UBC Faculty Research and Publications

Nursing Research and Teaching Scholarship : 2012/13 to 2014/15 Research Report Saewyc, Elizabeth Marie; Hughes, Merrilee A; McDougall, Jennifer 2015

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NURSING RESEARCH AND TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP2012/13 to 2014/15 RESEARCH REPORTAUTHORS:Elizabeth SaewycMerrilee A. HughesJennifer McDougallSchool of Nursing Faculty of Applied Science2INDEXRESEARCH SUPPORT 3FUNDING SOURCES 4RESEARCH CAPACITY 5RESEARCH STAFF 6INTERNAL RESEARCH GRANTS 7ELIZABETH KENNY MCCANN SCHOLARS 8TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP 9PUBLICATIONS 10MEDIA COVERAGE 16FACULTY AWARDS 17GRADUATE STUDENTS 18GRADUATE TRAINEE AWARDS 19FOCUS ON CENTRES 20We are often so immersed in the fascinating work of our research and teaching scholarship day to day, that we forget to pause and look back over our achievements, note how far we’ve come, and reflect on where we’re headed. This report represents an opportunity to take such a moment to reflect on the scholarly enterprise of the UBC School of Nursing over the past three years. There have been a lot of noteworthy research achievements – making a difference in health care practice, influencing policy, educating the next generation of nurses, or improving the health and well-being of people in Canada and the world. Our School’s talented researchers have secured, sustained, and even increased levels of funding support for research in a time of increasing competition, and our research results regularly garner media attention. These are all laudable, and worth reflecting on.It strikes me as equally important to highlight those who come along with us on the journey of knowledge development and mobilization. This includes more than 100 research staff in our School, employed as research coordinators, postdoctoral fellows, research assistants, technicians, and teaching assistants, who all contribute to our mandate for excellence in developing and applying knowledge in nursing and health. Many of these staff are also graduate students, our next generation of scholars and researchers. Much of our research takes place in community and clinical settings, and so our research teams also include community co-researchers, advisory group members, Aboriginal elders, policymakers, and health care practice partners. And our communities of practice and networks of scholarship extend beyond the local communities, to include teams of researchers and communities across Canada, and increasingly, across the world. Trying to convey the network of relationships and research partners that contribute to the UBC School of Nursing’s research and teaching scholarship is challenging. Research is a team sport, and on that measure, our School’s research and teaching scholarship involves not just a single team, but an entire international sports league! This annual report presents only a small slice of our diversity, our productivity, and our global reach, but in doing so, let’s take a moment to celebrate the people who contribute to our research and teaching scholarship, as we work toward health for all.  Dr. Elizabeth Saewyc, Associate Director, Research and Teaching ScholarshipINTRODUCTIONNOTE: All fiNANciAl dETAils ArE iN TErms Of ThE UBc fiscAl YEAr (April 1 - mArch 31)3RESEARCH SUPPORTThe UBC School of Nursing has secured growing research funds in a competitive funding environment. Combined with a reduction in the number of tenure-track faculty between 2011/12 and 2014-15, achieving this level of research funding demonstrates significant productivity. Recent increases in funding despite fewer grant submissions reflect the success of several researchers to secure large multi-year team and network grants. The drop in application rates may indicate more strategic targeting of proposals toward specific competition. Current success rates range between 20 to 27 percent, which are consistent with national averages.Total UBC SoN Grant Funds Awarded by YearGrant Applications SubmittedTHREE-YEAR TOTAL OF AWARDS TO FACULTY PIs$14.5M $- $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 $6,000,0002012-13 2013-14 2014-15Research AdministrativeAllocationsStudent ResearchAllowancesSalary AwardsResearch OperatingAwards010203040506070802012/13 2013/14 2014/15Funded GrantsUnsuccessful ProposalsFUNDING SOURCESSubstantial changes in funding structures at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the primary source of research funding at the UBC School of Nursing, may have implications for some principal investigators’ funding stability. Foundations appear to offer one avenue for diversification of research support. The private sector is another available growth area.Over $43 million in research funding was awarded to research teams with UBC Nursing faculty members as co-applicants from 2012 to 2015.Research Funding Sources (2012/13 - 2014/15)CIHR = Canadian Institutes of Health Research SSHRC =  Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council MSFHR =  Michael Smith Foundation for Health ResearchCIHR63%SSHRC5%MSFHR4%Foundations21%Other4%UBC3%4DR VICKY BUNGAYBRINGING BIG DATA TO QUALITATIVE RESEARCHMarginalization is a process of exclusion that has devastating effects for individuals and communities. As the first recipient of a Canada Research Chair (CRC) in the UBC School of Nursing, Dr. Vicky Bungay is illuminating the complex multidimensional factors perpetuating marginalization among communities excluded along lines of gender and sexuality including sex workers. “The Canada Research Chair allows me to build and become more focused in the direction of the research that I do, but also in the methods that I use and the advancement of the approaches we use particularly in qualitative research,” she explains.From 2015 to 2020, the salary support and related Canada Foundation for Innovation infrastructure funding will help her to construct a research informatics lab to incorporate large data sets typically not feasible in qualitative analyses. This could include using multiple sources of data as well as longitudinal material to tap into the incredible nuance and power of qualitative designs that can be overlooked because they are difficult to analyze on a large scale. For example, Dr. Bungay hopes to incorporate historical analyses of the evolution of policy alongside the impact on peoples’ wellbeing, to examine whether shifts in policy have actually contributed to improvements or interacted in unexpected ways with other factors. Ultimately, Dr. Bungay’s SSHRC-funded Chair in Gender, Equity and Community Engagement will build on her research program to generate knowledge to enhance more effective and just social policies and programs to promote the well-being of those who are marginalized.REDUCING DIFFERENCES IN HEART HEALTH OUTCOMESCardiovascular disease (CVD) exacts a high death, morbidity and financial toll on Canadians.  Research has identified differences in outcomes from CVD by ethnicity, sex/gender and socio-economic status, yet the reasons for these differences are not fully understood. Dr. Martha Mackay’s program of research seeks to elucidate these differences.  Martha holds the dual roles of Clinical Assistant Professor in the UBC School of Nursing and Clinical Nurse Specialist in Cardiology at St. Paul’s Hospital.  