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      Olympic Games Impact (OGI) Study for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Pre-Games Technical Report  December 1, 2009            Prepared by: The OGI-UBC Research Team For: The Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games (VANOC) Version date: December 1, 2009  OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Table of Contents     i Table of Contents Table of Contents............................................................................................................................. i List of Tables .................................................................................................................................. ii List of Figures ................................................................................................................................ iii 1. Introduction............................................................................................................................... 1 2. OGI: Sustainability Rationale, Impact Evaluation Background and Sustainability Indicators 3 2.1. OGI Reporting Framework............................................................................................. 3 2.2. OGI as Impact Evaluation............................................................................................... 4 2.3. Conceptualizing Sustainability: IOC’s Olympic Agenda............................................... 5 2.4. The History of Sustainability in IOC.............................................................................. 5 2.5. Measuring the Olympic Games Impact .......................................................................... 6 2.6. Sustainability Indicators ................................................................................................. 6 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment ........................ 9 3.1. Data Principles................................................................................................................ 9 3.1.1. Project Principles for OGI-UBC Data Assembly and Analysis.............................. 9 3.1.2. Data Sources ......................................................................................................... 10 3.1.3. Case Study of Ec12............................................................................................... 11 3.2. Standard Data Assembly............................................................................................... 12 3.2.1. Possible Outcomes in Assembling Data ............................................................... 12 3.2.2. Data Assembly Management ................................................................................ 12 3.2.3. Metadata Documentation ...................................................................................... 13 3.3. Data Analysis Needs..................................................................................................... 13 3.3.1. Longitudinal Study Needs..................................................................................... 15 3.3.2. Interpreting Indicator Needs ................................................................................. 15 3.3.3. Latitudinal Study Needs........................................................................................ 16 3.4. Attributing Impact to the Games .................................................................................. 17 Glossary of Terms......................................................................................................................... 20 Tables............................................................................................................................................ 21 Figures........................................................................................................................................... 30 Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators ...................................................................................... 40 Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments ........................................................................ 140 Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report List of Tables     ii List of Tables Figure 1: Sustainability Venn Diagram ........................................................................................ 31 Figure 2: Overview of the Data Assembly and Analysis Process Hierarchy ............................... 32 Figure 3: Precision vs. Accuracy .................................................................................................. 33 Figure 4: Standardized Data Assembly Process ........................................................................... 34 Figure 5: Snapshot of the Indicator Management Database Input Form...................................... 35 Figure 6: Screenshot of the Metadata Capturing System Input Window ..................................... 36 Figure 7: Typical Longitudinal Study........................................................................................... 37 Figure 8: Number of Games-explicit Initiatives by Start Year and Sphere.................................. 38 Figure 9: Typical Longitudinal-Latitudinal Study........................................................................ 39 Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report List of Figures     iii List of Figures Figure 1: Sustainability Venn Diagram ........................................................................................ 31 Figure 2: Overview of the Data Assembly and Analysis Process Hierarchy ............................... 32 Figure 3: Precision vs. Accuracy .................................................................................................. 33 Figure 4: Standardized Data Assembly Process ........................................................................... 34 Figure 5: Snapshot of the Indicator Management Database Input Form...................................... 35 Figure 6: Screenshot of the Metadata Capturing System Input Window ..................................... 36 Figure 7: Typical Longitudinal Study........................................................................................... 37 Figure 8: Number of Games-explicit Initiatives by Start Year and Sphere.................................. 38 Figure 9: Typical Longitudinal-Latitudinal Study........................................................................ 39 Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 1. Introduction     1 1. Introduction The Pre-Games Technical Report is submitted by the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in partial fulfillment of VANOC’s responsibility regarding the Olympic Games Impact (OGI) Program for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (2010 Winter Games). The OGI Program includes 126 indicators that measure the environmental, socio-cultural and economic impacts of the Host City, Region and Country. The purpose is to promote greater sustainability in the Olympic Games through a consistent and comparable reporting system. The Pre-Games Technical Report combined with the Results Report, represents the second of four OGI reports for the 2010 Winter Games. The Pre-Games Technical Report provides an in-depth description of how the context indicators (vs. event indicators) were analyzed. From this point forward, the Pre-Games Technical Report will be referred to as “the Technical Report” in this document. In addition to the description, the Technical Report also contains appendices that include the indicator data spreadsheets and governmental Games-related investments. In order to describe how the context indicators were analyzed, a clear working definition of context is important to the Technical Report. We encourage the reader to refer to the following definition and conceptualization of context impacts. Context, according to the OGI Technical Manual, refers to the “environment in which the Games will be staged” (p.31). The “environment” is broadly conceptualized as the broader economic, environmental and social setting of the Host. The definition of context is further accompanied by additional text in the OGI Technical Manual referring to context as a baseline for the Games. By doing so, it suggests that context is the state of the Host, as separate from the event itself, and something that is already present regardless of the event. The Games and its effects can be compared to a comet landing in a pond, tail-first. The body of the comet represents the Games, the pond is the Host City/Region/Country, and the splash and ripples that result are the impacts. The significance of the tail-first landing is that the initial impacts of the Games are felt well before the event itself, a process that begins with the awarding of the Games, and is foreshadowed in the bid phase. The head of the comet completes its landing with the end of the Paralympic Games, but the ripples are experienced for years afterwards and the shape of the pond will likely change. While changes to the “pond” would occur even in the absence of the Games, the role of OGI is to identify those changes associated with the Games themselves, focusing in three broad spheres: the economic (e.g., employment, tourism), environmental (e.g., air quality), and social (e.g., housing) in nature. To further illustrate, consider this Olympics-related example: A 14-year old snowboarding enthusiast whose commitment to training begins to grow when the region in which she lives wins the Olympic Bid in 2003. She trains with the aid of resources created by a program designed to increase the medals won by the host. In this example, the young athletes’ renewed commitment and training opportunities are ripples created by the 2010 Olympic Games. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 1. Introduction     2 The OGI Program employs a sustainability framework. For the Pre-Games Technical Report, context indicators represent the movement towards or away from sustainability in the Host. The economic, social and environmental spheres provide a framework with which the analyst can assess the impacts of the Games (benefits and costs). The report is prepared by a research team at the University of British Columbia. The University of British Columbia (UBC) is one of Canada’s largest public research and teaching institutions and ranks solidly among the top 35 universities in the world. It offers a range of innovative undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the arts, sciences, medicine, law, commerce and other faculties. UBC ranks in the top 10 universities in North America and number one in Canada for commercializing research, and for its patent activity in the life sciences. The members of the OGI-UBC team are, in alphabetical order: • Feruza Abdjalieva – Indicator Data Analyst • Mariana Gatzeva, Ph.D. – Post-Doctoral Fellow • Meredith Hambrock, B.A. – Indicator Data Analyst • Pam Jung – Indicator Data Analyst • Brenda Kwan, M.Sc. – Context Data Manager • Clark Lim, P.Eng. – Indicator Data Manager,  • Jessica Shing, B.Sc. – Context Data Analyst • Rob VanWynsberghe, Ph.D. – Lead Section 2 describes the use of an indicators-based sustainability framework for the OGI study. In this section, impacts, sustainability and context are defined and integrated in relation to OGI. In addition, the history of sustainability in the IOC and the decision to embark on the OGI study are presented. Finally, the process for determining the prescribed list of indicators is explained. Section 3 describes the plan for assembling and analyzing the available data within the sustainability indicators framework of OGI. A glossary, tables, figures, and appendices (indicator data spreadsheets and government investments) are included at the end.  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 2. OGI: Sustainability Rationale, Impact Evaluation Background and Sustainability Indicators     3 2. OGI: Sustainability Rationale, Impact Evaluation Background and Sustainability Indicators This section describes the use of an indicators-based sustainability framework for the OGI study. Impacts, sustainability and context are defined and integrated in relation to OGI. In addition, the history of sustainability in the IOC and the decision to embark on the OGI study are presented. Finally, the process for determining the prescribed list of indicators is explained. 2.1. OGI Reporting Framework The IOC recognizes the importance of sustainable development and social responsibility, and as such initiated the OGI Program in 2003 with objectives to: Measure the global impact1 of the Olympic Games; Create a comparable benchmark across all future Olympic Games; and,  Help those cities that are bidding for Olympic Games, and future organizers, to identify potential legacies to maximize Games’ benefits. The purpose of the OGI study is to enable the IOC to measure the long-term implications of Games organizations and to analyze the impact of the Olympic Games on a given Host City, Region and Country. The OGI study utilizes 126 environmental, socio-cultural and economic indicators to report on the status of the Host City, Region and Country from a period beginning two years prior to the awarding of the Games to the Host City/Country and ending three years following the staging of the Games. The OGI study includes a series of four reports that compare changes in the indicators data over time. The reports are to be prepared over the following timeline: 1) Report 1 (Baseline) – Prepared 4 years prior to the staging of the Games (for the 2010 Games in Vancouver, the report was completed in 2007 and reported on data from 2001);2 2) Report 2 – Prepared 2 years prior to the staging of the Games (for Vancouver, this is the current report completed in 2009); 3) Report 3 – Prepared 1 year after the staging of the Games (anticipated to be completed in 2011 for Vancouver); and, 4) Report 4 – Prepared 3 years after the staging of the Games (anticipated to be completed in 2013 for Vancouver).                                                             1 The term ‘global impact’ is defined as the ‘total’ or ‘holistic’ impact of the Games in the Host city, region and country. It does not refer to the ‘worldwide’ impact of the Games. 2 The Baseline Report was intended to profile the conditions of the Host City, Region and Country in the year that the NOC first applies to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games. For the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games, the baseline year is 2001. Coincidentally, in Canada, 2001 was also a National Census year, which means data for a wide range of indicators are readily available for the specified time period. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 2. OGI: Sustainability Rationale, Impact Evaluation Background and Sustainability Indicators     4 2.2. OGI as Impact Evaluation The modern Olympic Games were designed to have impacts on the Host region and beyond. The founder of the Olympic Movement, Pierre de Coubertin, hoped that physical education and friendly international competition would be impacts that would always be associated with the Olympic Games. In recent years however, the touted benefits of the Olympic Games and other mega-events are no longer being “assumed” to be a given; there are also “costs” associated with hosting the Olympic Games. This has generated an expansive list of possible impacts. The main perceived benefits include new athletic venues, updated transportation systems, additional jobs, increased income, a broadened tax base, enhancement of libraries and parks, and positive international media images of the Host City. There are also perceived costs for communities, such as increased fiscal expenditures, traffic congestion, consumption of local natural resources, and loss of, or competition for, social funds. Table 1 (Tables start on page 22) portrays the huge investments by hosts to stage the Games. The OGI study investigates the environmental, economic, and socio-cultural impacts of the Games. According to the Technical Manual, impacts are the changes, or outcomes, in the Host city/region that result from hosting the Games. In classical physics, the principle of inertia, or the First Law of Motion, offers a useful analogy to describe impact. The First Law of Motion states that a body in uniform motion continues in that state of motion unless acted upon by an external unbalanced force. The impacts of the Olympic Games are akin to the “external unbalanced force” in that they alter the course of the natural tendency. Environmental impacts refer to the impacts of the Games on soil, water, air, climate and the landscape. Economic impacts refer to the new dollars that will be brought in, as well as dollars expended as a result of the planning and delivery of the Games, including spin-off benefits. Socio-cultural impacts refer to the human experiences and responses to the outcomes of the Games, both intended and unintended (Vanclay, 2002). Many types of impacts may occur. To illustrate, here are some examples from literature on social impacts. Documented social impacts of Olympic Games include increased enthusiasm (Lensky, 2002), cosmopolitan identity (Ritchie, 1990) and sense of community (Preus, 2004). These emotions exist before the Games, but can change as a consequence of the global attention that the Games bring (Ohman, 2006). Other documented social impacts of the Games have included: increased volunteer activities (Ritchie, 1991); new social housing (Wamsley, 1996); greater community involvement and support for arts, culture and athletics (García, 2003); gains in social capital for communities (Misener, 2006); and improvements in social integration (PriceWaterhouseCoopers, 2007). The OGI Technical Manual identifies OGI as a study that emphasizes acquiring comprehensive knowledge of the range and depth of the impacts of the Games. OGI, however, is more than an assessment of impacts. It also calls for judgments about the relative size, value and importance of these impacts. Therefore, OGI is also an analysis and an evaluation. OGI spans a time period from before the bid, leading up to the Games, and after the Games. The pre-Games research component recognizes the fact that major strategic planning and investments occur before the Games, and that people start reacting to this before Games event time. This means that many impacts of the Vancouver Olympics could be felt in the five or so years before the Games. The entire OGI study timeframe is at least eleven years, starting when a city’s official candidacy for hosting an edition of the Olympic Games is announced by the country’s National Olympic Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 2. OGI: Sustainability Rationale, Impact Evaluation Background and Sustainability Indicators     5 Committee (NOC) and ending two years after the staging of the event (Preuss, 2007). Consequently, numerous data points are assembled for analysis and evaluation. In addition, one baseline report (base year of 2001) and three subsequent OGI reports are submitted to the IOC. This is the first of the OGI Reports and it is referred to as Pre-Games. 2.3. Conceptualizing Sustainability: IOC’s Olympic Agenda OGI is essentially a composite assessment of impacts from the three spheres of sustainability (socio-cultural, environmental and economic) that were identified in the OGI Technical Manual. The three spheres are, and have been, used in numerous impact analyses locally and world-wide. Achieving sustainability is a goal that is espoused by many governments and public and private sector organizations. Sustainability is also a substantial concern of the International Olympic Committee and the conceptual basis for OGI. Therefore, the spheres provide an organizational framework to summarize the analyses leading up to the final assessment of the impacts of the Olympic Games. These three spheres represent society’s values and interests regarding impacts from investments and activities. Sustainability is still generally equated with sustainable development. The well-known 1987 Brundtland Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development states that “Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987, p.23). However, the term “sustainable development” used in the Brundtland Report, has been replaced by the concept of sustainability. Now, sustainable development is seen as reinforcing the status quo—the inequitable generation and distribution of unprecedented monetary wealth, while billions of people continue to be impoverished, and while ecosystems and resources are being depleted. The concept of sustainability addresses economic, environmental, and social justice. Societal, economic and environmental systems are the basis of sustainability. These systems are represented by the Sustainability Venn diagram (Figure 1), which shows three interlocking and mutually inclusive circles. The economic circle (system) is a reinforcing process that suggests that the current market system can drive technical innovations that make nature more resilient. The environmental circle suggests that sustainability can be achieved through a restructuring of government, laws and/or educational systems to reflect a managerial focus on a vulnerable natural world. The social circle reflects the role that transformed individuals and groups play in achieving sustainability. The three circles overlap in the middle to show that achieving sustainability necessitates equal measures of market-based innovation, enlightened governance and transformed individual behaviour. 