerpoint presentation • 1 community feast    20 5. Community Planning Next Steps  Following a CCP ‘next steps’ strategy session, the local planning team is considering the following steps to complete and implement the CCP:  Complete Gud Ga Is (the CCP) • Finalize meta vision statement • Organize and list 10-15 guiding principles • Create high level objective statements for eight value areas • Organize preliminary action ideas under value areas  Keep the CCP Alive • Sustain CCP team and community advisory committee • Continue community engagement by reaching out to all band members living on and off reserve • Continue to collect, organize and analyze community information and facts through diverse community engagement methods • Finalize community baseline situation assessment through a community census  Action Plan • Rank action ideas against vision, principles, values and other criteria appropriate to the community (i.e. costs, capacity, time, customs, etc.) • Prioritize actions according to whether they require immediate, medium or long term implementation strategies • Develop an implementation strategy with (1) work plans that sequence and phase projects, and outline key actors, resource requirements and targets, (2) a communication plan, and (3) a framework for monitoring and evaluation   Monitor and Evaluate • Track and report CCP results based on vision, principles and values. Ensure the community is getting what they wanted • Communicate and disseminate planning accomplishments and results to Band Council, Administration and community • Identify process to adjust or revise CCP based on lessons learned • Create annual celebration for successes           21 6. Closing Reflections   6.1 Community Planning Context   The Haida Village of Skidegate’s CCP process had many strengths; it was community based, culturally appropriate, and two-way capacity driven, with the plan having the underlying goal of creating sustainable development.   The local CCP team led the planning process with our support, as well as that of Jessie Hemphill, the AANDC CCP Mentor. The CCP planning process consists of a number of phases, including preparing to plan (assessing organizational capacities, planning the CCP process, and conducting baseline assessments), planning in action (engaging the community, identifying key issues and assets, reframing and prioritizing community values and setting objectives), documenting the plan, implementation, and evaluating and monitoring the plan. The Skidegate Band Council, Administration, Hereditary Chiefs, Matriarchs, Elders, community advisory committee and broader community were invited to be involved in all phases of the CCP. During the ‘planning in action’ phase, the CCP team relied on the community advisory committee, community hall gatherings and workshops with special interest groups as the primary means of engaging and obtaining input for community assessments and CCP planning. The meetings and workshops were conducted in culturally appropriate ways, respecting the pace of community members, and incorporating Elder-led prayers, feasting, storytelling, singing, and table discussions organized around families and clans. The CCP title and headings were translated into Haida, and drew from Haida laws and customs to guide the process and plan contents. By incorporating Haida language and practices into the process and plan, the CCP also supported the community’s cultural revitalization efforts.  In every phase of planning, the CCP process was two-way capacity driven. We understood that planning in the Haida Village of Skidegate is based on Haida concepts of ‘planning’ and mobilizing people. Therefore, we learned from the local CCP team how to integrate Haida knowledge, values, and contemporary practices into the CCP process. We then contributed to the local CCP team’s planning knowledge by sharing ideas on strategic and participatory approaches to planning. Together we all brainstormed and exchanged ideas, stories, tools, resources, and best practices while collectively problem solving when issues arose. This planning environment of mutual learning and dialogue brought together both Haida and non-Haida ways of planning into the CCP.   As a result of our team’s approach, the CCP community engagement process built the broader community’s capacity for CCP planning. Members of the community advisory committee were empowered to help design and guide the CCP process. They are now committed to sustaining the plan and its engagement process into the future. The community engagement sessions incorporated the community’s preference for ‘planning in action’, inviting the 244 participants to not only communicate issues and assets, and visions, values and principles for the future, but also to create pragmatic actions and catalysts for change at the individual, family, clan, community and government levels.   The final CCP entitled Gud Ga Is. Kuuniisii Gan Yahguudang. KunGasda Tll llgihl, meaning “being together to talk, honoring the past and shaping our future” in Haida, will be a visionary document that promotes sustainability. The plan is not yet complete but will set out the community’s vision, and eight interconnected values with underlying objectives, information and action ideas. The CCP is intended to be used by Chief, Band Council, Administration, community   22 groups and members as a source of guidance for future development projects.     There were numerous challenges associated with the CCP process. The CCP was dependent on AANDC’s British Columbia Capacity Initiative (BBCI)’s funding cycle. Therefore, the local CCP team worked hard to complete the CCP within BCCI’s 2012-2013 funding cycle, limiting the amount of time, energy and resources spent on each phase of planning. Based on the rhythm and pace of the community, the local CCP team launched the planning process in the fall of 2012, several months after they had received funding. In order to meet the funding deadline of March 31 2013, less time was spent on “preparing to plan”, including determining organizational capacities, planning the CCP process, and conducting a situation assessment. In addition, the CCP team only spent two months “planning in action,” limiting their ability to engage the entire community living on and off reserve, to assess key issues and assets in depth and to reframe, organize and prioritize issues as objectives with an implementation strategy.  