Her current research explores the impact of important socio-demographic factors on health behaviour, access to, and outcomes from cardiovascular care, particularly during critical transition points.Martha completed her BSN, MSN, and PhD at UBC and was the recipient of a MSFHR Scholar Award in the clinician scientist stream in 2014.  It was her research mentors at the UBC School of Nursing that led her to pursue doctoral work and her current integrated role.DR MARTHA MACKAYCANADA RESEARCH CHAIRRESEARCH CAPACITY5“As professors, we mentor postdocs and graduate students, but to have the staff able to support them means that they have really consistent mentoring and support. Students that come onto those projects benefit from that team approach,” explains CRIHHI co-director Dr. Colleen Varcoe.On average the School of Nursing’s researchers employ more than 100 research staff, including project directors, postdoctoral fellows, research coordinators, research techs, graduate and undergraduate research assistants, community co-researchers, elders, and knowledge brokers.  Those are just the staff employed through UBC directly, some multi-site research studies also employ research team members across Canada, and internationally.RESEARCH STAFF6ElAiNE mOOdY ● AlisON phiNNEY Understanding How Nurses Judge Cognitive Function: A Description of Acute Care Nursing Practice with Older PeopleJAcqUEliNE fOrmAN ● JENNifEr BAUmBUsch Exploring changes in functional status while waiting for transcatheter aortic valve implantationTAmmY WU ● JOhN OliffE Male ICU nurses’ experiences in taking care of dying patientsNAvJOT sArAN ● JENNifEr BAUmBUsch Understanding nursing care of older adults with ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ orders in acute carerAmAN sANghErA ● sABriNA WONg Exploring Perinatal Depression in South Asian Immigrant WomenANNiE lAU ● WENdY hAll Safe sleep, day and night: The perceptions and experiences of parents regarding infant sleep safetydANA hAYWArd ● vickY BUNgAY Identifying the Contextual Factors that Influenced Experienced Nurses’ Decision to Leave Clinical PracticelEANNE cAlviN ● vickY BUNgAY Exploration of Community Nurses’ Experience of Organizational TrustAlisON gErlAch ● ANNETTE BrOWNE Pathways to health equity for aboriginal childrenrOBiN rEpTA ● JOY JOhNsON Fostering healthy dating experiences during adolescenceEmilY JENkiNs ● JOY JOhNsON Contributing to the development of community based knowledge translation through the creation, implementation, and evaluation of a youth mental health promotion initiative,riEllE cAplEr ● lYNdA BAlNEAvEs The CANARY Study: Cannabis access regulatory change studylAUriE cENdEr ● cOllEEN vArcOE Promoting equity in parental antenatal decision-making supporthArlEEN dEOl ● sUzANNE cAmpBEll Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in South Asian womencArlA hilAriO ● JOhN OliffE Influences of social context on mental health among immigrant young men: A collaborative integrated knowledge translation studyhOllY mckENziE ● cOllEEN vArcOE Reproductive justice and sovereignty as defined by urban indigenous women: A collaborative action based research projectkimBErlEY siNgiAN ● sABriNA WONg A Retrospective Cohort Study on the Primary Care Service Delivery to Men and Women diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease and Depression using the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance NetworkpriscillA TAipAlE ● TArNiA TAvErNEr Examining postoperative recovery after cardiac surgeryshEvONNE ThiNd ● sABriNA WONg Dietary choices in Canadian South Asian adolescentsApplicANT ● sUpErvisOrInternal Research GrantsINTERNAL RESEARCH GRANTSThe UBC School of Nursing’s internal research grants are funded entirely through donors. These funds directly support graduate student research projects and junior faculty members’ feasibility and pilot studies, which can catalyze future funding.0500010000150002000025000300003500040000024681012141618202012/13 2013/14 2014/15# of applicationsUnfunded Funded Amount7FLIPPING STUDENT LEARNING IN NURSINGGone are the days of didactic lectures.  Innovative pedagogies for the classroom and online environment are being explored to enhance teaching and learning practices.  Dr. Maura MacPhee is an associate professor in the UBC School of Nursing, and she is dedicated to the successful uptake and spread of pedagogical innovations.  Dr. MacPhee was the lead on a Flexible Learning initiative (2013-2015) that focused on the implementation of a hybrid model of curriculum delivery for the undergraduate program: online learning, in-class active learning strategies, an expanded skills lab with a diverse range of simulations, and community-engaged clinical practicums. Over two years, her team successfully introduced flipped or blended learning into the majority of undergraduate courses. Dr. MacPhee is the recipient of the Elizabeth Kenny McCann Scholar Award (2015 and 2016) in teaching at the UBC School of Nursing.DR MAURA MACPHEEELIZABETH KENNY MCCANN SCHOLARSDR BERNIE GARRETTCOLLABORATIVE ACTION FOR PEDAGOGIC EXCELLENCEFor seasoned educators it can be difficult to risk experimenting with potentially time intensive educational innovations over staying with tried teaching approaches. With the insight gleaned from three years in the role of Associate Director of the Undergraduate program at the UBC School of Nursing, Dr. Bernie Garrett was poised to use his Elizabeth Kenny McCann Scholar (2013 & 2014) award to stimulate novel thinking about teaching and learning. He launched a range of development activities designed to foster and sustain a climate conducive to optimal learning and professional development for students, faculty, and alumni.Early successes included hosting regular education journal clubs and capturing the ongoing dialogue about educational research and scholarship on a new teaching blog. Dr. Garrett also used the funds to build capacity through funding student activity in the field of educational scholarship.With relatively few funds targeted towards the development of educational research and scholarship, this award helps stimulate and support the ongoing progress in this area. Nurse educators continue to prove leaders in the development of novel and creative approaches to teaching and learning, and engaging in educational scholarship and research, which ultimately benefits students.The Elizabeth Kenny McCann Scholar Award is awarded to enhance teaching and learning pedagogy and scholarship in the UBC School of Nursing. Building on the capacity and strengths within the School, this scholar award supports a faculty leader to launch teaching/learning scholarship initiatives and devote significant attention to optimizing the engagement of faculty in new and evolving pedagogical and curricular processes.The Award is made possible through a fund developed in memory of Elizabeth Kenny McCann, who was a leading force in the development of nursing education in British Columbia and a faculty member in the School of Nursing for 35 years. Most importantly, she exemplified a student-centered approach to teaching and learning.8TEACHING SCHOLARSHIPThe UBC School of Nursing is committed to using research to inform best practices in health professional education. Recent projects funded through the UBC-wide Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund tackle diverse areas from simulation and augmented reality to ensuring that nursing educators and students learn about the roots of inequity and the responsibility of health professionals within the context of health and healthcare.In addition to nursing-led initiatives, many of our faculty and students engage as co-investigators