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Creating Reciprocal and Ethical Learning Partnerships in the Downtown Eastside : Messages from Participants… Taylor, Alison, 1959-; Glick, Stephanie; Peikazadi, Nasim; Chow, Alex; Allan, Beverly May 31, 2018

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CREATING	RECIPROCAL	AND	ETHICAL	LEARNING	PARTNERSHIPS	IN	THE	DOWNTOWN	EASTSIDE:		MESSAGES	FROM	PARTICIPANTS	ON	THE	DEVELOPMENT	OF	PARTNERSHIP	PLANNING	TOOLS				SYNTHESIS	REPORT		May	2018	UNIVERSITY	OF	BRITISH	COLUMBIA				 	  2 Table	of	Contents		Land	Acknowledgement	 3	Letter	to	Readers	 4	Principles	for	Ethical	and	Reciprocal	Partnerships	 6	Community-Engaged	Learning	(CEL):	What	is	it?	 7	Place	Matters:	The	Downtown	Eastside	(DTES)	and	the	Learning	Exchange	(LE)	 9	The	Downtown	Eastside	 9	UBC’s	Learning	Exchange	(LE)	 10	The	ABCD	Approach	to	Community	Adopted	at	the	LE	 10	Student	Involvement	and	Training	at	the	LE	 11	Student	Orientation	at	the	LE	 11	Learning	From	the	Partners	 13	Community	Organizations	in	the	DTES	 13	Students	 15	University	Instructors/Coordinators	 18	Learning	Exchange:	Supervisors	of	Students	 21	UBC	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	Learning	(CCEL)	 23	Taking	a	360:	Key	Messages	From	All	Partners:	Community	Organizations,	Students,	Instructors,	LE	and	CCEL	Staff	 25	Continuing	the	Conversation	and	Developing	Partnership	Tools	 27	Appendix	1:	Readings	About	Experiential	Learning	and	Critical	Pedagogy	 31	Appendix	2:	Resources	for	Partnerships	 33	Appendix	2A:	Resources	for	Community	Partners	 33	Appendix	2B:	Resources	for	Faculty	 39	Appendix	2C:	Resources	for	Students	 48	Appendix	3:	Information	about	Dialogue	Sessions	 58	Acknowledgements	 59					  3 		Land	Acknowledgement		This	report	was	researched,	written	and	produced	on	the	traditional,	ancestral	and	unceded	territory	of	the	xwməθkwəy̓əm	(Musqueam),	Skwxwú7mesh	(Squamish),	and	Səl "ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh	(Tsleil-Waututh)	Nations.		 	 		 	 				Photo:	Musqueam	artist	Elder	Doris	Fox	facilitated	the	co-creation	of	this	community	button	blanket	with	participants	at	the	UBC	Learning	Exchange	in	a	workshop	series	called		Threading	Our	Stories.						 	  4 Dear	Friends,	Letter	to	Readers	We	are	pleased	to	bring	you	this	report,	which	is	compiled	for	all	who	live	in	and	provide	services	to	the	Downtown	Eastside	(DTES),	including	those	who	work,	volunteer	and	learn	at	the	UBC	Learning	Exchange	and	other	community	organizations.			What	issues	motivate	this	report?	A	key	impetus	for	the	work	leading	to	this	report	was	to	contribute	to	creating	more	egalitarian	partnerships	amongst	and	between	community	organizations,	students,	and	UBC	staff	and	faculty.	Achieving	this	goal	is	challenging.	Community	organizations	in	the	DTES,	who	are	the	hosts	of	many	students	engaged	in	what	is	called	experiential	learning	or	“learning	by	doing,”	have	told	us	that	their	involvement	with	university	students	is	often	time-consuming	and	lacking	in	continuity.	While	some	of	their	concerns	are	rooted	in	institutional	differences	(e.g.,	the	semester	system	constrains	faculty,	lack	of	sustainable	funding	constrains	non-profit	organizations),	successful	partnerships	can	be	achieved	when	relationships	are	based	on	mutual	respect	and	understanding.			Who	should	read	this	report?	This	report	aims	to	share	the	knowledge	of	people	in	the	DTES	who	are	continuously	thinking	about	how	to	engage	in	ethical	and	reciprocal	experiential	learning	partnerships	in	the	community.	Partners	include	UBC	students,	instructors	and	coordinators,	and	staff	members	at	DTES	neighbourhood	organizations	who	are	engaged	in	work	for	the	benefit	of	community	members.	There	are	multiple	audiences	for	this	work—community	partners	may	find	it	useful	as	part	of	a	general	orientation	to	the	DTES	for	students	and	new	instructors;	university	instructors	who	see	the	value	in	experiential	learning	pedagogies	may	be	motivated	to	explore	new	learning	partnerships;	and	students	may	become	more	aware	of	the	work	that’s	involved	in	learning	partnerships	on	the	part	of	community	organizations	and	instructors.	UBC’s	new	Strategic	Plan	(see	https://strategicplan.ubc.ca/)	refers	to	Transformative	Learning	and	Local	and	Global	Engagement	as	core	areas.	To	“co-create	with	communities	the	principles	and	effective	practices	of	engagement	and	establish	supporting	infrastructure,”	is	one	strategy.	Thus,	this	report	is	also	relevant	for	university	administration.			What’s	our	view?	Given	the	importance	of	relationships,	this	report	aims	to	provide	a	“360	degree	view”	of	effective	partnerships,	highlighting	similarities	and	differences	within	and	across	partner	groups	in	aspirations,	ideas	about	success,	and	constraints.	It	is	intended	to	lay	the	foundation	for	the	development	of	“partnership	planning	tools”	(PPTs),	tools	or	resources	that	can	help	students,	instructors,	and	community	partners	enter	into	and	maintain	strong	learning	partnerships	(see	Call	to	Action).	Although	this	report	focuses	on	experiential	learning	in	the	DTES	(because	of	its	unique	features),	there	is	little	doubt	that	our	messages	about	effective	partnership	will	resonate	more	widely.		Who	was	involved?	This	report	is	the	collaborative	effort	of	staff	from	the	UBC	Learning	Exchange	(LE),	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	Learning	(CCEL),	and	UBC	faculty,	graduate	and	undergraduate	students,	with	funding	support	from	a	UBC	Teaching	and	Learning	Enhancement	Fund	(TLEF)	grant	(see:	https://tlef.ubc.ca/funded-proposals/entry/36/)	It	reflects	the	wisdom	  5 of	community	organizations,	undergraduate	students,	instructors/coordinators,	as	well	as	CCEL	and	LE	staff	who	participated	in	dialogues.	Future	activities	include	the	development	and	piloting	of	PPTs	for	use	by	different	partner	groups	in	2018-19.		Report	structure:	Community	voices	are	quotes	throughout	the	report	to	reinforce	the	need	to	center	community	desires,	needs	and	motivations	in	community-engaged	learning.	These	quotes	come	from	a	video	produced	by	the	LE	in	which	community	members	were	asked	to	give	“advice	for	students	learning	about	the	Downtown	Eastside”	(see	Appendix	2).			We	hope	you	enjoy	the	pages	that	follow.		Prof.	Alison	Taylor,	Stephanie	Glick,	&	Nasim	Peikazaki	(Educational	Studies,	UBC)	Alex	Chow	(Sociology,	UBC),	and	Beverly	Allan	(Learning	Exchange)		 	  6 Principles	for	Ethical	and	Reciprocal	Partnerships		 Infographic:	Matt	Hume		 	  7 Community-Engaged	Learning	(CEL):	What	is	it?	 	Photo:	UBC	student	staff	member	Gurjit	Pawar	interacts	with	a	patron	at	a	Tech	Café	event	at	Oppenheimer	Park	in	downtown	Vancouver				“When	we’re	thinking	about	…whatever	we’d	like	to	do	in	this	space	…	the	questions	for	that	project	or	that	research,	have	to	be	from	the	people	…	what	does	the	community	want?...	And	if	the	answer	is	‘nothing’	then	perhaps	…	this	isn’t	the	way	to	participate.	Maybe	there’s	other	ways	to	contribute	that	aren’t	about	your	own	projects.”	-	Cecily	Nicholson				We	often	hear	frustration	from	community	about	academics’	lack	of	grounding	in	“the	real	world”	and	universities’	distance	from	their	communities,	in	particular,	from	those	who	are	most	marginalized	in	society.	Often,	this	is	framed	in	terms	of	a	theory-practice	(university-community)	divide.	We	see	theory	and	practice	as	intertwined,	and	experiential	learning	is	about	exploring	their	interrelationships	rather	than	asserting	the	value	of	one	over	the	other.	For	new	instructors	who	feel	the	need	to	justify	community-engaged	learning	within	the	university,	and	for	community	members	who	want	to	think	more	deeply	about	why	community-based	learning	is	so	powerful,	we	begin	this	report	by	talking	briefly	about	learning	theory.			Learning	as	Participation,	Learning	for	Social	Justice			A	common	view	of	learning	sees	it	as	acquisition,	conjuring	an	image	of	the	human	mind	as	a	container	to	be	filled	and	the	learner	as	a	passive	recipient	of	knowledge.	In	contrast,	we	believe	that	learning	and	development	take	place	through	human	engagement	with	the	world.	  8 Learning	is	social,	embodied,	emotional,	and	grounded	in	place	and	time.	Rather	than	simply	acquiring	or	adding	to	our	knowledge	base,	learning	often	involves	the	disintegration	of	old	ways	of	thinking	and	reconfiguring	knowledge	to	make	sense	of	new	situations.	Thus,	learning	is	better	understood	as	the	result	of	participation	in	a	community.	The	language	of	participation	highlights	the	importance	of	relationships	and	the	bonds	between	individuals.	It’s	consistent	with	educational	aims	that	encompass	citizenship	and	social	development	in	addition	to	developing	employability	skills.	The	“participation”	perspective	also	challenges	the	idea	of	one-way	knowledge	transfer	from	university	to	community;	instead	learning	is	seen	as	a	pathway	to	finding	one’s	place	among	other	people.	Experiential	learning	is	powerful	because	human	beings	come	to	know	their	world	and	themselves	in	the	process	of	collaboratively	changing	it.	Thus,	knowledge	emerges	from	practice	instead	of	being	“applied”	to	practice.		Finding	one’s	place	among	other	people	requires	also	that	power	and	privilege	are	acknowledged.	The	language	of	service	learning	is	problematic	in	its	suggestion	that	(usually)	privileged	university	students	go	to	community	to	serve	the	less	fortunate.	A	contrasting	perspective	suggests	that	students	and	faculty	members	must	be	open	to	being	taught	by	others;	learning	happens	by	engaging	in	projects	of	relationality	and	responsibility	(Bruce,	2013).	Such	projects	remind	us	of	the	4	R’s—respect,	relevance,	reciprocity,	and	responsibility—discussed	by	Kirkness	and	Barnhardt	(1991)	as	key	in	fostering	a	more	responsive	higher	education	system	for	Indigenous	students.	Fostering	two-way	relationships	requires	acknowledging	that	there	are	multiple	ways	of	knowing	and	forms	of	knowledge.	For	example,	Indigenous	knowledge	systems	privilege	the	relationship	to	Land	as	a	place,	sacred	site,	and	teacher,	which	is	quite	distinct	from	approaches	to	learning	that	ignore	physical	and	historical	locations.		Since	learning	occurs	in	different	places,	and	is	messy	and	somewhat	unpredictable,	there	is	not	just	one	way	to	organize	such	learning	partnerships.	For	this	reason,	we	seek	to	identify	principles	about	effective	experiential	learning	rather	than	providing	a	prescriptive	template.	An	important	goal	of	such	learning	is	to	help	students	move	between	different	learning	spaces	(university	and	community)	which	are	organized	by	quite	different	logics,	and	to	foster	learning	communities	that	respect	and	value	the	diversity	of	participants	and	perspectives.	This	diversity	is	likely	to	lead	to	a	pedagogy	that	interrupts	the	status	quo	(particularly	for	university	students	and	instructors/coordinators),	since	previous	understandings	are	likely	to	be	shaken.	In	sum,	university	partners	should	try	to	be	open	to	the	messiness,	ambiguities,	differences	(sometimes	very	strong)	in	perspectives,	and	contestation	that	are	likely	to	characterize	relationships	within	and	between	diverse	groups	of	instructors,	students,	community	organizations,	and	community	members.		Appendix	1	provides	a	list	of	references	to	look	at	if	you’re	interested	in	exploring	these	ideas	further.		        9 Place	Matters:	The	Downtown	Eastside	(DTES)	and	the	Learning	Exchange	(LE)	   Photo:	Staff	and	patrons	at	the	UBC	Learning	Exchange,	Downtown	Eastside,	Vancouver,	BC			“I	think	it’s	really	important	to	know	the	neighbourhood	first	as	much	as	you	can.	…	It’s	good	to	remember	that	we	[at	the	Carnegie	Community	Center]	get	so	many	requests	for	studies.	…	we’re	constantly	going	for	funding	trying	to	…	stay	afloat	and	it	takes	staff	time	to	work	with	students	and	researchers.	If	you’re	going	to	come	down	here	and	do	the	work,	think	about	what	you	can	give	back.”	-	Phoenix			The	following	sections	aim	to	disrupt	preconceptions	about	the	Downtown	Eastside	(DTES)	for	those	who	are	new	to	it	and	to	raise	awareness	about	the	unique	resources	provided	by	the	Learning	Exchange	(LE).			The	Downtown	Eastside		As	one	of	Vancouver’s	oldest	neighbourhoods,	the	DTES	is	rich	in	history	and	culture.	