2.4. The History of Sustainability in IOC The message portrayed by the Sustainability Venn diagram is reflected in several important IOC initiatives. For example, in 1994, the “environment” was added as the third Olympic pillar (sport and culture are the other two). A decade later in 2004, the “environment” was added to the Olympic Charter, which further established sustainability as an important principle in the Olympic Movement and how the Games are staged. As the Olympic Charter explains: Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 2. OGI: Sustainability Rationale, Impact Evaluation Background and Sustainability Indicators     6 “[T]he Olympic Games are held in conditions which demonstrate a responsible concern for environmental issues and encourage the Olympic Movement to demonstrate a responsible concern for environmental issues, takes measures to reflect such concern in its activities and educates all those connected with the Olympic Movement as to the importance of sustainable development.” (IOC, 2004) Perhaps the most important development occurred in 1999 when the IOC adopted Agenda 21, which was based on the United Nation’s (UN) Agenda 21 adopted at the UN Conference on Environment and Development in 1992. The IOC’s Olympic Agenda 21 encourages its members to participate actively in promoting sustainable development. The rationales are to ensure that athletes are not harmed, and to recognize that hosting the Games could result in potential damage for the entire planet (Furrer, 2002). The objectives of Olympic Agenda 21 are outlined in Table 2 below. The three objectives in the left-hand column of the table (e.g., Improved Socio-economic Conditions, etc.) each reflect one of the circles of the Sustainability Venn diagram. These are accompanied by sub-objectives for their achievement, such as “engaging the values of Olympism and action on behalf of sustainable development.” The Olympic Agenda 21 is the IOC’s primary overarching framework for the delivery of the entire Olympic Games. For example, VANOC has subscribed to sustainability in their values, mission and mandate. The Olympic Agenda also serves as a backdrop for the OGI study. 2.5. Measuring the Olympic Games Impact The IOC commissioned the International Sports Science and Technology Academy (AISTS) to execute the Olympic Games Global Impact study (OGGI, now OGI) in 2000. The idea behind OGI was to develop indicators to operationalize the objectives of Olympic Agenda 21 in the host region (IOC, 2006). These indicators were selected using a successive refinement method that included four selection stages that begin broadly and gradually narrowed the list of indicators. The first stage recognized the three categories of indicators, environmental, socio-cultural and economic, in accordance with the three dimensions of the Sustainability Venn diagram. During the second stage, “systems” for each of the sustainability dimensions were defined. For example, real, monetary and trade systems are located in the economic dimension. During the third stage, a number of different fields for each of the different systems was defined. For example, tourism, employment and private business field are included in the real system. During the fourth stage, indicators were identified within each field. For example, the employment field contains indicators addressing jobs created in Olympic-related activities, employment indicators, etc. Dubi (2002) explains that the process of developing indicators to study the impact of the Olympic Games entails information loss at each stage of refinement. Often, lack of data for a particular impact meant that it was not chosen as an indicator, even if that impact was highly relevant. 2.6. Sustainability Indicators OGI is a sustainability indicators-based impact study comprised of 126 indicators that represent all three circles of the Sustainability Venn diagram. When the study is finished, it will feature Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 2. OGI: Sustainability Rationale, Impact Evaluation Background and Sustainability Indicators     7 comprehensive data gathered at a minimum of three points in time. These data will be analyzed in terms of Games-related changes in the economic, social and environmental landscape. Each indicator is accompanied by a set of indicator dimensions (specific measures) that essentially dictate what type of data is to be assembled. Taken together, the indicator dimensions capture the indicator. Data for the variables in the Pre-Games reporting process are temporal and geographical. The temporal parameters of data include the year 2001 for baseline and the year 2006 for Pre-Games (although these data points may vary). Data from 2006 are compared to data from 2001 (i.e., baseline). The geographical parameters of data are generally at the city, region and country levels. In some cases, data parameters were adjusted as necessary to account for different data collection cycles from various data sources, or to account for the lack of availability of “local” data for the cities of Vancouver and Whistler, the regional municipalities of Squamish-Lillooet, the province of British Columbia and the country of Canada. In some instances, quality data were lacking for dimensions. After “timing out” on these efforts, some variables (and in rare cases indicators), were given a partial or full “DNAA” (Data not Available or Accessible) status, rendering the indicator not-applicable for use in the overall OGI process.3 Every reasonable effort was made to optimize the assembly and analysis of appropriate data for a given indicator. Figure 2 summarizes the phases of data assembly, analysis and assessment used for OGI. It also illustrates the work involved in assembling data for each variable, according to the data parameters. A metadata system is used to record information, such as calculations used, sources of data, and other relevant information that will be required in the future to repeat the processes used for data assembly, analysis and assessment. The figure shows multiple dimensions that inform each indicator. A final Olympic Games impact attribution was calculated for each bundle and for each sustainability sphere in which they are located. Bundling is explained in the next chapter. References Dubi, C., P.A. Hug. and P. van Griethuysen. 2002. “Olympic Games Management: From the candidature to the final evaluation, an integrated management approach.” The Legacy of the Olympic Games 1984 – 2000 International Symposium, Lausanne. Pp. 402-413. Essex, Stephen and Brian Chalkley. 2004. “Mega-sporting events in urban and regional policy: a history of the Winter Olympics.” Planning Perspectives 19(2); 201—204. Furrer, P. 2002. “Sustainable Olympic Games. A dream or a reality?” Bollettino della Societa Geografica Italiana, Serie XII 7(4). García, B. 2003. “Securing sustainable legacies through cultural programming in sporting events.” In The Legacy of the Olympic Games: 1984-2000: International Symposium, November 2002. By de Maroaga, M., C. Kennett and N. Puig (Eds.). Lausanne, Switzerland: International                                                             3 The availability of adequate data was found to be higher for indicators in the Economic sphere, followed by the Environmental sphere, and then the Socio-Cultural sphere. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 2. OGI: Sustainability Rationale, Impact Evaluation Background and Sustainability Indicators     8 Olympic Committee Olympic Studies Centre and the Olympic Studies Centre of the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Holden, Meg, Julia MacKenzie and Robert VanWynsberghe. 2008. “Vancouver’s Promise of the World’s First Sustainable Olympic Games.” Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy. 26(5): 882-995. Humphreys, J.M. and M.K. Plummer. 1995. “The Economic Impact of Hosting the 1996 Summer Olympics.” Athens, Georgia: The University of Georgia Selig Center for Economic Growth.  IOC. 1999. Olympic Movement’s Agenda 21 for Sustainable Development.  IOC, 2004. “Sport and Environment Commission: History and Mission of the Commission.”, from (www.olympic.org/uk/organisation/commissions/environment/index_uk.asp) (retrieved February 3, 2009). IOC, 2006. “Focus: Olympic Games Global Impact.” Olympic Review (June). Lenskyj, H.J. 2002. The Best Olympics Ever? Social Impacts of Sydney 2000. New York, New York: State University of New York Press. Misener, L. and D.S. Mason. 2006. “Creating Community Networks: Can Sporting Events Offer Meaningful Sources of Social Capital?” Managing Leisure 11(1): 39-56. Ohmann S, I. Jones and K. Wilkes. 2006. “The Perceived Social Impacts of the 2006 Football World Cup on Munich Residents.” Journal of Sport and Tourism 11(2): 129-152. Preuss, H. 2004. The Economics of Staging the Olympics. Northampton, Massachusetts: Edward Elgar Publishing Inc . PricewaterhouseCoopers. 2007. Olympic Games Impact Study. London, England: Department of Culture, Media and Sport. Ritchie, J.R.B. and M. Lyons. 1990. “Olympulse VI: A Post-Event Assessment of Resident Reaction to the XV Olympic Winter Games.” Journal of Travel Research 14-23. Ritchie, J.R.B. and B.H. Smith. 1991. “The Impact of a Mega-Event on Host Region Awareness: A Longitudinal Study.” Journal of Travel Research 3-10. Vanclay F. 2002. “Conceptualising social impacts.” Environmental Impact Assessment Review 22: 183-211. Wamsley. K.B. and M.K. Heine. 1996. “Tradition, Modernity, and the Construction of Civic Identify: The Calgary Olympics.” Olympika: The International Journal of Olympic Studies V: 81-90. World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987. Our Common Future. Oxford University Press, Oxford.  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     9 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment The IOC recognizes that there is no “one way” to measure the impacts of the Olympic Games, nor are there set techniques. The OGI Technical Manual does not prescribe a specific approach to analyzing the indicator data. This section describes the plan for assembling and analyzing the available data within the sustainability indicators framework of OGI. We refer to our data assembly and analysis methodology as policy-informed, context indicator bundles assessment. Our methodology is conveniently sub-divided into data assembly and data analysis. We begin this section by outlining the project principles that were developed for data assembly and analysis. Adopting these principles made it possible for the project to move forward in a systematic manner. The data assembly sub-section begins by discussing the selection of data sources for indicator variables with different levels of local sensitivity. Following this, data assembly concepts are discussed with specific attention to reliability (careful and secure process of updating baseline data) and compatibility (ensuring different data points share similar definitions, methodologies and, ideally, sources). The data analysis sub-section explains how context indicators were “bundled” to provide grounds for the plausible attribution of a Games impact (or lack thereof). Next, the “before and after control impact” (BACI) methodology (Manly, 2001) is described. Lastly, we discuss a strategy for evaluating whether impacts could be attributed to the Games. This involved the exploration of alternative explanations (not caused by the Games) for the observed differences in trends, e.g., between Vancouver and control cities. 3.1. Data Principles 3.1.1. Project Principles for OGI-UBC Data Assembly and Analysis Principle 1 - Consistency OGI is an indicator-based project; therefore, the research must remain consistent with the OGI Technical Manual. In some cases, the data assembled is exactly as specified by the definition of indicator dimensions, and the analysis has robust data and a clear context for a baseline. In other cases, the data has been more difficult to come by. Principle 2 – Data Points At least two points of data that are separated by five or more years is our minimum requirement. Having only two data points would make the research susceptible to the “regression-to-the- mean” phenomenon (i.e., random variance will cause some samples to be extreme; the problem can be solved by including more data). Two population data samples taken at 20 year intervals is less influenced by this situation than are two samples of annual air quality data. However, more data points yield a more valid analysis; wherever possible, these are incorporated into the data assembly. How often data get updated should correspond with how sensitive an indicator is in detecting changes. Data that are collected more frequently (e.g., annually) is preferable because of its increased sensitivity in detecting changes due to the Games. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     10 Principle 3 – Exemplary Data Sources The time-series dataset should be assembled based on stable sources and sound methodologies. It is not useful to obtain accurate and thorough data over a period of time for the purposes of trend analysis if the sources and their methodologies differ significantly. This may result in an analysis that compares “apples with oranges,” where any discernable changes in trend are due to methodological inconsistencies. In order to avoid such errors, the datasets obtained should ideally come from the same source and be based on the same methodology. Principle 4 – Reliability The quality and reliability of a dataset are important factors to consider in the analysis of data. When conducting analyses for the estimation of impacts, errors can be introduced if issues such as confounding factors and data precision and accuracy are not taken into account. In the case of data based on measurement methods, precision and accuracy are important considerations that describe the variation in the reproducibility and repeatability of a measurement (precision), and the degree in which the measurement represents truth (accuracy) typically describe the bias (the difference between the mean estimate and the particular observation). Ideally, high accuracy and precision are desired for datasets. Therefore, the estimation of impact for time-series data is based on an estimation of how accurate and precise the data are. Figure 3 graphically demonstrates the definitions of accuracy and precision. Principle 5 – Documentation Proper and complete documentation is essential for reliability, repeatability, and audit-ability. Documentation benefits the understanding and proper application of the data. The data can also be used more reliably in the future. Further, documentation acts as an “audit-trail” that allows for the validation of the data. Documentation can consist of: data limitations and applicability (parameters such as geographic scope, temporal scope, population scope); data processing protocol (checking, cleaning, estimates: imputation, extrapolation/forecasting and outliers policies); processing tools used and scripting; instrument design; sampling size and bias; type of measurement (observed (empirical) or stated (subjective)); and quality of data description provided. Use of metadata techniques, as discussed below, allows for a standardized approach in the documentation of data. 3.1.2. Data Sources The organizations and agencies that gathered the primary data used in this study largely dictated the kind and quality of data that could be assembled for any given indicator dimension. The main source of data originated from Statistics Canada (or StatsCan).4 StatsCan provides very reliable data. It is collected across the country (indicating robust and broad standardization) on a regular basis (every 5 years) using a consistent methodology (as required for their trend analyses). As prescribed by the requisite data parameters for the OGI process, StatsCan typically provided data for the years 2001 and 2006 (their Census years) and on national, provincial (“B.C.”), regional (“Metro Vancouver”) and city-level (“City of Vancouver”) scales. Other typically reliable                                                             4 Statistics Canada is a federal government agency commissioned with producing statistics about Canada. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     11 sources of multiple datasets were provincial agencies (e.g., B.C. Stats) and regional agencies (e.g., Metro Vancouver). The presence of these agencies made it possible to gather reliable and consistent secondary data for the OGI data assembly process. In some cases, reliable sources of data were not available for indicators. These were mainly concentrated in the Socio-Cultural sphere. Data assembly methodologies that required more significant efforts usually rectified this problem. However, at times, these efforts gradually produced diminishing returns and left indicators with a partial or full DNAA (Data Not Available or Accessible) status. A lack of data was seen as an opportunity to assemble new variables and this was done using the following criteria: a) Similarity to the original data dimension and congruent to the definitions of the indicator; b) Availability of a series of multiple time periods, preferably in annual frequencies; c) Availability of data for other cities from the same source; d) Measures defined by absolute numbers rather than percentages (to increase sensitivity to determine changes over time); and e) Dimensions that are sensitive to changes over time, but are not overly-sensitive so that “random noises” in the data significantly affect the analysis. Criteria d) and e) together address the need to balance a stable variable over time (plasticity) with the need for enough sensitivity (elasticity) to be able to discern impacts related to the Olympic Games. 3.1.3. Case Study of Ec12 The indicator Ec12 (Hosting of International Events) is a prototypical example of some of the complexity involved in ensuring reliable data through the assembly and analysis processes. The baseline data for this indicator was based on a custom query by Tourism Vancouver staff for the year 2001 (see Table 3). The same source (but different staff person) was consulted for the subsequent assembly of the Pre-Games data. The total number of events for 2001 using the latest dataset was more than double that which was reported in the 2001 baseline report.5 To ensure consistency in the categorization of the data by the data sources, the Pre-Games researchers manually classified events in the format required by the indicator definition (see Table 3). Following this, “rules of thumb” were established and applied in the categorization of the events for the 2006 dataset.6 In addition, data for the baseline 2001 year was regenerated using the same Tourism Vancouver data extraction. The case study exemplifies situations where returning to the source of OGI baseline (2001) data and repeating the data assembly for the year (2006) can result in incorrect data causing erroneous analysis outcomes. The problem is that the original 2001 data source does not provide a matching source for the dataset for the year 2006. This case shows how critical (and                                                             5 It is possible that two different database queries were performed at source, or the sources’ database was updated during the period between the two queries. 6 Creating “rules of thumb” for the manual classification of data naturally introduces comparability bias into the results as one can presume that two different groups of researchers may not apply the rules exactly the same way. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     12 complicated) the “apples-to-apples” comparison is for determining whether an indicator can be classified as useful for the purposes of analysis, or given a “DNAA” status. This example underscores the vital importance of ensuring consistent methodology throughout the data assembly and analysis process. 