This shortened planning timeframe was a challenging context for our CCP team to work within. We all had to work at an accelerated pace to develop useful survey instruments, gather value-based information and organize, code, analyze and synthesize all of the information collected in the final CCP. The values that the Haida people of Skidegate regard as critical to their sense of identity, cultural practices, spiritual beliefs, customary management practices and livelihoods, are also challenging to quantify. The local CCP team thus needed extra time and support in framing their core values with clear objectives and measurable targets that can be implemented, monitored and evaluated over time. As a result of these challenges, the local CCP team is extending the planning process into the coming year so as to fill in the information gaps in the plan and to develop an implementation strategy with clear monitoring, evaluation and celebration methods.  6.2 Student Context   Haida First Nations have been planning for thousands of years prior to colonization. Today, planning in the Haida Village of Skidegate has become a movement to plan by and for their community. Barbara Stevens describes one Haida worldview as “everything is connected to everything else” where there is a synergistic relationship between humans and non-humans, the natural and supernatural. In planning alongside the Haida Village of Skidegate, we learned that planning is holistic, process and action-oriented, grounded in-place, and about planning for balanced relationships between humankind, nature and the supernatural. Haida values flow from these worldviews and are manifest in their guiding laws, and in their plans’ vision, values, principles and actions.   Planning alongside the Haida in Skidegate has had a positive impact on our development as emerging planners. We gained knowledge from building relationships with and learning alongside the local CCP team, including the value and importance of respect, reciprocity, asking permission, making it right when wrongs have been done and mutual responsibility, all of which are important components of Haida planning philosophies and practices.  The ability of the local CCP team to design and implement their own community-driven plan revealed to us the important role local First Nation planners play in planning for their own community. They understand the context of their community, can dedicate time to making in-person contacts with community members, and can host and participate in regular meetings, updates, dinners and informal gatherings. They also understand the ways in which a plan can be actively used and referenced by local government, organizations and community members, avoiding conditions where the plan is ‘left on the shelf’.    23 In this case, Dana Moraes led the planning process while actively engaging a plurality of voices, ranging from the Skidegate Band Council, community advisory committee, Elders, CCP Assistant and youth mentee to us and the AANDC CCP Mentor, in the design and implementation of the CCP process. Dana Moraes’ leadership style created a collaborative planning environment of mutual learning and dialogue. The nature of our diverse team required that we respect the rhythm and pace of the local CCP team, and share planning information, ideas, resources, and tools where needed and requested. While we worked in collaboration, the local CCP team had final decision-making power and we respected their decisions on all methods used and adapted.   As visiting, emerging planners, we faced the challenge of limited time planning in the Haida Village of Skidegate. We were only able to travel to the village one week a month for 6 months. This limited our in person contact with community members and time spent learning and understanding Haida ways of planning and mobilizing people, as required for a truly culturally appropriate planning process. We thus depended on the local CCP team to lead the planning process when we were in the community, as well as to update us biweekly by phone when we were working out of the community.  When we were working in-community, the local CCP team taught us how to facilitate a plan that is holistic, process and action oriented. They taught us how to recognize and respect the First Nations context, worldviews, values and customs through the centrality of history, myth, storytelling, circle work and ceremony. They taught us to honor the past and traditional knowledge while embracing the new; to plan in culturally appropriate ways; and to be creative in reaching out to the community through workshops, one-on-one meetings, family gatherings, Elder ceremonies, presentations, feasts, school classes, and youth center events. They also taught us to design a planning process with catalysts for immediate community actions so that the community felt they were seeing immediate positive benefits to planning.  We learned that the CCP is as much about the process as it is about the final plan. Therefore, we had to be open, understanding, flexible, and diplomatic when unexpected social challenges such as death, suicide, violence and poverty emerged both amongst our team and the broader community. We learned that many of these social challenges are the direct result of historical trauma and the intergenerational legacy of colonialism and that part of our responsibility was to find ways within the CCP to address and overcome these challenges.  Finally, this planning experience taught us about our responsibility as emerging planners; that we can shift our planning roles from being perceived as ‘experts’ to embracing our roles as ‘learners’ and from outside planners to collaborative planners. No longer are the days when First Nations are considered solely stakeholders to be consulted in a planning process, but rather leaders of their own planning process. Outside planners can support rather than lead Indigenous community-based plans because planning is an ongoing living process, starting long before and continuing long after outside planners influence the process. For First Nations that have been imposed upon historically by outsiders, the opportunity to plan and develop according to their own practices is also an important part of the process of improving the sustainability of their community.          24 6.3 Principles For Future Practicum Partnerships  Students and communities who hope to complete a partnership together and to conduct collaborative planning can consider some of the following principles and guidelines we learned in our partnership.   