The	neighbourhood	is	home	to	a	robust	group	of	community	organizers	and	activists	who	work	collectively	to	resist	ever-expanding	threats	of	gentrification,	homelessness	and	governmental	neglect.	It	also	has	one	of	the	highest	concentrations	of	artists	in	the	city.	It	is	economically	and	culturally	diverse	and	is	comprised	of	Indigenous	peoples,	Japanese-Canadians,	Chinese-Canadians,	and	African-Canadians,	to	name	a	few.	The	neighbourhood	is	also	known	for	being	  10 home	to	many	vulnerable	populations	including	seniors,	low-income	singles	and	families,	those	who	work	in	the	sex-industry,	as	well	as	individuals	experiencing	homelessness,	addiction,	mental	illness,	and	physical	disabilities.	Over	half	of	the	residents	of	the	DTES	are	of	low	income,	relying	on	income	assistance	support,	pensions,	or	charitable	and	social	services.	Because	of	this,	the	DTES	tends	to	be	a	target	for	many	interventions	including	experiential	learning	for	students	and	others	wanting	to	do	research.	The	community	has	been	an	important	teacher	for	the	university	although	relationships	have	often	been	far	from	reciprocal.		UBC’s	Learning	Exchange	(LE)	The	UBC	Learning	Exchange	is	a	hub	for	community-based	programs,	student	learning	and	community-based	research	in	the	DTES.	Established	in	1999,	the	LE	provides	adult	educational	opportunities	to	DTES	residents,	collaborates	with	UBC	staff	and	faculty	to	engage	university	students	in	“hands	on”	education	with	the	community	and	supports	community	based	research	and	knowledge	exchange.	The	LE	occupies	a	unique	location	“inside-outside”	UBC.	As	a	neighbourhood	site,	it	provides	community	programming	and	maintains	strong	collaborative	relationships	with	nonprofit	organizations	in	the	DTES.	As	a	university	outreach	site,	it	has	a	strong	commitment	to	student	learning	and	embraces	innovative	teaching.	The	mission	of	the	Learning	Exchange	is	to	engage,	inspire	and	lead	these	two	very	different	communities	to	work	and	learn	together (Towle	&	Leahy,	2016). Each	year,	the	LE	works	with	over	500	students,	50	faculty	members,	30	community	partners	and	over	2,000	community	members. 	The	ABCD	Approach	to	Community	Adopted	at	the	LE		“[Y]ou	could	sit	down	(and)	talk	to	someone.	Play	cards	with	them.	I	think	that	you’ll	find	a	person	there.	You	start	to	see	people,	you	don’t	just	see	‘the	job,’	the	stereotype,	the	label.	Yes,	there	are	those	things,	but	there	are	other	things.	…	And	there	are	a	lot	of	people,	a	lot	of	rich	history	here.	A	lot	of	wisdom	here.”	-	Lance	Lim		The	Learning	Exchange	adopts	an	asset-based	community	development	(ABCD)	approach,	which	draws	upon	the	strengths,	skills,	and	abilities	that	are	present	in	a	community	rather	than	focusing	on	challenges	or	deficits.	This	approach	mobilizes	individuals,	associations,	and	institutions	to	act	as	change	agents	on	issues	of	relevance	to	their	community.	It	also	recognizes	the	power	of	relationships	within	a	community	and	the	importance	of	development	led	by	local	leadership.		Following	this	approach,	the	LE	recognizes	the	capacities	and	strengths	of	people	living	in	the	Downtown	Eastside	and	is	committed	to	developing	ethical	partnerships	and	non-hierarchical	learning	relationships	in	its	community	programming.	For	example,	in	its	Learning	Lab,	residents	become	teachers	in	response	to	community	requests.	New	programs	and	workshops	stem	from	needs	identified	by	the	community.	Activities	included	the	development	of	computer	training	workshops	for	residents,	and	an	innovative	English	Conversation	Program.	The	Learning	Exchange	is	true	to	its	name,	working	with	the	idea	that	everyone	has	something	to	learn	and	everyone	has	something	to	teach.		The	Asset-Based	Community	Development	Institute	at	the	Irwin	W.	Steans	Center	for	  11 Community-Based	Service	Learning	&	Community	Service	Studies	at	DePaul	University	has	compiled	a	set	of	resources	on	ABCD,	as	has	Vibrant	Communities	Canada	and	Tamarack	Institute	(see	links	in	Appendix	2:	Resources).		Student	Involvement	and	Training	at	the	LE		“This	community	doesn’t	need	another	drop-in	moment	of	someone’s	three-month	long	project	or	term	paper	that	addresses	something	briefly	and	then	goes	away.	We	need	strong	relations,	everywhere.”	-	Cecily	Nicholson		The	LE	provides	a	spectrum	of	curricular	and	co-curricular	(not	tied	to	a	course)	experiential	learning	opportunities	to	undergraduate	and	graduate	students	that	range	in	length	from	one	day	to	more	than	a	semester.	Faculty,	staff,	and	students	usually	contact	the	LE	to	learn	more	about	opportunities	and	the	LE	occasionally	reaches	out	to	individuals	and	groups	at	UBC	who	have	specific	skills	and	assets	that	could	enhance	community	programming.		The	UBC	LE	is	fortunate	to	have	a	Student	Learning	Coordinator	and	an	Academic	Director,	whose	work	includes	thinking	about	supporting	student	learning.	The	coordinator	supports	student	involvement	and	learning	and	helps	orient	UBC	faculty,	staff,	and	students	to	the	DTES.	LE	staff	also	spend	time	talking	with	students	about	their	skills,	interests	and	passions	to	help	them	engage	with	community	in	productive	ways.	Because	many	other	community	organizations	in	the	DTES	do	not	have	staff	specifically	for	this	purpose,	it	can	be	challenging	for	them	to	work	with	students	in	the	ways	they	would	like	(e.g.,	taking	time	to	clarify	and	discuss	expectations	and	reflections	on	learning).		The	LE	has	developed	resources	(e.g.	orientation	materials)	that	may	be	useful	for	other	DTES	community	organizations.			Student	Orientation	at	the	LE		“Open	up	your	ears	and	open	up	your	eyes	and	try	not	to	talk	so	much;	just	learn	and	observe	and	really	learn	[from]	the	interactions	of	people	there.	It’s	great	that	you	got	all	these	books	behind	you	but	there’s	a	lot	of	things	that	you	can’t	learn	from	books	so	use	that	wisdom	from	the	community.”	-	Hendrik	Beune	 The	LE	offers	a	variety	of	orientations	to	students	based	on	length	and	type	of	placement	or	project,	skills,	and	experience.	Since	negative	single-story	representations	about	the	DTES	from	the	media	and	other	sources	can	lead	students	to	enter	the	community	with	misconceptions	and	apprehension,	the	LE	spends	a	lot	of	time	orientating	students	to	the	neighbourhood	prior	to	their	placements.	Orientations	include	self-guided	neighbourhood	walks,	a	series	of	five	videos	called	Shifting	the	Story,1	and	group	discussions;	all	of	which	help	students	counter	negative	stereotypes	and	open	up	to	more	complex	narratives	of	the	                                                1 Shifting	the	Story	was	produced	with	support	from	the	Equity	Enhancement	Fund	from	the	Equity	&	Inclusion	Office	at	the	University	of	British	Columbia.   12 neighbourhood.	Shifting	the	Story	videos	feature	interviews	with	DTES	residents	and	community	members	who	discuss	their	lived	experiences	and	address	topics	such	as	community,	gentrification,	creativity,	activism,	and	messages	for	students.		In	the	final	video	titled,	“Advice	for	Students	Learning	About	the	Downtown	Eastside,”	residents	and	community	members	delve	into	topics	they	believe	are	important	for	both	newcomers	and	students	returning	to	the	DTES	neighbourhood	for	community	placements	and	projects.	Important	themes	include	reciprocity	in	learning	and	relationship	building,	seeing	beyond	stereotypes,	making	broader	connections	between	the	DTES	and	systemic	issues	across	Canada	and	the	world,	and	avoiding	“drop-in”	volunteerism.	See	information	about	how	to	access	the	videos	in	Appendix	2.		Students	also	receive	training	in	a	workshop	called	“Establishing	and	Maintaining	Boundaries”	to	help	them	foster	and	practice	respectful	and	safe	connections	with	community	members.	Learning	about	boundaries	also	helps	students	better	understand	their	roles	and	responsibilities.		Student	Opportunities	at	the	LE:	Short-term,	Long-term,	Volunteerism	and	Employment	Short-term:	UBC	classes	can	visit	the	Learning	Exchange	for	one	day	to	learn	about	the	UBC	Learning	Exchange	and	to	learn	more	about	the	neighbourhood.		Long-term:	Students	from	several	disciplines	have	completed	their	practicum	at	the	UBC	Learning	Exchange	including	First	Nations	and	Indigenous	Studies,	the	School	of	Social	Work,	and	the	Faculty	of	Pharmaceutical	Sciences.	Additionally,	some	Teacher	Education	candidates	participate	in	a	full-time,	three-week	Community	Field	Experience	(CFE)	while	students	from	the	Faculty	of	Medicine	participate	in	a	full-time,	six-week	practicum	called	Flexible	and	Enhanced	Learning	(FLEX).	The	Urban	Ethnographic	Field	School	(UEFS)	is	a	six-week	summer	course	for	students	in	Anthropology	and	Sociology	conducted	by	UBC	instructors,	which	takes	place	at	the	LE.		Volunteerism:	CCEL’s	Trek	program2	helps	link	students	with	volunteer	opportunities	at	the	Learning	Exchange.	Students	can	also	opt	to	volunteer	independently	by	reaching	out	to	the	Learning	Exchange	directly.	Staff	will	help	students	find	an	appropriate	fit	based	on	their	skills	and	interests.	Volunteers	are	involved	in	all	areas	of	community	programs.	CCEL’s	Reading	Week	program	offers	students	an	annual	opportunity	to	participate	in	a	three-day	community	project	and	students	have	completed	this	at	the	Learning	Exchange	as	well.		Employment:	Student	employees	are	key	contributors	in	running	programming	at	the	LE.	Co-op	students	are	employed	full-time	for	four	to	eight	months;	Work-Learn	opportunities	are	part-time	for	10-20	hours	a	week	and	also	range	in	length	from	four	to	eight	months.						 	                                                2	For	more	information	on	TREK,	see:	https://students.ubc.ca/career/community-experiences/trek	  13 Learning	From	the	Partners	  Photo:	Stephanie	Glick		To	learn	about	effective	partnerships,	our	main	sources	of	information	were	dialogue	sessions	with	students,	community	organization	representatives,	LE	and	CCEL	staff,	and	instructors/coordinators	(see	Appendix	3	for	details).	We	also	reviewed	resources	and	evaluation	materials	from	the	LE,	CCEL,	and	other	sources.	This	section	summarizes	what	we	learned	from	each	partner	group,	followed	by	discussion	of	common	themes.				Community	Organizations	in	the	DTES		“Remember	that	this	community	knows	itself	better	than	you.	So	we’re	not	ever	entering	into	an	experiential	community	as	experts	if	we	don’t	have	those	shared	experiences.”		-	Cecily	Nicholson		We	spoke	with	five	community	partners	who	have	hosted	students	from	different	post-secondary	education	institutions	in	placements	of	different	durations	and	types	(e.g.,	internships,	curricular	community-engaged	learning,	co-curricular	activities,	etc.).	A	key	issue	for	participants	concerned	the	need	for	greater	institutional	support	for	community-engaged	learning	(CEL)	programs;	they	suggested	building	it	into	university	and	academic	programs.	In	the	current	state	of	CEL,	which	tends	to	be	piecemeal	and	fragmented,	the	lack	of	continuity	is	challenging	for	community.	Further,	insensitivity	to	community	realities	requires	constant	re-education	of	students.	The	need	for	more	institutional	coordination	of	CEL	was	also	reinforced	at	the	2017	Community	Dialogue	Session	held	at	the	Dr.	Sun	Yat-Sen	Gardens	in	Vancouver.	Community	representatives	there	spoke	about	the	challenges	of	short-term	placements	and	the	need	for	students	to	have	a	better	understanding	of	the	non-profit	sector	before	they	participate	in	CEL.	More	specific	to	the	DTES,	community	partners	suggested	UBC	participants	need	to	be	attentive	to	their	power	and	privilege	in	interacting	with	  14 community.	In	our	dialogue,	community	partners	felt	that	CEL	is	more	successful	when:		● University	instructors/coordinators	are	embedded	in	community--when	they	are	committed	to	building	and	maintaining	relationships	over	time	with	community	organizations;		● Instructors,	students	and	community	organizations	are	attentive	to	each	others’	structural	constraints	and	differences	in	aims;		● There	are	clearly	defined	tasks	and	responsibilities	for	students;		● Instructors/coordinators	attend	to	administrative	details	(e.g.,	communication	among	student-partner-instructor,	matching	students	with	placements	and	tasks)	and	acknowledge	the	emotionality	of	student	learning;		● Community	partners	and	instructors	support	student	learning,	e.g.,	providing	opportunities	to	debrief	and	reflect	on	their	experiences;		● Students	already	have	some	background	working	in	communities,	and	are	knowledgeable	and	well-prepared	(e.g.,	oriented	to	community	in	a	way	that	emphasizes	assets	rather	than	deficits,	provided	with	‘boundary	training’),	take	their	responsibilities	seriously,	and	respect	those	they	interact	with	(including	privacy);	● Students	are	given	time	to	observe	and	‘tune	in’	as	opposed	to	‘diving	in’	and	‘taking	over	space;’	and	● Students	have	time	to	reflect	and	to	engage	in	creative	problem	solving.		