3.2. Standard Data Assembly The need to develop consistent data assembly methods is a key issue for a team of researchers. A standard process for the research and assembly of data was developed at the commencement of the data assembly phase. This was done to educate the research team on the steps required, and to develop consistency in their methods. Figure 4 illustrates the standard process developed and used by the research team in the assembly of data. The process outlined above can be summarized as a review of the Technical Manual for the indicator description. After the review, the next general step was to update the dimensions of each of the indicators in the baseline document. Indicator data were collected and put into Microsoft® Excel spreadsheets. Following this, research was conducted in order to assemble updated data. This entire process was documented including sources, calculations, and adjustments in the data. Finally, the updated spreadsheets were submitted for verification of accuracy. 3.2.1. Possible Outcomes in Assembling Data The process of ensuring that the data are consistent with project principles was important. In the beginning, all data are considered to be “candidate” data. Candidate data go through a three-level quality check (see Table 4, Table 5 and Table 6). If candidate data do not pass any of these three levels during Stage A, new data are sought and the three-level quality check begins anew (Stage B). Candidate data that pass all three levels are considered “successful” data, i.e., data that are available, consistent, and reliable. An example is used to illustrate this process. Level 1 assesses data for availability. At this level, if candidate data is of Outcome Type 1.3 (Table 4) (which means that data are available for both 2001 and 2006), the data would undergo quality check Level 2 (Table 5). Level 2 assesses for consistency between data sources and methodologies. At this level, if candidate data is of Outcome Type 2.3 (which means that data sources are consistent between 2001 and 2006), the data would undergo quality check Level 3. Level 3 appraises the candidate data on reliability (see Table 6). At this level, if candidate data is of Outcome Type 3.3 (reliable data from both 2001 and 2006), the data become “successful” data. When candidate data do not pass quality checks in Stage A, Stage B is applied to new candidate data. In Stage B, researchers use the same process as in Stage A. A new set of data can be obtained through further research using the same definitions as the original indicator dimensions, or the original indicator dimensions can be redefined to better reflect the available data for a given indicator. 3.2.2. Data Assembly Management The assembly of 126 indicators is an enormous task that requires strict management and oversight. In order to accomplish this task, an indicator assembly database was developed to aid Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     13 the management of the data assembly process. The database (created in Microsoft® Access 2007) allowed for the periodic reporting of the status of the data assembly for each indicator. It also provided the ability to assign an overall reliability ranking for each indicator. Figure 5 shows a screenshot of the database input form. Key aspects of the Input Form include the Reliability Rating (discussed below) and the Approval Code. The Approval Code confirmed that the indicator had been double-checked by the Indicator Manager. 3.2.3. Metadata Documentation The data were recorded in spreadsheets (Microsoft® Excel 2007). An automated and standardized metadata capturing system was developed for the spreadsheets. A metadata (or “data about data”) system allows for documenting information within each cell of every spreadsheet. Metadata documentation provides assurances that the current analyses can be reproduced to check accuracy, and that analyses can be replicated in the future. Examples of entries include sources of information, individual contact information and calculations. Figure 6 shows a screenshot of the input window for metadata capturing. The standardized approach employed here, grounded in metadata capturing and production, also allowed for the designation of the quality of indicators based on a standard index (i.e. “star rating”). Most of the data assembled are from sources that do not provide a quantified estimate of reliability. Therefore, a reliability rating can be assigned to a dataset by taking into consideration the reputation and quality of the data source, namely the agency responsible for the collection and processing of the data. A “star rating” scheme can be employed in which a range of 1-5 stars is used to designate general reliability of a dataset, with 1 star indicating a low reliability ranking, and 5 stars indicating very high reliability. The metadata associated with each indicator was used to assign the star rating. This rating can then be used during the analysis phase to provide a quantitative representation of reliability. 3.3. Data Analysis Needs The essence of this work is to analyze the changes in an indicator over time due to some event. In this report, the events are the selection of Vancouver as a Host City and the associated planning and preparations for the Games. Determining the impact of these events raises some important issues that must be taken into account. The first is to ascertain whether it is plausible for the change to be caused by the specific event. The second is to examine whether the change would have occurred without the event. An example from the World Bank concerning the evaluation of an intervention illustrates this type of approach: Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     14 “The central impact evaluation question is what would have happened to those receiving the intervention if they had not in fact received the program. Since we cannot observe this group both with and without the intervention, the key challenge is to develop a counterfactual–that is, a group which is as similar as possible (in observable and unobservable dimensions) to those receiving the intervention. This comparison allows for the establishment of definitive causality– attributing observed changes in welfare to the program, while removing confounding factors.” (World Bank, 2009) From the perspective of this quote, what the analysis needed was a formal process in which to factor in the context in which the Games will be staged. Hiller (1998) explains that mega-events are part of a chain of prior and future relationships that need to be explored. By taking into account the impacts of the burgeoning development in the Host region before the Games, we are better able to determine Games-related impacts to the extent that the analysis can account for the pre-Games state and compare it to the Games era. In addition, the resulting changes can be assessed for their consistency with sustainability dimensions. This line of reasoning led to the “bundling” of similar indicators within a Games-investment framework in which they can be analyzed and assessed as a whole. This framework was based on a process that identified selected OGI indicators that are most likely to be impacted by the Games via government initiatives that were explicitly stated as having been created in relation to the 2010 Winter Games. These selected OGI indicators are known as “primary indicators.” The bundling method can be found in the work of Kansanko et al (2005), who used five sets of indicators (1-3 indicators per set) to study sustainability in 15 European cities. These researchers argue that, while indicators have their strengths and weaknesses, when used in parallel, they “enable a thorough analysis.” This research supports the bundling methodology used in the OGI study, which combines similar indicators with relevant areas of Games-related investment in order to provide a more comprehensive understanding of impacts. Similarly, Taylor (2005) showed how the European Environment Agency developed a set of indicators for assessing the integration of environmental considerations in the energy sector. Their indicators targeted a set of policy-relevant questions, and the results suggested that this bundling process created a comprehensive tool for analysis. The OGI bundling methodology also links indicators and initiatives, such as policies. Finally, Preuss (2006) uses the term “event structures” to refer to impact themes, such as knowledge and skill development. This process implies that such themes are mega-event impacts that emerge due to investments that extend beyond the actual event. The OGI bundling methodology also enriches the causal connections among similar indicators by linking them together and with investments that may collectively affect the Games impacts and indicators. For example, Socio-Cultural Bundle 1 titled “Progress in elite amateur sport in Canada” (see Section 5.1 in the Results Report) combines the following two indicators: So19 (Results at the Olympic/Paralympic Games and World Championships) and So16 (Top-Level Sportsmen and Women). As a package, these two indicators measure national and regional changes in the athletic development of Canadians in the Games era. The context for this bundle includes government initiatives such as Own the Podium and Podium Canada whose collective objective is to achieve excellence in Canadian sports. Combining indicators into a bundle and taking into account the initiatives that could affect those indicators gives a more powerful basis to hypothesize and test attribution of impacts to the Games. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     15 3.3.1. Longitudinal Study Needs Bundling indicators was necessary because the data from two study periods (e.g., 2001, 2006) is the minimum required to perform a time-trend analysis (Figure 7). Knowing that additional data would enrich the analyses, the researchers seized any opportunity to increase the number of data points during the data assembly and/or analysis processes. These opportunities usually accompanied a query to an especially accommodating data source. An example is the rich time- series data collected during the assembly of water usage data in the Metro Vancouver region for indicator En1. Ideally, any changes in the primary indicators that took place between 2001 and 2006 were analyzed. The year 2001 is two years before Vancouver won the bid for Host City in 2003. Therefore, whenever possible, 2001 was used as the baseline year against which changes over time (or lack thereof) are compared. The indicator data from 2006 are three years after Vancouver was selected as a Host City. This choice of year captures any significant changes underway specifically due to the selection of Vancouver as a Host City. This analysis determined whether the selected indicators exhibited any trends, whether the indicators were generally stable over time (i.e., they did not fluctuate wildly), and whether they were sensitive to the 2010 Winter Games. 3.3.2. Interpreting Indicator Needs A second data analysis need recognizes that impact indicators have limitations when establishing parameters (Leonardsen, 2007). The bundling methodology involved selecting context indicators for analysis when there was a local context for the statistical findings. Bundling the indicators, and taking government initiatives into account, enables the interpretation of the indicator results. Bundling also begins to suggest a causal chain for attributing changes in indicator trends to the 2010 Winter Games. To that effect, an investments-informed context indicator analysis was undertaken. We identified 50 Olympic-related investments that were new, or were otherwise modified, as a result of the 2010 Winter Games (see Appendix B for a list of investments). These include municipal, regional, provincial and federal government investments in initiatives. We also differentiated between physical (e.g., transportation) and social (e.g., health programs) infrastructure advanced for the Games. The logic was that it is reasonable to anticipate that, in the case of the Olympic Games, most changes can be expected in areas where there is a specific driving force to instigate them. It is important to recognize that governments and organizers may tend to emphasize evidence of economic and other benefits to justify public expenditures (Hiller, 1998). Public authorities push to create long lasting effects from the investments (Preuss, 2006). Therefore, it is important to look at all possible impacts of these investments, which OGI tries to do. As a result, the impacts of the 2010 Winter Games are potentially mediated by actions that are initiated by government and Games organizers and that aim to develop the Host City/region/Country and/or leverage the Games. These actions in turn may also contribute to the achievement of goals for the Games (see Table 7). As Table 7 shows, 50 Games-explicit initiatives were included in the analysis. For each initiative, the OGI indicator(s) that could potentially be affected by the initiative were identified. These “primary” indicators were then analyzed for trends. Following this, similar indicators were Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     16 bundled to create themes, e.g. Health and Physical Activity. Table 8 shows the year in which these various projects and investments started. Figure 8 portrays a relatively even distribution of these investments in the social sphere and a lack of Olympics-related environmental initiatives. There were three criteria for the inclusion of these initiatives. First, there were explicit statements made when these initiatives were launched that they were created, or pushed along, in an effort to win the bid to host the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, or to prepare for a successful hosting of the Games. Second, the initiatives came from Games’ stakeholders (i.e., Resort Municipality of Whistler and the City of Vancouver; Metro Vancouver; the Governments of B.C. and Canada). Third, the initiatives had to be started, or were in operation, 1998-2008. Strategies for finding relevant investments included: 1) Internet searches using Google with mixed combinations of keywords that included the Olympics, one of the various stakeholders (e.g., City of Vancouver), environmental, social or economic sustainability and the word policy, program, or initiative; 2) searches on stakeholders' websites (e.g., City of Vancouver’s website); 3) experts, who recommended additional initiatives; and 4) the snowball method, when additional initiatives were referenced in documents that were found via the above methods. 3.3.3. Latitudinal Study Needs A good understanding of a base trend is required to attribute an impact of the Games to a particular indicator. This means understanding what the Host City/Region/Country would be like had the 2010 Winter Games not been hosted in Canada, or in other words, the “normal” trend of changes. However, there are many confounding factors that could influence the establishment of a base-trend, such as global economic conditions. Therefore, from the start of the data assembly phase, it was understood that latitudinal studies were necessary to compare, for example, the city of Vancouver with other cities that face similar conditions. This necessitated a duplicate data assembly process and analyses for these “control cities,” as well as conducting a longitudinal- latitudinal study (long-lat study) (Figure 9). Furthermore, in order to provide an “apples-to-apples” comparison between cities, the indicator data were normalized (typically to population). This required the assembly of a consistent set of base normalization data7 for each city within these comparisons, such as population, household, etc. data. The most appropriate quantitative technique for analysis to achieve these goals is the “before and after control impact,” or BACI, method (Manly, 2001). The goal of this method is to establish a statistically significant change in the difference between the impact and control sites, before and after the event. Briefly, the method compares the Host City (Vancouver) to other cities over time on indictors of interest. The control cities ideally are cities that are most similar to Vancouver, and can therefore serve as a “norm” against which Vancouver can be compared (Preuss, 2000; Baade and Matheson, 2002; Hagn and Maennig, 2007).                                                             7 A special spreadsheet incorporating population, household, employment, labour force and Consumer Price Index (CPI) data for 2000-2008 was developed and distributed to the OGI Study team in order to standardize the consistent use of normalization data. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     17 In order to best control for variation, the ideal would be to have numerous control cities that are randomly selected from a larger group of cities that are as similar to Vancouver as possible. In reality, however, it is extremely difficult to find even one city sufficiently similar to Vancouver in all the relevant aspects, much less a group of such cities for the purposes of random selection. With these limitations in mind, we chose Calgary, Edmonton and Victoria for comparisons. Like Vancouver, all three cities are in Western Canada. Using Canadian cities for comparison allowed us to control for the political structure, geography and economic variations present internationally. For regional comparisons, we chose the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Like Metro Vancouver, it is an urban and growing regional district with common issues (e.g., homelessness). Provincially, B.C. was compared with Alberta (and occasionally to Ontario). Both B.C. and Alberta are resource-based economies with lots of urban growth and in- migrations. Educational policies are similar as are geographies. Canada was usually compared to the United States, except when there was a need for comparison of smaller populations. Bundling also aids our BACI analysis by identifying the investments that are potential factors (causes) in a cause-effect analysis (Hiller, 1998) when comparing the pre-Games state with the Games era. This analysis involves the assessment of indicators around certain impact areas, i.e., bundling. 3.4. Attributing Impact to the Games As discussed above, this method makes it possible to more conclusively attribute changes in select indicators to the 2010 Winter Games. This means documenting: 1) whether or not the Games have had an impact in the Host City/region/Country; 2) the direction of this impact (i.e., positive or negative); and 3) the size of this impact relative to a hypothetical “no-Games” scenario. As a result, the analyses presented in the bundles sections of the Pre-Games Results Report potentially reveal different trends in the indicator measurements over time between Vancouver and the selected control cities. The key question asked is whether any observed change in an indicator for Vancouver was attributable to the Games or whether it was part of a normal trend. In order to determine this, the analysis sought to attribute an impact for each individual indicator used in the indicator bundles. If the change was large enough (i.e., too large to be a part of a normal trend), the working hypothesis was that the change can be attributed to the Games. Seeking causality, however, may be too strong a judgment of Games impacts at this stage (i.e., the current OGI Pre-Games Technical Report). At best, correlation may be noted and that can allow for some postulation of attribution. At this point in time, however, we can assign one of five possible “scores” when assessing bundles, sustainability spheres and the final 2010 Winter Games impact: • Positive Impact; • Negative Impact; • No impact; • Neutral impact; and • Inconclusive. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     18 A “positive” impact is when there is a positive impact (weak or strong) in the indicator that is most likely due to the 2010 Winter Games. A “negative” impact is a negative impact (weak or strong) that is most likely due to the 2010 Winter Games. “No” impact means that there was no change in the indicator, or when the change could not be attributed to the 2010 Winter Games with any acceptable level of certainty (i.e., although in some cases impact is statistically possible, the lack of impact is equally as likely). A “neutral” impact means that the degree of positive impacts that the 2010 Winter Games contributes to the Host city/region/Country is “cancelled- out” by a similar degree of negative impacts. An “inconclusive” impact implies that one or more of the following occurred during the OGI process: a) There was an overall lack of available data to represent the prescribed indicators (for either the primary or secondary dimensions) for one or both analysis periods (2001 and ~2006). b) The overall quality of the data assembled was not sufficient to provide a conclusive analysis. This could be due to data not being collected often enough to provide two or more longitudinal data points.  