on campus wide projects. For example, Marlee Groening has been a co-applicant on several projects including personalized accessibility plans for students with disabilities and interventions to support student mental health. Year Project PI Amt2014/15mLearning for Practice Phase 2: using augmented reality to enhance lab and clinical teaching in multidisplinary health professional education and practiceBernie Garrett $30,7602013/14 Building collaborative nursing simulation education excellenceMaura MacPhee $42,5902013/14mLearning for Practice Skills: Using augmented reality to enhance lab and clinical teachingBernie Garrett$13,0262012/13Educating Towards Equity, Citizenship, and Respectful Relations in Nursing and Health Care:  A Faculty and Student Transformative Intervention ProjectHelen Brown $37,786TLEF Competitions9PUBLICATIONSPEER REVIEWFrom 2012 to 2014, 256 peer-review journal articles were published by tenure track faculty. The commitment of UBC School of Nursing researchers to mentoring the next generation of researchers is evident from their student co-authored publications.01020304050607080901002012 2013 2014Faculty Publications Faculty Pubs with student co-authorsUBC Nursing Peer-Reviewed Publications10Although Web of Science only indexes 215 of the 256 peer-reviewed articles authored by UBC Nursing faculty between 2012 and 2014, the trends show growing impact of our work.CITATIONSNurses’ perceptions of and responses to morally distressing situations  Varcoe, Colleen; Pauly, Bernie; Storch, Jan; et al. NURSING ETHICS: 19(4): 488-500   Published: JUL 2012 Closing the health equity gap: evidence-based strategies for primary health care organizations  Annette Browne, Colleen Varcoe, Sabrina Wong, Victoria Smye, Josée Lavoie, Doreen Littlejohn, David Tu, Olive Godwin, Murry Krause, Koushambhi Khan, Alycia Fridkin, Patricia Rodney, John O’Neil, and Scott Lennox  INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR EQUITY IN HEALTH: 11:59  Published: OCT 13 2012 Men’s discourses of help-seeking in the context of depression  Johnson, Joy L.; Oliffe, John L.; Kelly, Mary T.; et al. SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH & ILLNESS: 34(3): 345-361   Published: MAR 2012Our Most Cited Papers0200400600800100012001400160018002010 2011 2012 2013 2014Peer-reviewed Journal CitationsUBC Nursing Peer-Reviewed Citations Trends11Almutairi, A.F. & Rodney, P. (2013). Critical cultural competence for culturally diverse workforces: Toward equitable and peaceful health care. Advances in Nursing Science, 36 (3), 200-212.Balneaves, L.G., Truant, T.L.O. (n.d.) Complementary Medicine Education and Outcomes Research (CAMEO) program. Retrieved from http://www.cameoprogram.orgBalneaves, L.G., Van Patten, C., Truant. T.L.O., Kelly, M., Neill, S.E., Campbell, K.L. (2014). Women’s perspectives on a weight loss and physical activity lifestyle intervention in the context of breast cancer. Journal of Supportive Care in Cancer, 22, 2051-2065. doi:10.1007/s00520-014-2185-4.Balneaves, L.G., Truant, T.L.O., Verhoef, M., Porcino, A., Ross, B., Wong, M., & Brazier, A.S. (2012). The Complementary Medicine Education and Outcomes Program (CAMEO) program: A foundation for patient and health professional education and decision support programs. Special edition on Complementary Medicine for Patient Education & Counseling, 89(3), 461-6. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2012.01.005.Baumbusch, J., Mayer, S., Phinney, A., & Baumbusch, S. (2015). Aging Together: Older Parents Caring for Adult Children with Intellectual Disabilities. (early view). The Gerontologist. doi:10.1093/geront/gnv103Baumbusch, J., Phinney, A., & Baumbusch, S.  (2014). Practicing family medicine for adults with intellectual disabilities: Patient perspectives of helpful interactions. Canadian Family Physician, 60, e.356-361.Baumbusch, J., & Phinney, A. (2014). Invisible hands: The role of families in care work in long-term residential care.  Journal of Family Nursing, 20, 73-97. doi:10.1177/1074840713507777Baumbusch, J., Dahlke, S., & Phinney, A.  (2012).  Nursing Students’ Knowledge and Beliefs about Care of Older Adults in a Shifting Context of Nursing Education. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 68(11), 2550-2558.Bell, J.A.H. & Balneaves, L.G. (2015). Cancer patient decision making related to clinical trial participation: A systematic review with implications for patients’ relational autonomy. Journal of Supportive Care in Cancer, 23(4), 1169-1196. doi: 10.1007/s00520-014-2581-9.Boschma, G. (2015). Conducting oral history research in community mental health nursing. In: M. de Chesnay, Series Editor. Nursing Research Using Historical Methods: Qualitative Research Designs and Methods in Nursing. NY: Springer Publishing, pp. 85-104.Boschma, G. (2015). Beyond the Cuckoo’s Nest: Nurses, Electro-Convulsive Therapy and Dutch general hospital psychiatry. In: G. Fealy, C. Hallett & S. Malchau Dietz (eds), Histories of Nursing Practice, pp. 100-122. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Boschma, G., Davies, M., Morrow, M. (2014). “Those people known as mental patients…”: Professional and patient engagement in community mental health in Vancouver, BC in the 1970s. Oral History Forum d’histoire orale, 34. [http://www.oralhistoryforum.ca/index.php/ohf/article/view/571] Boschma, G. (2013). Community mental health post-1950: Reconsidering nurses’ and consumers’ identities. In: D’Antonio, P., Fairman, J. & Whelan, J. (Eds.). Routledge Handbook on the Global History of Nursing, pp. 237 -258. London: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.Boschma, G. (2012). Community mental health nursing In Alberta, Canada: An oral history. Nursing History Review, 20, 103-135.Brown, H., McPherson, G. & Peterson, R*., Newman, V*. & Cranmer, B*. (2012). Our land, our language: Connecting dispossession and health equity in a rural Aboriginal context. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 44(2), 44-63.Brown, H. & McPherson, G. (2012) Maternal and Child Health. In Stamler & Yiu (Eds.), Community Health Nursing: A Canadian Perspective, 3rd edition. Toronto: Pearson Prentice Hall.Brown, H. & Allison, G. (2012). Educative spaces for teaching and learning ethical practice in nursing. In J. Storch, P. Rodney & R. Starzomski (Eds.) Toward a moral horizon: Nursing ethics for leadership and practice (2nd Ed). Toronto: Pearson Prentice Hall.Browne, A.J., MacDonald-Jenkins, J., & Luctkar-Flude, M. (Eds.) (2014). Physical examination and health assessment by C. Jarvis (2nd Canadian Edition). Toronto: Elsevier. Browne, A. J., Varcoe, C. M., Wong, S. T., Smye, V. L., & Khan, K. B. (2014). Can ethnicity data collected at an organizational level be useful in addressing health and healthcare inequities? Ethnicity and Health, 19(2), 240-254. doi:10.1080/13557858.2013.814766Browne, A.J., Varcoe, C., Wong, S., Smye, V., Lavoie, J., Littlejohn, D., Tu, D., Godwin, O., Krause, M., Khan, K., Fridkin, A., Rodney, P., O’Neil, J., & Lennox, S. (2012). Closing the health equity gap: Evidence-based strategies for primary health care organizations. International Journal for Equity in Health, 11(59), doi:10.1186/1475-9276-11-59Bungay, V., Oliffe, J., & Atchison, C. (2015). Addressing underrepresentation in sex work research: Reflections on designing a purposeful sampling strategy. Qualitative Health Research.  Published ahead of print. doi:10.1177/1049732315613042Bungay, V., Masaro, C., & Gilbert, M. (2014) Examining the scope of public health nursing practice in sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention and management. What do nurses do? Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23(21-22), 3274-3285.  doi:10.1111/jocn.12578Bungay, V. (2013). Health care among street-involved women: The justification and perpetuation of inequity. Qualitative Health Research, 23(3), 1016-1026. doi:10.1177/1049732313493352Bungay, V., Kolar, K., Thindal, S., Remple, V., Johnston, C., & Ogilvie, G. (2013). Community-based HIV and STI prevention with women working in indoor sex markets. Health Promotion Practice, 14(2), 247-255. doi:10.1177/1524839912447189Bungay, V., Halpin, P., Halpin, M., Johnston, C., & Patrick, D. (2012). Violence in the massage parlour industry: Experiences of Canadian-born and immigrant women. Health Care for Women International, 33, 262-284. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07399332.2011.Campbell, S. H., Crabtree, R. D., & Kelley, P. W. (2013). Integrative Nursing and Health Sciences Initiatives For The 21st Century: Vision And Pedagogy At One Jesuit University. Journal of Catholic Higher Education, 32 (2), 2, 227-248.Campbell, S. H., Pagano, M. P., O’Shea, E. R., Connery, C., & Caron, C. (2013). Development of the Health Communication Assessment Tool: Enhancing Relationships, Empowerment, and Power-Sharing Skills. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 9(11): e543-e550. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2013.04.016.Castral, T. C., Warnock, F. F., Ribeiro, L. M., Vasconcelos, M. G. L. D., Leite, A. M., & Scochi, C. G. S. (2012). Maternal factors regulating preterm infants’ responses to pain and stress while in maternal kangaroo care. Revista latino-americana de enfermagem, 20(3), 435-443.Currie, L.M., Ronquillo, C., Dick, T. (2014). Rural and Remote Access to Technology in Canada. Studies in Health Technologies and Informatics, 201:407-12. Dahlke, S., Hall, W. A., Phinney, A. (2015). Maximizing contributions of participant observation while managing challenges. Qualitative Health Research, 25(8), 1117 – 1122. doi: 10.1177/1049732315578636Dick, B., Ferguson, J., Saewyc, E., Baltag, V., & Bosek, K. (14 May 2014). Health for the World’s Adolescents: A Second Chance in the Second Decade of Life. Geneva: World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/adolescent/second-decade. Dowding, D.W., Currie, L.M., Borycki, E., Clamp, S., Favela, J., Fitspatrick, G., Gardner, P., Hamer, S., Hardiker, N., Johnson, O., Lawton, R., O’Brien, A., Randell, R., Westbrook, J., Whitewood-Moores, Z. & Dykes, P.C. (2013). International Priorities for Research in Nursing Informatics for Patient Care. Proceedings of the International Medical Informatics Association - MedInfo 2013, August 23-25th Copenhagen, Denmark. Studies in Health Technologies and Informatics, 192:372-6.Ford-Gilboe, M., Varcoe, C., Noh, M., Wuest, J., Hammerton, J., Alhalal, E., & Burnett, C. (2015). Patterns and predictors of service use among women who have separated from an abusive partner. Journal of Family Violence, 30(4), 419-431. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10896-015-9688-8Garrett B.M. (2013) Science and Modern Thought in Nursing: pragmatism and praxis for evidence-based practice. Victoria, Canada, Northern Lights Media. ISBN: 978-0-9919846-0-2pUBlicATiONs cONT’dThe citations on this and the following pages represent a much larger collection of publications produced during this period.12Garrett B.M. & Cutting R.L. (2015) Ways of Knowing; realism, nominalism and non-realism and a typology revisited. Nursing Inquiry, 22(2), 95-105.Garrett, B.M., MacPhee, M., Jackson, C. (2013) Evaluation of an ePortfolio for the Assessment of Clinical Competence in a Baccalaureate Nursing program. Nurse Education Today, 33(10), 1207-1213.Garrett B.M., Taverner T., Masinde W., Gromala D., Shaw D. Negraeff D. (2014) A Rapid Evidence Assessment of Immersive Virtual Reality as an Adjunct Therapy in Acute Pain Management in Practice. The Clinical Journal of Pain, 30(12), 1089-98.Gerlach, A., Browne, A.J., & Suto, M. (2014). Play as a critical occupational determinant of health for Aboriginal children. Journal of Occupational Science, 21(3), 243-258. doi: 0.1080/14427591.2014.908818Greenlee, H., Balneaves. L.G., Carlson, L.E., Cohen, M., Deng, G., Hershman, D., Mumber, M., Perlmutter, J., Seely, D., Sen, A., Zick, S.M., & Tripathy, D. (2014). Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as a supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs, 2014(50), 346–358.Hall  W. A., Hutton  E., Brant  R., Collet, JP, Gregg,  K., Saunders,  R., Ipsiroglu, O., Gafni,  A., Triolet,  K., Tse,  L., Bhagat,  R., & Wooldridge,  J. (2015). A randomized controlled trial of an intervention for infants’ behavioral sleep problems. BMC Pediatrics, 15:181. doi:10.1186/s12887-015-0492-7Hall, W. A., Liva, S., Moynihan, M., Saunders, R. (February, 2015). A comparison of actigraphy and sleep diaries for infants’ sleep behavior. Frontiers in Psychiatry, Special topic: Frontiers in Sleep Disorders, 6 (19), 1-7. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2015.00019Hartrick Doane, G., & Varcoe, C. (2015). How to nurse: Relational inquiry with individuals and families in changing health and health care contexts. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.Konishi C., Saewyc E., Homma Y., & Poon C. (2013). Population-level evaluation of school-based interventions to prevent problem substance use among gay, lesbian and bisexual adolescents in Canada. Preventive Medicine, 57(6), 929-933. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.06.031Lauck SB, Baumbusch J, Achtem L, Forman JM, Carroll SL, Cheung A, Ye J, Wood DA, Webb JG. (2015). Factors influencing the decision of older adults to be assessed for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: An exploratory study. Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1474515115612927Lauck SB, Sawatzky R, Johnson JL, Humphries K, Bennett MT, Chakrabarti S, Kerr CR, Tung S, Yeung-Lai-Wah JA, Ratner PA. (2015). Sex is associated with differences in individual trajectories of change in social health after implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes, 8(2 Suppl 1):S21-30. doi: 10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.114.001607McDuff, J. & Phinney, A. (2015). Walking with meaning: subjective experiences of physical activity in dementia. Global Qualitative Nursing Research, 2, 2333393615605116.Musto, L., Rodney, P., & Vanderheide, R. (2014). Moving toward interventions to address moral distress: Navigating the reciprocity of structure and agency. Journal of Nursing Ethics, 22(1), 91-102. doi: 10.1177/0969733014534879 Oliffe, J.L., Mroz, L., Bottorff, J.L., Braybrook, D., Ward, A., & Goldenberg, L.S. (2015). Heterosexual Couples and Prostate Cancer Support Groups: A Gender Relations Analysis. Supportive Care in Cancer. 23(4), 1127-1133.Oliffe, J.L., Han, C.S., Drummond, M., Sta. Maria, E., Bottorff, J.L. & Creighton, G. (2015). Men, Masculinities and Murder-Suicide. American Journal of Men’s Health. 9(6), 473-485.  