In	addition	to	clearer	expectations	and	better	coordination	of	CEL	at	universities,	Butterwick	and	Henry3	recommend	‘avoiding	one-size-fits	all’	approaches	to	partnership	since	each	partnership	and	placement	is	unique,	and	organizational	life	is	dynamic.	Their	practical	suggestions	include	universities	offering	longer	courses	for	CEL	in	order	to	provide	more	time	for	students	to	engage	in	meaningful	ways,	and	including	community	partner	perspectives	when	making	policy,	undertaking	research,	and	implementing	CSL	activities.		In	sum,	most	suggestions	from	community	partners	involve	university	participants	doing	their	homework	before	engaging	with	community	to	ensure	that	CEL	opportunities	for	students	are	thought	through	carefully	so	expectations	are	clear	and	all	partners	benefit.	The	five	community	participants	in	our	dialogue	sessions	were	supportive	of	tools	that	would	help	them	learn	more	about	how	other	non-profit	organizations	were	approaching	CEL	and	how	to	orientate	students	to	their	organizations	and	to	the	DTES.	In	particular,	community	might	benefit	from	having	regular	conversations	about	what	works	and	what	doesn’t	work	in	CEL.			 	                                                3 See	Butterwick	and	Henry’s	(2014)	report	based	on	community	perspectives	on	learning	partnerships	with	UBC	(Appendix	2).   15 Students	 “It’s	important	to	acknowledge	how	lucky	we	are	to	be	able	to	go	to	university	or	to	have	a	university	education.	But	it	doesn’t	make	us	better	than	anybody	else.	Like	that’s	the	thing,	like	down	here,	like	who	cares!	You	know?	It’s	who	you	are	that	matters	more.”	-	Phoenix   Photo:	 UBC	 student	 staff	Maggie	Miland	 provided	 graphic	 facilitation	 during	 a	 workshop	 at	 the	 UBC	Learning	Exchange’s	New	Perspectives	on	Learning	in	the	Downtown	Eastside	conference.		In	the	dialogue	sessions,	students	who	had	engaged	with	the	DTES	community	described	it	as	“enriching,”	“empowering”	and	“caring,”	as	well	as	“challenging.”		This	section	draws	on	interview	transcripts	from	students	about	their	experiences	at	the	LE,	as	well	as	two	dialogue	sessions	conducted	with	nine	students	who	were	placed	in	DTES	organizations	as	part	of	their	course	requirements.	Students	discussed	what	worked	well,	what	didn’t	work	well,	and	suggestions	for	improvement.			What	works	well:		● Preparation:	Students	appreciated	it	when	UBC	staff	and	community	partners	encourage	critical	thinking.	In	particular,	professors	were	able	to	interrupt	stereotypes	of	the	DTES	community	through	assigned	readings	that	centered	asset-based	community	approaches.	In	one	class,	this	work	was	furthered	through	discussion	of	decolonization,	prompting	students	to	think	more	deeply	about	their	social	locations	as	well	as	the	ethical	implications	of	short-term	research	projects.	In	the	same	course,	students	explored	the	problems	with	“savior”	or	“charity”	models	of	volunteerism	while	  16 simultaneously	investigating	their	own	assumptions	about	what	it	means	to	volunteer	with	marginalized	populations.	● Place-based	activities:	One	community	partner	offered	an	art-tour	of	the	DTES	as	part	of	the	student	orientation,	which	provided	students	with	a	different	vision	of	the	neighbourhood	than	the	one	often	presented	in	the	media.	Students	at	the	LE	found	that	being	part	of	a	community	space	offered	opportunities	to	develop	relationships	with	community	members,	blurring	an	“us”	vs.	“them”	mindset.	Sharing	space	also	exposed	students	to	tacit	understandings	about	communication	and	interaction	with	partners	and	members	of	the	community,	further	encouraging	disruption	of	students’	preconceptions	of	the	DTES.	This	learning	often	resulted	in	recognizing	the	diversity	and	agency	found	in	the	community.	Students	also	appreciated	when	organizations	fostered	respectful	discussions	about	stereotypes.	● Mentorship:	Students	reflected	on	the	value	of	community	staff	who	were	welcoming	and	supportive.	They	gained	a	sense	of	freedom	from	the	belief	that	“it’s	okay	to	mess	up,”	“try	again,”	and	accept	the	complexity	of	the	learning.	As	one	student	aptly	noted,	“freedom	to	fail	gives	the	freedom	to	explore.”	Students	felt	that	community-engaged	learning	offers	an	excellent	opportunity	for	praxis-oriented	learning,	whereby	a	theory,	lesson,	or	skill	is	enacted,	embodied,	or	realized.				What	does	not	work	well:	Students’	reflections	on	obstacles	to	learning	can	be	captured	in	three	recurring	themes:	expectations,	preconceptions,	and	time	limitations.	● Expectations:	Most	student	concerns	focused	on	their	orientation	to	partner	organizations	and	the	DTES	neighbourhood.	Some	students	felt	that	orientation	should	take	place	early	in	their	placements	while	others	voiced	a	desire	to	repeat	aspects	of	the	orientation	later	in	the	term	once	they	become	more	familiar	with	their	roles.	In	particular,	students	who	felt	unsure	about	how	to	develop	relationships	with	community	members	felt	they	would	have	benefited	from	a	workshop	or	similar	learning	opportunity	offered	after	they	had	some	experience.	Clearly,	the	timing	of	the	orientation	depends	on	where	students	are	at	in	their	own	journeys,	and	these	differences	need	to	be	recognized	by	instructors.	Along	similar	lines,	students	expressed	the	need	for	stronger	lines	of	communication	between	the	professor/instructor	and	the	community	partner	in	order	to	provide	clear	expectations	to	students.	● Preconceptions:	Some	students	shared	that	fear	of	the	DTES	is	sometimes	transferred	to	students	before	they	have	a	chance	to	form	their	own	opinions,	through	parental	warnings,	opinions	of	friends,	the	media,	and	even	orientations	to	the	community.	As	a	result,	some	did	not	establish	a	strong	enough	sense	of	safety	in	their	placements	to	feel	comfortable	navigating	the	neighbourhood.	● Time	limitations:		Like	community	partners,	students	identified	the	short	time	span	of	their	placements	as	a	limitation,	and	were	discouraged	by	how	little	they	felt	they	could	contribute	to	the	community.	Students	felt	that	pressure	to	produce	often	contributed	to	a	fear	of	failure	and	stress.	Related	to	this	pressure	was	the	challenge	of	navigating	between	course	expectations	and	community	expectations:	course	assignments	could	distract	from	community	work	and	it	was	sometimes	difficult	to	move	back	and	forth	between	the	two	seemingly	disparate	worlds.	Alternatively,	students	recognized	that	  17 pressure	to	“give	back”	was	often	self-induced,	based	on	their	own	preconceived	notions	about	how	to	make	a	“meaningful”	contribution	to	the	community.	Some	students	also	reflected	that	their	involvement	was	a	first	step	in	becoming	more	aware	of	the	DTES	and	intended	to	reach	out	to	the	community	again	in	the	future.			Suggestions:		For	other	students:	Former	students	suggested	ways	to	strengthen	experiences	for	other	students	placed	in	the	DTES.	They	had	a	message	for	incoming	students:	“come	with	an	open	mind	and	know	that	you	are	entering	an	established	space.”	Students	also	articulated	that	while	it	is	important	to	avoid	a	“savior”	mentality,	one	shouldn’t	avoid	community-engaged	work	as	a	result.	Students	shared	that	it	is	“okay	to	mess	up”	as	long	as	one	learns	from	it.			 	For	instructors:	Former	students	also	had	several	practical	suggestions	for	educators	in	the	classroom.	They	felt	that	it	was	particularly	beneficial	to	be	exposed	to	articles	written	specifically	about	the	community	rather	than	more	general	theoretical	papers,	at	least	initially.	Inviting	leaders	of	community	organizations	to	speak	to	classes	is	also	helpful	where	possible.	They	also	proposed	bringing	in	former	students	and	alumni	who	have	had	similar	placements	in	the	DTES,	so	current	students	can	ask	them	questions	they	wouldn’t	ask	their	professors.	These	inquiries	ranged	from	how	to	connect	some	of	the	dots	between	classroom	and	community	learning,	to	sharing	personal	experiences	in	the	placement	and	the	DTES,	to	how	to	dress	for	the	position.	And	finally,	while	recognizing	the	limitations	of	what	can	be	done	in	short-term	placements,	some	students	wanted	to	believe	that	there	was	room	for	them	to	be	involved	in	meaningful	change.		For	partners:	Some	concrete	suggestions	made	by	students	were	intended	for	DTES	partners.	Usually,	if	expectations	were	clarified	early	on,	students	felt	more	able	to	engage	with	the	community	organically.	Students	also	had	ideas	for	walking	tour	orientations	to	familiarize	them	with	the	neighbourhood,	break	down	walls	and	stereotypes,	and	help	them	integrate	faster.	Specifically,	they	felt	tours	led	by	people	who	have	lived	or	worked	in	the	DTES	and	know	the	neighbourhood	thoroughly	are	best	(rather	than	someone	following	written	instructions);	also,	dividing	tours	into	small	groups	consisting	of	new	students	and	an	experienced	guide.	On	the	tours,	students	suggest	covering	where	drug	use	takes	place	as	well	as	where	people	go	for	emergency	assistance,	food	and	shelter.	Clearly,	these	suggestions	require	resources	but	are	worth	further	discussion.	The	LE	currently	provides	different	self-guided	tours	for	pairs	of	students	and	offers	staff	resources	to	help	students	debrief	their	experiences.		Overall:	On	a	final	note,	students	highlighted	the	necessity	of	clear	and	ongoing	communication	between	faculty	and	community	partners	so	that	each	knows	their	role	and	can	convey	responsibilities	appropriately	to	students.	For	example,	a	“job	sheet”	including	duties	and	expectations	would	help	students.	The	University	of	Alberta	community	service-learning	program	uses	templates	to	communicate	placement/project	opportunities	and	requires	a	student	agreement	form	to	be	completed	by	instructors,	students,	and	community	partners	to	help	ensure	that	initial	expectations	are	discussed	and	communicated	(see	Appendix	2).	  18 		University	Instructors/Coordinators		“I	feel	like	part	of	the	challenge	is	when	we	think	about	the	DTES	but	we	don’t	connect	it	to	broader	communities,	to	movements	and	flows	of	people,	to	systemic	issues	beyond	this	space.”								-	Cecily	Nicholson			Photo:	UBC	professor	Catherine	Douglas	speaks	to	community	partners	at	the	UBC	Learning	Exchange		Instructors	who	have	developed	effective	relationships	with	organizations	in	the	DTES	over	time	are	aware	that	it	should	be	community	organizations	driving	CEL,	although	this	is	not	always	reinforced	within	the	university.	Universities	tend	to	reproduce	traditional	pedagogical	approaches	to	student	learning	and	prioritize	research	productivity	in	reward	structures;	they’re	often	blind	to	the	partnership	work	that	is	required	for	CEL.	This	work	includes	identifying	appropriate	partners	and	developing	relationships	that	are	mutually	beneficial,	co-designing	student	learning	opportunities	that	also	benefit	community	partners,	maintaining	open	communication	with	students	and	partners	throughout	the	experience,	and	implementing	  19 assessment	tools	that	fit	this	pedagogical	approach.		A	key	message	from	our	dialogue	with	instructors	and	coordinators,	like	community	partners,	concerns	the	need	for	more	institutional	support	for	CEL	at	all	levels	of	the	university.			Classroom	instructors	would	like	to	see	more	recognition	of	the	significant	amount	of	time	and	energy	required	to	design	and	monitor	community-engaged-learning	experiences	for	students,	and	more	willingness	on	the	part	of	UBC	to	share	university	resources	with	community	partners	(especially	with	under-resourced	non-profit	organizations)	who	contribute	a	significant	amount	of	time	and	energy.	A	small	example	would	be	providing	funding	for	end	of	project	class	celebrations	or	providing	financial	support	so	students	can	professionally	print	and	present	materials	for	partners.	