It is possible to assess outcomes at the level of indicators, indicator bundles and sustainability spheres. Any of these sub-assessments can be incorporated into a final assessment of the overall process at the 2010 Winter Games impact level. Furthermore, a corresponding reliability index can be defined at all process levels. This hierarchical process, in which the final assessment is grounded on a foundation of assembled and reliability-assessed data, provides one of the best means in supporting a robust assessment of the Olympic Games. References Baade, R.A. & V. Matheson. 2002. “Bidding for the Olympics: Fool’s Gold?” Pp. 127–151 in C.P. Barros, M. Ibrahimo and S. Szymanski (Eds.) Transatlantic Sport: The Comparative Economics of North America and European Sports. London: Edward Elgar.  Daniels, Steven E. and Gregg B. Walker. 2001. Working Through Environmental Conflict : The Collaborative Learning Approach. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger. Hagn, F. and W. Maennig. 2007. “Short-Term to Long-Term Employment Effects of the Football World Cup 1974 in Germany.” Hamburg Working Paper Series in Economic Policy, 9/2007. Hotchkiss, J.L., R.E. Moore and S.M. Zobay. 2001. “Impact of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games on Employment and Wages in Georgia.” FRP Report No. 53, Georgia State University. Manly, Bryan F.J. 2001. Statistics for Environmental Science and Management. Boca Raton, Florida: Chapman and Hall/CRC Press.  Preuss, Holger. 2000. “Electing an Olympic city – a multidimensional decision.” Pp. 89–104 in K.B. Wamsley, S.G. Martyn, G.H. MacDonald, H. Gordon and R.K. Barney (Eds.) Bridging three Centuries: Intellectual Crossroads and the Modern Olympic Movement. London, ON. Preuss, Holger. 2007. “The Conceptualisation and Measurement of Mega Sport Event Legacies.” Journal of Sport and Tourism 12(3): 207-228. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report 3. OGI Methodology: Policy-Informed, Context Indicator Bundles Assessment     19 World Bank. 2009. “What Is an Impact Evaluation?” (http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTPOVERTY/EXTISPMA/0,,men uPK:384339~pagePK:162100~piPK:159310~theSitePK:384329,00.html#whatis) (accessed February 2009).  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Glossary of Terms     20 Glossary of Terms Hierarchy   Level Key Concept Definition Example a Goal/OGI Assessment To measure the impact of the Games. This measurement will be further defined and substantiated by the other key concepts down the hierarchy, so their definitions are critical. “Positive Impact” b Sustainability Spheres The 3 sustainability spheres are Socio-Cultural, Economic, and Environmental. The choice of these 3 spheres reflect societal and OGI values.  “Environmental ” c Indicator Bundles Sets of similar indicators can be summarized or reduced in order to be useful and usable for the impact analysis “Land Use Bundle” d Indicators General concepts that represent the initiatives or areas that are valued by society. Section 2 of the Pre-Games Technical Report defines context indicators. “En 6: Land Use Changes” e Indicator Dimensions The actual measures that describe an Indicator. Dimensions are variables that require the collection or assembly of data – the fundamental elements of indicators. “Commercial Land Use Change” f Data Value The actual data value that is an instance of the indicator dimension substantiated and defined by specific parameters and descriptive metadata. “29.6 km2”; “1.0%” g Data Parameters Parameters describe the scope and attributes of data, specifically the time period (temporal) and geographic scope (spatial), as well as units of measurement. Data parameters are important in the comparability of data values, typically differentiated by a single parameter (i.e. temporal parameter for longitudinal studies). “2006, GVRD region, area in km2, % of total regional area” h Metadata Descriptive information to substantiate Data Values and provide the means to assess quality, statistical significance, and documentation for consistency assurance in source and methodology. Examples of metadata are source description, frequency of renewal or update, and other indications in the adequacy for the analyses for which they are applicable. “Data provided by Joe Smith (555-555- 5555).”  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Tables     21 Tables Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Tables     22 Table 1: Costs of Staging the Winter Olympic Games, 1984-2010 Host City Year Cost in USD (millions) Cost Converted to 2009 USD (millions) Sarajevo 1984 $179 $364 Calgary 1988 $628 $1,121 Albertville 1992 $767 $1,154 Lillehammer 1994 $1,511 $2,153 Nagano 1998 $3,412 $4,420 Salt Lake City 2002 $1,330 $1,561 Turin1 2006 $2,207 $2,312 Vancouver2 2010 $1,384 $1,384 1 Bondonio, P. and N. Campaniello. 2006. “Torino 2006: What kinds of Winter games were they?” Working Paper n. 2/2006. University of Toronto. 2 VANOC. 2009. "VANOC Releases Updated Balanced Budget for 2010 Winter Games." (http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/news/news-releases/-/62856/32566/gnd387/vanoc-releases-updated- balance.html) (accessed February 28th 2009). Table adapted from: Essex, S. and B. Chalkley. 2004. “Mega-sporting events in urban and regional policy: a history of the Winter Olympics,” Planning Perspectives,19:2,201—204. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Tables     23 Table 2: Objectives and Sub-objectives of Olympic Agenda 21 Objectives Sub-Objectives Improved socio-economic conditions  Engaging the values of Olympism and action on behalf of sustainable development Stronger international cooperation for sustainable development  Combating exclusion  Changing consumer habits  Health protection  Human habitat and institutions  Integrating the concept of sustainable development into sports policies  Conservation and management of resources for sustainable development Methodology of environmental action for the Olympic movement  Protection of conservation areas and countryside  Sports facilities  Sports equipment  Transport  Energy  Accommodation and catering at major sports events  Water management  Management of hazardous products, waste, and pollution  Quality of the biosphere and maintenance of biodiversity  Strengthening the role of major groups Advancement of the role of women  Promoting the role of young people Recognition and promotion of indigenous populations Source: Holden, Meg, Julia MacKenzie, and Robert VanWynsberghe. 2008. Vancouver’s promise of the world’s first sustainable Olympic Games. Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy. 26(5)882-995.  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Tables     24 Table 3: Comparison of Ec12 Indicator Data from the Same Source Using Different Extraction Queries  Recently Acquired Data Original Baseline Data Category 2001 2006 2001 Difference Economic 69 80 33 -36 Social 40 97 21 -19 Environment 6 6 0 -6 Political 0 0 0 0 Olympic 3 0 8 5 Paralympic 0 0 0 0 Confidential 3 30  -3 Unknown 21 7  -21 Totals 142 220 62 -80  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Tables     25 Table 4: Stage A Outcome, Level 1 (At Least Two Data Points) Outcome Baseline (~2001) Pre-Games (~2006) Decision - Action Type 1.1 Data available DNAA 1 data point only: stage B Type 1.2 DNAA Data Available 1 data point only: stage B Type 1.3 Data available Data Available 2 data points: proceed to Level 2  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Tables     26 Table 5: Stage A Outcome, Level 2 (Consistent Sources and Methodologies) Outcome Baseline (~2001) Pre-Games (~2006) Decision - Action Type 2.1 Data Source i Data Source j Different sources: stage B Type 2.2 Data Source i(v1) Data Source i(v2) Different methodologies: stage B Type 2.3 Data Source i(v1) Data Source i(v1) Trend analysis: proceed to Level 3 Note: v1 = “version 1”and v2 = “version 2”, where these represent two different methodologies applied to datasets from the same source.  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Tables     27 Table 6: Stage A Outcome, Level 3 (Reliability Measurements) Outcome Baseline (~2001) Pre-Games (~2006) Decision - Action Type 3.1 Reliable Data Unreliable Data Unreliable data: stage B Type 3.2 Unreliable Data Reliable Data Unreliable data: stage B Type 3.3 Reliable Data Reliable Data “Successful” Data   Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Tables     28 Table 7: Number of Games-explicit Initiatives  Number of Games-explicit Initiatives Dimension Total Has an End Date2 End Date of 2010 Socio-cultural 18 13 10 Multiple1 17 6 4 Economic 11 8 7 Environmental 4 2 2 Total 50 29 23 1 “Multiple” means that two or more of the spheres were considered a primary focus of the initiative. 2 Most laws/bylaws do not have a planned end date. Some policies also do not specify an end date, or the information was not found.  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Tables     29 Table 8: Number of Games-explicit Initiatives by Start Year1 Dimension 1988 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total Socio-cultural 1 1 1 2 3 2 5 2 1  18 Multiple 1  1 1 1  4 3 5 1 17 Economic     1   3 7  11 Environmental      1 1  2  4 Total 2 1 2 3 5 3 10 8 15 1 50 1 A blank cell in the table means that no initiatives (0) were found that started in that respective year.  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     30 Figures Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     31 Figure 1: Sustainability Venn Diagram Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     32 Figure 2: Overview of the Data Assembly and Analysis Process Hierarchy  OGI Assessment Socio-Cultural Sphere Environmental Sphere Economic Sphere Land Use Bundle Transportation Bundle Air & Water Bundle Dimensionj Data Parameters Data Valuemn Metadatamn Indicatori Indicatori+1 Indicatori+2 Indicatori+m Dimensionj+1 Dimensionj+2 Dimensionj+n Data Level Indicator Dimension Level Indicator Level Indicator Bundle Level Values Sphere Level OGI Assessment Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ... ... ...  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     33 Figure 3: Precision vs. Accuracy    Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     34 Figure 4: Standardized Data Assembly Process  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     35 Figure 5: Snapshot of the Indicator Management Database Input Form   Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     36 Figure 6: Screenshot of the Metadata Capturing System Input Window   Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     37 Figure 7: Typical Longitudinal Study   Notes: V1A and V2A are normalized values (by population) for location A) Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     38 Figure 8: Number of Games-explicit Initiatives by Start Year and Sphere Number of  Games ‐explicit  Initiatives  by Start Year and Dimens ion 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Pr e‐1 99 8 ( 19 88 ) 19 98 19 99 20 00 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 20 08 20 09 Start Year N um be r  of  I ni ti at iv es Socio‐cultural Multiple Economic Environmental  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Figures     39 Figure 9: Typical Longitudinal-Latitudinal Study   Notes: the degree of distortion in the resulting “surface” represents the degree of consistency of the indicator dimension between two locations, A and B  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     40 Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     41 Economic Indicators Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     42 NASIC (b) FTEs (thousands) (c) % A-Agriculture, hunting and forestry Agriculture 34.7 1.6% B-Fishing C-Mining and quarrying D-Manufacturing Manufacturing 197.5 9.0% E-Electricity, gas and water supply Utilities 8.6 0.4% F-Construction Construction 179.3 8.2% H-Hotels and restaurants Accommodation and food services 170.5 7.8% I-Transport, storage and communications Transportation and warehousing 119.5 5.4% J-Financial intermediation Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 138.0 6.3% K-Real estate, renting and business activities Business, building and other support services 98.8 4.5% L-Public administration and defense; compulsory social security Public administration 91.3 4.2% M-Education Educational services 156.0 7.1% N-Health and social work Health care and social assistance 232.2 10.6% O-Other community, social and personal service activities Other services 90.8 4.1% P- Activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated production activities of privatehouseholds Professional, scientific and technical services 167.6 7.6% Q-Extraterritorial organisations and bodies Information, culture and recreation 113.2 5.2% Total 2,195.5 100.0% NASIC (b) FTEs (thousands) (c) % A-Agriculture, hunting and forestry Agriculture 346.4 2.1% B-Fishing C-Mining and quarrying D-Manufacturing Manufacturing 2,117.7 12.8% E-Electricity, gas and water supply Utilities 122.0 0.7% F-Construction Construction 1,069.7 6.5% H-Hotels and restaurants Accommodation and food services 1,015.0 6.2% I-Transport, storage and communications Transportation and warehousing 802.2 4.9% J-Financial intermediation Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 1,040.5 6.3% K-Real estate, renting and business activities Business, building and other support services 690.0 4.2% L-Public administration and defense; compulsory social security Public administration 837.4 5.1% M-Education Educational services 1,158.4 7.0% N-Health and social work Health care and social assistance 1,785.5 10.8% O-Other community, social and personal service activities Other services 701.0 4.3% P- Activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated production activities of privatehouseholds Professional, scientific and technical services 1,089.9 6.6% Q-Extraterritorial organisations and bodies Information, culture and recreation 745.0 4.5% Total 16,484.3 100.0% (c) Data in thousands of persons; the number of FTEs specifically was not available. Sources (1) Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey (unpublished data presented by BC Stats)  http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/dd/handout/naicsann.pdf . (2) Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey  http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/econ40.htm. Notes: (a)  Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (b) Statistics collected in accordance with North American Standard Industry Classification (NASIC); ISIC data not available. Country - Canada (2) Forestry, fishing, mining, oil and gas 330.1 2.0% G-Wholesale and retail trade; Trade 2,633.5 16.0% G-Wholesale and retail trade; Trade 353.7 16.1% Ec1: Employment by Economic Activity (2006) Region - British Columbia (1) (a) Forestry, fishing, mining, oil and gas 43.8 2.0%  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     43 Region - British Columbia (a) Country - Canada (b) Global activity rate has been taken to mean "participation rate", which is defined as the percentage of the general population [over the age of 15] who are currently employed or are actively seeking employment. Unemployment rate (1) number of unemployed divided by active population 6.0% 6.6% Net migration rate (2) migratory balance divided by permanent resident population 12.3% 7.8% Sources (1)  Statistics Canada Census 2006 http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/topics/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?Temporal =2006&PID=92110&METH=1&APATH=3&PTYPE=88971&THEME=74&AID=&FREE=0&F OCUS=&VID=0&GC=99&GK=NA&RL=0&TPL=RETR&SUB=741&d1=0&d2=0&d3=0&GID= 771240 (2) http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/080929/t080929c-eng.htm Notes: (a) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. Women in the active population (1) number of active women divided by the active population 60.8% 61.8% Ec2: Employment Indicators (2006) Global activity rate (1)(b) number of active persons divided by the permanent population 65.7% 66.9%Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     44 (a ) N u m be r o f en tr ep ri se s (1 ) % N um be r of en tr ep ri se s( 2) % T ot al  F T E s (b ) % M ic ro  (1 -9 ) In de te rm in at e 10 0, 69 4 53 .9 % 10 4, 00 5 54 .7 % S m al l ( 10 -4 9) 1 to  1 9 E m pl o ye es 74 ,1 20 39 .6 % 74 ,0 06 38 .9 % M ed iu m  ( 50 -2 49 ) 20  t o 49  E m pl oy ee s 7, 33 2 3. 9% 7, 30 0 3. 8% L ar g e (2 50  a nd  m o re ) 50 + E m pl oy ee s (c ) 4, 79 9 2. 6% 4, 76 2 2. 5% T ot al 18 6, 94 5 10 0. 0% 19 0, 07 3 10 0. 0% (a ) N u m be r o f en tr ep ri se s % N um be r of en tr ep ri se s % T ot al  F T E s (b ) % M ic ro  (1 -9 ) In de te rm in at e 18 2, 59 9 52 .1 % 18 7, 26 9 52 .7 % S m al l ( 10 -4 9) 1 to  1 9 E m pl o ye es 14 6, 09 7 41 .7 % 14 6, 18 2 41 .2 % M ed iu m  ( 50 -2 49 ) 20  t o 49  E m pl oy ee s 13 ,6 70 3. 9% 13 ,6 31 3. 8% L ar g e (2 50  a nd  m o re ) 50 + E m pl oy ee s (c ) 8, 07 8 2. 3% 7, 99 6 2. 3% T ot al 35 0, 44 4 10 0. 0% 35 5, 07 8 10 0. 0% N u m be r o f en te rp ri se s % N um be r of en tr ep ri se s % T ot al  F T E s (b ) % M ic ro  (1 -9 ) In de te rm in at e 1, 24 4, 20 8 53 .8 % 1, 25 5, 40 4 54 .0 % S m al l ( 10 -4 9) 1 to  1 9 E m pl o ye es 91 9, 23 7 39 .8 % 92 0, 03 3 39 .6 % M ed iu m  ( 50 -2 49 ) 20  t o 49  E m pl oy ee s 89 ,9 74 3. 9% 91 ,6 40 3. 9% L ar g e (2 50  a nd  m o re ) 50 + E m pl oy ee s (c ) 57 ,9 18 2. 5% 58 ,4 66 2. 5% 2, 31 1, 33 7 10 0. 0% 2, 32 5, 54 3 10 0. 0% R eg io n - B ri tis h C ol u m bi a (1 ) ( d) E c3 : S iz e of  C o m pa ni es  (2 00 6) R eg io n - G re at er  V an co u ve r R eg io na l D is tr ic t ( 1)  ( d) C ou nt ry  - C an ad a (3 ) (d ) R eg io na l d at a fo r th is  in di ca to r re pr es en t t he  G re at er  V an co uv er  R eg io na l D is tri ct , t he  S qu am is h Li llo oe t R eg io na l D is tri ct  a nd  th e P ro vi nc e of  B rit is h C ol um bi a. T o ta l S o ur ce s (1 ) B C  S ta tis tic s ht tp :// w w w .b cs ta ts .g ov .b c. ca /d at a/ bu s_ st at /b us in d/ sm _b us /b us _e st .p df . (2 )h ttp :// da ta .li br ar y. ub c. ca /ja va /js p/ da ta ba se /p ro du ct io n/ de ta il. js p? id =1 01 1 (3 ) B C  S ta ts  S pe ci al  D at a B as e E xt ra ct io n re : E de lg ar d P an ze nb oe ck    N o te s: (a ) D at a w er e no t a va ila bl e fo r t he  e xa ct  s iz es  a s re qu es te d by  th e or ig in al  O G I d at a te m pl at e. (b ) D at a w er e no t a va ila bl e fo r t he  n um be r o f e m pl oy ee s (F T E s)  b y si ze  o f b us in es s as  r eq ue st ed  b y th e or ig in al  O G I d at a te m pl at e. (c ) T he  n um be r of  la rg e bu si ne ss es  ( 50 + em pl oy ee s)  w as  n ot  p ro vi de d bu t w as  c al cu la te d fr om  to ta ls  m in us  th e ot he r 3  s iz es .Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     45 (b) Number of entreprises % ISO 14000 (1) % ISO 9000 (1) % SA 8000 (2) Micro (1-9) No Employees 182,599 Small (10-49) 1 to 19 Employees 146,097 Medium (50-249) 20 to 49 Employees 13,670 Large (250 and more) 50+ Employees 8,078 Total 350,444 Number of entreprises % ISO 14000 (1) % ISO 9000 (1) % SA 8000 (2) Micro (1-9) No Employees 1,244,208 Small (10-49) 1 to 19 Employees 919,237 Medium (50-249) 20 to 49 Employees 89,974 Large (250 and more) 50+ Employees 57,918 Total 2,311,337 Ec4: Quality Management of Companies (2006) Region - British Columbia (a) Country - Canada Sources (1) WhosRegistered.com Global  http://www.whosregistered.com/iso/form.php. (2) SAI http://www.sa- intl.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=document.showDocumentByID&nodeID=1&DocumentID=142. Notes: (a) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (b) Data were not available for the number of employees (FTEs) by size of business as requested by the original OGI data template.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     46 Number of Vehicles by Type (1) 2003 (2) % 2008 (2) % Class 1 (Passenger) 985,700 77% 1,095,696 76% Class 2 (Commercial) 188,864 15% 215,558 15% Class 3 (Motorcycle) 11,830 1% 17,753 1% Class 4 (Trailer) 54,376 4% 64,910 5% Class 5 (Motorhome) 10,917 1% 9,342 1% Class 6 (Commercial Trailer) 25,702 2% 36,716 3% Total 1,277,389 100% 1,439,975 100% Sources Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Ec5: Motor Vehicle Population (2003, 2008) (2) End of March totals (1) ICBC data (provided by Translink).Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     47 T yp e of  n et w or k 1 (n am e) T yp e of  n et w or k 2 (n am e) T yp e of  n et w or k 3 (n am e) T yp e of  n et w or k x (n am e) T ot al R ai l n et w or k (W es t C oa st  E x p re ss ) 70 .4 37  (2 00 1)  (1 ) ( a)  (b ) 10 0% 8 10 0% 2, 68 0, 00 0 D N A A D N A A D N A A S ee  co lu m n 2 S ee  c ol um n 3 N A S ee  c ol um n 6 N A N A L ig ht  r ap id  tr an si t ne tw or k (S ky tr ai n) 69 .9 12 21 0 ca rs  (2 00 8)  (6 ) ( c) 10 0% 33 10 0% 73 ,5 30 ,0 00 D N A A D N A A D N A A S ee  co lu m n 2 S ee  c ol um n 3 N A S ee  c ol um n 6 N A N A C on ve nt io na l b us  ne tw or k (C oa st  M ou nt ai n  B us  C om pa ny  &  W es t V an co uv er  M un ic ip al  T ra ns it S ys te m ) 30 45 .7 31 1, 27 5 (2 00 8) 10 0%  (J an ua ry  2 00 8) D N A A D N A A 21 4, 84 0, 00 0 D N A A D N A A D N A A S ee  co lu m n 2 S ee  c ol um n 3 N A S ee  c ol um n 6 N A N A C om m un ity  sh u tt le  b us  ne tw or k 61 2. 76 9 15 7 (2 00 8) 10 0% N A D N A A 5, 82 0, 00 0 D N A A D N A A D N A A S ee  co lu m n 2 S ee  c ol um n 3 N A S ee  c ol um n 6 N A N A B oa ts  (F er ri es  an d S ea B us ) ( 5) 3. 06 5 (S ea B us  O nl y) 4 (2 00 1)  (5 ) ( e) D N A A 4 D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A S ee  co lu m n 2 S ee  c ol um n 3 N A S ee  c ol um n 6 N A N A T ot al D N A A 14 70 D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A N A N A N A N A N A N A T yp e of  n et w or k 1 (n am e) T yp e of  n et w or k 2 (n am e) T yp e of  n et w or k 3 (n am e) T yp e of  n et w or k x (n am e) T ot al (f ) C ity  a nd  c ou nt ry  s ca le  d at a ar e no t a va ila bl e or  a cc es si bl e (D N A A ). (g ) D at a re pr es en t v eh ic le s an d st at io ns  th at  a re  w he el ch ai r ac ce ss ib le . (h ) D at a re pr es en t t he  n um be r o f p as se ng er  b oa rd in gs . N ot es : (a ) W C E  =  W es t C oa st  E xp re ss  p as se ng er  tr ai ns . T hi s fig ur e ex cl ud es  a ll fr ei gh t t ra in s / c ar s. (b ) T he re  a re  5  tr ai ns . H ow ev er , d at a re pr es en t i nd iv id ua l r ai l c ar s as  e ac h ca r i s co m pa ra bl e (a pp ro x.  n um be r o f p as se ng er s)  to  a  la rg e tra ns it bu s.  T he  5  lo co m ot iv es  h av e no t b ee n in cl ud ed  in  th e da ta  a s th ey  d o no t a cc om m od at e pa ss en ge rs . (c ) I nd iv id ua l c ar s ha ve  b ee n co un te d fo r t hi s fig ur e as  th er e is  n o se t n um be r o f S ky T ra in s - t he  n um be r o f t ra in s va rie s on  a  d ai ly  b as is . (d ) T hi s fig ur e in cl ud es  b us es  fr om  th e C oa st  M ou nt ai n B us  C om pa ny  a nd  W es t V an co uv er  M un ic ip al  T ra ns it S ys te m . (e ) T hi s fig ur e in cl ud es  2  S ea B us es , w hi ch  c ro ss  B ur ra rd  In le nt  a s w el  a s 2 A lb io n P as se ng er  fe rr ie s cr os si ng  th e Fr as er  R iv er , w hi ch  w ill  b e re pl ac ed  p rio r t o 20 10  b y th e 'G ol de n E ar s'  b rid ge  a cr os s th e Fr as er  R iv er . P as se ng er s jo ur n ey s %  o f pa ss en ge rs  ve hi cl e- ki lo m et re s S ou rc es (1 ) W es t C oa st  E xp re ss : T im  S ha ve r, Fi na nc e M an ag er  (c or re sp on de nc e) . (2 ) B C  R ap id  T ra ns it C om pa ny : I an  G ra ha m , S en io r O pe ra tio ns  P la nn er  (c or re sp on de nc e) . (3 ) C oa st  M ou nt ai n B us  C om pa ny : J an et  Y ue n,  P er fo rm an ce  A na ly st  (c or re sp on de nc e) . (4 ) W es t V an co uv er  M un ic ip al  T ra ns it Lt d:  G re g C ur rie , T ra ns it M an ag er . (5 ) F ra se r R iv er  M ar in e T ra ns po rta tio n Lt d:  K im be rle y B lo om , M an ag er  o f F in an ce  &  A dm in is tra tio n. (6 ) T ra ns Li nk  (G re at er  V an co uv er  T ra ns it A ut ho rit y) . R os s Lo ng , K en ne th  K uo , K el ly  M al an iu k (c or re sp on de nc e,  2 00 9) N um be r of  pa ss en ge rs  w ith  N um be r of  pa ss en ge rs  %  o f p as se ne g er s w ith  d is ab ili tie s V eh ic le  st oc k %  o f v eh ic le  ac ce si bl e fo r T yp e of  fu el Le ng th  o f t he  ne tw or k [k m ] T otal nu m be r of  ve hi cl es %  o f v eh ic le s fo r pe op le  w ith  T ot al  n um be r of  st at io ns %  o f s ta tio ns  ac ce ss ib le  fo r N u m be r of  pa ss en ge rs  P as se ng er  jo ur n ey s %  o f pa ss en ge rs  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s V eh ic le - ki lo m et re s C ou n tr y Fo r bu se s an d co ac h se rv ic es N um be r of  pa ss en ge rs  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s jo ur n ey s N um b er  o f pa ss en ge r ki lo m et re s %  o f p as se ne g er s w ith  d is ab ili tie s ki lo m et re s V eh ic le  st oc k %  o f v eh ic le  ac ce si bl e fo r pe op le  w it h di sa bi lit ie s T yp e of  fu el Le ng th  o f t he  ne tw or k [k m ] (2 00 7)  (6 ) T otal nu m be r of  ve hi cl es  (2 00 1;  2 00 2) %  o f v eh ic le s fo r pe op le  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s (2 00 7)  (6 ) (g ) T otal nu m be r of  st at io ns  (2 00 7)  (6 ) %  o f s ta ti on s ac ce ss ib le  fo r pe op le  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s (2 00 7)  N u m be r of  pa ss en ge r jo ur ne ys  (2 00 8)  (6 ) ( h) P as se ng er s jo ur n ey s %  o f pa ss en ge rs  R eg io n - G re at er  V an co uv er  R eg io na l D is tr ic t Fo r bu se s an d co ac h se rv ic es N um be r of  pa ss en ge rs  w ith  N um be r of  pa ss en ge rs  %  o f p as se ne g er s w ith  d is ab ili tie s V eh ic le  st oc k %  o f v eh ic le  ac ce si bl e fo r T yp e of  fu el E c 6:  P ub lic  tr an sp o rt C ity  - V an co u ve r Fo r bu se s an d co ac h se rv ic es Le ng th  o f t he  ne tw or k [k m ] T otal nu m be r of  ve hi cl es %  o f v eh ic le s fo r pe op le  w ith  T ot al  n um be r of  st at io ns %  o f s ta tio ns  ac ce ss ib le  fo r N u m be r of  pa ss en ge rs  V eh ic le - ki lo m et re s  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     48 Ec7 Number of establishments % of establishments accessible for people with disabilities (b) Number of rooms or beds % of rooms or beds accessible for people with disabilities (b) Average rate (beds per establishment) Class 1 (name) Hotels 179 23,982 134.0 Class 2 (name) 151+rooms 50 14,510 290.2 Class 3 (name) 76-150 rooms 57 6,116 107.3 Class x (name) 1-75 rooms 72 3,356 46.6 Class x (name) Misc. 37 1,821 49.2 Class x (name) Motels                        39 1,708 43.8 Total 255 27,511 107.9 Number of establishments % of establishments accessible for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds % of rooms or beds accessible for people with disabilities Average rate (beds per establishment) Class 1 (name) Fishing lodges 159 1,958 12.3 Class 2 (name) Hotels 705 59,024 83.7 Class 3 (name)      251+ Rooms 34 13,365 393.1 Class x (name)      151-250 Rooms 49 9,272 189.2 Class x (name)      76-150 Rooms 194 19,963 102.9 Class x (name)      1-75 Rooms 428 16,424 38.4 Class x (name) Motels                        766 21,032 27.5 Class x (name) Vacation Rentals       421 9,206 21.9 Class x (name) Miscellaneous 450 9,494 21.1 Total 2,501 100,714 40.3 Number of establishments % of establishments accessible for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds % of rooms or beds accessible for people with disabilities Average rate Class 1 (name) Class 2 (name) Class 3 (name) Class x (name) Total Sources (a) Data were unavailable at the city scale; however, regional data are provided for two different regional scales, including Greater Vancouver and British Columbia. (b) The British Columbia Building Code has evolved to include the following provisions regarding accessibility: parking and door-widths (1978), washrooms (1982), all accessibility aspects (1988), all accessibility aspects integrated within the code document (1992). In addition, many buildings originally constructed prior to these building code provisions may have been retrofitted; however, there is no single source of information to confirm the number of buildings accessible. Region - Greater Vancouver (2007) (1) (a) (b) Region - British Columbia (2007) (1) (a) (b) Country - Canada (2007) (1) http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/bus_stat/busind/tourism/trra2007.csv Notes:Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     49 Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities 9,992 Total number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) 15,489 Total number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities 15,939 Total number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) 28,616 Total number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities 90,270 Total number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) 172,271 Total number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Sources Ec8: Accommodation Occupancy Rate (2007) (1) (a) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (b) Region - British Columbia (b) Class x (name) x 100 x 100 Average rate x 100 64.51% x 100 Average rate (d) x 100 55.70% x 100 Class x (name) x 100 x 100 Country - Canada (1) Smith Travel Research, 2007. Canadian Lodging Outlook HVS International - Canada. April 2007 Year- to-Date. http://www.hotelassociation.ca/reports/Archived%20HVS%20Lodging%20Reports/HVS%20Canadian%20L odging%20Outlook%202007/Canadian_Lodging_Outlook_April_2007.pdf Class x (name) x 100 x 100 Average rate x 100 52.40% x 100 Notes: (a) Occupancy rates by hotel class were not available. (b) Data were unavailable at the city scale; however, regional data are provided for two different regional scales, including Greater Vancouver and British Columbia. (c) A weighted average was calculated to determine the percentage of occupancy rate (d) Includes Vancouver Downtown (7715 rooms), Vancouver/Burnaby Area (2218 rooms), & Richmond-Surrey/East Area (5546) a weighted average was calculated to determine the percentage of occupancy rate Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     50 O ri g in s- -- - D es tin at io ns  M o nt h s N u m be r of  to ur is ts  % A ve ra ge  le ng th  o f st a y s N um b er  o f to ur is ts  % A ve ra g e le ng th  o f st a y s N u m be r o f to ur is ts  % A ve ra ge  le n gt h  o f st a y s N um b er  o f to ur is ts  % A ve ra ge  le ng th  o f st ay s 19 98 2, 36 4, 68 4 30 .0 % D N A A 2, 20 9, 80 1 28 .1 % D N A A 3, 29 0, 98 0 41 .8 % D N A A 7, 86 5, 48 3 10 0. 0% D N A A 20 01 2, 50 8, 39 1 30 .0 % D N A A 2, 26 1, 85 8 27 .1 % D N A A 3, 57 6, 90 4 42 .9 % D N A A 8, 34 7, 15 3 10 0. 0% D N A A 20 04 2, 61 3, 99 2 30 .7 % D N A A 2, 33 8, 14 8 27 .4 % D N A A 3, 57 6, 96 4 42 .0 % D N A A 8, 52 3, 30 4 10 0. 0% 4. 36 20 06 2, 68 5, 19 3 30 .9 % D N A A 2, 50 6, 06 0 28 .8 % D N A A 3, 49 9, 67 2 40 .3 % D N A A 8, 69 2, 92 6 10 0. 0% D N A A O ri g in s- -- - D es tin at io ns  M o nt h s N u m be r of  to ur is ts  % A ve ra ge  le ng th  o f st a y s N um b er  o f to ur is ts  % A ve ra g e le ng th  o f st a y s N u m be r o f to ur is ts  % A ve ra ge  le n gt h  o f st a y s N um b er  o f to ur is ts  % A ve ra ge  le ng th  o f st ay s 19 98 ~3 ,2 00 ,0 00 59 .0 % D N A A ~1 ,4 00 ,0 00 26 .0 % D N A A ~8 40 ,0 00 15 .4 % D N A A ~5 ,4 40 ,0 00 10 0. 0% 2. 97 20 01 ~2 ,7 00 ,0 00 52 .4 % D N A A ~1 ,6 00 ,0 00 31 .0 % D N A A ~8 50 ,0 00 16 .5 % D N A A ~5 ,1 50 ,0 00 10 0. 0% 3. 51 20 04 2, 20 0, 00 0 52 .5 % D N A A 1, 33 0, 00 0 31 .7 % D N A A 66 0, 00 0 15 .8 % D N A A 4, 19 0, 00 0 10 0. 0% D N A A 20 06 D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A R eg io n A lb er ta C o un tr y - C an ad a A b ro ad T ot al E c9 : T ou ri st  N ig h ts  (2 00 4; 20 06 ) R eg io n  - B ri ti sh  C o lu m bi a C o un tr y - C an ad a A b ro ad T ot al V an co uv er   ( 6)  (7 ) C al g ar y  ( 4)  (5 ) (1 ) h ttp :// w w w .to ur is m bc .c om /P D F/ R eg io na l% 20 P ro fil es _V an co uv er C oa st M ou nt ai ns _2 00 8. pd f (2 ) h ttp :// w w w .c or po ra te .c an ad a. tr av el /d oc s/ re se ar ch _a nd _s ta tis tic s/ st at s_ an d_ fig ur es /to ur is m _y ea r- in -r ev ie w _2 00 6_ w eb _e ng .p df (3 ) h ttp :// w w w 40 .s ta tc an .c a/ l0 1/ cs t0 1/ ar ts 26 a- en g. ht m S o ur ce s (4 ) h tt p: // tp r. al be rt a. ca /t ou ris m /s ta tis tic s/ do cs /A B_ Ca lg ar y0 4. pd f (5 ) h tt p: // tp r. al be rt a. ca /t ou ris m /s ta tis tic s/ do cs /C al ga ry an dA re aT D R_ Pr of ile .p df (6 ) h tt p: // w w w .t ou ri sm va nc ou ve r. co m /p df /r es ea rc h/ an nu al _g eo gr ap hi c_ m ar ke t_ or ig in _1 99 4_ 20 07 .p df (7 ) h tt p: // w w w .t ou ri sm va nc ou ve r. co m /p df /r es ea rc h/ ov er ni gh t_ su m m ar y. pd fVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     51 A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A A D w ith  di sa bi lit ie s w ith ou t di sa bi lit ie s w ith  di sa bi lit ie s w ith ou t di sa bi lit ie s w ith  di sa bi lit ie s w ith ou t di sa bi lit ie s w ith  di sa bi lit ie s w ith ou t di sa bi lit ie s w ith  di sa bi lit ie s w ith ou t di sa bi lit ie s w ith  di sa bi lit ie s w ith ou t di sa bi lit ie s w ith  di sa bi lit ie s w ith ou t di sa bi lit ie s N um be r o f p as se ng er s (d ) sc he du le d ai rli ne s tra ns it pa ss en ge rs te rm in al  pa ss en ge rs ch ar te r ai lin es tra ns it pa ss en ge rs te rm in al  pa ss en ge rs A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A A D A D A D A D A ug A ug S ep t O ct N ov D ec T ot al F eb M ar ch A p ri l M ay Ju n Ju l S ep t O ct N ov D ec T ot al E c1 0:  A ir po rt  T ra ff ic  (2 00 8)  (e ) C ity Ja n F eb M ar ch A p ri l M ay Ju n Ju l N um be r o f ai rc ra ft s m o ve m en ts  ( d) sc he du le d ai rli ne s ch ar te r ai lin es pr iv at e ai r t ra ns po rt Ja n A DVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     52 A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D T ot al  n um be r of pa ss en ge rs  ar ri vi ng  a nd  de pa rt in g (1 ) ( b) A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A A D w ith ou t di sa bi lit ie s A ir po rt  1 A ir po rt  2 A ir po rt  3 A ir po rt  x A ir po rt  1 A ir po rt  2 A ir po rt  3 A ir po rt  x A ir po rt  1 A ir po rt  2 A ir po rt  3 A ir po rt  x 16 ,3 56 (b ) D at a re pr es en ts  2 00 8.  D is ag re ga te d da ta  u na va ila bl e fo r a rr iv al s an d de pa rtu re s.  It  is  n ot  p os si bl e to  d is ag gr eg at e pa ss en ge rs  th at  a re  tr an sf er rin g to  c on ne ct in g fli gh ts , w hi ch  re pr es en ts  (c ) D is ag gr eg at ed  d at a fo r f re ig ht  a rr iv al s an d de pa rtu re s is  n ot  a va ila bl e. (d ) D at a is  n ot  a va ila bl e fo r p as se ng er s w ith  d is ab ili tie s or  fo r t he  n um be r o f a irc ra ft m ov em en ts  b y sc he du le d or  c ha rte r f lig ht s. S ou rc es (1 ) V an co uv er  In te rn at io na l A irp or t F ac ts : w w w .y vr .c a/ au th or ity /fa ct s/ . ( 19 92 -2 00 9) (2 ) Y V R  C ar go  V ol um e (T on ne s)  2 00 8.  (1 99 2- 20 09 ) N ot es : (a ) R eg io na l d at a fo r t hi s in di ca to r r ep re se nt  th e G re at er  V an co uv er  R eg io na l D is tri ct . D es tin at io n fo r de pa rt in g pa ss en ge rs C ou nt ry  1 C ou nt ry  2 19 ,3 37 17 ,1 13 16 ,1 04 18 ,1 31 18 ,2 37 17 ,8 06 17 ,6 86 C ou nt ry  x w ith  di sa bi lit ie s D ec T ot al 17 ,8 52 ,4 59 T ot ai l a ir  fr ei gh t i n to ns  - V an co uv er  In te rn at io na l A ir p o rt  2 00 8 (2 ) ( c) Ja n Fe b M ar ch A pr il M ay Ju n Ju l 1, 79 8, 42 2 1, 89 2, 90 1 1, 44 0, 71 7 1, 32 7, 44 2 1, 17 3, 36 3 1, 32 2, 41 9 1, 42 0, 77 5 1, 36 1, 18 3 21 1, 31 3 19 ,3 79 17 ,8 40 17 ,5 06 15 ,8 18 1, 52 7, 58 5 1, 40 1, 73 1 1, 54 4, 03 0 1, 64 1, 89 1 S ep t O ct N ov D ec A ug S ep t O ct N ov R eg io n - G re at er  V an co uv er  R eg io na l D is tr ic t ( V an co uv er  In te rn at io na l A ir po rt ) 2 00 8 (a ) Ja n Fe b M ar ch A pr il M ay Ju n Ju l A ug T ot alVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     53 Europe America Asia Oceania Africa Total Number of Private foreign organizations Number of Public foreign organizations Europe America Asia Oceania Africa Total Number of Private foreign organizations Number of Public foreign organizations Sources Ec11: Foreign Organization Establishments (2006) (1) Region - Brisith Columbia Country - Canada (1) Statistics Canada, Industrial Organization and Finance Division, custom tabulation. Notes: NAVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     54 2001 2002 2006 2007 Total 4 years 1 Economic 69 68 80 59 276 2 Social 40 41 97 66 244 3 Environment 6 5 6 6 23 4 Political 0 0 0 0 0 5 Olympic 3 1 0 4 8 6 Paralympic 0 0 0 1 1 7 Confidential 3 2 30 36 71 Unknown 21 11 7 3 42 Total 142 128 220 175 665 (1) Vancouver Tourism Board. Special database extraction.(2008) See files. Sources Ec12: Hosting of International Events (2001-2007) (1) Region - City of VancouverVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     55 Women Men Ratio [≤;≥ 1] (b) Annual Earnings $28,427.00 $44,246.00 0.64 Mean Weekly Wage (c) $546.67 $850.88 0.64 Mean Hourly Wage(d) $14.58 $22.69 0.64 Median $20,754.00 $30,652.00 0.68 Women Men Ratio [≤;≥ 1] Annual Earnings $26,905.00 $42,469.00 0.63 Mean Weekly Wage $517.40 $816.71 0.63 Mean Hourly Wage $13.80 $21.78 0.63 Median $19,997.00 $31,598.00 0.63 Women Men Ratio [≤;≥ 1] Annual Earnings $27,653.00 $43,684.00 0.63 Mean Weekly Wage $531.79 $840.08 0.63 Mean Hourly Wage $14.18 $22.40 0.63 Median $20,460.00 $32,224.00 0.63 (d) Calculated by: Mean Weekly Wage/37.5 Ec13: Wages (2005) Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area (1) (a) Region - British Columbia (2) Country - Canada (3) (1)http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/topics/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?Temporal=2006&PID=94188&GID=838071&METH=1&AP ATH=3&PTYPE=88971&THEME=81&AID=&FREE=0&FOCUS=&VID=0&GC=99&GK=NA&RL=0&TPL=RETR&SUB=0&d1=0&d2=0&d3=2 (2)http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/topics/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?Temporal=2006&PID=94188&METH=1&APATH=3&PTYP E=88971&THEME=81&AID=&FREE=0&FOCUS=&VID=0&GC=99&GK=NA&RL=0&TPL=RETR&SUB=0&d1=0&d2=0&d3=2&GID=838062 (3)http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/topics/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?Temporal=2006&PID=94188&GID=837928&METH=1&AP ATH=3&PTYPE=88971&THEME=81&AID=&FREE=0&FOCUS=&VID=0&GC=99&GK=NA&RL=0&TPL=RETR&SUB=0&d1=0&d2=0&d3=2 (a) data chart from baseline report was not reproduced by Stats Canada, thus new Stats Canada source was found and used. (b) Calculated by: Women Value/Men Value (c) Calculated by: Annual Earnings/52 Sources Notes:Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     56 Sources (1) 2007/2008 Human Developments Report: Inequality in income or expenditure http://hdrstats.undp.org/indicators/147.html Notes: (a) Gini Income Distribution Index not calculated at the regional level. Ec14: Gini Income Distribution Index (2007/2008) (1) Region - British Columbia (a) Gini Income Distribution I d DNAA Country - Canada (1) Gini Income Distribution I d 32.6Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     57 Index at G-108 (2 years prior to the Host City Election) Sources (1) Statistics Canada data prepared by BC Stats: http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/dd/handout/CPIAN.pdf.               Source: Statistics Canada, CANSIM Table 326-0021 Notes: (a) CPI is calculated monthly, so data represents annual averages. Consumer Price Index of the country O N D Consumer Price Index of the region Monthly basis during the Olympic period J F M A M J J A S Consumer Price Index of the region 108.1 Consumer Price Index of the country 109.1 Year 2004 Consumer Price Index of the region 104.2 Consumer Price Index of the country 104.7 Year 2005 Consumer Price Index of the region 107 Consumer Price Index of the country 106.3 Year 2006 Ec15: Consumer Price Index (2003-2006) (1) (a) 2002=100 Consumer Price Index of the region - British Columbia 102.2 Consumer Price Index of the country - Canada 102.8 Year 2003Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     58 Reference year G-108 (2 years prior to the Host City Election) 2004 Region- British Columbia Country- Canada Building prices DNAA DNAA Water prices (b) Electricity prices (b) Housing prices (c) 104.0 105.8 2005 Region Country Building prices DNAA DNAA Water prices (b) Electricity prices (b) Housing prices (c) 106.2 109.2 2006 Building Prices DNAA DNAA Water prices (b) Electricity prices (b) Housing prices (c) 108.7 113.1 2007 Building Prices DNAA DNAA Water prices (b) Electricity prices (b) Housing prices (c) 110.9 116.9 2008 Building Prices DNAA DNAA Water prices (b) Electricity prices (b) Housing prices (c) 114.3 122.0 Notes: (a) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (b) Published as part of the consumer price index for shelter (2002=100); represents the sub-index for water, fuel and electricity. (c) Consumer Price Index, shelter (2002=100). 