Relationships of respect A successful partnership is based on building relationships grounded in respect, understanding, mutual responsibility, mutual learning and open communication. Planning partnerships require students and community to understand each other’s different cultures and build bridges between planning philosophies and practices.  Cross-cultural awareness Building bridges is not simply about relationship building, it is also about cross-cultural awareness. It is about understanding that First Nations are the original inhabitants and caretakers of their traditional territories with distinctive rights and responsibilities flowing from that history. It is also about understanding that planners are from this land, by birth, adoption, affection or loyalty, and have their own distinctive beliefs, rights and responsibilities. Students must be aware of the colonial forces at play in planning, including the wrongs of past plans completed by outside planners or mandated by the federal government. But it is important to learn from the past and not to be a prisoner of history. No matter what power imbalances and inequities exist, First Nations are able to plan for themselves according to their beliefs, culture and practices. Good planning is conducted in this environment of mutual learning and sharing, which often takes more time. It starts with dialogue and inquiry before work plans are finalized, making time for relationship building, and co-learning about the community and practicum students within each phase of planning.  Mutual responsibility Mutual responsibility is key, transforming the relationship between outside planner and community from one of dependence to joint partnership. The local planning team thus has the autonomy and capacity to take responsibility for the process and to document their own plan while students can share in the process, contributing ideas, knowledge and initiatives where requested.   Clear communication about strengths and weaknesses It is important to be clear to each other about your roles, goals, expectations, and what you can and cannot offer from the start. Strong relationships allow you to expose your respective strengths and weaknesses and create opportunities to address the gaps.  Collaborative learning As two practicum students, we often shared visits to the community and worked together in collaboration with the local CCP team. This co-learning experience presented a number of strengths as well as challenges. In terms of strengths, we were able to contribute different experiences, knowledge and skills to the CCP process. Depending on our respective strengths and interests, we could collaborate on, share or switch planning roles and responsibilities. On occasion, however, there would be too much overlap in responsibilities. This would typically lead to either one of us seeking out alternate tasks. In future practicum partnerships, it will be important for practicum students and the local planning team to assess their planning capacities and to consider their respective strengths and weaknesses while discussing appropriate methods for collaboration.   25 Follow the Pace and Rhythm of the Community  The Haida Village of Skidegate’s planning process occurred over a six-month period. The pace of the planning process was guided in part by AANDC’s BCCI funding cycle rather than the timeline of the community. In the future, community and student practicum partners should discuss a feasible timeframe for their planning process, respecting the rhythms of the community and the time required by the local planning team to get started, engage community members both on and off reserve, to collect and synthesize community values and data, and to document the plan.   Taking initiative In this partnership, it was vital we took initiative in supporting the local planning team where needed. We faced a number of uncertainties throughout the practicum, including uncertainty over when the local CCP team would formally begin leading the CCP process and when and where to access information on the community’s past and present state. We made sure to respect the local team and community while striving to take initiative where needed, at times drafting resources and tools in anticipation of the local team’s planning needs.   Importance of balancing life and work Throughout this experience, our relationships and planning activities often occurred outside of the office, before or after work hours, and while on the land and sea. Future practicum students should spend time immersing themselves in their partner community outside of a typical workweek, spending time learning on the land and water. Opportunities such as these played a pivotal role in informing our understanding of the community and culture, and local planning processes.                    26 7. References   Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) Comprehensive Community Planning Working Group, Okanagan, Lytton, Squiala, and We Wai Kai Yekooche First Nations. 2006. CCP Handbook: Comprehensive Community Planning for First Nations in British Columbia. Ottawa.  Lane, M. B. & Hibbard, M. 2005. Doing it for themselves: Transformative planning by indigenous peoples. Journal of Planning Education and Research, 25, 172-184.  Moraes, D. 2013. Gud Ga Is: Skidegate’s Comprehensive Community Plan. Skidegate Band Council.  Moraes, D. 2012. 2012 Skidegate First Nation Language Needs Assessment. Skidegate Band Council.   Porter, L. 2006. Planning in (post) colonial setting: Challenges for theory and practice. Planning Theory and Practice, 7(4), 383-396.  Porter, L. 2010. Unlearning the colonial cultures of planning. Burlington, USA: Ashgate Publishing Limited.  Sandercock, L. 2004. Commentary: Indigenous planning and the burden of colonialism. Journal of Planning Theory and Practice, 5(1), 118-124.  Skidegate Health Center. 2007. Xaaynangaa Nay Health Center 5-Year Strategic Plan. Skidegate.  Wilson, S. 2008. Research is ceremony: Indigenous research methods. Halifax: Fernwood Publishing.  Jones, B. 2013. Skidegate Band Membership List. Skidegate Band Council.               