Partnership	work	is	logistically	challenging	and	requires	academics	to	develop	new	skills,	including	being	open	to	uncertainty,	guiding	students	who	are	often	out	of	their	“comfort	zones,”	valuing	community	members’	knowledge	and	experience,	and	communicating	with	diverse	groups.		The	kind	of	support	offered	by	CCEL—	help	to	identify	potential	partners	and	think	through	pedagogy,	including	curriculum,	student	assessment,	and	partnership	work—	is	vitally	important	for	instructors	who	are	new	to	this	work.	Instructors	would	like	to	see	UBC	provide	funding	for	classroom	support	in	the	form	of	‘place-based’	CCEL	Teaching	Assistant	(TA)	positions,	which	would	help	support	learning	across	disciplines	with	specific	kinds	of	partners	(e.g.	after	school	programs,	literacy-focused	organizations)	in	the	DTES.	In	addition,	while	all	CEL	work	requires	careful	planning,	communication,	and	monitoring,	facilitating	learning	opportunities	in	the	DTES	requires	additional	care	given	the	lack	of	capacity	of	many	of	the	community	organizations	located	there	and	the	distrust	that	exists	because	of	the	history	of	often	exploitative	interactions	between	university	representatives	and	community	organizations	and	members.			Practicum	coordinators	(where	the	LE	may	be	one	of	several	possible	placements	for	students)	were	mainly	concerned	about	how	to	develop	and	share	resources	related	to	organizing	placements,	orientating	students,	facilitating	communication	with	and	between	students	and	community	partners,	and	assessing	student	learning—an	issue	also	of	interest	to	instructors.	They	were	also	interested	in	how	to	attract	students	to	placements	that	may	be	out	of	their	comfort	zones	while	supporting	them.	Both	instructors	and	coordinators	share	an	interest	in	how	to	design	and	monitor	CEL	opportunities	for	students	in	ways	that	are	most	likely	to	be	successful.	The	LE	is	seen	as	an	intermediary	between	the	main	campus	of	UBC	and	DTES	community,	an	entry	point	into	the	DTES	for	students	and	instructors,	as	well	as	a	placement	site	for	students.	As	noted	above,	some	university	classes	are	held	there	and	co-curricular	opportunities	ranging	from	a	day	to	several	weeks	are	available,	including	the	Trek	program	operated	by	CCEL.			What	works	well:	Instructors	who	have	built	community-engaged	learning	into	their	courses	suggest:	● In	early	stages,	take	time	to	identify	appropriate	community	partners	and	to	develop	mutually	beneficial	relationships--recognize	that	it	won’t	happen	overnight.	Where	  20 possible,	involve	community	members	as	the	course	is	being	developed	to	inform	content	and	assessment.		● Teaching	assistant	(TA)	help	is	extremely	valuable	to	help	with	partnership	logistics	(e.g.,	matching	students	to	projects)	and	maintaining	communication	with	community	partners	and	students	in	large	classes.	Building	in	communication	requirements	and	benchmarks	for	monitoring	placements	is	helpful.		● Be	realistic	about	expected	outcomes	and	talk	about	these	with	students	and	community	organizations.	These	expectations,	which	are	likely	to	shift	over	time,	should	take	into	account	the	time	period,	level	and	abilities	of	students,	and	the	capacity	of	community	organizations	as	well	as	instructors/coordinators.		● Include	discussion	about	professional	ethics	and	need	for	respectful	behavior	in	student	orientation.	Communicate	the	history	of	relationships	between	the	DTES	and	university,	in	particular,	the	fact	that	the	community	feels	over-studied	and	under-resourced.		● Ensure	students	know	their	responsibilities	regarding	communication	with	community	organizations,	attendance,	and	expected	outcomes	(including	assignments	and	community	work).	Involve	students	in	goal	setting.	● Don’t	make	assumptions	about	students’	experiences	with	the	DTES	or	similar	communities	but	instead	find	out	and	provide	appropriate	kinds	of	orientation.	● Help	students	make	connections	between	classroom	and	community	in	different	ways,	including	guest	speakers,	classroom	discussion,	peer	learning,	and	one-on-one	conversations	with	students.		● Try	to	organize	learning	in	ways	that	break	down	hierarchies	of	academic	and	community	expertise.	● Hosting	an	end	of	term	celebration	of	learning	with	community	partners	present	is	a	great	way	of	marking	the	end	of	the	course	and	CEL	achievements	while	thanking	partners	for	their	contributions	to	student	learning.		What	does	not	work	well:	When	the	match	between	student	and	placement	is	poor,	the	experience	is	more	challenging	for	everyone.	Developing	and	communicating	realistic	expectations	is	very	important,	as	is	identifying	and	addressing	any	problems	early	on	in	the	student	experience.	Especially	when	the	communication	between	instructors	and	coordinators	and	community	partners	is	poor,	student	problems	go	unnoticed.		Suggestions:		● Coordination	of	support	for	this	kind	of	high	impact	teaching	and	learning	across	UBC	would	be	helpful.		● There	is	a	need	to	document	failures	as	well	as	successes	to	help	others	learn	about	effective	partnership.	Documenting	the	value	of	CEL	would	also	help	change	the	culture	in	universities.	● Recognize	and	support	faculty	who	engage	in	CES:	Reward	systems	(e.g.,	promotion	&	tenure	processes)	need	to	acknowledge	and	value	this	work.		● Providing	more	support	(e.g.,	TA	support,	funds	for	end-of-term	celebrations,	evaluation	support)	will	help	instructors	meet	the	logistical	challenges,	build	long-term	relationships,	and	demonstrate	the	value	of	this	learning	for	students.	  21 		Learning	Exchange:	Supervisors	of	Students		“Get	involved,	do	your	homework,	just	relax	when	you	come	into	the	neighbourhood”		-	Priscillia	Tait		What	works	well:	Learning	Exchange	(LE)	staff	agreed	that	when	students	are	able	to	self-select	into	placements,	they’re	generally	more	engaged	in	the	work.	When	students	chose	the	LE	out	of	a	list	of	community	organizations,	it’s	usually	because	something	about	the	LE	or	the	work	of	the	LE	“resonated	with	them,”	which	usually	leads	to	higher	levels	of	engagement	and	interest	in	the	placement.	● Recognize	and	respond	to	student	differences:	Students	vary	in	their	comfort	level	interacting	with	community	members	—	although	some	adapt	to	whatever	happens,	others	feel	more	at	ease	when	they	have	assigned	tasks,	especially	when	they	are	new	to	community	settings.		For	example,	some	students	have	enjoyed	serving	food	at	a	BBQ	or	handing	out	slushies	at	a	Reading	Week	event	because	these	tasks	provide	an	“icebreaker”	or	“vehicle”	for	them	to	connect	with	community	members.	There	is	a	community	Drop-In	at	the	LE	and	staff	find	that	even	playing	cards,	or	taking	part	in	an	arts-based	activity	can	make	students	and	community	members	feel	more	comfortable	with	their	initial	interactions	as	it	“takes	the	pressure	off.”	● The	LE	also	utilizes	students	as	administrative	volunteers	who	help	with	the	“behind	the	scenes”	operational	work	of	the	organization.	This	kind	of	role	can	benefit	students	who	want	to	get	involved	in	a	community	setting	but	are	not	yet	ready	for	direct	engagement	with	community	staff	and	members.	LE	staff	pointed	out	that	such	roles	respect	the	different	levels	of	comfort	that	students	have	in	community	settings	as	well	as	recognizing	their	unique	skills.		● Opportunities	for	reflection:	LE	staff	also	noted	the	importance	of	debriefing	in	student	placements.	For	example,	students’	discomfort	can	provide	a	space	for	learning	and	growth.	Giving	students	the	opportunity	to	reflect	on	their	emotions	can	help	them	reconsider	their	perspectives.	LE	staff	point	out	that	debriefs	don’t	have	to	take	a	lot	of	time.	Even	a	few	minutes	of	discussion	around	a	specific	interaction	—	for	example,	what	could	have	gone	better	or	how	students	could	handle	situations	differently	in	the	future	—	can	be	very	valuable.	● Flexibility:	Even	though	specific	tasks	can	be	helpful,	UBC	LE	staff	members	suggest	that	placements	usually	work	best	when	students	are	“comfortable	working	in	ambiguity.”	When	students	are	flexible	in	their	approach	to	a	community	setting,	as	opposed	to	needing	continuous	direction	or	getting	frustrated	when	plans	change,	they’re	more	likely	to	flourish.	● LE	staff	acknowledged	that	they	are	very	fortunate	to	have	a	Student	Learning	Coordinator	to	help	support	student	placements.	This	staff	member	supports	practices	that	work	well	and	helps	to	combat	some	of	the	challenges	discussed	below.	Having	a	  22 person	work	as	a	bridge	between	the	various	stakeholders	in	experiential	learning	placements	is	very	helpful.		What	does	not	work	well:	LE	staff	indicated	that	students	sometimes	enter	placements	with	the	idea	that	they	will	offer	help	and	do	a	“favor”	to	a	community	organization.	These	attitudes	aren’t	surprising	given	that	a	“charity”	approach	dominates	much	of	the	discourse	around	community-university	engagement.	LE	staff	try	to	model	an	asset-based	approach	to	community	development	instead,	encouraging	students	to	recognize	the	many	strengths	of	the	community	and	the	knowledge	that	community	members	are	able	to	share.	As	Butterwick	and	Henry	(2014)	(see	Appendix	1)	suggest,	community	hosts	and	students	learn	from	and	teach	each	other	in	experiences	that	are	well	thought	out:	for	example,	students	learn	about	the	organization’s	mandate,	the	needs	of	their	constituents,	and	the	ebb	and	flow	of	community	services;	they	come	with	theories	and	co-create	new	knowledge	through	their	practice.	But	it	can	be	challenging	when	students	don’t	take	responsibility.	For	example,	students	who	enter	course-based	placements	should	share	their	course	requirements	and	learning	objectives	with	their	community	partners.	Supervisors	should	also	be	made	aware	of	what	they’re	being	asked	to	do	(e.g.,	reviewing	reflection	papers	or	completing	forms).	Different	students	have	different	requirements,	and	it	can	be	challenging	for	community	partners	if	students	don’t	manage	the	logistical	details	of	their	own	placements.	Like	other	community	partners,	LE	staff	members	raise	concerns	about	the	consequences	of	students	not	following	through	on	their	commitments	in	community.	When	students	are	managing	multiple	priorities	and	become	overwhelmed,	their	community	activities	may	suffer.	Although	community	organizations	come	to	rely	on	them,	there	are	usually	few	repercussions	if	students	arrive	late,	leave	early,	or	miss	volunteer	shifts	entirely.	Although	LE	staff	remind	students	of	their	commitment,	they	felt	that	university	instructors	and	coordinators	could	help	more	with	this.	Too	much	focus	on	grades	by	students	rather	than	on	their	learning	in	community	was	also	seen	as	problematic.	Again,	instructors	could	perhaps	play	a	greater	role	in	shifting	the	focus	away	from	traditional	approaches	to	assessment	towards	alternative	ways	to	document	students’	learning.		Finally,	LE	staff	acknowledge	the	amount	of	work	that	is	done	by	community	partners	to	support	student	placements.	There	are	times	when	students	require	a	great	deal	of	time	from	community	partners	—	in	particular,	if	they	have	not	organized	the	logistics	of	their	placements,	if	they	are	unprepared,	if	they	need	significant	guidance	in	completing	tasks,	and	if	they	need	frequent	debriefs	after	each	encounter.	There	are	times	when	supporting	students	can	take	much	more	time	for	community	partners	than	completing	the	task	themselves,	making	them	reluctant	to	take	on	new	UBC	students.		Suggestions:	LE	staff	had	several	suggestions	for	potential	partnership	tools.	One	idea	was	to	share	stories	from	community	members	with	lived	experience	in	the	neighbourhood	with	students.	Another	idea	was	to	create	a	gathering	place	for	students	who	volunteered	or	completed	placements	in	the	DTES	to	allow	them	to	debrief	and	reflect	with	their	peers.	This	gathering	place	could	be	an	actual	location	in	the	DTES,	but	another	option	would	be	an	online	hub	to	host	these	discussions.	This	platform	would	allow	space	for	students	to	talk	with	peers,	  23 share	articles	and	resources	and	their	learning.	UBC	LE	staff	also	suggested	that	more	acknowledgement	of	the	work	done	by	community	partners	to	support	student	placements	would	be	helpful.	