111.7 119.8 114.7 125.9 Sources (1) Statistics Canada Consumer Price Index, shelter (BC) http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/econ157k.htm. (2) Statistics Canada Consumer Price Index, shelter (Canada) http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/econ157a.htm. 115.1 126.6 122.1 135.5 108.0 112.5 Ec16: Price Indices (2004-2008) 2002=100  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     59 M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te M ea n (c ) M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te S in gl e D ou bl e S ui te M ea n (c ) M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . M ea n M ax . N ot es : (a )  T ou ris m  B C  d oe s no t c ol le ct  in fo rm at io n on  m ax im um  p ric es  o r t he  a ve ra ge  p ric es  fo r di ffe re nt  c la ss es  o f h ot el s an d ro om  s iz es . T he re  is  c ur re nt ly  n o co un t o f t he  n um be r o f ac ce ss ib le  h ot el  ro om s av ai la bl e. (b ) D at a w er e un av ai la bl e at  th e ci ty  s ca le , t he re fo re  d at a ar e pr es en te d fo r t w o di ffe re nt  re gi on al  s ca le s. (c ) d at a fo r t he  m ea n pr ic e w as  u na va ila bl e fo r b ot h 20 01  a nd  2 00 6 da ta . T he  a ve ra ge  h ot el  pr ic e w as  u se d.  $1 05 .3 3 D N N A $1 19 .1 6 $1 27 .6 4 D N N A $1 38 .2 7 D N N A $1 45 .8 6 D N N A D N N A $1 46 .5 6 D N N A $1 33 .6 7 D N N A $1 13 .4 6 D N N A S ou rc es (1 ) T ou ris m  B C . Y ea r i n R ev ie w  2 00 6.  ht tp :// w w w .to ur is m bc .c om /P D F/ T B C 20 06 _0 6_ Y IR _2 .0 .p df  (d at a as  s up pl ie d by  P an ne ll K er r F or st er  C on su lti ng ).   O ve ra ll fo r th e ye ar A ve ra ge  p ri ce  fo r al l h ot el  c la ss es  a nd  r oo m  s iz es $1 11 .8 8 D N N A $1 12 .6 1 D N N A $1 11 .3 0 D N N A $1 08 .7 2 D N N A Ju ly A ug us t S ep te m be r O ct ob er N ov em be r D ec em be r Ja nu ar y Fe br ua ry M ar ch A pr il M ay Ju ne D N N A $1 24 .7 3 C la ss  1 C la ss  2 C la ss  3 C la ss  4 C la ss  5 R eg io n - B ri ti sh  C ol um bi a (b ) Ju ly A ug us t S ep te m be r O ct ob er N ov em be r D ec em be r D N N A P ri ce R eg io n - B C N um be r of  r oo m s ac ce ss ib le  fo r pe op le  w ith  Ja nu ar y Fe br ua ry M ar ch A pr il M ay Ju ne D N N A $1 10 .3 8 D N N A $1 04 .9 7 D N N A $1 28 .2 4 D N N A $1 51 .2 9 D N N A $1 43 .4 5 D N N A $1 21 .6 5 D N N A $1 38 .6 9 D N N A $1 50 .7 8 D N N A $1 52 .3 4 D ec em be r O ve ra ll fo r th e ye ar Ju ly A ug us t S ep te m be r O ct ob er N ov em be r A ve ra ge  p ri ce  fo r al l h ot el  c la ss es  a nd  r oo m  s iz es $1 06 .3 5 D N N A $1 06 .9 1 D N N A $1 09 .7 2 D N N A $1 10 .8 8 Ju ne R eg io n - G re at er  V an co uv er  R eg io na l D is tr ic t ( b) Ja nu ar y Fe br ua ry M ar ch A pr il M ay C la ss  1 C la ss  2 C la ss  3 C la ss  4 C la ss  5 Ju ly A ug us t S ep te m be r O ct ob er E c1 7:  H ot el  P ri ce  In de x (2 00 6)  (1 ) ( a) P ri ce R eg io n - G V R D N um be r of  r oo m s ac ce ss ib le  fo r pe op le  w ith  Ja nu ar y Fe br ua ry M ar ch A pr il M ay Ju ne O ve ra ll fo r th e ye ar N ov em be r D ec em be rVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     60 Lo ca l c ur re nc y / s qu ar e m et re U S  $  / sq ua re  m et re (c ) Lo ca l cu rr en cy  / sq ua re  m et re U S  $  / sq ua re  m et re (a ) (b ) N um be r of  R es id en tia l P ro pe rt ie s S ol d (1 ) A ve ra ge  R es id en tia l P ri ce  ($  lo ca l cu rr en cy ) ( 1)  A ve ra ge  R es id en tia l P ri ce  ($ U S  cu rr en cy ) ( 2)  (d ) A ve ra ge  O w ne r' s M aj or  P ay m en ts      ($  lo ca l cu rr en cy ) ( 2) A ve ra ge  O w ne r' s M aj or  P ay m en ts  ($ U S  c ur re nc y)  (2 ) ( d) A ve ra ge  R en ta l P ri ce  ($  lo ca l cu rr en cy ) ( 3) A ve ra ge  R en ta l P ri ce  ($ U S  cu rr en cy ) ( 4)  B ac he lo r $7 01 $6 06 O ne -B ed ro om $8 16 $7 05 T w o- B ed ro om $1 ,0 45 $9 03 T hr ee -B ed ro om $1 ,2 20 $1 ,0 54 B ac he lo r $6 50 $5 62 O ne -B ed ro om $7 54 $6 52 T w o- B ed ro om $8 82 $7 62 T hr ee -B ed ro om $1 ,0 01 $8 65 $1 ,0 59  (e ) N ot es : (a ) D at a w er e un av ai la bl e at  th e ci ty  s ca le , t he re fo re  d at a ar e pr es en te d fo r t w o di ffe re nt  re gi on al  s ca le s.       E c1 8:  R ea l E st at e M ar ke t ( 20 06 ) R ea l e st at e fo r sa le  (1 ) ( 2)  (c ) ( d)  (e ) R ea l e st at e fo r re nt  (3 ) ( 4)  (d ) R eg io n - G re at er  V an co uv er  R eg io na l ne w $5 09 ,8 76 $4 40 ,6 50 $1 ,2 41 $1 ,0 73 ex is tin g 36 ,4 79 (b ) D et ai le d da ta  d is tin gu is hi ng  b et w ee n th e co st s of  n ew  a nd  e xi st in g re al  e st at e w as  n ot  a va ila bl e. (c ) D at a w er e un av ai la bl e on  a  s qu ar e m et re  b as is . (d ) C ur re nc y C on ve rs io n fr om  J an . 3 , 2 00 6 of  1 .1 57 1 (e ) t hi s is  th e av er ag e.  n ot  th e m ed ia n $9 15 ex is tin g S ou rc es (1 ) h ttp :// w w w .b cs ta ts .g ov .b c. ca /D A T A /d d/ ha nd ou t/m ls .p df (2 ) h ttp :// w w w .b cs ta ts .g ov .b c. ca /d at a/ ce n0 6/ fa ct s/ cf f0 61 4. pd f (3 ) h ttp :// ds p- ps d. pw gs c. gc .c a/ C ol le ct io n/ C M H C /R M H /N H 12 -2 09 E /N H 12 -2 09 -2 00 6E .p df (4 ) h ttp :// w w w .b an ko fc an ad a. ca /e n/ ra te s/ ex ch fo rm .h tm l R eg io n - B ri tis h C ol um bi a ne w 96 ,6 96 $3 90 ,9 63 $3 37 ,8 82Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     61 Imports Exports Year = 2001 31.6% 38.0% Year= 2002 30.90% 35.90% Year= 2003 28.20% 32.80% Year= 2004 28.10% 33.20% Year=2005 28.30% 32.78% Year= 2006 27.87% 31.28% Year=2007 27.02% 30.15% Year x+7 Year x+8 Year x+9 Year x+10 Year x+11 Year x+12 Sources Ec19: Economic Balance (Import-Export) (2001-2007) (1) Country - Canada Ratio of total value of import or exports over the nominal GDP (1) (1) Statistics Canada http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/gblec02a. htm?sdi=imports. (2) http://estat.statcan.ca/cgi- win/CNSMCGI.EXE CANSIM Table No: Table 384-0002Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     62 Sources Ec20: Dynamics of Service Activities (2001, 2006) (1) Country - Canada 2001 Ratio of the net balance of services to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) (2006) Difference between the value of services exported and that of services imported [in the country's currency] -5.044 (divided by) x 100 Rate [%] Gross Domestic Product (a) 896.5 -0.56 2006 Ratio of the net balance of services to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Difference between the value of services exported and that of services imported [in the country's currency] -13.369 (divided by) x 100 Gross Domestic Product (a) 1 200.96814786 Rate [%] -1.11 (1) OECD Statistical Profile for Canada http://stats.oecd.org/WBOS/ViewHTML.aspx?QueryName=177&QueryTy pe=View&Lang=en. Notes: (a) For consistency, the GDP figure quoted is that from the same OECD report. Year x+n Ratio of the net balance of services to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Difference between the value of services exported and that of services imported [in the country's currency] (divided by) x 100 Rate [%] Gross Domestic ProductVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     63 Rating 84.5 DNAA (a) AA1 AA+ Rating Rating 85.5 AAA/Stable/A-1+ Rating Aaa AAA/Stable/A-1+ Notes: (a) Data access through Euromoney has been confirmed to be contingent upon a (b) Data for 2007 were acquired during the acquisition of 2001 baseline data. Moody Standard and Poor Sources (1) Political Risk Services (ICRG) http://www.prsgroup.com. (2) Euromoney http://www.euromoney.com. (3) Moody http://www.moodys.com. (4) Standard and Poor http://www.standardpoor.com. Moody Standard and Poor (2007) 2008 Political Risk Services (ICRG) Euromoney Moody Standard and Poor 2007 (b) Political Risk Services (ICRG) (2007) Euromoney Moody - Sovereign long-term debt rating (foreign Standard and Poor - Sovereign long-term debt rating Year x+1 Political Risk Services (ICRG) Euromoney Ec21: Investment Risks (2001, 2007, 2008) Country - Canada 2001 Political Risk Services (ICRG) (1) (Composite Risk Euromoney (2)Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     64 Year Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) - Cdn millions of $ Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) - US millions of $ (a) (b) 2001 $340,429 $227,514 2002 $356,819 $223,305 2003 $373,685 $237,306 2004 $379,450 $294,147 2005 $395,238 $328,380 2006 $437,801 $378,361 2007 $500,851 $428,114 Year x +7 [in millions US $] Year x +8 [in millions US $] Year x +9 [in millions US $] Year x +10 [in millions US $] Year x +11 [in millions US $] Year x +12 [in millions US $] (b) Nominal Rate used Ec22: Foreign Direct Investment (2001-2007) (1) (2) Sources (1) http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.exe?Lang=E&Accessible=1&ArrayId =V1477&ResultTemplate=CII\SNA___&RootDir= CII/&Interactive=1&OutFmt=HTML2D&Array_Ret r=1&Dim=-#HERE. Table 376-0037 - International investment position, annual (2) Export Development Canada -  Currency Coversion Calculator: http://www.edc.ca/currencyconverter/index_e.asp . Notes: (a) Rates in US dollars calculated based on exchange rates calculated on January 2 of the listed year.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     65 Sums of public spending Ratio of public spending to GDP Sums of tax revenue Ratio of tax revenue to GDP Region (a) (2) $27,914.00 20.9% $28,067.00 21.0% Country (b) (1) $184,612.00 16.7% $193,825.00 17.5% Region $29,256.00 21.2% $27,007.00 19.5% Country $184,941.00 16.0% $192,288.00 16.7% Region $28,586.00 19.6% $26,382.00 18.1% Country $189,249.00 15.6% $190,914.00 15.7% Region $28,728.00 18.2% $28,186.00 17.9% Country $197,272.00 15.3% $199,398.00 15.4% Region $28,885.00 17.1% $32,351.00 19.1% Country $207,128.00 15.1% $212,244.00 15.5% Region $30,779.00 16.8% $34,249.00 18.7% Country $215,205.00 14.8% $224,746.00 15.5% Region $33,688.00 17.5% $36,284.00 18.8% Country $223,852.00 14.6% $231,222.00 15.1% Region $36,137.00 DNAA $36,980.00 DNAA Country $237,021.00 14.8% $250,782.00 15.6% Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] 2001 Ec23: Economic Role of the State (2001-2008) (1) Region - British Columbia and Country - Canada Spending (millions of $) Revenue (millions of $) year x+12 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 year x+8 year x+9 year x+10 year x+11 (1) Statistics Canada http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.exe?Lang=E&Accessible=1&ArrayId=V1329&ResultTemplate=CII\SNA___&RootDir=CII\&Interactive =1&OutFmt=HTML2D&Array_Retr=1&Dim=-#HERE. (2) http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.pgm Notes: (a) Data represent spending and revenue of the Provincal Government of British Columbia. (b) Data represent the spending and revenue of the Federal Government of Canada. SourcesVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     66 Amount ($ millions) % (e) 0 Administration General government $115.90 10.9% Police protection $179.57 16.9% Fire protection $81.37 7.7% 2 Education and training 3 Culture and leisure (excluding sport) 4 Health 5 Social affairs Planning and development $64.12 6.0% Engineering $171.15 16.1% Water utility $69.83 6.6% Solid waste $45.32 4.3% Sewer utility $80.03 7.5% 8 Public economy Community and cultural services $92.97 8.8% 9 Finance and taxation DNAA DNAA DNAA 10 Sport Recreation and parks $160.26 15.1% Total Total $1,060.52 Amount ($ millions) (b) % 0 Administration General government services $753 2.2% 1 Public security Protection of persons and property $1,126 3.3% 2 Education and training Education $8,925 25.9% 3 Culture and leisure (excluding sport) Recreation and culture $426 1.2% 4 Health Health $11,888 34.4% 5 Social affairs Social services $5,223 15.1% 6 Transport and communications Transportation and communication $1,755 5.1% 7 Environment Environment $247 0.7% 8 Public economy Labour, employment and immigration $55 0.2% 9 Finance and taxation General purpose transfers to other government subsectors $145 0.4% 10 Sport Sport DNAA Housing $167 0.5% Regional planning and development $81 0.2% Research establishments $50 0.1% Resource conservation and industrial development $1,462 4.2% Total (f) $34,508 Ec24: Structure of Public Spending (2006) City - Vancouver (1) (d) 1 Public security 6 Transport and communications 7 Environment Region  - British Columbia (2) (a) (d)Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     67 Ec24 (continued) Amount ($millions) (c) % of total (e) 0 Administration General government services $19,796 3.9% 1 Public security Protection of persons and property $43,534 8.5% 2 Education and training Education $82,685 16.1% 3 Culture and leisure (excluding sport) Recreation and culture $14,207 2.8% 4 Health Health $99,126 19.3% 5 Social affairs Social services $131,543 25.6% 6 Transport and communications Transportation and communication $24,723 4.8% 7 Environment Environment $12,935 2.5% 8 Public economy Labour, employment and immigration $2,480 0.5% 9 Finance and taxation General purpose transfers to other government subsectors $0 0.0% 10 Sport Sport / Housing $4,244 0.8% Regional planning and development $2,217 0.4% Research establishments $1,859 0.4% Resource conservation and industrial development $19,754 3.8% Total (f) $513,957 (e) Calculated by dividing Specific Amount Value by Total Value (2)  Statistics Canada http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.exe?Lang=E&Accessible=1&ArrayId=V1328&ResultTemplate=CII\SNA___&RootDir=CII\&Interactive=1& OutFmt=HTML2D&Array_Retr=1&Dim=-#HERE. (f) Total accounts for values that are not listed in this table (c) Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial and local government revenue and expenditures, annual (dollars x 1,000,000) from Total Expenditure (b) Based on provincial revenues only (for consistency with baseline). Sources Notes: (a) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (1)) City of Vancouver Annual Financial Report 2006 http://vancouver.ca/corpsvcs/financial/pdf/AR2006.pdf (d) Data are not available or accessible for the expenditure categories requested on the original OGI data template. (d) Country - Canada (2)Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     68 Amount (dollars x 1,000,000) % Direct taxation Property tax , solid waste, sewer and other $507.51 47.6% Water fees $68.86 6.5% Solid waste fees $42.79 4.0% Sewer fees $33.19 3.1% Other fees $313.23 29.4% Revenue sharing, grants and contributions $18.59 1.7% Investment income $30.08 2.8% Rental and lease income $43.02 4.0% Sale of property $8.06 0.8% Total $1,065.31 100% Amount (dollars x 1,000,000) % Direct taxation Income Taxes $7,841 20.4% Indirect taxation Consumption Taxes $8,127 21.2% Property and related taxes $2,708 7.1% Other taxes $802 2.1% Health and drug insurance premiums $1,461 3.8% Contributions to social security plans $1,271 3.3% Sales of goods and services $3,446 9.0% Investment income $5,662 14.8% Other revenue from own sources $1,140 3.0% General purpose transfers from other government subsectors $1,804 4.7% Specific purpose transfers from other government subsectors $4,082 10.6% Total $38,344 100% Amount (dollars x 1,000,000) % Direct taxation Income Taxes $225,218 42.4% Indirect taxation Consumption Taxes $107,844 20.3% Property and related taxes $49,404 9.3% Other taxes $18,885 3.6% Health and drug insurance premiums $3,258 0.6% Contributions to social security plans $32,368 6.1% Sales of goods and services $42,869 8.1% Investment income $45,341 8.5% Other revenue from own sources $5,950 1.1% Total $531,137 100% Other revenue Ec25: Structure of Fiscal Revenue (2006) (a) City - Vancouver (1) Indirect taxation Other revenue Region - British Columbia (2) Notes: (a) Tax data in Canada is not classified into "direct" and "indirect" forms of taxation, as per the request of the original OGI data template. As income tax and conumption tax are the most common forms of direct and indirect taxation (respectively), these represent the best available alternative source of data. Country - Canada (2) Other revenue Sources (1) City of Vancouver Annual Financial Report http://vancouver.ca/corpsvcs/financial/pdf/AR2006.pdf (2))) Statistics Canada http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.pgmVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     69 (a) Debt is expressed here in terms of NET financial debt per capita as opposed to gross. (b) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. Sources (1) Statistics Canada http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/071211/d071211d.htm(2) Statistics Canada http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/080130/d080130a.htm (3) CANSIM: http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.pgm?DIM_GEO=11&DIM_PRI=1&DIM_EST=1..6,35,7..10,37,11..15,36,16..18,38,19..20,49..50,23,51..52, 47,26..27,53..54,30,55..56,48,33,46,34,45&Unary=&ARRAY_RETR=Refresh+table&OUTFMT=HTML2D&LANG=E&AR RAYID=V920&SDATE=19810101&EDATE=20070101&FRQCVT=&RESULTTEMPLATE=CII\SNA_HTML2D&TPLPRE FIX=SNA&ORDERID=2008110712500033981&ROOTDIR=CII%2F&PWRK=&Accessible=1&C2DB=PRD&C2APASS= &INTERACTIVE=1&SDDSID=&SDDSDESC=&SDDSLOC=&NOINTER=1&RESULTTEMPLATE=/CII/RAW_2D (4) CANSIM: http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.pgm?Lang=E&Accessible=1&ArrayId=T920&ResultTemplate=CII\SNA___&RootDir=CII/&Interactive=1&O utFmt=HTML2D&Array_Retr=1&Dim=-&NOINTER=1&RESULTTEMPLATE=/CII/RAW_2D Notes: Value Value ($ millions) The net (not gross) debt of the public administration per inhabitant (a) $15,798 x 100 Rate (%) The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) (4) $1,450,490 1.09% The gross debt of the public administration per inhabitant DNAA Value The gross debt of the public administration per inhabitant DNAA Value The net (not gross) debt of the public administration per inhabitant (a) $3,770 x 100 Rate (%) The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) (3) $182,743 2.06% Country - Canada (2) Region - British Columbia (1) (a) (b) Ec26: Public Debt (2006) City Value The gross debt of the public administration per inhabitant DNAA Value The net (not gross) debt of the public administration per inhabitant x 100 DNAA Rate (%)The Gross Domestic Product (GDP)Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     70 Number of Olympic activities Number of Context activities Total for all job categories 0 0 Number of Olympic activities Number of Context activities Total for all job categories 0 0 Olympic activities Context activities Total for all job categories 0 0 x Notes: (a) As of 2008, no jobs were created for either Olympic or context activities because the games had not yet been awarded to Vancouver. It is estimated that in 2001, approximately 25 jobs were associated with the bid phase (Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation). These jobs do not relate to the employment sectors listed within the OGI data collection form for indicator Ec27. Ec27: Jobs Created in Olympic and Context Activities (2006) (1) (a) City - Vancouver Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Country - Canada Sources 1 Personal communication with VANOC. 2 3 4 5  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     71 Country - Canada Region - British Columbia Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area Ratio 4 Ec44: Employability of People with Disabilities (2006) (1) (a) Ratio 1 Active people with disabilities on active Percentage of active persons with disabilities Ratio 2 Active people with disabilities on people with Percentage of active persons with disabilities Ratio 3 Number of unemployed people with disabilities to Percentage of unemployed persons Average annual earnings of persons with mean of wages for people with disabilities (a) Percentages are provided instead of ratios (as per the OGI Technical Manual) and new row headings are provided as defined by the data source. Sources (1) Statistics Canada. Income Statistics Division. Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. 