27 8. Appendix  8.1 Learning Agreement    28         29          30         31 8.2 Student Workplan      32       33 8.3 2005-2012 Community Plan Summary       34     35     36     37     38     39     40     41     42     43     44     45                        46 8.4 Planning Inventory       47        48        49         50       51        52       53       54       55    56       57 8.5 Facilitation Toolkit     58    59    60    61    62     63     64     65      66       67      68     69     70      71     72     73                        74 8.6 Community Factbook                                                        Haida Village of Skidegate: Community Factbook By Krystie Babalos and Jessa Williams May 2013                              75                                              Acknowledgements  The writing and development of the Skidegate Community Factbook involved many people and organizations from Skidegate, Skidegate Band Council and beyond. UBC School of Community and Regional Planning practicum students were invited to organize and write the document. They were supported by the Skidegate Band Council, Band Manager Barbara Stevens, Comprehensive Community Planning coordinator Dana Moraes and assistant Janine Williams and community organizations who helped guide the development of the profile and facts, providing information where needed. Special thanks are also expressed to the Comprehensive Community Planning Advisory Committee and broader community members, including Elders, families, adults, children and youth, for sharing stories and information about the past, and present conditions in Skidegate. The community’s vision for a healthy and vibrant future is the inspiration for this project.                                   76                                         Introduction  This Community Factbook provides a picture of the current conditions in Skidegate and is a starting point for information to be used in the 2013 Comprehensive Community Plan. The Community Factbook aims to guide the 2013 Comprehensive Community Plan, a road map to greater sustainability and community wellbeing, by:  • Providing information on what exists in the community, which areas need attention and which areas the community can nurture and grow  • Providing fast facts to support future decision making and funding • Providing an understanding of the governance systems and plans, policies, programs and services in place that support the community • Celebrating community strengths and achievements   The Profile has been organized into ten sections: (1) Skidegate community, (2) Haida language, (3) health, (4) education and learning, (5) community lands, (6) community assets, (7) economy and jobs, (8) water and waste, (9) energy, and (10) facts still to collect. Each section is broken into sub-sections that ask the broader questions of “Where have we been?” and “Where are we now?” The information gathered is then organized into tables with (1) fast facts (2) governance systems (3) plans, policies and/or programs, assets and services, and (4) accomplishments or opportunities (where relevant). The community can look to this information to build on its strengths, address some of its challenges and capture opportunities.  This is one of the first efforts as part of the 2013 Comprehensive Community Plan to create a factbook for Skidegate. Some topics, information and facts are missing and can be added at a later date once the information is made available. The last section in this factbook also provides a guide for future areas of information that need to be gathered.                           77                                         Skidegate Community    Fast Facts  Name:   Location:  Population:  On-reserve:  Off-reserve:  Ages:  Clans:  Reserves (#):  Landscape:    Skidegate (SGIIDAGIDS, meaning child of red chiton) Southeast coast of Graham Island ~1,583 (on and off reserve) people 736 people 847 people See Figure 1 and 2 Eagle and Raven Clan 11 Reserves, with Reserve # 1 largest Steep slopes; link to the Slarkedus watershed; forests with cedar, cypress, hemlock and spruce trees; and mix of soils ranging from organic topsoil to sand, gravel, clay and rock.   History The Haida people have lived on Haida Gwaii since time immemorial. Pre-colonization, over 10,000 Haida people lived in their traditional village sites.  1800’s: ~90 percent of Haida people died from settler introduced small pox 1850: The people of Rose Spit and Cape Ball villages first relocated to Skidegate  1889: Villagers from Cumshewa arrived  1893: Six families from the southern villages moved to Skidegate   Governance Systems 1. Federal & Provincial government: Coordinated by AANDC and legislated by the Indian Act 2. Council of Haida Nation (CHN): Formed in 1974 to unite Haida people under one political entity and to protect and assert Aboriginal title and collective rights. CHN consists of a House of Assembly, Hereditary Chiefs Council and Secretariat of the Haida Nation  3. Skidegate Band Council (SBC): Elected by the community; responsible for the well being of the community and policies/programs in the areas of Culture, Capital, Education, Membership, Health, Social Assistance, and socio-economic development.  4. Hereditary Chief & Matriarchal Family Clan System Planning Documents 1992: Interim Measures Agreement Sport Fish Plan between CHN and BC Government 1993: Gwaii Haanas Agreement with Federal and BC Government to protect Gwaii Haanas 1997: SFN Physical Land Use and Development Plan  2001: General Protocol Agreement on Land Use Planning with CHN, SFN, BC and other Nations 2003: Framework on tenure for aquaculture and commercial recreation between CHN and BC  2005: SFN Comprehensive Community Development Plan  2007: MOU between CHN and NaiKun Haida Power Authority - BC Hydro Accord 2009: Haida Gwaii Strategic Land Use Agreement with BC Government.  2010: CHN Haida Nation Children and Youth Declaration 2013: SFN Comprehensive Community Plan  Legal Decisions 2004: Haida Nation v. British Columbia [2004] case ruled the Crown has a duty to consult and accommodate Aboriginal peoples even when claims to land/resources have not been proven            78                                         Community Member Age Distributions                                                157 245 268 213 253 219 132 61 30 4 1 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Population (#) Age Figure 2. Skidegate Population (#) by Age 25% 30% 30% 12% 2.25% 0.06% Figure 1. Skidegate Population (%) by Age 0 – 19 20-39 40-59 60-79 80-99 100-109   79                                           Haida Language   Fast Facts (2012)  Languages  Dialects (#):  Haida Speakers (#):   Haida   14  19 fluent Elders, 5 people comfortable speaking/understanding Haida and 5 people (20-44 years old) in the process of learning Haida  Governance Systems Skidegate Band Council supports Skidegate Haida Immersion Program (S.H.I.P.) to revive Haida oral language and build a multi-lingual nation. Skidegate Band Council aims to: • Rebuild the Haida Language • Mobilize Haida speakers and knowledge keepers • Promote Haida in the community • Make Haida the Official Language • Integrate Haida in education, jobs, and government • Keep Haida alive in every day life  Plans, Policies and Programs S.H.I.P. offers the following program services: • Teach Haida language at the Skidegate Nursery School for 10 hrs/week, the Preschool for 2 hrs/week, the Skidegate Head Start program for 15 hrs/week and Haida immersion program for 20 hrs/week. • Archiving language – Video and audio recordings of elders speaking Haida • Record and produce language CDs with songs, stories and Haida lessons • Community translation and prayer requests • First Voices internet project – 2000 words and 500 phrases on the Internet • Writing and recording idiomatic phrases (2000+ written/20,000 +CD recorded) • Word Glossary – Over 9000 words and growing • Short stories project – 20 stories written and CD recorded • Place names project – Over 700 places, names and meaning documented Accomplishments • 10 children (0-4 years) at the Skidegate Nursery School are learning Haida • 5 children (0-4) at the Preschool are learning Haida • 18 community members (5-84 years old) are learning Haida in Haida immersion classes • Elders are both teachers and participants in the immersion program • 8 students in the Skidegate Head Start Program are learning Haida • SHIP is in the process of translating all road signs into Haida Source: 2012 Skidegate First Nation Language Needs Assessment; 2005 Comprehensive Community Development Plan   80                                         Community Health Fast Facts  Community Wellbeing Index (CWI):    “Sleep Well” Safe House:   Top 7 Most Valued Sources of Health:  78 (70 average BC First Nation CWI and 85 non-First Nation) 23 women with children and 16 individuals per yr Elder wisdom, clan/family strength, traditional healing, coming together to support one another, volunteerism, independence and celebrations  Governance Systems 1. Community health comes from the matrilineal system that creates identity and connectedness within clan systems. Grandparents pass down family history. Aunts and uncles provide economic teachings and discipline. Mothers and fathers provide emotional support. Extended family provides teachings on spiritual beliefs, community values and responsibilities. 2. Skidegate Band Council also supports the health programs below. Policies 1. 2007 and 2012 Community Health Plans  2. Annual Report on Health Services 3. 2011 Haida Directions • Xaaynangaa Naay (“House of Life”) Skidegate Health Centre: Offers programs to address mental health, community health and wellness, home and community care; alcohol and drug program; community garden; community wellness nursing; healthy bodies lending library; home support and community care; “keepers of our culture” program; maternal and child health programs; medical travel; mental health; nutrition and cooking classes; and pregnancy outreach/Canadian prenatal nutrition program • Adult Day Program (ADP): Assists individuals to live independently • Ngystle Communities Living Better: Offers healing programs and counseling for residential school survivors • Skidegate Dental Clinic  • Taaxwi Laas Good Friends: Offers addictions counseling services • Tllgiid Naay: Helping House offers health education, relapse prevention, life skills, safety from trauma and abuse, counseling and crisis Intervention • We Care Committee: Suicide prevention • Drug Free Community Committee • Haida Child and Family Services • Haida Gwaii Youth Society • Residential Schools Committee • Northern Health Authority’s regional hospital (to be built in 2013)  • The Brown Recreation Hall provides space for sports, running-walking groups and annual celebrations • Haida Gwaii offers space for healing (i.e. Spirit Lake trail, canoe and kayaking in the waterways, traditional village and heritage sites, and Gwaii Haanas).  Accomplishments • The Health Center was built with increased culture and language integrated into programs • A community garden with organic produce was developed • ADP expanded programs for elders to include physiotherapy, art, music and a garden Source: 2007 Xaaynangaa Nay Health Center 5-Year Strategic Plan  2005 Comprehensive Community Development Plan 2011 Finding Balance Skidegate Social Development for Family Violence Prevention Program   81                                           Education and Learning          Fast Facts  Elementary School  High School  Cultural Center at Kaay’llnagaay  1 0 1  Governance Systems The Skidegate Education Department is in charge of creating, implementing and supporting learning and education programs.  The Skidegate Social Development Office is in charge of coordinating life skills program for community members on social assistance  Programs 1. The Skidegate Education Department offers the following services: • School supply funds • Fees for students attending Queen Charlotte Secondary • Button Blanket Grade Twelve Graduation Ceremony • Nursery School Program for four year olds • Skidegate Haida Immersion Program (SHIP) • Haida language in elementary and secondary schools • Post Secondary student support including vocational training • Short term training support • Homework sessions • Tuition support for grades Kindergarten to Grade Twelve • Workshops 2. The Skidegate Social Development Office works with the Bill Reid Teaching Centre at Kaay’llnagaay Heritage Center to provide essential skills training for work and cultural life to community members on social assistance.  3. The Head Start daycare program prepares young children (0-6 years) and their families for their school years by offering programs on culture, language, education, health, and social and parental support.  4. The Swan Bay Rediscovery Program gives youth skills to be leaders by teaching life skills founded in Haida culture. Camps are offered in the summer, engaging youth in outdoor activities, cooking and food-gathering, overnight solos, cedar bark weaving, singing and dancing Haida songs, learning about the environment and history of Haida Gwaii, practicing survival skills, and learning navigation skills.  