Trying	to	provide	tangible	benefit	to	these	community	partners	would	be	one	way	to	recognize	all	the	time	and	work	they	put	into	supporting	student	learning.	At	the	University	of	Alberta,	community	partners	were	allowed	to	apply	to	take	a	university	course	(not	for	credit)	as	recognition	for	their	contributions.	Perhaps	this	could	be	considered	at	UBC.			UBC	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	Learning	(CCEL)		“Just	come	to	some	of	the	events	that	are	going	on	around	here…	we’re	always	open	to	new	people	coming	in	there’s	always	stuff	going	on	at	the	auditorium	at	Carnegie	[Community	Center];	there’s	movies,	music,	theatre,	portrait	reading	first	Mondays	of	every	month…	lots	of	stuff	to	get	involved	and	get	to	know	local	people”	-	Gilles	Cyrenne	   Photo	Credit:	Madeleine	Zammar		Second	year	mechanical	engineering	students	working	with	Habitat	for	Humanity’s	ReStore	in	Burnaby	as	part	of	a	Community-Based	Experiential	Learning	project	for	their	engineering	course.			Like	the	LE,	the	UBC	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	Learning	(CCEL)	also	works	with	students,	faculties,	and	community	partners	to	facilitate	ethical	and	reciprocal	partnerships	aimed	at	addressing	complex	community-based	issues.	Through	a	variety	of	curricular	and	co-curricular	programs,	students	are	placed	in	non-profit	organizations	and	other	community	settings	for	hands-on	and	immersive	experiential	learning	opportunities	throughout	Vancouver	and	across	the	Lower	Mainland.	Besides	helping	set	up	student	placements,	CCEL	also	provides	support	and	resources	for	faculties	and	departments	to	enhance	the	teaching	and	learning	process	  24 while	working	towards	ensuring	sustainable	relationships	between	the	university	and	community	(see	Appendix	2).	CCEL	provides	support	and	resources	to	community	partners	as	well	including	tools	to	guide	project	and	placement	scoping,	and	preparing	students	to	understand	the	not	for	profit	sector	before	beginning	a	community	placement.	Programs	coordinated	by	CCEL	include:	TREK,	Reading	Week,	Community	Grants	for	students,	student	workshops	on	asset-based	community	development,	ethical	community	engagement,	storytelling,	and	root	causes,	as	well	as	UBC	Changemaker	Showcase.4	For	this	report,	we	reviewed	CCEL	resources	and	evaluation	research,	and	held	a	dialogue	with	CCEL	staff	on	June	19,	2017.			What	works	well:		● CBEL	coordinators	agreed	that	effective	communication	and	early	outreach	to	community	partners	(3	to	9	months	in	advance,	plus	regular	contact	every	couple	of	months),	coupled	with	in-person	communication	are	crucial	to	successful	partnerships.	Early	communication	also	helps	community	partners	organize	their	annual	calendars.	● Establishing	clear	links	among	the	outcomes,	scope,	and	goals	of	the	course	in	advance	with	the	community	partners	helps	to	align	their	learning	goals.	This	alignment	ensures	that	community	needs	are	fulfilled	while	the	learning	and	contributions	of	students	are	optimized.	Communicating	community	and	university	needs	and	objectives	also	sustains	long-term	partnership	which,	in	turn,	contributes	to	the	development	of	infrastructure	supporting	student	involvement.		● CCEL	also	found	that	it	was	important	for	students	to	feel	involved	in	the	organization	process	while	being	clear	about	what	they	will	contribute.	Orientation	and	debriefing	opportunities	throughout	the	experience	have	benefits	for	both	the	partners	and	the	students.	For	example,	in	a	Kinesiology	course,	community	partners	offered	workshops	for	students	when	they	were	struggling	with	boundary	setting.			What	does	not	work	well:	Most	of	the	challenges	discussed	by	CCEL	staff	were	related	to	the	difficulties	that	community	partners	experience	in	working	with	the	university.	As	noted	by	other	partners,	the	fact	that	many	students	are	placed	in	the	DTES	for	short	time	periods	makes	it	difficult	for	them	to	complete	tasks,	and	the	frequent	turnaround	of	students	means	there	is	a	constant	need	to	orient	and	acculturate	newcomers,	which	is	onerous	for	community	partners.	Again,	while	there	may	not	be	easy	solutions,	more	recognition	of	this	work	by	university	people	would	help.	 			Suggestions.	CCEL	staff	recognize	the	need	to	develop	tools	for	students	that	better	inform	them	about	the	DTES	before	they	are	placed,	tools	that	don’t	reinforce	stereotypes.	These	tools	or	resources	should	be	provided	at	the	time	when	they	are	likely	to	be	the	most	effective,	for	example,	the	Situational	Analysis	template	(see	Appendix	2)	is	most	useful	before	the	start	of	student	placements.	                                                4	See	CCEL	website:	https://students.ubc.ca/about-student-services/centre-community-engaged-learning		  25 To	address	the	lack	of	institutional	memory,	suggestions	from	community	partners	to	CCEL	include:	a)	instructors	passing	along	reflections	from	past	to	current	students,	and	b)	creating	an	open	blog	for	students	to	document	their	learning	and	share	their	knowledge	with	current	and	future	students	(open	also	to	community	partners	to	provide	feedback).	These	practices	would	encourage	transfer	of	tacit	knowledge	between	student	cohorts	to	another.		CCEL	also	emphasizes	the	importance	of	developing	strong	partnerships	where	all	partners	in	learning	(students,	faculty,	and	community	organizations)	are	seen	as	equals,	working	together	in	constant	dialogue.	When	one	side	of	the	triad	is	stronger	than	the	others,	learning	experiences	are	often	less	effective.			Taking	a	360:	Key	Messages	From	All	Partners:	Community	Organizations,	Students,	Instructors,	LE	and	CCEL	Staff					Common	themes	across	the	partner	groups:			Communication								Communication	was	seen	by	all	as	critical	to	successful	partnerships.	University	instructors	should	connect	early	with	community	partners	to	ensure	time	for	clear	communication	around	project	scope,	learning	objectives,	and	how	relationships	can	develop	in	mutually	beneficial	ways.	Clear	communication	also	allows	students	to	have	clarity	regarding	their	tasks	and	responsibilities.	Students	also	need	to	be	reminded	of	the	importance	of	communicating	with	community	partners	as	well	as	with	their	instructor	throughout	their	placement.	Instructors	can	play	important	roles	in	helping	students	learn	how	and	when	to	communicate	with	partners.				  26 Ethics	and	reciprocity	in	relationships							All	partners	emphasized	the	importance	of	forming	ethical	and	reciprocal	relationships.	Strong	relationships	between	partners	developed	over	time	that	recognize	and	seek	to	address	all	partners’	needs	are	more	likely	to	result	in	success.	UBC	staff	and	community	partners	emphasized	the	need	to	prepare	students	prior	to	their	engagement	in	partnerships.	Students	and	instructors	need	to	acknowledge	the	time	and	effort	of	community	partners	in	supporting	their	learning.				Student	choice	regarding	community	engagement							Many	partner	groups	noted	that	when	students	can	choose	to	work	with	particular	community	partners	and	projects,	they	tend	to	be	more	engaged.				Sustainability	and	continuity	(transfer	of	knowledge)								All	partner	groups	found	it	challenging	that	students	are	usually	only	involved	in	these	partnerships	for	a	relatively	short	period	of	time.	Lack	of	continuity	can	be	challenging	for	community	partners	who	constantly	need	to	re-educate	students.	Students	too	often	feel	that	they	have	inadequate	time	to	contribute	to	the	organization.	Interaction	with	past	students	and	community	organizations	can	help	orient	new	students	to	ongoing	projects	and	ease	the	process	for	community	partners	and	instructors.	Models	of	CEL	where	it	is	built	into	programs	and	there	is	a	clear	sequencing	of	CEL	activities	may	be	helpful,	such	as	in	Land	and	Food	Systems	or	Dentistry.			Resource	and	time	constraints							Each	of	the	partners	face	their	own	resource	and	time	constraints.	Community	partners	are	often	managing	many	priorities	in	their	daily	work	and	find	it	challenging	to	support	students.	Instructors	feel	that	CEL	takes	a	great	deal	of	time	that	is	not	recognized—	additional	institutional	support	at	various	levels	would	motivate	more	instructors	to	include	CEL	in	their	courses.	UBC	students	also	find	it	challenging	to	balance	competing	demands	and	to	align	course	deadlines	and	deliverables	with	the	expectations	of	their	community	partners.		  			 	  27 Continuing	the	Conversation	and	Developing	Partnership	Tools	 		A	key	aim	of	this	report	is	to	spark	ideas	about	the	kind	of	tools	that	would	be	useful	in	helping	different	partners	plan,	implement,	and	sustain	ethical	and	reciprocal	experiential	learning	opportunities	in	the	DTES.					Key	Features	of	Resources	or	Tools	● Ideally,	tools	should	be	housed	in	a	central	location	that	can	be	accessed	by	all	partners	online.	Much	information	at	UBC	is	password	protected;	these	tools	must	be	open	access	for	community	organizations	and	members.	● Tools	should	be	designed	with	input	from	different	partners	but	should	recognize	that	one	size	does	not	fit	all.	The	extent	to	which	they	are	used	will	be	a	key	measure	of	success.	● Tools	should	be	adaptable	for	different	partnership	sites	and	participants;	their	design	should	recognize	different	stages	of	partnership	development	and	different	goals	for	partnership.	Principles	for	partnership	rather	than	recipes	are	desirable.	● Some	tools	should	be	targeted	toward	specific	partners	(e.g.	community	organizations	or	instructors),	recognizing	that	their	aims	and	circumstances	usually	differ.	Other	tools	should	be	intended	for	all	partners	to	help	improve	their	relationships	(e.g.,	template	for	debrief	involving	student,	partner	and	instructor).	● Tools	should	complement	not	replicate	the	numerous	resources	that	already	exist	for	partners.	● Tools	should	help	pass	along	practical	knowledge	so	that	partners	are	not	constantly	feeling	the	need	to	“reinvent	the	wheel.”	● Tools	should	be	sustainable.			  28 Some	Suggestions	from	Dialogues	and	Discussions		To	pass	along	practical	knowledge,	an	online	portal	offering	a	centralized	information	system	for	all	partners	was	proposed.	One	option	would	be	to	link	this	to	the	‘Information	Hub’	a	portal	on	the	LE	website	being	developed	as	a	central	repository	of	open	access	materials	for	the		‘Making	Research	Accessible	in	the	DTES’	initiative,	a	collaboration	between	the	LE,	UBC	Library	and	other	university	and	community	partners.			Other	useful	items	that	could	be	hosted	on	a	portal	or	housed	elsewhere	include:	● The	resources	listed	in	Appendix	2	in	a	user-friendly	format	● A	glossary	of	terms	related	to	partnerships	for	folks	who	are	new	to	CEL	and/or	the	DTES		● Interactive	online	map	of	key	organizations	in	the	DTES	● An	audio-guided	walking	tour	of	key	organizations	and	landmarks	in	the	DTES	● Communication	checklist	(specific	to	students,	instructors,	and	community	partners)	● Streamlined	forms	such	as	those	used	to	match	students	with	placements	(e.g.,	descriptions	of	opportunities	as	well	as	student	profiles)	● Anonymized	descriptions	of	common	learning	partnership	challenges	(e.g.,	related	to	logistics,	differences	in	partners’	aims)	and	suggestions	for	addressing	them		● VLOG	(video	blog)	which	shares	stories	of	community-engaged	learning	from	different	partner	perspectives	● A	comprehensive	list	of	pertinent	literature	including	case	studies	and	principles	for	effective	experiential	learning	in	communities		Different	partners	made	the	following	specific	suggestions	regarding	possible	uses	of	a	portal:		Community	Partners	A	portal	could	be	used	to:	● Post	“job”	descriptions	of	available	placements	including	○ Requirements	and	qualities	they	look	for	in	a	student	○ Communication:	description	of	how	student	will	be	mentored	(weekly	check-ins	vs.	other	options)	○ Time	requirement/length	of	placement		○ Number	of	positions	available	per	term	○ Deadline	by	which	to	apply	and	application	process	(interviews,	etc.)	○ Contact	information	and	link	to	online	application	Benefits:	A	centralized	location	for	educating	students,	instructors/coordinators	about	position	goals	and	ways	to	prepare	for	the	placement.			Students	A	portal	could	be	used	to:	● Post	student	profiles	for	partners.	