2001. Custom Table. R27085PD. 2 Notes: Ratio 5 Median of wages for people with disabilities Median annual earnings of persons with  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     72 Environmental Indicators Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     73 Actual external inflow Internal flow Total renewable fresh water ressources Annual withdrawals of freshwater Total [in millions of m3] [in millions of m3] [in millions of m3] [%] Actual external inflow Internal flow Total renewable fresh water ressources Annual withdrawals of freshwater Total [in millions of m3] [in millions of m3] [in millions of m3] [%] Please note any additional comments you may have on an attached file (Word) 2 3 4 5 x Sources 1 Country  En1: Renewable Fresh Water Use RegionVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     74 Volume [m3] Ground Water Regional River Other River Volume [m3] per annum Agriculture Commercial & Institutional Industrial Domestic Other TOTAL Volume [m3] Ground Water Country's own River International Rivers Volume [m3] Agriculture Mining and other primary Industries Industrial Domestic TOTAL Sources (1) Municipal Use Database (1999). Special data aggregation by the Fraser Basin Council (2) Human Activity and the Enviornment (2003) - Statistics Canada (Table 2.1). Notes: (a) Latest data for Canada is for 1996 (used in baseline) % of Total % of Total Water Consumption Water Reserves Country: Canada (2) (a) (2006) TOTAL % of Total Water USE % of Total  En1: Renewable Fresh Water Use Region: Greater Vancouver - Squamish Lillooet (2006) (1) (a) TOTAL Water ReservesVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     75 M un ic pa lit y 19 89 19 90 19 91 19 92 19 93 19 94 19 95 19 96 19 97 19 98 19 99 20 00 20 01 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 V an co uv er 35 2 36 1 35 2 33 8 32 3 32 5 33 4 33 9 34 0 36 1 34 5 34 7 34 2 36 5 36 4 35 9 35 3 34 3 33 1 W es t V an co uv er 24 24 24 23 26 26 28 25 24 26 22 21 24 22 24 20 18 19 14 N or th  V an . D is t.   58 62 52 46 45 47 48 49 51 55 50 49 51 54 50 50 47 48 42 Ri ch m on d 94 92 93 91 93 97 10 1 10 1 99 10 8 10 5 10 5 11 1 11 0 10 9 10 9 10 7 11 4 10 8 U EL 20 19 19 20 19 19 20 20 19 19 19 17 16 17 16 16 16 16 14 To ta l G V W D 1, 02 5 1, 07 1 1, 04 6 1, 02 6 1, 00 0 1, 03 9 1, 07 5 1, 07 5 1, 06 3 1, 15 1 1, 10 7 1, 10 8 1, 11 2 1, 16 8 1, 17 1 1, 18 8 1, 15 2 1, 16 4 1, 11 5 M un ic pa lit y 19 89 19 90 19 91 19 92 19 93 19 94 19 95 19 96 19 97 19 98 19 99 20 00 20 01 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 V an co uv er 12 8, 48 0 13 1, 76 5 12 8, 48 0 12 3, 37 0 11 7, 89 5 11 8, 62 5 12 1, 91 0 12 3, 73 5 12 4, 10 0 13 1, 76 5 12 5, 92 5 12 6, 65 5 12 4, 83 0 13 3, 22 5 13 2, 86 0 13 1, 03 5 12 8, 84 5 12 5, 19 5 12 0, 81 5 W es t V an co uv er 8, 76 0 8, 76 0 8, 76 0 8, 39 5 9, 49 0 9, 49 0 10 ,2 20 9, 12 5 8, 76 0 9, 49 0 8, 03 0 7, 66 5 8, 76 0 8, 03 0 8, 76 0 7, 30 0 6, 57 0 6, 93 5 5, 11 0 N or th  V an . D is t.   21 ,1 70 22 ,6 30 18 ,9 80 16 ,7 90 16 ,4 25 17 ,1 55 17 ,5 20 17 ,8 85 18 ,6 15 20 ,0 75 18 ,2 50 17 ,8 85 18 ,6 15 19 ,7 10 18 ,2 50 18 ,2 50 17 ,1 55 17 ,5 20 15 ,3 30 Ri ch m on d 34 ,3 10 33 ,5 80 33 ,9 45 33 ,2 15 33 ,9 45 35 ,4 05 36 ,8 65 36 ,8 65 36 ,1 35 39 ,4 20 38 ,3 25 38 ,3 25 40 ,5 15 40 ,1 50 39 ,7 85 39 ,7 85 39 ,0 55 41 ,6 10 39 ,4 20 U EL 7, 30 0 6, 93 5 6, 93 5 7, 30 0 6, 93 5 6, 93 5 7, 30 0 7, 30 0 6, 93 5 6, 93 5 6, 93 5 6, 20 5 5, 84 0 6, 20 5 5, 84 0 5, 84 0 5, 84 0 5, 84 0 5, 11 0 To ta l G V W D 37 4, 12 5 39 0, 91 5 38 1, 79 0 37 4, 49 0 36 5, 00 0 37 9, 23 5 39 2, 37 5 39 2, 37 5 38 7, 99 5 42 0, 11 5 40 4, 05 5 40 4, 42 0 40 5, 88 0 42 6, 32 0 42 7, 41 5 43 3, 62 0 42 0, 48 0 42 4, 86 0 40 6, 97 5 M un ic pa lit y 19 89 19 90 19 91 19 92 19 93 19 94 19 95 19 96 19 97 19 98 19 99 20 00 20 01 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 V an co uv er 27 1. 5 27 5. 6 26 4. 6 24 9. 5 23 5. 0 23 1. 4 23 2. 5 23 0. 6 22 7. 6 23 9. 4 22 6. 1 22 4. 9 21 9. 2 23 1. 4 22 7. 8 22 2. 0 21 5. 6 20 6. 3 19 7. 5 W es t V an co uv er 22 3. 3 22 1. 6 22 0. 7 20 8. 0 23 2. 7 22 8. 7 24 4. 2 21 5. 9 20 4. 7 22 1. 1 18 6. 6 17 8. 1 20 2. 6 18 5. 5 20 1. 7 16 8. 5 14 8. 9 15 6. 5 11 5. 9 N or th  V an . D is t.   27 9. 7 29 5. 7 24 6. 1 21 2. 9 20 4. 0 20 9. 5 21 3. 6 21 4. 4 22 0. 2 23 6. 0 21 4. 0 20 9. 3 21 6. 7 22 9. 3 21 0. 5 21 1. 2 19 8. 4 20 1. 6 17 6. 3 Ri ch m on d 28 1. 6 26 6. 2 26 1. 0 24 6. 8 24 3. 9 24 6. 0 24 6. 9 23 8. 3 22 6. 4 24 1. 5 23 0. 6 22 7. 7 23 6. 2 23 1. 0 22 5. 9 22 3. 4 21 6. 0 22 7. 2 21 1. 2 U EL 1, 75 4. 0 1, 59 5. 0 1, 52 9. 6 1, 53 6. 5 1, 43 8. 8 1, 40 7. 8 1, 44 9. 0 1, 06 8. 0 95 3. 3 94 3. 9 93 4. 3 79 2. 9 74 7. 2 79 3. 9 70 7. 6 70 3. 6 67 9. 1 53 9. 2 41 1. 1 To ta l G V W D 25 2. 6 25 7. 1 24 3. 6 23 0. 9 21 9. 6 22 1. 3 22 1. 6 21 6. 5 20 9. 4 22 2. 6 21 3. 6 20 7. 6 20 4. 7 21 2. 7 21 0. 6 21 1. 3 20 1. 7 20 0. 4 18 9. 4 (1 ) h tt p: // w w w .m et ro va nc ou ve r. or g/ ab ou t/ pu bl ic at io ns /P ub lic at io ns /2 00 7W at er Co ns um pt io nS ta tis tic s. pd f N ot es :So ur ce s: (a ) T he  fi gu re s  ar e  ba se d  on  th e  m et er  re ad in gs  th e  m ea su re  th e  flo w  in to  a nd  o ut  o f a  M un ic ip al ity . E ac h  m un ic ip al ity  is  b ill ed  fo r  th e  to ta l w at er  th at  th ey  u se . T hi s  in cl ud es  a ll  re si de nt ia l &  n on ‐r es id en tia l  cu st om er s  pl us  th e  le ak s  in  th e  m un ic ip al ity  w at er  m ai n  sy st em . (b ) T he  G re at er  V an co uv er  W at er  D is tr ic t ( th e  G VW D  o r t he  “ D is tr ic t” ) i s  re sp on si bl e  fo r s up pl yi ng  w at er  to  it s  m em be r  m un ic ip al it ie s. (c ) T he  V ill ag e  of  A nm or e  jo in ed  th e  G VW D  in  1 99 9.  H ow ev er , s ta tis tic al  d at a  re ga rd in g  w at er  c on su m pt io n  is  c ur re nt ly  n ot  a va ila bl e  an d  is  th er ef or e  no t i nc lu de d  in  a ny  s ta tis tic s.  T he  V ill ag e  of  A nm or e’ s  co ns um pt io n  is  in cl ud ed   i th  th e  Ci ty  o f P or t M oo dy ’s  c on su m pt io n. (d ) A s  of  2 00 2,  “ sy st em ”  flo w  re pr es en ts  fl ow  d ra w n  fr om  th e  so ur ce s.  P re vi ou sl y,  “ sy st em ”  flo w  r ep re se nt ed  fl ow  d el iv er ed  b y  th e  tr an sm is si on  n et w or k. (e )U EL  p er  c ap ita  fl ow s  in cl ud e  al l U EL  a nd  U BC  fl ow s.  H ow ev er  p op ul at io nE n 2:  P ub lic  W at er  S up pl y (1 98 9;  2 00 7)  ( 1)  (a ) ( b)  ( c)  (d ) ( e) G W RD  A nn ua l A ve ra ge  D ai ly  W at er  F lo w  (m ill io ns  o f l it re s/ da y) G W RD  A nn ua l W at er  F lo w  (m ill io ns  o f l it re s/ yr ) G W RD  A nn ua l W at er  F lo w  p er  C ap it a  (t ho us an ds  o f l it re s/ yr )Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     76 Concentration of intestinal enteroccoci [ISO 7899]  Concentration of Fecal Coliform (a) Third Beach DNAA 20 - 33 MPN/100 mL Second Beach DNAA 20 - 46 MPN/100 mL English Bay Beach DNAA 24 - 57 MPN/100 mL Sunset Beach DNAA 26 - 176 MPN/100 mL Kitsilano Beach DNAA 20 - 128 MPN/100 mL Kitsilano Beach 511 DNAA 20 - 172 MPN/100 mL Jericho Beach DNAA 27 - 68 MPN/100 mL Locarno Beach DNAA 29 - 78 MPN/100 mL Spanish Banks DNAA 23 - 167 MPN/100 mL Wreck Beach Foreshore East DNAA 22 - 60 MPN/100 mL Wreck Beach Acadia DNAA 23 - 63 MPN/100 mL Wreck Beach Trail 4 DNAA 20 - 49 MPN/100 mL Wreck Beach, Breakwater Trail 6 DNAA 21 - 58 MPN/100 mL Wreck Beach Trail 7 DNAA 26 - 111 MPN/100 mL Concentration of nitrate (NO3/l) Total of phosphorus (P/l) Site 1 (name) DNAA DNAA Concentration of Ammonia - N (b) Concentration of Nitrite - N (c) Concentration of of orthophosphate (P/l) Fraser River (Near Boundary Rd) 0.01 - 0.049 mg/L <0.001 - 0.002 mg/L DNAA Fraser River (near McDonald Slough) 0.037 - 0.076 mg/L <0.005 - <0.020 mg/L DNAA Annacis Sediment Survey (Far Field) 0.0773 mg/L DNAA DNAA Annacis Sediment Survey (Near Field Up Stream) 0.0993 mg/L DNAA DNAA Annacis Sediment Survey (Near Field Down Stream) 0.0947 mg/L DNAA DNAA Tilbury Island 0.026 mg/L <0.002 mg/L DNAA Near Ewen Slough 0.079 mg/L <0.092 mg/L DNAA Concentration of intestinal enteroccoci [ISO 7899] Concentration of Fecal Coliform (d) Centenial Beach DNAA 22 - 79 MPN/100 mL Crescent Beach DNAA < 20 - 33 MPN/100 mL Crescent Beach North DNAA 24 - 45 MPN/100 mL White Rock DNAA 20 - 44 MPN/100 mL Ambleside Beach DNAA 30 - 163 MPN/100 mL Dundarave DNAA 20 - 81 MPN/100 mL Eagle Harbour DNAA 20 - 122 MPN/100 mL Whytecliff Park DNAA 20 - 68 MPN/100 mL Cates Park DNAA 28 - 39 MPN/100 mL Barnet Marine DNAA 21 - 151 MPN/100 mL Orchard Park DNAA 24 - 138 MPN/100 mL Bedwell Bay DNAA 24 - 45 MPN/100 mL Belcara Park DNAA 26 - 61 MPN/100 mL Deep Cove DNAA 30 - 187 MPN/100 mL Concentration of nitrate (NO3/l) Total of phosphorus (P/l) Site x (name) DNAA DNAA Concentration of Ammonia - N (e) Concentration of Nitrite - N (f) Concentration of of orthophosphate (P/l) Fraser River (MacMillan Island) 0.013 - 0.038 mg/L 0.001 - 0.002 mg/L DNAA Fraser River (Barnston Island) 0.008 - 0.027 mg/L <0.001 - 0.002 mg/L DNAA Fraser River (Upstream Saperton bar) 0.00 8- 0.025 mg/L <0.001 - 0.002 mg/L DNAA Sources (f) Table 21. Fraser River (Kanaka Creek to the Mouth) Water Quality Objectives - 2006. Notes: (a) Table 20. Burrard Inlet Water Quality Objectives - 2006. (b) Table 21. Fraser River (Kanaka Creek to the Mouth) Water Quality Objectives - 2006. (c) Table 21. Fraser River (Kanaka Creek to the Mouth) Water Quality Objectives - 2006. (d) Table 19. Boundary Bay Water Quality Objectives - 2006, Table 20. Burrard Inlet Water Quality Objectives - 2006. (e) Table 21. Fraser River (Kanaka Creek to the Mouth) Water Quality Objectives - 2006. Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Number of sites monitored Bathing Water Quality Euthrophisation of lakes and ponds Euthrophisation of rivers (1) Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection Water Quality in BC - Objectives attainment in 2006. http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/wat/wq/attain_pdf/06_attain_report.pdf En3: Water Quality (2006) (1) City - Vancouver Number of sites monitored Bathing Water Quality Euthrophisation of lakes and ponds Number of sites monitored Euthrophisation of rivers Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     77 Carbon dioxide (CO2) Methane (CH4) Nitrous oxide (N2O) Hydro- fluoro- carbons (HFC) Perfluoro- carbon (PFC) Sulphur- hexa- fluorides (SF6) Total (b) Energy 519,000    54,000       10,000         NA NA NA 583,000               Industrial Process 41,000      NA 2,440           5,300         2,600          2,700        54,400                 Solvent & Other Product Use NA NA 320              NA NA NA 320                      Agriculture NA 27,000       34,000         NA NA NA 62,000                 Waste 190           20,000       700              NA NA NA 21,000                 Land Use, Land-use Change and Forestry 19,000      7,500         4,700           NA NA NA 31,000                 Total [in millions of tonnes of Co2E per year] 560,000    100,000     48,000         5,300         2,600          2,700        721,000               Carbon dioxide (CO2) Methane (CH4) Nitrous oxide (N2O) Hydro- fluoro- carbons (HFC) Perfluoro- carbon (PFC) Sulphur- hexa- fluorides (SF6) Total (b) Energy 49,000      3,400         1,000           NA NA NA 53,700                 Industrial Process 2,200        NA NA NA 520             0.36          2,750                   Solvent & Other Product Use NA NA 43                NA NA NA 43                        Agriculture NA 1,400         1,000           NA NA NA 2,400                   Waste 57             3,300         100              NA NA NA 3,400                   Land Use, Land-use Change and Forestry NA NA NA NA NA NA Total [in millions of tonnes of Co2E per year] 51,300      8,000         2,500           NA 520             0.36          62,300                 Sources Country - Canada (2006)  (1) (a)  (kilotonnes CO2 equivalent) Region - British Columbia (2006) (1) (a)  (kilotonnes CO2 equivalent) (1) Environment Canada (2008) http://www.ec.gc.ca/pdb/ghg/inventory_report/2006_report/2006_report_e.pdf Notes: (a) Data are developed, compiled, and reported annually by the Greenhouse Gas Division of Environment Canada in accordance with the requirements of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Data represent CO2 equivalents on the basis of their global warming potential (GWP). Totals do not include GHGs attributed from Land Use, as per national methodology. En4: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     78 Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Energy 587,000    582,000    588,000    609,000     604,000      596,000    583,000    Industrial Process 51,100      49,800      49,700      51,200       55,300        54,800      54,400      Solvent & Other Product Use 240           210           170           220            210             180           320           Agriculture 60,000      59,000      58,000      61,000       63,000        63,000      62,000      Waste 20,000      20,000      20,000      20,000       20,000        21,000      21,000      Land Use, Land-use Change and Forestry 98,000-      88,000-      51,000      12,000       41,000        8,400-        31,000      Total [in millions of tonnes of Co2E per year] 718,000    710,000    717,000    741,000     743,000      734,000    721,000    Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Energy 51,400      51,800      50,400      52,100       56,200        55,200      53,700      Industrial Process 3,880        2,910        2,820        2,960         3,150          3,020.00   2,750        Solvent & Other Product Use 32             28             22             29              28               24             43             Agriculture 2,400        2,500        2,500        2,600         2,700          2,700        2,400        Waste 3,500        3,600        3,600        3,600         3,500          3,400        3,400        Land Use, Land-use Change and Forestry NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Total [in millions of tonnes of Co2E per year] 61,300      60,800      59,300      61,300       65,600        64,400      62,300      Sources Country - Canada (2000-2006)  (1) (a)  (kilotonnes CO2 equivalent) Region - British Columbia (2000-2006) (1) (a)  (kilotonnes CO2 equivalent) (1) Environment Canada (2008) http://www.ec.gc.ca/pdb/ghg/inventory_report/2006_report/2006_report_e.pdf Notes: (a) Data are developed, compiled, and reported annually by the Greenhouse Gas Division of Environment Canada in accordance with the requirements of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Data represent CO2 equivalents on the basis of their global warming potential (GWP). Totals do not include GHGs attributed from Land Use, as per national methodology. En4: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     79 St at io n  Lo ca ti on  N am e  (b ) Pr ov St at io nI D G V St at io nI D 20 00 20 01 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 A bb ot sf or d  A ir po rt  ‐  W al m sl ey  R oa d E2 46 24 0 T3 4 0. 2 3. 3 0. 5 1. 3 3. 7 Bu rn ab y  Ke ns in gt on  P ar k 31 01 77 T4 5. 6 4. 2 4. 9 4. 5 5. 5 5. 0 4. 6 4. 2 Bu rn ab y  So ut h E2 07 41 8 T1 8 5. 8 5. 1 4. 8 4. 8 6. 0 5. 1 4. 5 4. 5 La ng le y  Ce nt ra l E2 09 17 8 T2 7 4. 4 3. 1 3. 6 4. 1 4. 2 3. 2 4. 2 3. 6 N or th  V an co uv er  M ah on  P ar k E2 09 17 7 T2 6 5. 8 4. 3 6. 3 4. 6 5. 5 4. 8 4. 7 4. 0 Pi tt  M ea do w s  M ea do w la nd s  El em en ta ry  S ch oo l E2 32 24 4 T2 0 5. 5 3. 4 3. 8 3. 8 3. 9 3. 5 4. 3 3. 4 Po rt  M oo dy  R oc ky  P oi nt  P ar k 31 01 62 T9 5. 3 3. 8 3. 6 4. 4 5. 8 4. 4 4. 4 4. 0 Ri ch m on d  So ut h E2 07 41 7 T1 7 5. 9 5. 6 4. 4 4. 5 5. 6 4. 5 5. 0 4. 4 Sq ua m is h 31 01 72 3. 1 2. 1 0. 9 2. 9 2. 7 3. 5 3. 6 Su rr ey  E as t E2 06 27 1 T1 5 5. 6 3. 7 3. 6 4. 4 5. 0 3. 6 4. 2 3. 9 V an co uv er  In te rn at io na l A ir po rt  # 2 E2 32 24 6 T3 1 6. 3 5. 7 4. 7 5. 4 6. 7 1. 3 4. 5 4. 6 V an co uv er  K it si la no 31 01 75 T2 5. 9 5. 0 5. 6 5. 7 5. 5 5. 7 5. 6 6. 0 W hi st le r  M ea do w  P ar k E2 27 43 1 2. 4 0. 2 4. 9 3. 3 4. 6 6. 5 S ou rc es (b ) S ta tio ns  c ho se n to  re fle ct  a ir qu al ity  n ea r O ly m pi c ve nu es  a s w el l a s re fe re nc e no n- O ly m pi c lo ca tio ns . A nn ua l A ir  Q ua lit y  H ea lt h  In de x  (a ) E n5 : A ir  Q ua lit y (2 00 0- 20 07 ) ( 1) N ot es : (a ) I nd ex  s ca le  d ef in iti on s:  h ttp :// w w w .a irh ea lth bc .c a/ sc al em es sa gi ng .h tm (1 ) B as e da ta  (P M 10 , P M 2. 5,  O 3,  N O 2 ho ur ly  re ad in gs ) p ro vi de d by  th e B C  M in is try  o f E nv iro nm en t: ht tp :// a1 00 .g ov .b c. ca /p ub /a qi is /a qi .b ul le tin .  D at a an d ca lc ul at io ns  to o la rg e to  s ho w  (7 60 16  x  9 3 m at rix ).Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     80 Land Use (a) Area (ha) Area (% of total) Area (ha) Area (% of total) Agriculture 54,580 19.3% 53,620 18.9% Commercial 2,790 1.0% 2,960 1.0% Harvesting and Research 8,660 3.1% 8,660 3.1% Industrial 6,300 2.2% 6,430 2.3% Industrial - Extractive 1000 0.4% 560 0.2% Institutional 4470 1.6% 4630 1.6% Open and Undeveloped 29,790 10.5% 25,960 9.2% Port Uplands 2,050 0.7% 2,050 0.7% Protected Watershed 46,690 16.5% 46,690 16.5% Recreation and Protected Natural Areas 63300 22.4% 67180 23.7% Residential - Commercial/Mixed 350 0.1% 390 0.1% Residential - High-rise Apartment 300 0.1% 380 0.1% Residential - Low-rise Apartment 1,620 0.6% 1,650 0.6% Residential - Rural 8600 3.0% 8070 2.8% Residential - Single Detached & Duplex 27,510 9.7% 28,460 10.1% Residential - Townhouse 1,820 0.6% 2,140 0.8% Transportation Corridor, Communication & Utility 4,130 1.5% 4,130 1.5% Road and Lane Right-of-Way 19,220 6.8% 19,220 6.8%  Total 283,180 100% 283,180 100% En6: Land Use Changes               Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (2001, 2006) (1) Initial Situation (2001) Final Situation (2006)  km2 % km2 % km2 % km2 % km2 % km2 % km2 % City Country Region km2 % km2 % km2 % km2 % km2 % km2 % km2 % City Country Region *For urban areas, data should also be provided for the extent of derelict and contaminated land (area in km2) In iti al  s itu at io n Urban fabric* Industrial, commercial, and transport units Agricultural Forest Unproductive Others Total Fi na l s itu at io n Urban fabric* Industrial, commercial, and transport units Agricultural Forest (a) Land use categories defined by GVRD (2006 Land Use Classification_8.5x11.doc) Unproductive Others Total Sources (1) Greater Vancouver Regional District, Bob Denboer, Senior Analyst, Policy & Planning Dept. Notes:Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     81 Total Area (km2) % of total land area Number of listed sites (f) The area for two of the three World Heritage sites is available. Data requested for Sgang Gwaay village site in Haida Gwaii BC 22 march 2007. (g) Data on the area of National Parks is not Available. Data request to Parks Canada was not fulfilled. Notes: (a) This includes Mt Revelstoke, Glacier, Yoho, Kootenay and Pacific Rim National Parks - data not available for Gwaii Haanas. Excludes data for Gulf Islands Reserve, which was created in 2003. (b) National Parks are a country-wide system of representative natural areas of Canadian significance. By law, they are protected for public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment, while being maintained in an unimpaired state for future generations.     (c) Strictly protected areas in this document are those that have been classified as IUCN classes I-III, other protected areas are those designated IUCN IV-VI. (d) Only includes area of Saguenay St. Lawrence Marine Park; area data not available for Fathom Five marine park. (e) Two of the three World Heritage Sites straddle the border between BC and a neighbouring province. Therefore it is not possible to calculate the % area in relation to total BC land area. National Parks (b) (g) DNAA DNAA 41 Sources (1) BC Parks http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/facts/stats.html. (2) BC Parks - www.bcparks.com. (3) Parks Canada http://www.pc.gc.ca/progs/lhn-nhs/index_E.asp. (4) Environment Canada Environment Signals National Indicators Series (2002)  - Protected Areas and Biodiversity indicator. National Historic Sites  (3) (2006) DNAA DNAA 157 World Heritage Sites DNAA DNAA 13 Country - Canada Strictly Protected Sites (2001)  (4) (c) ~ 610,000 km2 6% 1850 (2002) National Marine Conservation Areas (2006) 1 138 km2 (d) DNAA 2 World Heritage Sites (2001) ~ 120,000 km2 (f) DNAA (e) 3 Total BC Land area 950,000 km2 100% 793 TOTAL protected areas National Parks (2006) (2) (b) 4831.62km2 (a) 0.01% 6 National Historic Sites (2006) (3) DNAA DNAA 7 En7: Protected Areas (2001; 2006) Region - British Columbia Provincial Parks (2006) (1) 130,900 km2 13.80% 777 (2001)Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     82 Invertabr ates Fishes Reptiles Amphibians Birds Mamals Vascular plants Mosses Lichens Fungi Algae Number of known species % of endangered % of vulnerable Molluscs (not Invertabr t ) Fishes Butterflies and Moths Amphibians & Reptiles Birds Mamals Vascular plants Mosses Lichens Fungi Algae Number of known species % of total endangered % of total threatened (no vulnerable category) Invertab rates Fishes Reptiles Amphibians Birds Mamals Vascular plants Mosses Lichens Fungi Algae Number of known species % of endangered % of vulnerable Invertab rates Fishes Reptiles Amphibians Birds Mamals Vascular plants Mosses Lichens Fungi Algae Number of known species % of endangered % of vulnerable En8: Threatened Species Initial Situation Region Animals Plants Country - Canada Animals Plants Final Situation Region Animals Plants Country Animals Plants  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     83 Number % (f) Number % (g) Number % (h) Total Number Assessed in Canada (j) 550 100% 191 100% 18 100% Endangered (b) 46 8.4% 34 17.8% 6 33.3% Threatened (c) 25 4.5% 11 5.8% 2 11.1% Extripated 6 1.1% 0 0.0% 0 0.0% Special Concern  (d) 41 7.5% 3 1.6% 3 16.7% Extinct (e) 3 0.5% 0 0.0% 1 5.6% Total 121 22.0% 48 25.1% 12 66.7% Number % (f) Number % (g) Number % (h) Total Number Assessed in Canada (j) 550 100% 191 100% 18 100% Endangered (b) 132 24.0% 83 43.5% 7 38.9% Threatened (c) 85 15.5% 51 26.7% 3 16.7% Special Concern  (d) 120 21.8% 32 16.8% 4 22.2% Extirpated 19 3.5% 2 1.0% 1 5.6% Extinct (e) 12 2.2% 0 0% 1 5.6% Total 368 66.9% 168 88.0% 16 88.9% Source En8: Threatened Species (2007) (1) Region - British Columbia (i) Animals (a) Plants Vascular plant Non-vascular plant (1) COSEWIC.  