Accomplishments  Source: 2007 Xaaynangaa Nay Health Center 5-Year Strategic Plan  2005 Comprehensive Community Development Plan 2011 Finding Balance Skidegate Social Development for Family Violence Prevention Program   82                                         Community Lands  Skidegate’s 2005 land use plan:                                               Source: 2005 Comprehensive Community Development Plan   83                                         Community Lands  Fast Facts Land tenure options: Land use designations:    Housing units (#):  Houses in adequate form (%):  Houses in need of renovations (%)  Houses need to be replaced (%) Lease agreements and rental agreements 8: residential, commercial, facilities, tourism, industrial, quarry, protected open space and natural resources 392 on reserve 70.7% 28%  1.3%    Governance Systems The Skidegate Band Council is responsible for managing land tenures on reserve.  Policies/Programs 1. 1997 Physical Land Use Development Plan 2. 2005 Comprehensive Community Development Plan Land Use Plan guides the Skidegate Band Council to manage all land uses under their jurisdiction. It enables SBC to allocate land in the following order of priority: Haida Individuals and businesses; non-Haida First Nations and non-First Nation members; joint ventures with Haida First Nations; and non-Haida First Nations. The Plan also requires proposals for land include: The proposed use for the site; how the development will address Band Council’s principles for land allocation and development; how the development will benefit the community; how the development conforms to the Land Use Plan and Land Use and Development Policies; a reasonable basis to negotiate rental or lease agreements; a business and marketing plan (where needed); and do environmental impact assessment on the protection of creeks and watercourses (where needed). Skidegate Band Council requires a 15 metre “leave strip” from the high water mark of a watercourse to a development; a 100 metre setback from an eagle’s or heron’s nest and heron roosting site; no development on or near archaeological sites; and an 8 meter separation between commercial, light industrial and community buildings.  Accomplishments All houses on reserve are serviced lots with access to roads (paved or gravel); ground water through the community well and community-wide piped system; sewage servicing through the community treatment plant, piped system and septic tanks; and electrification.  Source: 2005 Comprehensive Community Development Plan; 2011-2012 Community Infrastructure and Housing Annual Report   84                                         Community Assets   Fast Facts SFN controlled assets/services (#):   57   Governance Systems The Skidegate Band Council, Administration and GNC run and support community-controlled assets/services  Assets/Services • Adult Day program • AHS Daycare • Archipelago Management Board • Basketball Program • Bingo Hall • Brown Recreation Centre • Canoe House • Carving House • Certified psychology of vision trainer • Children’s Public Library • Community Garden • Community Hall • Community Well • Council of Haida Nation • ECE training through NWCC • Fire Department and Hall • Garbage Truck (1) • Gift Shop • Good Food Box • Gwaii Co-op • Gwaii Haanas Base camps • Gwaii Trust  • Haida Child and Family Services • Haida Fisheries • Qay Haida Heritage Centre • Hummingbird Gardens • Long-term care aide program • Matriarchs • Massage Therapy  • Maud Island Farmer’s Market • Nursery School • NWCC • Playground x 5 • Processing Plant • Pumper Truck • Pumphouse Building • Skidegate Haida Immersion Program • Ngystle Healing Society • Watchmen Society and Posts • Swan Bay Rediscovery Program • Children and Adult dance groups • Raven Cabs • Regional Public Library • Repatriation Committee • Row on Kelp permits • Safe House • Sanitary Sewer System • Septic Tanks x 5 • Sk’aadgaa Naay Elementary School • Spirit Lake • Stand-by Generator • Taan Forestry • Taaw Naay gas station • Traditional medicine/healers • United Church • Water treatment facility and system • Weavers • Xaaynaagaa nay Health Centre • Youth Centre          Source: 2007 Xaaynangaa Nay Health Center 5-Year Strategic Plan  2005 Comprehensive Community Development Plan   85                                                Fast Facts Type of economy:  GNC businesses (#): GNC properties (#):  User fees collected/year: Resource-based (logging, fishing salmon, herring, halibut, black cod and crab, and eco-tourism), Government and service industry 4 4 $240/household/year for water, sewer and garbage or traded items (crafts, art work and exchanging skills)  Governance Systems 1. The Council of Haida Nations Haida Gwaii Land Use Plan outlines initiatives that aim to improve local economic development. 2. Gwaalagaa Naay Corporation (GNC): created by SBC in 1991 to ensure the community’s economic self-sufficiency with a focus on generating revenue and supporting community enterprises. GNC develops land for economic activities. GNC gathers the following benefits from managing land and economic development:  • Revenue from lease payments and taxation; • Capacity building and employment; • Spin off opportunities such as services which support larger developments • User fees from services • Taxes on property and the sale of goods on reserve as outlined in the Real Property tax bylaw (Bill C-115) for leased reserve lands and the Sales Tax (Bill C – 93)  3. The Skidegate Band provides social assistance to those unable to work or find work.  4. Misty Isles Economic Development Society and Graham Island East Coast Farmer’s Institute provides workshops on food production, access to resources (funding, land, research) and marketing services  Assets/Services GNC controlled small Businesses: • Taaw Naay Enterprises Ltd. • Gwaii Co-op • Aay Oo Guiding Services Inc., • Haida Gwaii Interior Solutions  GNC controls the following properties: • Skidegate Commercial Centre (Phase I and II) • An Industrial Site • The Qay'llnagaay Heritage Centre • The Canoe Shed and rentals as a tourist attraction Opportunities • Alternative energy • Business incubator • Cultural arts program • ”Destination Haida Gwaii” (hotel, RV Park, Feast House and tours) • Eco-tourism • Energy production and conservation • Feast House  • Fisheries (Smoker processing plant) • Forestry (value-added, silviculture, logging, non-timber products) • RBC Agency Bank • Rock quarry • Resort Hotel • Shell fish aquaculture • Local Agriculture Source: 2005 Comprehensive Community Development Plan 2011 Haida Gwaii Agriculture Strategy and Implementation Plan   Economy and Jobs    86                                         Water & Waste Fast Facts Main sources of drinking water:  Water system:  Water storage: Water reservoir storage capacity: Sewage system:  Slardekus Lake and watershed (574 ha in reserve #1) Source, water treatment system, storage, pump stations and distribution 4 steel reservoirs No 1: 542m^3; No 2: 713m^3; No 3: 568m^3; No 4: 245,000 m^3 North and south system (see below)  Governance Systems 1. The Skidegate Band Council and Water and Waste department manages Skidegate water and waste services 2.  