Information	could	include:	○ Type	of	placement	they	hope	to	obtain	○ Related	(past/current)	work	or	volunteer	experience	  29 ○ Related	(past/current)	coursework	○ Strengths	related	to	the	position	○ What	they	hope	to	learn	○ How	often	and	in	what	ways	they	should	communicate	with	community	hosts.	● Share	experiences	with	the	current	or	next	generation	of	student	learners.	Format	will	be	streamlined	and	can	include:	○ Communication	advice	○ A	blog	where	students	can	share	experiences/ask	each	other	questions.	Benefits:	In	addition	to	learning	about	various	placements,	students	can	be	in	communication	with	each	other	through	a	blog	on	the	portal.	Importantly,	they	can	ask	each	other	questions	that	they	do	not	feel	comfortable	asking	their	professors	or	placement	supervisors	(such	as	how	to	dress	for	their	positions,	etc.).		Instructors/Coordinators	A	portal	could	be	used	to:	● Offer	suggestions	for	building	and	maintaining	partnerships	with	community	organizations.		● Enhance	course	requirements.	Suggestions	include:	○ Creating	a	student	profile	on	the	portal	○ Student	access	to	appropriate	sections	of	this	report	for	their	courses	○ Student	access	to	the	LE	videos	entitled	Shifting	the	Story	● Share	CEL	readings	and	materials	for	students	(example:	Dr.	Catherine	Douglas	has	produced	a	Student	Handbook	for	her	courses	that	could	be	shared	with/accessed	by	the	broader	community)	● Disseminate	guiding	questions	for	different	partners	to	consider	in	planning	experiential	learning	partnerships	with	students	in	the	DTES		Benefits:	A	two-pronged	tool	for:	1)	connecting	students	with	resources,	and	2)	sharing	resources	with	other	instructors/coordinators.			Next	Steps		Our	Call	for	Action	summarizes	key	ideas	from	this	report	and	outlines	a	process	for	engagement	with	partners.	This	includes:	● Expanding	Appendix	1	as	an	annotated	bibliography.	● Expanding	Appendix	2	to	indicate	how	resources	might	be	useful	for	different	partners	at	different	times.	Developing	infographics	for	CCEL	and	LE	websites.	● Mapping	existing	resources	(in	Appendix	2)	against	the	needs	outlined	by	partners	in	this	report	to	identify	gaps.	● Holding	focus	groups	with	different	partners	to	create	ideas	about	tools	which	will	be	most	useful,	sustainable,	and	feasible	to	develop.	Our	aim	is	to	develop	at	least	one	tool/resource	each	for	community	organizations,	instructors/coordinators,	and	students,	as	well	as	one	tool	to	be	used	by	all	partners.	  30 ● We	will	implement	and	assess	the	use	of	these	new	PPTs.	● Finally,	we	will	identify	additional	system	supports	that	could	be	provided	by	UBC.			 	  31 Appendix	1:	Readings	About	Experiential	Learning	and	Critical	Pedagogy		Bacon,	N.	(2002,	Fall).	Differences	in	faculty	and	community	partners’	theories	of	learning.	Michigan	Journal	of	Community	Service	Learning,	34-44.		Biesta,	G.	J.	J.	(2006).	Reclaiming	a	language	for	education	in	an	age	of	learning.	Beyond	learning:	Democratic	education	for	a	human	future	(pp.	13-32).	London:	Paradigm.			Bruce,	J.	(2013).	Service	learning	as	a	pedagogy	of	interruption.	International	Journal	of	Development	Education	and	Global	Learning,	5(1):	33-47.		Butterwick,	S.	&	Henry,	E.		(2014).	Community	Hosts’	Perspectives	of	CSL	Placements:	Supporting	Good	Partnerships	Between	Community	and	UBC.	http://hdl.handle.net/2429/64586			Butin,	D.	(2015).	Dreaming	of	justice:	Critical	service-learning	and	the	need	to	wake	up.	Theory	Into	Practice,	54(1):	5-10.		Dewey,	J.	(1938).	Experience	and	education.	New	York:	Collier	Books.		Freire,	P.	(2013).	Education	for	critical	consciousness.	London:	Bloomsbury.		Hodkinson,	P.,	Biesta,	G.	&	James,	D.	(2008).	Understanding	learning	culturally:	Overcoming	the	dualism	between	social	and	individual	views	of	learning.	Vocations	and	Learning,	1,	27-47.			Kilgo,	C.,	Ezell	Sheets,	J.	&	Pascarella,	E.	(2015).	The	link	between	high-impact	practices	and	student	learning:	some	longitudinal	evidence.	Higher	Education,	69:	509-525.		Kirkness,	Verna	J.,	&	Barnhardt,	Ray.	(1991).	First	Nations	and	higher	education:	The		four	R’s	–	respect,	relevance,	reciprocity,	responsibility.	Journal	of	American	Indian	Education,	30(3),	1-15.		Available	online:	http://www.ankn.uaf.edu/IEW/winhec/FourRs2ndEd.html		Lave,	J.	&	E.	Wenger.	(1991).	Situated	learning.	Cambridge:	Cambridge	University	Press.		Santos,	B.	S.	(2007).	Cognitive	justice	in	a	global	world:	Prudent	knowledges	for	a	decent	life.	Lanham:	Lexington	Books.		Sefa	Dei,	G.	(2016).	Indigenous	philosophies,	counter-epistemologies,	and	anti-colonial	education:	The	case	of	Indigenous	proverbs	and	cultural	stories.	In	W.	Lehmann	(Ed).	Education	and	society:	Canadian	perspectives	(pp.	190-206).	Don	Mills:	Oxford	University	Press.		Sfard,	A.	(1998).	On	two	metaphors	for	learning	and	the	dangers	of	choosing	just	one.	Educational	Researcher,	27(2):	4-13.	  32 	Simpson,	L.	B.	(2014).	Land	as	pedagogy:	Nishnaabeg	intelligence	and	rebellious	transformation.	Decolonization:	Indigeneity,	Education	&	Society,	3(3);	1-25.			Stetsenko,	A.	(2008).	From	relational	ontology	to	transformative	activist	stance	on	development	and	learning:	expanding	Vygotsky’s	(CHAT)	project.	Cultural	Studies	of	Science	Education,	3:	471-491.		Stoecker	R,	Tryon	EA.	(2009).	Unheard	voices:	Community	organizations	and	service	learning.	Philadelphia,	PA:	Temple	University	Press.		Taylor,	A.	(2017).	Service-learning	programs	and	the	knowledge	economy:	Exploring	the	tensions.	Vocations	and	Learning,	10(3):	253-273.			Taylor,	A.,	Butterwick,	S.,	Raykov,	M.,	Glick,	S.2,	Peikazadki,	N.2	and	Mehrabi,	S.2	(2015,	October).	Community	service	learning	in	Canadian	higher	education.	Knowledge	Synthesis	Report	produced	for	Social	Sciences	and	Humanities	Research	Council,	Ottawa.	URL:	https://open.library.ubc.ca/cIRcle/collections/facultyresearchandpublications/52383/items/1.0226035		Taylor,	A.	&	Kahkle,	R.	(2017).	Institutional	logics	and	community	service-learning	in	higher	education.	Canadian	Journal	of	Higher	Education,	47(1):	137-152.		Taylor,	A.,	Glick,	S.	&	Peikazadi,	N.	(forthcoming,	2018).	Service-learning	and	the	discourse	of	social	justice.	Service	learning	and	the	discourse	of	social	justice.	In	D.	Lund	&	K.	Grain	(Eds.),	Handbook	of	service-learning	for	social	justice.	Wiley.		Towle,	A.	&	Leahy,	K.	(2016).	The	Learning	Exchange:	a	Shared	Space	for	the	University	of	British	Columbia	and	Vancouver’s	Downtown	Eastside	Communities.	Metropolitan	Universities,	27(3):	67-82.	See:			https://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/muj/article/view/21372		Vygotsky,	L.	(1978).	Mind	in	society.	Cambridge:	Harvard	University	Press. 	  33 Appendix	2:	Resources	for	Partnerships		Appendix	2A:	Resources	for	Community	Partners		Name	of	Resource	sub-category	(if	necessary)	Link	 Description	 Format	(video,	article,	report,	etc)	Useful	for	(Experience	Level:	Beginner	Intermediate	Advanced)	Notes	(good	for	funding,	teaching	tool,	partnerships,	etc.)	UBC	Learning	Exchange	(LE)		 http://learningexchange.ubc.ca	Main	Website	for	the	learning	exchange,	which	allows	user	to	access	different	resources	and	contact	information	Website	 B,	I,	A	 For	an	historical	perspective	on	the	Learning	Exchange,	see:	www.margofryer.ca		 Introduction	to	the	Learning	Exchange	https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktd-jV8ZQF8	Introduction	to	the	Learning	Exchange;	short	3-minute	video	to	introduce	community	partners	to	the	role	and	opportunities	of	the	Learning	Exchange.	Video	 B,	I	 		 Learning	Exchange	feature	stories:	first-hand	experiences	of	students	who	have	participated	in	learning	http://learningexchange.ubc.ca/campus/students/feature-stories/	recounts	and	experiences	of	students	who	have	participated	in	learning	exchange	in	the	DTES	in	individual	webpages;	news	article/interview	style	Website,	news	article/interview-style	B,	I	 Last	updated	in	2015	  34 exchange	in	the	DTES		 Shifting	the	Story	trailer	https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JCbEaNxOxE	Trailer/Introduction	to	Shifting	the	Story;	short	1-minute	video	that	community	partners	can	assign	to	students	to	introduce	them	to	the	DTES	with	opportunity	to	find	out	more	by	checking	out	the	full	series.	Video	 B,	I,	A	 Must	have	UBC	CWL	account	to	access,	OR	contact	the	LE	Student	Learning	Coordinator,	Katie	Forman	at	katie.forman@ubc.ca	for	access	to	the	full	videos	UBC	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	Learning	(CCEL)	About	CCEL	 https://students.ubc.ca/about-student-services/centre-community-engaged-learning	We	collaborate	with	students,	staff,	faculty	and	community	partners	to	work	through	complex	community-based	issues.	Our	programs	place	students	in	community	settings	(non-profits	and	inner	city	schools)	either	as	a	required	part	of	an	academic	course,	or	through	voluntary	co-curricular	placements.	We	also	provide	resources	and	support	to	instructors,	departments,	and	faculties,	to	enhance	teaching	and	learning	processes.	We	connect	University	resources	to	the	community	in	ways	that	support	lasting	relationships.		 B,	I	 	  35 	 Definition/overview	of	CBEL	https://facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/sites/facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/files/cbel%20package_community_2016.pdf	Comparative	overview	of	CBEL	for	students,	faculty,	and	community	members	Website/PDF	B,	I	 List	of	potential	benefits	and	outcomes		 Resources	for	Community	Partners	https://facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/student-development-services/resources-community-partners	The	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	provides	its	community	partners	with	resources	to	aid	them	in	building	relationships	with	students	and	facilitating	successful	projects.		 	 		 Tools	for	a	Successful	Partnership	https://facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/sites/facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/files/ccel%20community%20resources.pdf	The	toolkit	is	designed	to	help	you	develop	and	build	partnerships	with	students,	student	leaders,	faculty,	and	staff	at	the	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	Learning.	Workbook	 B,	I	 		 An	Agreement	to	Work	Together	https://facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/sites/facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/files/ccel%20resources%20agreement.pThis	document	(similar	to	a	contract)	helps	define	the	partnership	between	the	student	leader	and	the	community	partner	including:	clarifying	goals,	individual	roles	and	responsibilities,	supervision,	and	plans	for	providing	learning	support,	Form/contract	B,	I	 	  36 df	 reflection,	communication	and	feedback		 Project	Request	and	Scoping	Form	https://survey.ubc.ca/s/CCEL/partners/	Are	you	an	organization	with	a	community-based	project	or	placement	idea	that	could	benefit	from	the	time,	skills,	and	commitment	of	UBC	students?	Whether	it’s	a	clear	project	idea	or	the	inkling	of	a	possible	opportunity,	complete	and	submit	this	project	request	form	and	staff	from	CCEL	will	follow-up	with	you	to	help	you	flesh	it	out.	Form	 B,	I,	A	 	Video:	Dr.	Eduardo	Jovel	on	Community-Based	Learning		 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTnaVuGzgCY	Interview	with	Dr.	Eduardo	Jovel	on	how	he	designed	his	curriculum	for	a	Land	and	Food	Systems	course	and	the	importance	of	reciprocal	relationships	and	partner	participation	in	community-based	learning.	Community	partners	can	view	this	video	for	an	example	of	how	CBEL	are	conducted	and	how	partnerships	are	formed	Video	 B,	I	 	Report	of	the	April	2017	Community	Dialogue		 	 Report	details	feedback	from	30	community	partner	organizations	to	process	how	to	increase	the	value	of	UBC	student	Report	 B,	I,	A	 Available	on	request	by	emailing	community.learning@ubc.ca	  37 Session	organized	by	CCEL/UBC	Community	Engagement	projects	for	not-for-	profit	organizations.		Butterwick,	S.	&	Henry,	E.	(2014).	Community	Hosts’	Perspectives	of	CSL	Placements:	Supporting	Good	Partnerships	Between	Community	and	UBC.	Report	prepared	for	the	Community	Learning	Initiative,	UBC.		 https://open.library.ubc.ca/cIRcle/collections/facultyresearchandpublications/52383/items/1.0363457	A	report	on	the	perspectives	of	community	hosts	on	their	community-service	learning	placements	Report	 I,	A	 	Tamarack	Institute		 http://www.tamarackcommunity.ca/latest/eight-touchstones-Tamarack's	goal	is	to	equip	you	with	the	skills,	knowledge,	resources	and	connections	you	need	to	make	lasting	change	in	your	community.	