Oliffe, J.L., Han, C.S.E., Sta. Maria, E., Lohan, M., Howard, T., Stewart, D., & MacMillan, H. (2014). Gay Men and Intimate Partner Violence: A Gender Analysis. Sociology of Health and Illness, 36(4), 564-579.Oliffe, J.L., & Han, C.S.E. (2014). Beyond Workers’ Compensation: Men’s Mental Health In and Out of Work. American Journal of Men’s Health, 8(1), 45-53. Oliffe, J.L., Ogrodniczuk, J.S., Bottorff, J.L., Johnson, J.L., & Hoyak, K. (2012). “You Feel Like You Can’t Live Anymore”: Suicide From the Perspectives of Canadian Men Who Experience Depression. Social Science and Medicine, 74, 505-514.O’Shea, E. R., Campbell, S. H., Engler, A. J., Beauregard, R., Chamberlin, E. C., Currie, L. M., (2015),  Effectiveness of a perinatal and pediatric End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) curricula integration. Nursing Education Today. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2015.02.015 Pagano, M. P., O’Shea, E. R., Campbell, S. H., Currie, L. M., Chamberlin, E., & Pates, C. A. (2015, September). Validating the health communication assessment tool_ (HCAT). Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 11(9), 402-410. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2015.06.001. Phinney, A. (2014). As the body speaks: creative expression in dementia. In L-C. Hyden, H. Lindemann, & J. Brockmeier (Eds.). Beyond loss. Dementia, identity, personhood. pp. 120-134. New York: Oxford University Press. Phinney, A. Making art for making place: Imagining possibilities in dementia. Paper presentation, From Memory Loss to Memory Shift: Rethinking the Discourse of Pathology, Toronto, September 26, 2015. Retrieved from https://memoryshift.wordpress.com/recordings/Phinney, A., Moody, E. & Small, J. (2014). The effect of a community-engaged arts program on older adults’ well-being. Canadian Journal on Aging, 33(3), 336-345. Phinney, A., Dahlke, S. & Purves, B. (2013). Shifting patterns of everyday activity in early dementia: Experiences of men and their families, Journal of Family Nursing, 19, 348-374.pUBlicATiONs cONT’dLauck SB, Wood DA, Achtem L, Baumbusch J, Boone RH, Cheung A, Dvir D, Stub D, Tan JS, Ye J, Webb JG. (2014). Risk stratification and clinical pathways to optimize length of stay after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Can J Cardiol, 30(12):1583-7. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2014.07.012Lauck S, Garland E, Achtem L, Forman J, Baumbusch J, Boone R, Cheung A, Ye J, Wood DA, Webb JG. (2014). Integrating a palliative approach in a transcatheter heart valve program: bridging innovations in the management of severe aortic stenosis and best end-of-life practice. Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs, 13(2):177-84. doi: 10.1177/1474515114520770Lauck S, Garland E, Achtem L, Forman J, Baumbusch J, Boone R, Cheung A, Ye J, Wood DA, Webb JG. (2014). Integrating a palliative approach in a transcatheter heart valve program: bridging innovations in the management of severe aortic stenosis and best end-of-life practice. Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs, 13(2):177-84. doi: 10.1177/1474515114520770Lynam, M.J., Grant, E. & Staden, K. (2012) Engaging with Communities to Foster Health: The Experience of Inner-City Children and Families with Learning Circles. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 44(2): June.Lynam, M.J. (2015). Qualitative analytic strategies:  Writing against ‘representation’ and ‘categorization’.  Qualitative Methods Handbook. Eds. Olson, J. & Young, R.  Sage.Mackay, M. H., Ratner, P. A., Nguyen, M., Percy, M., Johnson, J. L., Galdas, P. & Grunau, G. (2014). Inconsistency in measuring treatment-seeking delay among acute coronary syndrome patients: A systematic review. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 13, 483-493. doi:10.1177/1474515114524866MacPhee, M., Chang, L., Havaei, F., & Chou, W.S. (2014). A descriptive account of an interprofessional collaborative leadership project. Administrative Sciences, 4(3), 373-399.MacPhee, M., Berry, S., Brander, R., Van Dikj, J., Bainbridge, L., & Paterson, M. (2015). A hybrid approach to service learning via a new leadership development program. In Lan Lin, P., M. Wiegand & A.R. Smith-Tolkien (Eds), Service-learning in higher education: building community across the globe. Indianapolis, IN: University of Indianapolis Press.MacPhee, M. (2014). Valuing Patient Safety: Responsible Workforce Design. Published by the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions. Retrieved from https://nursesunions.ca/sites/default/files/valuing_patient_safety_web_may_2014.pdf MacPhee, M., & Bora, L. (2012). Flexible Work Practices for Nurses. Published by the International Council of Nurses. Retrieved from http://www.icn.ch/images/stories/documents/pillars/sew/ICHRN/Facts_Sheets/Flexible%20Work%20Practices%20in%20Nursing.pdf Mager, D.M. & Campbell, S.H. (2013).  Home Care Simulation for Student Nurses: Medication Management in the Home. Nurse Education Today (33), 1416 - 1421. doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.11.007; http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2012.11.00713Rodney, P.A. (2013). Seeing ourselves as moral agents in relation to our organizational and sociopolitical contexts. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, 10 (2). doi: 10.1007/s111673-013-9461-8Rodney, P., Harrigan, M.L, Jiwani. B., Burgess, M., & ., Phillips, J.C. (2013). A further landscape: Ethics in health care organizations and health/health care policy. In Storch, J., Rodney, P., & Starzomski, R. (Eds.) Toward a moral horizon: Nursing ethics for leadership and practice (2nd ed.). Toronto: Pearson-Prentice Hall.Roots, R., Brown, H., Bainbridge, L., Li, L.C. (2014) Rural rehabilitation practice: Perspectives of occupational therapists and physical therapists in British Columbia, Canada. Rural and Remote Health. 14, 2506. Ruck, M.D., Keating, D.P., Saewyc, E.M., Earls, F.J., Ben-Arieh, A. (2014, September 26). The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child: Its Relevance for Adolescents. Journal of Research on Adolescence. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/jora.12172.Saewyc, E. (2014). Chapter 8: Adolescent pregnancy among lesbian, gay and bisexual teens. In A. Cherry, M.E. Dillon, (eds.) International Handbook on Adolescent Pregnancy. New York: Springer Science+Business Media. Pp 159-169. Silas, L., MacPhee, M., Forward, D., McKenna, V., Zambory, T. Symposium presentation: Safeguarding Patient Safety through Responsible Workforce Design. International Council of Nurses, Seoul, Korea.Stoll, K., Edmonds, J., & Hall, W.A. (2015). Fear of childbirth and preference for cesarean section among young American women prior to childbirth: A survey study. Birth, 42(3), 270-276. Storch, J., Rodney, P., & Starzomski, R. (Eds.) (2013). Toward a moral horizon: Nursing ethics for leadership and practice (2nd ed.). Toronto: Pearson-Prentice Hall.Tang, S., Browne, A. J., Mussell, B., Smye, V., & Rodney, P. (2015). ‘Underclassism’ and access to healthcare in urban centres. Sociology of Health and Illness, 37(5), 698-714. doi: 10.1111/1467-9566.12236Taverner T, Briggs M and Closs SJ. (2014). The Journey to Chronic Pain: A Grounded Theory of Older Adults’ Experiences of Pain Associated with Leg Ulceration. Pain Management Nursing; 15(1), 186-198. doi: 10.1016/j.pmn.2012.08.002Taverner, T and Prince J. (2014). A Retrospective Chart Review to Assess Nurse Screening for Neuropathic Pain in Post-Operative Patients, Using the 7-Item Douleur Neuropathic 4 (DN4), Incorporated Within the Generic Pain Assessment Record. British Journal of Nursing; 23 (2), 76-80. doi: 10.1016/j.pmn.2012.08.002Thorne, S. & Stajduhar K. (2012). Patient perceptions of communications on the threshold of cancer survivorship: Implications for provider responses. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 6(2), 229-237.Thorne, S.,  Oliffe, J.L., Stajduhar, K.I., Oglov, V., Kim-Sing, C. & Hislop, G. (2013). Poor communication in cancer care: Patient perspectives on what it is and what to do about it. Cancer Nursing, 36(6): 445-453.Thorne, S. (2013). Interpretive description. In C. T. Beck (Ed.), Routledge International Handbook of Qualitative Nursing Research (295-306). New York: Taylor & Francis.Thorne, S., & Sawatzky R. (2014).  Particularizing the general: Sustaining theoretical integrity in the context of  an evidence-based practice agenda. Advances in Nursing Science, 27(1), 5-18.Thorne, S. (2014). Nursing as social justice: A case for the emancipatory thrust of conventional theorizing. In Kagan, P., Smith, M., & Chinn, P.L. (Eds.), Philosophies and practices of emancipatory nursing: Social justice as praxis (pp. 79-90).  New York: Routledge. Varcoe, C., Brown, H., Calam, B., Harvey, T., & Tallio, M. (2013). Help Bring Back the Celebration of Life: A Community-Based Participatory Study of Rural Aboriginal Women’s Maternity Experiences and Outcomes. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 13(26). doi:10.1186/1471-2393-13-26Varcoe, C., Pauly, B., Storch, J., Makaroff, K., Newton, L., (2012). Nurses’ Perceptions of and Reponses to Moral Distressing Situations. Nursing Ethics, 19(4):488-500.Varcoe, C., Pauly, B. Webster, G. & Storch, J. (2012). Moral Distress: Tensions as Springboards for Action.  Health Ethics Forum, 24(1) 51-62.Veale, J., Saewyc, E., Frohard-Dourlent, H., Dobson, S., Clark, B. & the Canadian Trans Youth Health Survey Research Group. (2015). Being Safe, Being Me: Results of the Canadian Trans Youth Health Survey. Vancouver, BC: Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia. Retrieved from http://www.saravyc.ubc.caWarnock, F. F., Craig, K. D., Bakeman, R., & Castral, T. (2014). Self-Regulation (Recovery) From Pain: Association Between Time-based Measures of Infant Pain Behavior and Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Depression and Anxiety. The Clinical journal of pain, 30(8), 663-671.Wong, S.T., Chau, L., Hogg, W., Teare, G. Miedema, B., Breton, M., Aubrey-Bassler, K., Katz, A., Burge, F., Boivin, A., Cooke, T., Francoeur, D. & Wodchis, W. (2015).  An international cross-sectional survey, Quality and Costs of Primary Care (QUALICO-PC): lessons learned in recruitment and data collection in primary care across Canada. BMC Family Practice, 16:20, DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0236-7Wong, S.T., Browne, A.J., Varcoe, C., Lavoie, J., Fridkin, A., Smye, V., Godwin, O. , & Tu, D. (2014) Development of Health Equity Indicators in Primary Health Care Organizations Using a modified Delphi. PLOS One, 9(12): e114563. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0114563  Wong, ST, Lynam, M.J., Khan, K., Scott, L. & Loock, C. (2012). The RICHER model of primary healthcare: fostering access and patient empowerment. BMC Pediatrics, 12:158. doi:10.1186/1471-2431-12-158     Wong, S.T, Manca, D., Barber, D., Morkem, R., Khan, S., Kotecha, J., Williamson, T., Birtwhistle, R. & Patten, S. (2014).  The diagnosis of depression and its treatment in Canadian primary care practices: An epidemiological study. Canadian Medical Association Journal Open, 2(4), E337-E342. doi:10.9778/cmajo.20140052Wong, S.T., Black, C, Cutler, F., Brooke, R., Haggerty, J.L., & Levesque, J-F. (2014). Patient-reported confidence in primary health care: Are there disparities by ethnicity or language? BMJ Open, 4(2) e003884. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003884 Wong, S.T., Lavoie, J., Browne, A.J., Macleod, M., & Chongo, M. (2015) Patient confidentiality within the context of group medical visits: is there cause for concern. Health Expectations, 18(5):727-39. doi: 10.1111/hex.12156Young, Q. R., Nguyen, M., Roth, S., Broadberry, A. & Mackay, M.H. (2015). Single-item measures for depression and anxiety: Validation of the STOP-D in an inpatient cardiology setting. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 14(6), 544–551. doi: 10.1177/1474515114548649Zaidman-Zait, A., & Hall, W. A. (2015). Children’s Night Waking among Toddlers: Relationships with Mothers’ and Fathers’ Parenting Approaches and Children’s Behavioral Difficulties. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 71(7), 1639-1649. doi:10.1111/jan.12636pUBlicATiONs cONT’d14UBC Nursing scholars published 51 book chapters, edited six books, and authored three books from 2012 to 2014. Faculty authors have contributed book chapters covering diverse areas of scholarship including: Alison Phinney’s chapter: As the body speaks: Creative expression in dementia Beyond Loss: Dementia, Identity, PersonhoodElizabeth Saewyc’s chapter: Adolescent pregnancy among lesbian, gay and bisexual teens International Handbook on Adolescent PregnancyWendy Hall’s chapter: The high-risk postpartum woman Canadian Maternity, Newborn & Women’s Health NursingGeertje Boschma and Marlee Groening’s chapter: Psychiatric nursing: Past to present Pschiatric Nursing for Canadian PracticeColleen Varcoe & Annette Browne’s chapter: Culture and sultural seafety: Beyond cultural inventories Fundamentals: Perspectives on the Art and Science of Canadian NursingMaura MacPhee’s chapter: Power, politics and influence Leading and Managing in Canadian NursingJohn Oliffe’s chapter: Men’s health Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being ResearchSally Thorne’s chapter: Graduate education Realities of Canadian Nursing: Professional, Practice and Power IssuesBOOKS AND CHAPTERS15MEDIA COVERAGEMass media coverage is one of many avenues for knowledge translation. The news coverage received by UBC School of Nursing faculty and students is aggregated by research unit and media type.UBC Nursing’s research centres and units regularly attract media coverage of their research.CRIHHI = Critical Research in Health and Healthcare Iniquities GERO = Gerontelogical Education Research and Outreach MHR = Men’s Health Research SARAVYC = Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre OthersCoverage of SoN Units and Centres in the Media151 182720 191131413112443Magazine Newspaper Web Media Radio TV News18%4%43%15%20%CRIHHIGEROSARAVYCMHROthersCoverage of SoN Units and Centres in the Media         2012                  2013                    2014                   20151618%4%43%15%20%CRIHHIGEROSARAVYCMHROthers  CRNBC Award of Excellence in Nursing EducationELSIE TAN    ALISON PHINNEY CRNBC Award for Excellence in Nursing Research  Kil lam Teaching Prize,  UBCSABRINA WONG UBC Kil lam Faculty Research FellowshipFACULTY AWARDSSUZANNE CAMPBELL AJN Book of the Year 2013:  Information Technology/InformaticsELIZABETH SAEWYC Fellow, Canadian Academy of Health SciencesCOLLEEN VARCOE Nursing Network on Violence  Against Women International Award in Education  CRNBC Award of Excellence in Nursing EducationCATHERINEJACKSON  Ethel Johns Award (CASN)   Distinguished Service to Nursing Ed in CanadaSALLY THORNE  Pat Griff in Nursing Education Research Award (CASN)BERNIE GARRETTJOHN OLIFFE Distinguished Scholars in Residence UBC Peter Wall  Institute for Advanced Studies  CRNBC Award of Excellence in Nursing EducationJOANNE RICCIGEERTJE BOSCHMA201220132014Between 2012 and 2014, UBC School of Nursing faculty members received 70 awards.  