Environment Canada manages programs to preserve and enhance the quality of water resources, enforce rules relating to boundary waters; and coordinate environmental policies and programs, including the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency. 3. Fisheries and Oceans Canada is mandated to protect fish populations and habitat in receiving waters and urban streams Plans/Policies  1. Canadian Drinking Water Quality Guidelines 2. BC Plans and Regulations that may overlap: the Water Act, Drinking Water Protection Act, Environmental Management Act, and Public Health Act.  Water Services A dam on Slarkedus Creek (downstream of Slardekus lake) is connected to a water treatment facility, 4 water storage reservoirs, 2 booster pump stations and a network of distribution pipes to homes. Water flows by gravity from the creek through the water treatment plant to Reservoir #1. Water is then distributed to First Beach, Second Beach, Skidegate Village, the New Subdivision, 4th Avenue Subdivision, and Highway Subdivision. The 3 other reservoirs supply Skidegate Heights, Skidegate Properties, Oceanview and Skidegate Mountain Subdivision. Construction of a new water treatment facility was completed in 1997 to provide a safe water supply to the Skidegate community. Waste Services 1. The Skidegate community has two separate sewage collection and disposal systems: • The north system serves Skidegate Mountain, Skidegate Properties and Oceanview as well as the proposed Skidegate Vista Subdivision. The north system consists of a network of gravity collection mains to a septic tank, and ocean outfall.  • The south system services Skidegate Village, First Beach, New Subdivision, 4th Avenue Subdivision, Highway Subdivision and Skidegate Heights. This system consists of a network of gravity collection mains, force mains, lift stations, 4 septic tanks and an ocean outfall. Primary treatment is provided by septic tanks, and secondary treatment by the local sewage treatment plant.  2. Skidegate Band solid waste crew collects solid waste and disposes of waste at the regional transfer station 6km north of the community for transport to the Regional Landfill. Source: 2005 Comprehensive Community Development Plan; 2011-2012 Community Infrastructure and Housing Annual Report   87                                         Energy   Fast Facts (2010) Skidegate GHG emissions: Average household electricity use:  Residential Demand: Facilities/Equipment Demand:   ~2,554 tonnes of CO2 equivalents/year 100 homes used an average of 16,023 KWh electric power and 246 homes used an average of 11,812 KWh Non-electrical power 5,543,958 KWh or 84.30% 1,034,120KWh or 15.70% Skidegate Power sources:   Power Capacity (MW): Power Supply (MWh): Skidegate power use (%): Queen Charlotte Power Corporation (QCPC) hydroelectric facility & Sandspit Diesel Generator System (DGS)  DGS: 10.2 MW; QPCP: 5.7MW DGS: 8,260 MWh; QPCP: 18,215 MWh DGS: ~30%; QPCP: ~70%    Governance Systems Skidegate aims to develop a road map to a greener community by supporting the Council of the Haida Nations’ 2008 Community Electricity Plan and establishing their own energy baseline and goals for the future.   Plans and Reports 1. 2008 Haida Gwaii Community Electricity Plan  2. 2011 Skidegate First Nation Energy Baseline Report  Energy Systems • Skidegate is powered by the South Grid System provided by BC Hydro through two power stations: The Sandspit Diesel Generator System (DGS) and the Queen Charlotte Power Corporation’s (QCPC) hydroelectric facility. QCPC is an Independent Power producer that runs a small hydro facility built below Moresby Lake. Backup power is provided by the Sandspit (SPT) diesel generating station (DGS) • Houses rely on electrical and non-electrical heating systems (wood, oil and propane). • Community facilities and equipment (i.e. the Health Clinic, Recreation Hall and Skidegate Band Administration Office and water treatment plant, two water pumps, sewage treatment plant, street lighting and additional maintenance equipment) use propane as their heat and hot water source • The Elders Center/Day Care uses furnace oil for space heating and hot water • The Haida Heritage Center uses geothermal energy and electric heat and hot water source Source: 2008 Haida Gwaii Community Electricity Plan;  2011 Skidegate Energy Baseline Report    88 8.7 Participation Plan Summary  This Participation Plan will help guide who, what, where and when the community will take part in the CCP planning process from February – April 2013.   Vision  SFN envisions a vibrant and living CCP that is community based, community driven and part of a community owned process.   Goals The CCP team led by Dana Moraes and Janine Williams aims to achieve this vision by: • Drawing on a Haida approach to honoring the culture and voices of the community • Empowering the community to have ownership over the CCP  • Collaborating with government and community groups to take responsibility for the CCP  Bringing the CCP to Life The CCP team will lead the following phases of community engagement:   1.Develop a community-based approach to planning • Collect information at the Open House on how best to honor the voices in the community  • Create a Community Advisory Committee to co-create the CCP • Identify community members and groups with a stake in the CCP • Identify the best engagement approaches with each community group • Set a planning timeline and milestones • Collect preliminary information on the community’s hopes, fears, strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities  2.Engage the Community  • Communicate the CCP purpose, process and event dates/times to on and off-reserve members via posters, social media, newsflashes and at events • Facilitate planning meetings, workshops, interviews, feasts and other activities • Where possible, translate events/materials in Haida  • Invite the community to weekly community hall gatherings to consult on the CCP • Work with the advisory committee and organizations to host group-specific workshops, round tables, meetings, feasts and interactive small group discussions • Value the community’s time and insight by following protocols and customs, “meeting people where they already are,” listening, and reporting back contributions • Use a variety of participation activities   3.Document Process and Voices  • Identify community’s past and present state, and vision, values, objectives, principles, issues and assets, and action ideas for the future • Record, document and report back all community input shared • Oral testimonies, stories, and songs recorded by audio and videotaping events, interviews, and note taking. Written information collected by surveys, drawing paper, Facebook messages, letters and e-mails, comment box submissions, photography and other mediums • Code and analyze data   4.Reflect and Celebrate the Process • Determine the milestones of the CCP process, i.e. # and diversity of people part of the process/committed to taking action, quick start actions completed, partnerships created, challenges overcome, stories told etc. • Celebrate each milestone completed  • Seek ongoing feedback from the community   89 8.8 Gud Ga Is (CCP) Summary Booklet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! ! ! ! ! !"#$!%&'#()!!!!!"#$%&'(!)*!+),,#'&$-!./%#(01!!""#$"%&'(%"$%)''*""+",%%23/'4#/4(!5!6#%$#7(8!*+   ,&&-.&!/0'!!29/&:/!%/'4#/4(8!1+   2003&&4&5!26#%$#7(8!6+   78&&8&!2;<&7&$#/%&$-8!9+   :').&!803&!80.!2=>(!?/-!$>&'40!?(7(8!-.#/0(1!29(/%&'48!!""#$"%23""$(445"*%2((*".""#%26),,#'&$-8!*+   ;&&8&'&38!2@/,&%-8!1+   <=&)80.&><&&-+-&5!2A%:(708!6+   ?00@&8&3003&!2B)#$>8!9+   <&&8&3!2;/*($-!5!;(+#7&$-8!A+   4B&&.'##C&3!8#.!8&!0)!2C/$>(7&'4!$)4($>(78!6&""$."!2A:#+/D)'8!*+   ,&&-3&+38&!D00+38&!)/E&&.8&!23&*(!3)'4!3(/7'&'48!)"%0""%."#%2@)):!;(+#7&$-8!*+   2&!@&&!800!5&&'C&!2=7/:&D)'/%!@)):!C/$>(7&'48!1+   :&=!/00!.&&3&&-!2E7),)$(!C/7:('&'48!6+   F&&5'8&5'!.&!G3)+/%!,/7F($8!9+   7008&&-!2"+(/'8!7(."!23/':8!*+   :'8&!.&&5'8&5'!.&!23/':!G(.(%)<,('$8!1+   H&&8&&-!29)#0&'48!6+   ?'8&=D##!2A'(74-8!9+   H&&38!2H(+7(/D)'8!8""((%"$%,()"*.9.4(5"%.4$%"$%0("")"("*.%2A+)'),-8!*+   2=&&'&8&&!H&&-!2A+)'),&+!G(.(%)<,('$8!1+   I'8&&-8=00!2I#0&'(00!G(.(%)<,('$8!6+   ?'2&38+8#'C&!.00!2A,<%)-,('$8!-"*.%:%244("/%2C).(7'/'+(8!*+   2#.!2&!/0'8#5'2&!26),,#'&+/D)'8!1+   H&38!<&&.''D##)!23(/:(70>&<8!!!"#"$%&'#((#!"#$%&''$(')*$+,''$,*-'&.#$/"#$%0''0+,*12$$)$'*'#$%+'#,'#-''./ $$34  5,6/07,-)'$89#',*#$0%$0&7$-099&*,/:$;4  <#=,#+$0%$()6/$-099&*,/:$(')*6$)$'*'#%*'#,'#.0,/ $$34  >"0$+#$)7#$)*.$+"#7#$+#$',=#$$;4  $?@#0('#$)7#$',A#$/7##6B$(0#9$C4  D71)*,E)80*)'$-")7/6$.#6-7,F,*1$0&7$10=#7*)*-#$6:6/#96$G4  HI,68*1$(7017)96J$071)*,E)80*6$)*.$()7/*#76",(6$K4  L&((07/$.0-&9#*/6 $$)$'*'#%*'#,'#102.1M $$34  D&7$F#',#%6$)*.$1&,.,*1$')+6$;4  N)'&#6$)*.$(7,*-,('#6$O,66&#6$)*.$)-80*6P$C4  Q099&*,-)80*$)*.$@)78-,()80*$@')*6$G4  Q099&*,/:$R)-/F00A$K4  S9('#9#*/)80*$@70-#66$T4  U&,-A$6/)7/$)-80*62$6"07/$)*.$'0*1$/#79 $$30,#40#,'#5.0,#,'#$%+'#&677''4'4/ ##34  V-A*0+'#.1#$(#0('#$+"0$")=#$-0*/7,F&/#.$/0$/"#$QQ@$;4  H=)'&)80*$)*.$90*,/07,*1$(')*$C4  S*W&#*-#$90.#'$G4  R&*.,*1$60&7-#$)((#*.,I$K4  Q#'#F7)/# $$  93                                        !"#$$%&&%&!!  !"#$%&'()%*+),-#',&.#%-&//012&3+*%4)5&6!2&72/89&(*:&;433"*#%<&=)4"',&!  1+>+$4'+:&%-+&)+,+();-5&?(;#$#%(@4*5&')+,+*%(@4*5&'()@;#'(%4)<&'$(**#*=5&?(;%&A*:#*=&(*:&.)#@*=&,B#$$,&4?&%-+&229&%+(35&')4C+;%&#*%+)*&(*:&;433"*#%<&,")>+<4),&!  !"#$%&;('(;#%<&4?&/:3#*#,%)(@4*5&24"*;#$&(*:&;433"*#%<&3+3D+),&%-)4"=-&#*>4$>+3+*%&#*&+>+)<&,%+'&4?&%-+&')4;+,,&(*:&#*;)+(,#*=&'$(**#*=&,B#$$,&!  E4,%+:&F&G'+*&E4",+&(*:&HH&3++@*=,5&(*:&;4*:";%+:&I&#*%+)>#+.,&!  1#,%)#D"%+:&FI&J"+,@4**(#)+,&%4&D+K+)&"*:+),%(*:&;433"*#%<&,%)+*=%-,5&;-($$+*=+,5&>($"+,&(*:&')#4)#@+,&!  L*=(=+:&HMM&;433"*#%<&3+3D+),&'()@;#'(%+:&#*&%-+&'$(**#*=&')4;+,,&!  8+,+();-+:&(*:&;43'#$+:&NO&,"''4)%&:4;"3+*%,&!  P4>+)*(*;+&,%)";%")+&:+>+$4'3+*%&!  P4>+)*(*;+&.4)B,-4'&?)43&0(@4*($&2+*%)+&?4)&Q#),%&0(@4*,&P4>+)*(*;+&R02Q0PS&!  T*;)+(,+:&;433"*#;(@4*&(%&=4>+)*(*;+&$+>+$&%4&,"''4)%&?"%")+&$(*:&*+=4@(@4*,&!  7%(U&(*:&24"*;#$&.4)B&%4=+%-+)&4*&'$(**#*=5&#3'$+3+*%(@4*&(*:&+>($"(@4*&!  T3')4>+:&;433"*#;(@4*&%4&;433"*#%<&%-)4"=-&F&2433"*#;(@4*&9$(*5&F&D)4;-")+5&(&Q(;+D44B&'(=+5&V&,"33()<&)+'4)%,5&F&')+,+*%(@4*&%4&24"*;#$&&!  1+>+$4'&#3'$+3+*%(@4*&')4;+,,&.-#;-&4"%$#*+,&(;@4*&'$(*&;)#%+)#(&(*:&')4=)+,,&)+'4)%&?)(3+.4)B&!  L*:&8+,"$%W&;433"*#%<X4.*+:Y:)#>+*&'$(*&!"#$%&$"'(%!"#$!%&''#()*+!,-.!/'0$-%/1!)*+%),%-(%2)*,!-(!&3/$2,/4')(5!-'&#(*!&6!.#77&$*8!9(!:;<=>:;<?@!&#$!%&''#()*+!74-(!2)44!%&(A(#/!*&!1/3/4&7!%&''#()*+!%-7-%)*+!6&$!+&#*,@!B41/$.@!&#$!%#4*#$-4!%/(*$/@!-(1!0)5!,&#./8!C/!2)44!-4.&!6&%#.!&(!-11$/..)(5!/(3)$&('/(*-4!%&(%/$(.!D)8/8!)$&(!6/$A4)E-A&(@!*.#(-')!1/0$).@!/-$*,F#-G/.H!2,)4/!-774+)(5!*$-1)A&(-4!$&4/.!-(1!$/.7&(.)0)4)A/.!)(!&#$!I-)1-!%#4*#$/!*&!&#$!JJK8! 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Analyze community information and data. Document process and plan and report back to the community.   4 Phase 4 - Swimming the Ocean, Action Develop implementation strategy that describes how to move ideas to action, including prioritizing values that require immediate actions, medium and long term actions, phasing actions, creating budgets and assessing capacity needs and partnerships.  5 Phase 5 – Returning Home, Results, Reflection, and Celebration  Watch and look at our results, adjust our plan, celebrate successes and share wisdom on challenges and begin our new planning cycles.   97 ! Residential!Schools! Small!Pox! Influenza! Indian!Act!Contact'Lost!Language!and!Culture! Broken!Families! Abuse!Bill!C?31!Dysfunctional!Parents!(Drugs,!alcohol!and!mental!health)!Abuse! Don’t!know!How!to!Parent!Lack!of!Education! Lack!of!Self?Esteem!Youth!Drugs!and!Alcohol!Crime! Conflict!Health!Centre!(Islands!Women’s!Society)!Haida!Child!&!Family!Services!First!Nations!Policing!Life!Long!Learning!Health!Centre!INFLUENCE'DIAGRAM'Need!for!Education!Lack!of!Understanding!Haida!Child!&!Family!Services!Head!Start!Health!Centre!Youth!Centre! Ngystle!! Negative!impacts!of!contact! ! Issues!affecting!Skidegate! ! Existing!supporting!programs! ! Potential!actions!Cultural!Programs!Swan!Bay!Other!       98 !Self%Family%Clan%Skidegate%Band%Council%Council%of%the%Haida%Nation%Self%      99 !Finance' Health' Housing' Education' Social'Development' Maintenance'Nursery!School!See!Health!Organization!Chart!Accounting!Clerk! Library! Haida!Language!Teachers! Daycare!Indian!Registry!Administrators!Lands!Energy!Economic!Development!Estates!Infrastructure! Headstart!SOS!Assistant!Roads/!Bridges!WTP!Vehicles!Sanitation!Community!Buildings!Janitor'Band!Office!Community!Hall!Rec.!Hall!Nursery!School!Skidegate'Membership'Skidegate'Band'Council'Chief'Administrative'Officer'SBC'Organizational'Chart'          

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