Website	 I,	A	 	  38 to-asset-based-community-development	This	link	offers	eight	touchstones	for	asset-based	community	development.			 	  39 Appendix	2B:	Resources	for	Faculty		Name	of	Resource	sub-category	(if	necessary)	Link	 Description	 Format	(video,	article,	report,	etc)	Useful	for	(Experience	Level:	Beginner	Intermediate	Advanced)	Notes	(good	for	funding,	teaching	tool,	partnerships,	etc.)	UBC	Learning	Exchange	(LE)		 http://learningexchange.ubc.ca		 	 	 For	an	historical	perspective	on	the	Learning	Exchange,	see:	www.margofryer.ca		 Introduction	to	the	Learning	Exchange	https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktd-jV8ZQF8	Introduction	to	the	Learning	Exchange;	short	3-minute	video	that	can	introduce	faculty	to	the	role	and	opportunities	of	the	Learning	Exchange.	Faculty	can	forward	video	to	community	partners	or	assign	video	to	students	to	build	partnerships/brief	students.	Video	 B,	I	 		 Learning	Exchange	feature	stories:	first-hand	experiences	of	students	who	have	participated	http://learningexchange.ubc.ca/campus/students/feature-stories/	Experiences	of	students	who	have	participated	in	learning	exchange	in	the	DTES	in	individual	webpages;	news	article/interview	style	Website,	news	article/	interview	style	B,	I	 last	updated	in	2015	  40 in	learning	exchange	in	the	DTES		 Shifting	the	Story	trailer	https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JCbEaNxOxE	Trailer/Introduction	to	Shifting	the	Story;	short	1-minute	video	to	introduce	faculty	to	the	DTES	with	opportunity	to	find	out	more	by	checking	out	the	full	series.	Faculty	can	also	assign	this	video	to	new	students.	Video	 B,	I,	A	 Must	have	UBC	CWL	account	to	access,	OR	contact	the	LE	Student	Learning	Coordinator,	Katie	Forman	at	katie.forman@ubc.ca	for	access	to	the	full	videos		 Student	orientation	materials.	"Shifting	the	Story"	faculty	facilitator	guide;	Asset	Exploration:	Self	directed	neighbourhood	walks;	Establishing	and	Maintaining	Boundaries	Workshop	http://learningexchange.ubc.ca/campus/students/student-orientation-materials/	Student	orientation	materials	help	students	learn	about	Vancouver’s	Downtown	Eastside	(DTES).	These	materials	are	designed	for	use	by	both	community	organizations	and	UBC	departments	to	help	students	better	understand	some	of	the	strengths,	opportunities	and	challenges	facing	this	community.	The	tools	help	students	to	balance	and	think	critically	about	the	negative,	one-dimensional	information	that	is	often	available.	Video;	self-guided	neighbourhood	walking	tour	(maps);	workshop	B,	I	 Offers	hands-on	guided	activities.	Must	have	UBC	CWL	account	to	access,	OR	contact	the	LE	Student	Learning	Coordinator,	Katie	Forman,	katie.forman@ubc.ca	for	access	to	these	materials.	  41 UBC	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	Learning	(CCEL)		 https://students.ubc.ca/about-student-services/centre-community-engaged-learning	We	collaborate	with	students,	staff,	faculty	and	community	partners	to	work	through	complex	community-based	issues.	Our	programs	place	students	in	community	settings	(non-profits	and	inner	city	schools)	either	as	a	required	part	of	an	academic	course,	or	through	voluntary	co-curricular	placements.	We	also	provide	resources	and	support	to	instructors,	departments,	and	faculties,	to	enhance	teaching	and	learning	processes.	We	connect	University	resources	to	the	community	in	ways	that	support	lasting	relationships.		 B,	I	 		 Description	of	community-based	experiential	learning	(CBEL)	for	faculty	members	https://facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/sites/facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/files/cbel%20package_Sept2016.pdf		 Website	 B,	I	 Defines	CBEL;	offers	examples	of	how	CBEL	has	been	used	in	UBC	courses		 Definition/overview	of	CBEL	https://facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/sites/facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/files/cbeComparative	overview	of	CBEL	for	students,	faculty,	and	community	members	Website/PDF	B,	I	 List	of	potential	benefits	and	outcomes	  42 l%20package_community_2016.pdf		 Faculty	Community	Based	Experiential	Learning	(CBEL)	Toolkit	(overview)	https://facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/student-development-services/faculty-community-based-experiential-learning-cbel-toolkit	This	toolkit	is	a	collection	of	tools	and	resources	that	can	be	utilized	in	the	design,	delivery	and	evaluation	of	community-based	experiential	learning	courses.	Website	 B,	I,	A	 It’s	ideal	to	contact	CBEL	well	before	the	course	start	date	to	ensure	there	is	ample	time	to	engage	with	the	collaborative	course	and	partnership	development	processes	that	make	for	successful	CBEL	courses.	CBEL	involvement	in	the	development	of	your	course	will	typically	span	three	years	and	shift	in	focus	and	intensity	over	time.	  43 	 The	Remote	Community	Based	Learning	Fund	https://students.ubc.ca/about-student-services/centre-community-engaged-learning/remote-community-based-learning-fund	Funding	to	instructors	teaching	courses	that	include	remote	community	based	experiential	learning	(CBEL)	opportunities	for	their	students.	This	funding	is	intended	to	support	collaborations	between	UBC	students	and	organizations	located	outside	of	the	Lower	Mainland	Website/	application	B,	I,	A	 Up	to	$5,000;	faculty	are	eligible	for	up	to	3	years	of	funding.	List	of	past	recipients	provided.		 CCEL	Workshops	https://students.ubc.ca/about-student-services/centre-community-engaged-learning/ccel-workshops	A	variety	of	workshops	designed	to	promote	ethical	community	engagement	and	equip	you	with	skills	to	create	and	deliver	projects	and	initiatives.	Topics	include	creating	strategic	project	budgets,	understanding	community	assets,	and	strengthening	community	partnerships,	as	well	as	how	to	scope	a	community	based	project	and	facilitate	conversations.	Website	 B,	I,	A	 These	workshops	are	open	to	everyone	and	provide	participants	a	great	environment	to	explore	opportunities	in	and	with	community,	as	well	as	network	with	students	across	campus.	Can	also	request	workshops.	UBC	Faculty	of	Education	Community	Engaged	Scholarship	http://ce.educ.ubc.ca/	Shows	the	range	of	community	engagements	available	through	the	Faculty	of	Education.	Website	 B	 		 What	is	Community	Engagement?	http://ce.educ.ubc.ca/definitions/	A	series	of	video	interviews	in	which	people	share	what	community	engagement	means	to	them.	Website	with	videos	B	 	  44 UBC	Faculty	of	Land	and	Food	Systems		 http://lfs350.landfood.ubc.ca/community-projects/	List	of	community	projects	pertaining	to	Land,	Food	and	Community	(2018	and	past).	Each	project	offers	a	summary,	purpose,	area	of	focus,	required	skills	and	location	Website	with	links	to	podcasts,	workshops	programs,	etc.	B,	I,	A	 Click	on	"2018	winter	projects"	in	left	margin	(links	in	centre	of	page	are	inactive).	iSchool	@	UBC:	School	of	Library	Archival,	and	Information	Studies	(SLAIS)	Experiential	Learning	Documents	and	Information	for	Supervisors	http://slais.ubc.ca/community/community-learning/experiential-learning-information/experiential-learning-documents/	Comprehensive	website/toolkit	to	aid	faculty	in	Experiential	Learning	(EL)	and	student	placements	Website/	toolkit/	forms	B,	I,	A	 Includes	links	for	supervisors:	EL	manual;	iSchool	Job	Blog;	host	an	Ischool	Student	online;	EL	Agreement;	various	placement	specific	documents;	practicum	and	internship	templates	and	guidelines;	supervisor	surveys	Examples	of	CBEL	courses		 	 	 	 	 		 Video:	Dr.	Eduardo	Jovel	on	Community-Based	Learning	https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTnaVuGzgCY	Interview	with	Dr.	Eduardo	Jovel	on	how	he	designed	his	curriculum	for	a	Land	and	Food	Systems	course	and	the	importance	of	reciprocal	relationships	and	partner	participation	in	community-based	learning	Video	 B,	I	 	  45 	 Field	Course	Collaboration	in	Food	Security	with	Squamish	First	Nation	http://lfs-indigenous.sites.olt.ubc.ca/place-based-learning/field-course-collaboration-in-food-security-with-squamish-first-nation/	Description	of	CBEL	course	(APBI	497B)	structure	and	topics,	which	can	offer	faculty	an	example	of	how	a	CBEL	course	is	designed	Website	 B,	I	 		 Land,	Food,	and	Community	http://lfs-indigenous.sites.olt.ubc.ca/place-based-learning/lfs-350/	Description	of	CBEL	course	(LFS	350)	with	links	to	blogs	and	videos	for	further	insight	into	how	the	course	was	conducted	and	how	it	was	beneficial	for	the	various	partners	involved	Website	with	links	to	blogs	and	videos	B,	I	 		 Faculty	of	Land	and	Food	Systems:	Course	working	on	developing	and	sustaining	institutional	memory	about	partnerships	http://lfs350.landfood.ubc.ca/community-projects/	List	of	community	projects	pertaining	to	Land,	Food	and	Community	(2018	and	past).	Each	project	offers	a	summary,	purpose,	area	of	focus,	required	skills	and	location	Website	with	links	to	podcasts,	workshopsprograms,	etc.	B,	I,	A	 Click	on	the	projects	in	current	and	previous	years	in	left	margin	(links	in	centre	of	page	are	inactive).	  46 and	projects.	Report	of	the	April	2017	Community	Dialogue	Session	organized	by	CCEL/UBC	Community	Engagement		 	 Report	details	feedback	from	30	community	partner	organizations	on	how	to	increase	the	value	of	UBC	student	projects	for	not-for-	profit	organizations.	Report	 B,	I,	A	 Available	on	request	by	emailing	community.learning@ubc.ca	Butterwick,	S.	&	Henry,	E.	(2014).	Community	Hosts’	Perspectives	of	CSL	Placements:	Supporting	Good	Partnerships	Between	Community	and	UBC.	Report	prepared	for	the		 https://open.library.ubc.ca/cIRcle/collections/facultyresearchandpublications/52383/items/1.0363457	A	report	on	the	perspectives	of	community	hosts	on	their	community-service	learning	placements	Report	 I,	A	 	  47 Community	Learning	Initiative,	UBC.	DePaul	University	Asset-Based	Community	Development	Institute	Training	Videos	&	Podcasts	https://resources.depaul.edu/abcd-institute/resources/Pages/training-videos-podcasts.aspx	Stories,	discussions,	speeches,	podcasts,	and	presentations	from	ABCD	Institute	faculty	and	related	sources.	Videos	+	podcasts	B,	I,	A	 		 Toolkit	 https://resources.depaul.edu/abcd-institute/resources/Pages/tool-kit.aspx	A	collection	of	tools	from	ABCD	faculty	members	as	well	as	individuals	and	organizations	that	embody	the	principles	of	ABCD	in	their	work.	Videos,	slides,	games,	forms	B,	I,	A	 	University	of	Alberta	CSL	Instructor	Information	https://www.ualberta.ca/community-service-learning/csl-instructor-info	Instructor	resources.	Learn	how	to	get	started,	integrate	CSL	into	already	existing	courses	or	access	already	built-in	CSL	components.	Website,	guidebook,	syllabi,	CSL	portal,	video	B,	I,	A	 Instruction	for	connecting	students	with	community	partners,	student	assessment	and	more.			 	  48 Appendix	2C:	Resources	for	Students		Name	of	Resource	sub-category	(if	necessary)	Link	 Description	 Format	(video,	article,	report,	etc)	Useful	for	(Experience	Level:	Beginner	IntermediateAdvanced)	Notes	(good	for	funding,	teaching	tool,	partnerships,	etc.)	The	Learning	Exchange		 http://learningexchange.ubc.ca		 	 	 For	an	historical	perspective	on	the	Learning	Exchange,	see:	www.margofryer.ca		 Introduction	to	the	Learning	Exchange	https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktd-jV8ZQF8	Introduction	to	the	Learning	Exchange;	short	3-minute	video	that	to	introduce	students	to	the	role	and	opportunities	of	the	Learning	Exchange.	Video	 B	 		 Learning	Exchange	feature	stories:	first-hand	experiences	of	students	who	have	participated	in	learning	exchange	in	the	DTES	http://learningexchange.ubc.ca/campus/students/feature-stories/	Recounts	experiences	of	students	who	have	participated	in	learning	exchange	in	the	DTES	in	individual	webpages;	news	article/interview	style	Website,	news	article/	Interview	style	B,	I	 last	updated	in	2015	  49 	 Shifting	the	Story	trailer	https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JCbEaNxOxE	Trailer/Introduction	to	Shifting	the	Story;	short	1-minute	video	to	introduce	students	to	the	DTES	with	opportunity	to	find	out	more	by	checking	out	the	full	series.	