There were 47 scholar awards, 18 teaching awards, and five service awards that honoured faculty for their excellence in research, teaching excellence, leadership, and contributions to the nursing profession. We have highlighted just a few of these in this listing.17Supporting graduate nursing students takes more than just dynamic faculty with innovative research programs. Funding is key to providing students with enriched research environments and protecting student research training hours from the demands of clinical work.Graduate student funding can be particularly difficult to track as awards are split across administrative departments at UBC. Stipend awards are managed by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, research and travel allowances are held by faculty supervisors through Research & Trust Accounting, and graduate research and teaching assistantships are paid through Human Resources. $- $20,000 $40,000 $60,000 $80,000 $100,000 $120,000 $140,0002012 2013 2014MN-NP MSN PhDUBC Nursing Graduate Student Funding by Degree ProgramGRADUATE STUDENTS18GRADUATE TRAINEE AWARDSPostnatal women can find it challenging to find time for exercise.  UBC Nursing doctoral student, Sarah Liva, is exploring postnatal women’s physical activity decision-making. She will apply her findings to intersectoral models of care that support accessible and applicable postnatal physical activity programs and education.In addition to participating in a research training program with TUTOR-PHC to gain experience with interdisciplinary research methodology in primary health care, Sarah attended the Obesity Summer Boot Camp for emerging researchers and health professionals. The annual event hosted by the Canadian Obesity Network is a multi-approach from epidemiology and public health to cell biology, energy regulation, clinical management and health policy. These are just a few of the many research, publication, presentation, networking, and funding opportunities that Sarah’s supervisor, Dr. Wendy Hall, has supported her in. MAKING HOSPITALS LESS DAUNTING FOR THOSE WITH DEMENTIA Acute care is often bewildering to new patients, but for people with dementia the unfamiliar setting and faces can be especially distressing and disorienting. UBC Nursing doctoral student, Lillian Hung, is developing practical solutions in the physical and social environments of acute hospital units to improve the care experience of older patients with dementia.  She hopes her work may lead to better implementation of person-centred care in acute settings.  Lillian has received funding awards from CIHR, Alzheimer Society, and the Canadian Nurses Foundation. She is also the recipient of the Vancouver Coastal Health Robert Ho Scholar award.As part of her experience in the UBC School of Nursing community, Lillian has engaged with the Centre for Research on Personhood in Dementia, regularly attends GERO club, and works closely with her supervisor Dr. Alison Phinney.HELPING POSTNATAL WOMEN GET PHYSICALLY ACTIVE19STIGMA AND RESILIENCE AMONG VULNERABLE YOUTH CENTRE (SARAVYC)SARAVYC researchers are dedicated to reducing stigma and improving resilience among vulnerable youth populations. SARAVYC’s executive director, Dr. Elizabeth Saewyc, a professor in the UBC School of Nursing, held a CIHR/PHAC Research Chair in Applied Public Health from 2008- 2014, and is recognized for her work in population indicators of adolescent health. She co-authored the major WHO report, Health for the World’s Adolescents: A Second Chance in the Second Decade.Two recent studies conducted by Dr. Saewyc and her team found that schools gay- straight alliances (GSAs) and LGBTQ–inclusive policies have better health outcomes for straight youth as well as lesbian, gay and bisexual students. The results have been used to justify safe school laws in other provinces, and have contributed to the sharp increase in BC school districts adopting LGBTQ policies and starting GSAs: districts with policies have more than doubled over the past few years, with 36 out of 59 school districts now having LGBTQ-inclusive policies, and schools with GSAs have more than tripled, from 53 schools previously to 167 schools as of early 2015.The Centre has also collaborated with the McCreary Centre Society to conduct and analyze multi-city homeless and street-involved youth surveys across BC. These have uncovered unexpected findings, such as equal rates of boys as girls reporting sexual exploitation, and that the majority of these boys had been sexually exploited by women. The findings have led to changes in services for young people in BC, national funding to develop interventions for boys in the United States, and a CIHR Team grant to further identify health issues and resilience factors among boys who have been sexually exploited.In May 2015, SARAVYC released a report titled Being Safe, Being Me: Results of the Canadian Trans Youth Health Survey. The study, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health research, was the first national survey of its kind in Canada. The report received local and national media attention, and has already been used to support changes in school policies and service funding in various provinces.The SARAVYC team collaborates with health professionals, policy-makers, educators, and youth themselves to identify the social forces and strategies that foster healthy environments and resilience among youth. The Centre is positioned as the leading research centre for LGBTQ youth health research in Canada, and is recognized among the top ten such research teams internationally.FOCUS ON RESEARCH UNITS20CRITICAL RESEARCH IN HEALTH AND  HEALTHCARE INQUITIES (CRiHHI)As economic inequities widen in Canada, health inequities are increasing. Poor health and limited access to healthcare continues to plague many groups in Canada, particularly Indigenous people. The Critical Research in Health and Healthcare Inequities (CRiHHI) unit consolidates a team of researchers working to reduce health inequities. The synergies achieved across multiple projects have been a boon to novel knowledge translation approaches.This cross-pollination allows for unique opportunities. For example, Dr. Colleen Varcoe drew on multiple CRiHHI studies to illustrate trauma- and violence-informed care for the provincial Community Coordination for Women’s Safety Working Group, for the International Association of Forensic Nurses, and the Surrey Coalition Against Domestic Abuse. This research evidence is helping victims’ services, shelters, and community-based anti-violence services to shift their practice. She has also been invited to develop resources for the Public Health Agency of Canada.“There’s a sea change in how equity, violence, cultural safety are being integrated into public health, population health, and health care at the organizational and individual level,” explains Varcoe.For example, Dr. Annette Browne’s EQUIP team has developed strategies for stimulating equity in primary health care centres. The EQUIP team is working to make health services more responsive, relevant, and effective for those who have experienced discrimination, violence, and trauma.  The EQUIP intervention was designed to enhance the capacity of PHC organizations to provide equity-oriented care using a combination of staff education and facilitation to support practice and policy changes. Key intervention concepts include health equity, cultural safety, and the impacts of various kinds of trauma, including structural violence, on people’s health and access to care.  Dr. Sabrina Wong’s TRANSFORM team are incorporating these findings in their health indicators for primary health care effectiveness and efficiency at the national level.Dr. Helen Brown’s Work 2 Give team is studying the impact of incarcerated Aboriginal men building furniture, and producing knitted goods and vegetables for impoverished families living on Tsilhqot’in   reserve communities (near Williams Lake). Providing meaningful work while deepening the connections between the inmates, the corrections service staff, and the community is solidifying a very powerful intervention to reduce recidivism and improve mental health. In launching a documentary film as part of the Aboriginal Women’s Intervention Study, CRiHHI researchers are intending to increase understanding of the challenges facing Indigenous women. The resulting film aimed at the Aboriginal Peoples’ Television Network (APTN) is reshaping public perceptions about Aboriginal women. For CRiHHI, the next five years will be accelerating knowledge translation innovation efforts. It is about getting more direct, more creative. It is about tapping into existing vehicles that people access and having a presence where people are going.21CONSORTIUM FOR THE HISTORY OF NURSING  Launched in 2012 with the generous support of Helen Shore, the Consortium is dedicated to the study and knowledge exchange of nursing and health history in collaboration with other groups on the UBC campus and the wider UBC community. With a mandate to build linkages with diverse groups and stakeholders, the Consortium is fueling interest in nursing and health history, as well as developing resources and organizing lectures, activities, and an annual symposium. Its programming is fostering recognition of the value of history in providing context to current nursing and healthcare realities.As the invited keynote speaker at the 2015 UBC Centennial Nursing History Symposium, Kathryn McPherson will share the way recent international scholarship in nursing history has re-examined the divisions within nursing education. She explores how nursing education has been influenced by larger political and cultural debates about skill, gender, nationalism, and religion.In partnership with the UBC Library’s digitization initiative, the Consortium is supporting preservation and make historical resources more widely available in innovative ways. Currently, the team is developing a collection of historical resources, most notably the History of Nursing in Pacific Canada collection.The Consortium is working to build ongoing resources for students, faculty and members of the School’s wider community to explore and examine nursing and health care’s past. 22MEN’S HEALTH RESEARCH The Men’s Health Research group, led by Dr. John Oliffe at the School of Nursing, researches, promotes, and helps implement effective ways of getting men engaged with their mental and physical well-being.The largest current project is the Men’s Depression and Suicide Network. Rather than “fight” against traditional masculinity, this network aims to emphasize the positive elements of multi-faceted, culturally-diverse masculinities—such as helping others, leadership, empathy, and accountability. Funded by the Movember Foundation, the network links several Canadian universities with community organizations and individuals to develop, expand, and evaluate six men’s mental health interventions. By garnering positive masculinities, the network’s projects create safe spaces for men to support each other.Part of the network’s aim is public engagement. After all, men’s depression and suicide is still very much a stigmatized topic. Examples of some of engagement activities have included performances of Contact! Unload on Granville Island, a therapeutic theatre piece co-written by returned veterans that is scheduled for a repeat performance at UBC; the launch of Man-Up Against Suicide at the Foster Eastman Gallery that showcased stories and photographs from people that have experience with male suicide and depression; and a survey on men’s depression and suicide completed by 901 Canadians (see side bar). In terms of some of the other interventions developed by the network, there is HeadsUpGuys, an online tool for men to manage depression; a formal evaluation and expansion of the DUDES Club, which operates in the Downtown Eastside as a source of spiritual, physical, mental, emotional, and social support for men; development of a toolkit of best practices to start Canadian Men’s Sheds, which are spaces for men to get together and work on projects; and the adaptation of the Veteran’s Transition Program, led by Dr. Marvin Westwood and Dr. David Kuhl, to college men and men diagnosed with prostate cancer.of men indicated they would feel embarrassed about seeking professional help for depression23%of Canadian men surveyed have been diagnosed or treated for depression57% 23GERONTOLOGICAL EDUCATION RESEARCH AND OUTREACH (GERO)The UBC GERO research unit brings a dynamic team of nurses and public stakeholders together to advance the nursing care of older adults.  The research program aims to develop innovative approaches to enhance gerontological nursing education in BC, increase the profile of gerontological nursing research being conducted in BC, and create a community of practice partners across the province with the aim of improving knowledge generation and uptake.  Co-led by Dr. Jennifer Baumbusch and Dr. Alison Phinney, both associate professors in the School of Nursing, a number of studies are already underway.Older adults will surely benefit from Dr. Baumbusch’s Inviting Dialogue on Experiences of Active Involvement in Long-term Residential Care (IDEAL) study that has been developing a better understanding of how care is negotiated in long-term residential care facilities with the aim of clarifying the policies and best practices needed to foster collaborative relationships between families, residents, and staff.  Dr. Phinney’s research explores how visual art in the healthcare environment can create a sense of meaningful place for older adults and an inspiring experience for the artist through her Making Art for Making Place study.  People with dementia will also benefit from Dr. Phinney’s Social Citizenship in Dementia study that aims to help this group remain as active and engaged citizens through community-based programs.  Dr. Baumbusch has examined transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVIs) and their impact on the medical, functional, and social needs of older adults undergoing this procedure through her TAVI study.  Research conducted in her AWAKE and HEARTS studies have explored the interactions between healthcare professionals and frail, older adults, who are awake during the TAVI procedure and the recovery process of these patients and caregivers.GERO recognized the need for a program that provides acute care nurses with education on evidence-based nursing care for older adults in hospitals and developed the Geriatric Education and Training (GET) program to share with hospitals across BC.24AckNOWlEdgEmENTs: Many thanks to Heather Swallow for layout and graphic design and members of the STaR Committee (Sabrina Wong, Maura MacPhee, Leanne Currie, Ranjit Dhari, and Cathryn Jackson) for their thoughtful feedback.phOTOgrAphsDon Erhardt, p. 22 Greg Rakozy (Unsplash.com) Front Cover Jeff Sheldon (Unsplash.com) p. 24 Joel Tonyan (Flickr.com) Back Cover Martin Dee, pp. 2, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 20 Rodion Kutsaev (Unsplash.com) p. 21 Serge Melkl (Flickr.com) p. 19 Logo - menshealthresearch.ubc.ca p. 23 www.nursing.ubc.ca/research25

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