Video	 B	 Must	have	UBC	CWL	account	to	access,	OR	contact	the	LE	Student	Learning	Coordinator,	Katie	Forman	at	katie.forman@ubc.ca	for	access	to	the	full	videos		 Student	orientation	materials.	"Shifting	the	Story"	faculty	facilitator	guide;	Asset	Exploration:	Self	directed	neighbour	hood	walks;	Establishing	and	Maintaining	Boundaries	Workshop	http://learningexchange.ubc.ca/campus/students/student-orientation-materials/	Student	orientation	materials	help	students	learn	about	Vancouver’s	Downtown	Eastside	(DTES).	These	materials	are	designed	for	use	by	both	community	organizations	and	UBC	departments	to	help	students	better	understand	some	of	the	strengths,	opportunities	and	challenges	facing	communities	like	the	DTES.	The	tools	help	students	to	balance	and	think	critically	about	the	negative,	one-dimensional	information	that	is	often	available.	Video;	self-guided	neighbourhood	walking	tour	(maps);	workshop	B,	I	 Offers	hands-on	guided	activities.	Must	have	UBC	CWL	account	to	access,	OR	contact	the	LE	Student	Learning	Coordinator,	Katie	Forman	at	katie.forman@ubc.ca	for	access	to	these	materials.	  50 UBC	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	Learning	(CCEL)		 https://students.ubc.ca/about-student-services/centre-community-engaged-learning	We	collaborate	with	students,	staff,	faculty	and	community	partners	to	work	through	complex	community-based	issues.	Our	programs	place	students	in	community	settings	(non-profits	and	inner	city	schools)	either	as	a	required	part	of	an	academic	course,	or	through	voluntary	co-curricular	placements.	We	also	provide	resources	and	support	to	instructors,	departments,	and	faculties,	to	enhance	teaching	and	learning	processes.	We	connect	University	resources	to	the	community	in	ways	that	support	lasting	relationships.	Website	 B,	I	 		 Definition/overview	of	CBEL	https://facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/sites/facultystaff.students.ubc.ca/files/cbel%20package_community_2016.pdf	Comparative	overview	of	CBEL	for	students,	faculty,	and	community	members	Website/	PDF	B,	I	 List	of	potential	benefits	and	outcomes		 Connect	to	Community	Grant	(C2C)	https://students.ubc.ca/career/community-experiences/grants-community-projects/connect-The	Connect	to	Community	Grant	(C2C)	offers	UBC	students	the	opportunity	to	create	and	implement	a	meaningful	project	in	partnership	with	a	local	not-for-profit	community	Website/	grant	application	I,	A	 Applicants	can	request	funds	between	$200	and	$1500	for	their	proposed	project,	which	must	be	  51 community-grant	 organization.	 completed	by	August	31st.	Website	offers	info	about	the	grant;	what	the	grant	can	fund;	applying	for	the	Grant;	important	Grant	Dates;	past	grant	winners		 Chapman	&	Innovation	Grants	https://students.ubc.ca/career/community-experiences/grants-community-projects/chapman-innovation-grants	The	Chapman	Grant	and	the	Innovation	Grant	are	two	distinct	grants	housed	within	the	Centre	for	Community	Engaged	Learning.	TREK	and	Reading	Week	students	are	eligible	for	both	the	Chapman	Grant	and	the	Innovation	Grant.	All	other	UBC	undergraduate	and	graduate	students	(except	doctoral)	are	eligible	for	the	Innovation	Grant.	A	single	application	is	utilized	to	adjudicate	both	grants	for	all	applicants.		Website/	grant	application	I,A	 Funding	for	larger	community	projects.	Up-to	$10,000	is	available	for	each	project	and	6-10	projects	are	funded	each	year.	Students	do	not	need	to	apply	for	the	full	amount	if	another	amount	is	more	appropriate	for	their	project	needs.	Projects	should	be	completed	no	later	then	August	31st.		 Global	Fund	 https://students.ubc.ca/about-student-services/simon-k-y-lee-global-lounge-resource-centre/global-Students	can	apply	for	grants	up	to	$2000	for	student-led	initiatives	with	an	international	or	intercultural	focus.	Website	 B,	I,	A	 The	award	will	typically	be	for	up	to	$2,000.	If	you	are	requesting	more	than	$2,000,	please	provide	your	rationale	in	the	  52 fund	 project	description	in	the	application	form.	Awards	will	be	made	available	by	cheque	within	three	weeks	of	notification	of	award.		 CCEL	Workshops	https://students.ubc.ca/about-student-services/centre-community-engaged-learning/ccel-workshops	Build	your	community	partnership	and	project	development	skills	through	a	variety	of	workshops	designed	to	help	you	understand	project	budgets,	community	assets,	and	project	scoping.	Workshops	are	designed	to	promote	ethical	community	engagement	and	equip	you	with	skills	to	create	and	deliver	projects	and	initiatives.	Topics	include	creating	strategic	project	budgets,	understanding	community	assets,	and	strengthening	community	partnerships,	as	well	as	how	to	scope	a	community	based	project	and	facilitate	conversations.	These	workshops	are	open	to	everyone	and	provide	participants	a	great	environment	to	explore	opportunities	in	and	with	community,	as	well	as	network	with	students	across	campus.	Website	 B,	I,	A	 These	workshops	are	open	to	everyone	and	provide	participants	a	great	environment	to	explore	opportunities	in	and	with	community,	as	well	as	network	with	students	across	campus.	Can	also	request	workshops.	  53 	 Student	program:	Trek	https://students.ubc.ca/career/community-experiences/trek	The	Trek	Program	is	a	year	long	non-credit	local	community	service	learning	program	that	combines	weekly	community	service	with	on-campus	learning	opportunities.	Through	Trek,	you	can	contribute	to	your	community,	gain	real-world	experience,	and	build	lasting	connections.	Website	 B,	I,	A	 Some	programs	require	a	criminal	background	check.	Program	deadlines	for	applications	apply	(see	"Program	Guide"	on	link	provided)		 Student	program:	Reading	Week	https://students.ubc.ca/career/community-experiences/reading-week	Make	connections	in	community	organizations	and	gain	valuable	experiences	in	elementary	schools	and	non-profits	during	reading	week.	Locations	are	Vancouver	and	Lower	Mainland.	Website	 B,	I,	A	 Application	deadline	is	usually	in	January.		 Student	program:	UBC	Changemaker	Series	https://students.ubc.ca/career/ubc-changemaker-series	UBC	Changemaker	is	a	series	of	events	for	anybody	who's	interested	in	making	a	difference,	big	or	small.	Whether	you	have	a	local	issue	you	want	to	improve,	an	idea	for	a	start-up	you	want	to	get	off	the	ground,	or	you	just	want	to	interact	with	and	learn	from	the	people	who've	done	it	all	before,	Changemaker	has	something	for	you.	Website	 	 	  54 	 Student	program:	UBC	Map	the	System		https://students.ubc.ca/career/career-events/ubc-map-system-2018	A	global	research-based	competition,	Map	the	System	asks	you	to	think	differently	about	social	change.	Participants	select	a	social	or	environmental	issue,	conduct	research,	and	present	the	issue	in	a	way	that	people	can	share	and	learn	from.	Website	 	 Deadline	is	usually	in	March	UBC	Faculty	of	Education	Community	Engaged	Scholarship	http://ce.educ.ubc.ca/	Shows	the	range	of	activities	related	to	community	engagement	in	the	faculty.	Website	 B	 		 What	is	Community	Engagement?	http://ce.educ.ubc.ca/definitions/	A	series	of	videos	that	describe	the	various	meanings	of	community	engagement	Website	with	videos		 	UBC	Faculty	of	Land	and	Food	Systems	Community	Projects	http://lfs350.landfood.ubc.ca/community-projects/	List	of	community	projects	pertaining	to	Land,	Food	and	Community	(2018	and	past).	Each	project	offers	a	summary,	purpose,	area	of	focus,	required	skills	and	location	Website	with	links	to	podcasts,	workshops,	programs,	etc.	B,	I,	A	 Click	on	"2018	winter	projects"	rest	of	links	are	dead.		 Indigenous	Land-Based	Learning	http://lfs-indigenous.sites.olt.ubc.ca/place-based-learning/lfs-350/	Description	of	CBEL	course	(LFS	350)	with	links	to	blogs	and	videos	for	further	insight	into	how	the	course	was	conducted	and	how	it	was	beneficial	for	the	various	partners	involved	Website	with	links	to	blogs	and	videos	B,	I	 	  55 iSchool@UBC:	School	of	Library	Archival,	and	Information	Studies	(SLAIS)	Experiential	Learning	Documents	and	Information	for	Students	http://slais.ubc.ca/community/community-learning/experiential-learning-information/experiential-learning-documents/	Comprehensive	website/toolkit	to	aid	students	in	Experiential	Learning	(EL)	and	placements	Website/toolkit/forms	B,	I,	A	 Includes	links	for	students:	Experiential	Learning	Manual;	iSchool	Job	Blog;	UBC	Risk	Management	Insurance	application;	Worksafe	BC	Coverage	Information;	EL	Agreement;	Placement/Practicum/Internship-specific	documentation	DePaul	University	Asset-Based	Community	Development	Institute	Training	Videos	&	Podcasts	https://resources.depaul.edu/abcd-institute/resources/Pages/training-videos-podcasts.aspx	Stories,	discussions,	speeches,	podcasts,	and	presentations	from	ABCD	Institute	faculty	and	related	sources.	Videos	+	podcasts	B,	I,	A	 		 Toolkit	 https://resources.depaul.edu/abcd-institute/resources/Pages/tool-kit.aspx	A	collection	of	tools	from	ABCD	faculty	members	as	well	as	individuals	and	organizations	that	embody	the	principles	of	ABCD	in	their	work.	Videos,	slides,	games,	forms	B,	I,	A	 	University	of	Alberta	CSL	Student	Information	https://www.ualberta.ca/community-service-learning/csl-Student	resources.	Learn	how	to	get	started,	why	to	do	CSL,	how	to	choose	a	placement	Website	 B,	I,	A	 	  56 instructor-info	Examples	of	CBEL	courses		 	 	 	 	 		 Video:	Dr.	Eduardo	Jovel	on	Community-Based	Learning	https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTnaVuGzgCY	Interview	with	Dr.	Eduardo	Jovel	on	how	he	designed	his	curriculum	for	a	Land	and	Food	Systems	course	and	the	importance	of	reciprocal	relationships	and	partner	participation	in	community-based	learning	Video	 B,	I	 		 Field	Course	Collaboration	in	Food	Security	with	Squamish	First	Nation	course	http://lfs-indigenous.sites.olt.ubc.ca/place-based-learning/field-course-collaboration-in-food-security-with-squamish-first-nation/	Description	of	CBEL	course	(APBI	497B)	structure	and	topics,	which	can	offer	students	an	example	of	how	a	CBEL	course	is	designed	and	what	might	be	expected	of	them	when	they	take	part	in	a	CBEL	course	Website	 B,	I	 	Report	of	the	April	2017	Community	Dialogue	Session	organized	by		 	 Report	details	feedback	from	30	community	partner	organizations	to	process	how	to	increase	the	value	of	UBC	student	projects	for	not-for-	profit	organizations.	Report	 B,	I,	A	 Available	on	request	by	emailing	community.learning@ubc.ca	  57 CCEL/UBC	Community	Engagement	Butterwick,	S.	&	Henry,	E.	(2014).	Community	Hosts’	Perspectives	of	CSL	Placements:	Supporting	Good	Partnerships	Between	Community	and	UBC.	Report	prepared	for	the	Community	Learning	Initiative,	UBC.		 https://open.library.ubc.ca/cIRcle/collections/facultyresearchandpublications/52383/items/1.0363457	A	report	on	the	perspectives	of	community	hosts	on	their	community-service	learning	placements	Report	 I,	A	 			  58 Appendix	3:	Information	about	Dialogue	Sessions			Date	 									 Participants	June	6,	2017	 5	community	organization	representatives	June	12,	2017	 6	students	from	Urban	Ethnographic	Field	School	June	19,	2017	 4	CCEL	staff	June	20,	2017	 3	students	from	Education	Community	Field	Experience	September	26,	2017	 4	LE	staff	October	10,	2017	 2	instructors,	2	coordinators						 	  59 Acknowledgements		Funding	for	this	project	from	the	Teaching	and	Learning	Enhancement	Fund	at	UBC	is	gratefully	acknowledged.		Our	Steering	committee	and	Advisory	committee	members	provided	valuable	input	in	the	development	and	writing	of	this	report:			Steering	Committee	Members		Shauna	Butterwick,	Emerita	Professor,	UBC	Alex	Chow,	student,	UBC	Stephanie	Glick,	student,	UBC	Susan	Grossman,	Director,	UBC	CCEL	Kathleen	Leahy,	Director,	UBC	LE	Nasim	Peikazadi,	student,	UBC	Jill	Porter,	Community	Development	Advisor,	UBC	CCEL	Alison	Taylor,	Professor,	UBC	Angela	Towle,	Professor,	UBC		Advisory	Committee	Members		Beverly	Allan,	Student	Learning	Coordinator,	UBC	LE	Catherine	Douglas,	Instructor,	UBC	Kerry	Greer,	Instructor,	UBC	Gurjit	Pawar,	student,	UBC	Jill	Porter,	Community	Development	Advisor,	UBC	CCEL				

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