Canadian Species at Risk - November 2007.  http://www.cosewic.gc.ca/eng/sct0/rpt/rpt_csar_e.pdf Country -  Canada Animals (a) Plants Vascular plant Non-vascular plant (j)   Total includes species designated in the Extinct, Extripated, Endangered, Threatened, and Special Concern categories, as well as the Not at Risk and Data Deficient categories. Notes: (a)  Animals = Vertebrates. (b)  Endangered = A wildlife species facing imminent extirpation or extinction. (c)  Threatened = A wildlife species likely to become endangered if limiting factors are not reversed. (d)  Special Concern = A wildlife species that may become a threatened or an endangered species because of (e)  Extinct = A wildlife species that no longer exists. (f)   Percentage based on total number of animals assessed in Canada = 550. (g)  Percentage based on total number of vascular plants assessed in Canada = 191. (h)  Percentage based on total number of non-vascular plants assessed in Canada = 18. (i)   Based on Historic Range of Occurrence.  Species may not be exclusive to BC. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     84 In km2 53.17 DNAA Number of occupants 599,780 DNAA Occupants per km2 11,280.4 DNAA In km2 DNAA DNAA Number of occupants DNAA DNAA Occupants per km2 DNAA DNAA in km2 411.02 DNAA number of occupants 2,199,121 DNAA occupants per km2 5,350.4 DNAA Sources Ratio of living space to the number of inhabitants DNAA En9: Housing Areas City - Vancouver 2006 (1) (a) (c) Residential area occupied by formal settlements Residential area occupied by informal settlements City - Whistler 2006 (b) Residential area occupied by formal settlements Residential area occupied by informal settlements Ratio of living space to the number of inhabitants DNAA (1) http://www.metrovancouver.org/about/publications/Publications/KeyFact s-LandusebyMunicipality-2006.pdf Region - GVRD 2006 (a) (c) Residential area occupied by formal settlements Residential area occupied by informal settlements Ratio of living space to the number of inhabitants DNAA Notes: (a) land use converted from ha to km. (b) data for Whistler was unavailable (c) data for informal settlements was unavailable. Previous sources lacking updated information. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     85 2001 2006 Population (a) 2,092,902 2,199,121 Total POAL Area (km2) (2) 2055.2 2055.2 POAL Area (m2) per capita 982.0 934.6 En10: Public open-air Leisure Areas (2001, 2006) Region: Greater Vancouver (1) http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/pop/pop/mun/PopulationEstimates_1996-2008.xls Sources (2) Metro VancouverVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     86 Usable length [km] Density [km/km2] % of compliance with accessibility criteria Usable length [km] Density [km/km2] % of compliance with accessibility criteria En11: Transport Networks (2007) City - Vancouver Motorways (1) (a) (2007) Sum - Arterial, Collector, Local, Lane, Ramp, Strata, Restricted, Service, Recreation - Road: 1644.1 km Sum - Arterial, Collector, Local, Lane, Ramp, Strata, Restricted, Service, Recreation - Lane: 3520.8 km Highways (1) (a) (2007) Sum - Highway, Freeway - Road: 8.1 km Sum - Highway, Freeway - Lane: 18.5 km Secondary or regional roads Cycle paths DNAA or No change since Baseline Pedestrian streets DNAA Railways DNAA or No change since Baseline Underground railways and tramways (2) (c) (2006) Sum - SkyTrain: 14.9 km Sum - SkyTrain bi-directional: 29.8 km Waterways (2006) DNAA or No change since Baseline Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Motorways (1) (b) (2007) Sum - Arterial, Collector, Local, Lane, Ramp, Strata, Restricted, Service, Recreation - Road: 9285.2 km Sum - Arterial, Collector, Local, Lane, Ramp, Strata, Restricted, Service, Recreation - Lane: 19040.6 km Highways (1) (b) (2007) Sum - Highway, Freeway - Road: 405.7 km Sum - Highway, Freeway - Lane: 900.7 km Secondary or regional roads Cycle paths DNAA or No change since Baseline Pedestrian streets DNAA Railways DNAA or No change since Baseline Waterways DNAA or No change since Baseline General Notes City data represents the City of Vancouver including the University of British Columbia, including surrounding bodies of water to the borders at some point between two municipalities. (Total area = 115 square km) Regional data represent the Greater Vancouver Regional District. (Total area = 2877 square km) Unable to acquire data on accessibility for people with disabilities.    Sources (1) Digital Road Atlas (GIS Innovations) by BITSAFS-Engineering, UBC (2) SkyTline.shp (Translink) Underground railways and tramways (2) (c) (2006) Sum - SkyTrain: 48.4 km Sum - SkyTrain bi-directional: 96.8 kmVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     87 Specific Notes (d) This figure includes the travelled length of  SkyTrain tracks: METHODOLOGY NOTES: All the values for SkyTrain were calculated from the SkyTline shapefile for June 2006. • The total SkyTrain kms was calculated from this file as a simple sum of all lengths plus ~0.8km for the VCC extension which did not exist in 2001. • The bi-directional length was calculated by doubling the length plus ~1.6km for the VCC extension which did not exist in 2001.  • The bi-directional length may be of interest as some future tracks may only consist of single directional track. (a) The following SQL scripts were used to extract data for motorways and highways: ///VANCOUVER/// (all distances for one way direction) (File Date: Dec. 2007) **Motorways Road** SET FILTER TO city_left="Vancouver" OR city_right="UBC" OR city_left="UBC" SUM seg_length FOR RD_SURFACE="paved" AND (RD_CLASS="arterial" OR RD_CLASS="collector" OR RD_CLASS="local" OR RD_CLASS="lane" OR RD_CLASS="ramp" OR RD_CLASS="strata" OR RD_CLASS="restricted" OR RD_CLASS="service" OR RD_CLASS="recreation") =1644.130875 km **Motorways Lanes (lane‐kms)** Create fields: [lanes_1] REPLACE lanes_l WITH val(numlanes_l) all REPLACE lanes_l WITH 1 FOR numlanes_l="N" OR numlanes_l="R" all [lanes_r] REPLACE lanes_r WITH val(numlanes_r) all REPLACE lanes_r WITH 1 FOR numlanes_r="N" OR numlanes_r="R" all SET FILTER TO city_left="Vancouver" OR city_right="UBC" OR city_left="UBC" SUM seg_length*(lanes_l+lanes_r) FOR RD_SURFACE="paved" AND (RD_CLASS="arterial" OR RD_CLASS="collector" OR RD_CLASS="local" OR  RD_CLASS="lane" OR RD_CLASS="ramp" OR RD_CLASS="strata" OR RD_CLASS="restricted" OR RD_CLASS="service" OR RD_CLASS="recreation") =3520.755906 km **Highways Road** SET FILTER TO city_left="Vancouver" OR city_right="UBC" OR city_left="UBC" SUM seg_length FOR RD_SURFACE="paved" AND (RD_CLASS="highway" OR RD_CLASS="freeway") =8.140109 km **Highways Lanes (lane‐kms)** SET FILTER TO city_left="Vancouver" OR city_right="UBC" OR city_left="UBC" SUM seg_length*(lanes_l+lanes_r) FOR RD_SURFACE="paved" AND (RD_CLASS="highway" OR RD_CLASS="freeway") =18.547785 km ///GVRD/// (all distances for one way direction) (File Date: Dec. 2007) **Motorways Road** SET FILTER TO rgn_left="GVRD" SUM seg_length FOR RD_SURFACE="paved" AND (RD_CLASS="arterial" OR RD_CLASS="collector" OR RD_CLASS="local" OR RD_CLASS="lane" OR RD_CLASS="ramp" OR RD_CLASS="strata" OR RD_CLASS="restricted" OR RD_CLASS="service" OR RD_CLASS="recreation") =9285.169214 km **Motorways Lanes (lane‐kms)** REPLACE lanes_l WITH val(numlanes_l) all REPLACE lanes_l WITH 1 FOR numlanes_l="N" OR numlanes_l="R" all REPLACE lanes_r WITH val(numlanes_r) all REPLACE lanes_r WITH 1 FOR numlanes_r="N" OR numlanes_r="R" all SET FILTER TO rgn_left="GVRD" SUM seg_length*(lanes_l+lanes_r) FOR RD_SURFACE="paved" AND (RD_CLASS="arterial" OR RD_CLASS="collector" OR RD_CLASS="local" OR  RD_CLASS="lane" OR RD_CLASS="ramp" OR RD_CLASS="strata" OR RD_CLASS="restricted" OR RD_CLASS="service" OR RD_CLASS="recreation") =19040.610364 km **Highways Road** SET FILTER TO rgn_left="GVRD" SUM seg_length FOR RD_SURFACE="paved" AND (RD_CLASS="highway" OR RD_CLASS="freeway") =405.650211 km **Highways Lanes (lane‐kms)** SET FILTER TO city_left="Vancouver" OR city_right="UBC" OR city_left="UBC" SUM seg_length*(lanes_l+lanes_r) FOR RD_SURFACE="paved" AND (RD_CLASS="highway" OR RD_CLASS="freeway") =900.679122 kmVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     88 Geographic Area 1996 2001 2006 Vancouver CMA 7.7 7.6 7.4 Abbotsford CMA DNAA 7.7 7.3 Victoria CMA 4.7 4.7 4.6 Toronto CMA 9.3 9.2 9.4 Calgary CMA 7.5 7.7 8.2 Montreal CMA 8.2 8.0 8.1 Edmonton CMA 7.6 7.6 7.8 BC 6.4 6.4 6.5 Canada 7.0 7.2 7.6 City 2001 2006 2001 2006 2001 2006 2001 2006 Vancouver 290,295 304,440 35.7% 42.9% 63.4% 56.0% 0.9% 1.1% Toronto 1,252,860 1,251,070 41.1% 43.0% 58.2% 56.2% 0.7% 0.8% Calgary 431,740 498,030 22.1% 24.4% 77.1% 74.7% 0.7% 0.9% Montreal 912,895 939,390 39.2% 40.5% 60.3% 58.8% 0.5% 0.7% Edmonton 333,795 378,190 17.5% 19.8% 81.8% 79.4% 0.7% 0.8% Sources: Notes: (a) Applies to population age 15 years and older with usual place of work (b) Sample Universise: 20% of all residents (c) In 2001, there was a transit strike in Greater Vancouver Sustainable Transp. Car OtherTotal Trips (1) StatsCan Census Journey to Work data (distances are approximate (straight-lined) and may not be travelled route distance) En12: Daily Travelling Distance Median Commute Distance (km) for Select Metropolitan Areas (1996, 2001, 2006) (1) (a) (b) (c) Total Commuters per Day by Place of Work for Select Metropolitan Areas, 2001, 2006 (1) (a) (b) (c)Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     89 24  H ou r B ot h D ir. B ot h D ir. In -B ou nd O ut -B ou nd B ot h D ir. In -B ou nd O ut -B ou nd B ot h D ir. In -B ou nd O ut -B ou nd B ot h D ir. In -B ou nd O ut -B ou nd R eg io n- w id e 3, 19 1, 97 4 56 7, 97 3 35 1, 30 6 21 6, 66 7 1, 08 3, 90 3 55 4, 75 5 52 9, 14 8 71 9, 09 7 31 2, 81 8 40 6, 27 9 1, 90 4, 90 4 94 3, 81 4 96 1, 09 0 H w y 99  N or th 12 ,0 77 2, 04 4 1, 23 7 80 7 4, 31 9 2, 27 4 2, 04 5 2, 89 2 1, 29 5 1, 59 7 7, 14 1 3, 40 3 3, 73 8 B ur ra rd  In le t 19 9, 09 4 38 ,1 16 22 ,5 86 15 ,5 30 66 ,5 57 34 ,8 16 31 ,7 41 44 ,2 28 19 ,8 11 24 ,4 17 11 6, 75 0 57 ,4 30 59 ,3 20 D ow nt ow n P en in su la 39 9, 83 2 64 ,4 54 41 ,5 46 22 ,9 08 13 8, 77 4 72 ,4 71 66 ,3 03 87 ,6 15 38 ,4 60 49 ,1 55 24 7, 76 3 12 3, 12 9 12 4, 63 4 B ou nd ar y R oa d 36 6, 22 9 62 ,6 84 36 ,5 07 26 ,1 77 12 1, 00 8 61 ,5 74 59 ,4 34 80 ,9 09 37 ,5 39 43 ,3 70 22 2, 63 6 11 0, 88 4 11 1, 75 2 N or th  R oa d 32 3, 95 2 63 ,0 51 44 ,1 28 18 ,9 23 10 3, 97 4 53 ,3 06 50 ,6 68 72 ,7 07 26 ,6 90 46 ,0 17 18 8, 19 4 90 ,9 78 97 ,2 16 N or th  A rm 35 4, 22 0 63 ,3 60 34 ,0 19 29 ,3 41 12 0, 08 3 60 ,7 22 59 ,3 61 77 ,1 52 38 ,4 67 38 ,6 85 21 3, 70 8 10 7, 99 1 10 5, 71 7 S ou th /M ai n A rm 40 1, 22 7 75 ,1 71 49 ,3 61 25 ,8 10 12 8, 80 6 66 ,7 18 62 ,0 88 89 ,7 29 34 ,6 32 55 ,0 97 23 6, 32 7 11 5, 28 9 12 1, 03 8 P itt  R iv er 78 ,6 33 14 ,8 24 11 ,0 08 3, 81 6 24 ,1 08 12 ,2 49 11 ,8 59 19 ,3 95 6, 52 6 12 ,8 69 44 ,4 14 21 ,2 92 23 ,1 22 20 0t h S tr ee t 27 0, 54 9 44 ,2 38 25 ,8 41 18 ,3 97 99 ,6 25 49 ,5 88 50 ,0 37 63 ,5 26 28 ,4 56 35 ,0 70 16 2, 78 5 81 ,2 32 81 ,5 53 H w y 1 an d 7 R eg io na l B or de r (e ) 13 ,7 15 1, 60 5 78 8 81 7 5, 62 9 2, 87 6 2, 75 3 2, 90 2 1, 56 2 1, 34 0 9, 20 8 4, 72 9 4, 47 9 24  H ou r B ot h D ir. B ot h D ir. In -B ou nd O ut -B ou nd B ot h D ir. In -B ou nd O ut -B ou nd B ot h D ir. In -B ou nd O ut -B ou nd B ot h D ir. In -B ou nd O ut -B ou nd R eg io n- w id e 2, 99 1, 46 1 53 9, 87 6 33 9, 06 1 20 0, 81 5 1, 00 3, 66 7 51 1, 72 3 49 1, 94 4 67 7, 54 8 29 0, 26 6 38 7, 28 2 1, 77 4, 03 7 86 4, 07 7 90 9, 96 0 H w y 99  N or th 10 ,6 41 1, 90 0 1, 17 9 72 1 3, 63 9 1, 95 3 1, 68 6 2, 56 0 1, 19 3 1, 36 7 6, 18 1 2, 97 2 3, 20 9 B ur ra rd  In le t 18 6, 69 4 37 ,8 51 23 ,6 52 14 ,1 99 60 ,3 50 31 ,8 61 28 ,4 89 42 ,4 10 17 ,8 95 24 ,5 15 10 6, 43 3 51 ,6 70 54 ,7 63 D ow nt ow n P en in su la 42 0, 21 6 67 ,0 99 44 ,4 61 22 ,6 38 14 4, 21 8 75 ,8 65 68 ,3 53 91 ,1 90 39 ,2 29 51 ,9 61 26 1, 92 7 12 8, 45 3 13 3, 47 4 B ou nd ar y R oa d 36 4, 29 4 62 ,4 25 37 ,8 49 24 ,5 76 12 2, 14 1 62 ,2 57 59 ,8 84 81 ,5 46 37 ,2 09 44 ,3 37 22 0, 32 3 10 7, 21 7 11 3, 10 6 N or th  R oa d 29 3, 63 9 57 ,8 44 40 ,6 32 17 ,2 12 93 ,9 80 47 ,7 72 46 ,2 08 64 ,0 29 24 ,0 59 39 ,9 70 17 1, 76 6 81 ,2 18 90 ,5 48 N or th  A rm 33 9, 06 4 65 ,0 53 34 ,7 84 30 ,2 69 11 3, 00 4 56 ,6 73 56 ,3 31 77 ,9 72 38 ,0 69 39 ,9 03 19 6, 03 9 97 ,4 47 98 ,5 92 S ou th /M ai n A rm 36 9, 65 0 76 ,2 81 52 ,9 12 23 ,3 69 11 5, 10 1 59 ,2 29 55 ,8 72 82 ,7 10 31 ,1 19 51 ,5 91 21 0, 65 9 10 1, 35 1 10 9, 30 8 P itt  R iv er 63 ,8 84 12 ,1 37 8, 84 3 3, 29 4 18 ,6 93 9, 62 7 9, 06 6 14 ,2 69 4, 86 3 9, 40 6 37 ,4 78 17 ,1 27 20 ,3 51 20 0t h S tr ee t 23 0, 30 3 35 ,8 63 21 ,6 03 14 ,2 60 84 ,9 55 42 ,7 48 42 ,2 07 53 ,9 52 23 ,3 41 30 ,6 11 14 0, 48 8 68 ,3 17 72 ,1 71 H w y 1 an d 7 R eg io na l B or de r (e ) 14 ,7 35 1, 47 9 63 4 84 5 6, 06 7 2, 80 4 3, 26 3 3, 20 8 1, 77 5 1, 43 3 10 ,0 48 4, 84 0 5, 20 8 S ou rc e: N ot es : (c ) P M  P ea k P er io d = 3p m -6 pm (d ) O ff- P ea k = 24  h ou r m in us  A M  a nd  P M  P ea k P er io ds (e ) M ap le  R id ge /M is si on  (H w y 7)  a nd  L an gl ey /A bb ot sf or d (H w y 1)  b or de rs E n1 3:  R oa d C on ge st io n R eg io n - G re at er  V an co uv er  ( 20 04 ) R eg io n - G re at er  V an co uv er  ( 19 96 ) (1 ) 2 00 4 an d 19 96  R eg io na l S cr ee nl in e S ur ve ys , T ra ns Li nk /G V R D  (a ut om at ic  c ou nt s) (a ) A M  P ea k P er io d = 6a m -9 am (b ) M id -D ay  =  9 am -3 pm A M  P ea k P er io d (a ) M id -D ay  (b ) P M  P ea k P er io d (c ) O ff -P ea k (d ) A M  P ea k P er io d (a ) M id -D ay  (b ) P M  P ea k P er io d (c ) O ff -P ea k (d )Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     90 (e) Gigajoules [Gj] Energy consumption per capita [Gj] Total energy intensity per year Crude Oil (2) DNAA. DNAA (d) Refined petroleum (3) products 398,444,000 92.23 Natural gas (1) 239,711,000 55.48 Coals (2) 10,813,000 2.5 DNAA DNAA Primary (1) electricity, hydro & nuclear 221,718,000 51.3 Solar Geothermal Tidal Wind Biomass Waste Total (1) 870,686,000 201.51 Gigajoules [Gj] Energy consumption per capita [Gj] Total energy intensity per year Fossil fuels Crude Oil (2) 0 DNAA (d) Refined petroleum products (3) 3,076,426,000 94.23 Natural gas (inlcuding gas plant natural gas liquids) (1) 2,365,649,000 72.46 Coals (2) 51,377,000 1.6 DNAA DNAA Primary  (1) electricity, hydro and nuclear 1,899,903,000 58.2 Solar Geothermall Tidal Wind Biomass Waste Total 7,393,355,000 226.49 Sources Country - Canada (b) En14: Energy Consumption by Source (2006) Region - British Columbia (a) (c) Fossil fuels Nuclear energy (f) Renewable energy (g) Data for nuclear energy consumption is aggregated with primary electricity and hydro electricity. Disaggregated data for nuclear energy is not available. Nuclear energy (g) Renewable energy (1) Statistics Canada -  CANSIM Table 128-0009 - Supply and demand of primary and secondary energy in terajoules, annual.    Notes:      (a) 97.5% of final energy demand is represented by the three energy sources reported. (2) http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/57-003-x/2006000/t041-eng.htm (3) http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/cst01/demo02a-eng.htm (b) 97.9% of final energy demand is represented by the four energy sources reported.       (c) Regional data represent the region of British Columbia.       (d) Data not available or accessible (I.e., percentages could not be calculated because of data suppression).       (e) Data categories have a similar coverage, but different degrees of aggregation and disaggregation compared with the OGI worksheet template.      (f) There are no nuclear power plants located in British Columbia.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     91 S ec to r P J % P J % P J % P J % P J % P J % Re si den tia l ( a) 14 9. 1 23 .6 % 14 9. 8 23 .2 % 14 4. 1 22 .7 % 14 5. 5 22 .2 % 15 2. 9 23 .6 % 15 5. 8 24 .2 % C o m m er ci al /In st itu tio n al  (b )( g) 12 3. 3 19 .5 % 13 5. 0 20 .9 % 12 1. 1 19 .1 % 11 9. 0 18 .2 % 11 7. 4 18 .1 % 11 7. 7 18 .3 % In du st ri al  (c ) 0. 0% 0. 0% 0. 0% 0. 0% 0. 0% 0. 0% T ra ns po rt at io n (d ) (g ) 34 2. 6 54 .1 % 34 6. 3 53 .6 % 35 6. 0 56 .1 % 37 6. 9 57 .6 % 36 5. 8 56 .5 % 35 9. 3 55 .8 % A gr ic ul tu re  (e ) 18 .1 2. 9% 14 .5 2. 2% 13 .7 2. 2% 13 .4 2. 0% 11 .2 1. 7% 11 .5 1. 8% T ot al 63 3. 1 10 0% 64 5. 6 10 0% 63 4. 9 10 0% 65 4. 8 10 0% 64 7. 4 10 0% 64 4. 4 10 0% S ec to r P J % P J % P J % P J % P J % P J % Re si den tia l ( a) 1, 33 5. 2 16 .9 % 1, 38 7. 5 16 .9 % 1, 44 4. 3 17 .1 % 1, 42 0. 7 16 .7 % 1, 40 2. 7 16 .5 % 1, 34 7. 3 16 .0 % C om m er ci al /In st itu ti on al  ( b) 1, 06 0. 9 13 .4 % 1, 13 1. 5 13 .8 % 1, 16 6. 5 13 .8 % 1, 17 2. 7 13 .8 % 1, 15 8. 9 13 .6 % 1, 09 2. 6 13 .0 % In du st ri al  (c ) 3, 00 6. 8 38 .1 % 3, 16 6. 4 38 .6 % 3, 26 3. 3 38 .6 % 3, 25 8. 0 38 .2 % 3, 22 4. 7 38 .0 % 3, 27 0. 6 38 .9 % T ra ns po rt at io n (d ) 2, 27 7. 3 28 .8 % 2, 30 6. 2 28 .1 % 2, 36 1. 7 28 .0 % 2, 46 5. 1 28 .9 % 2, 50 1. 3 29 .4 % 2, 49 2. 0 29 .6 % A gr ic ul tu re  (e ) 21 8. 1 2. 8% 20 6. 8 2. 5% 21 1. 8 2. 51 % 20 8. 9 2. 5% 20 8. 5 2. 5% 21 0. 8 2. 5% T ot al 7, 89 8. 3 10 0% 8, 19 8. 3 10 0% 8, 44 7. 6 10 0% 8, 52 5. 4 10 0% 8, 49 6. 1 10 0% 8, 41 3. 3 10 0% S ou rc es (g ) T ot al  in cl ud es  b ot h B C  a nd  T er rit or ie s (f ) I nc lu de s:  P as se ng er , F re ig ht , &  O ff- R oa d (a ) R es id en tia l h ttp :// oe e. nr ca n. gc .c a/ co rp or at e/ st at is tic s/ ne ud /d pa /ta bl es tre nd s2 /re s_ ca _3 _e _3 .c fm ?a ttr =0 (b ) C om m er ci al /In st itu tio na l h ttp :// oe e. nr ca n. gc .c a/ co rp or at e/ st at is tic s/ ne ud /d pa /ta bl es tre nd s2 /c om _c a_ 6_ e_ 3. cf m ?a ttr =0 (c ) I nd us tri al  h ttp :// oe e. nr ca n. gc .c a/ co rp or at e/ st at is tic s/ ne ud /d pa /ta bl es tre nd s2 /a gg _c a_ 5_ e_ 3. cf m ?a ttr =0 ; D at a no t a va ila bl e fo r B C (d ) T ra ns po rta tio n (f ) h ttp :// oe e. nr ca n. gc .c a/ co rp or at e/ st at is tic s/ ne ud /d pa /ta bl es tre nd s2 /tr an _c a_ 9_ e_ 3. cf m ?a ttr =0 (e ) A gr ic ul tu re  h ttp :// oe e. nr ca n. gc .c a/ co rp or at e/ st at is tic s/ ne ud /d pa /ta bl es tre nd s2 /a gr _c a_ 3_ e_ 3. cf m ?a ttr =0 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 C ou nt ry  - C an ad a 20 01 20 01 20 02 20 03 (1 ) N R C A N : O ffi ce  o f E ne rg y E ffi ci en cy  - C om pr eh en si ve  E ne rg y U se  D at ab as e  ht tp :// oe e. nr ca n. gc .c a/ co rp or at e/ st at is tic s/ ne ud /d pa /c om pr eh en si ve _t ab le s/ in de x. cf m ?f us ea ct io n= S el ec to r.s ho w T re e .  S ee  N ot es  fo r d et ai le d so ur ce s. N ot es : R eg io n - B ri tis h C ol um bi a E n1 5:  E ne rg y C on su m pt io n  b y U se  ( 20 01 -2 00 6)  (1 )Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     92 Gigajoule % ratio Energy Imported (1) (a) 44,953,000 Energy Consumed (1) 882,432,000 Gigajoule % ratio Energy Imported (1) (2) 3,565,229,000 Energy Consumed (3) (b) 8,413,290,000 Region - British Columbia (2006) 5.1% En16: Energy Self-Sufficiency (2006) Value Ratio of the annual energy imports [Gj] x 100 Total annual energy consumption [Gj] Country - Canada  (2006) 42.4% Sources (1) http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/57-003-x/2006000/5208796-eng.htm (2) http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/57-003-x/2006000/5208568-eng.htm (3) http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/tablesanalysis2/aaa_ ca_1_e_3.cfm?attr=0 Notes: (a) total primary and secondary energy # is suppressed to meet the confidentiality requirements of the Statistics Act, instead used the available numbers of imports under the primary energy sub-heading in terajoules (b) for consistency with baseline, total energy consumed figure for Canada uses NRCAN source, however Energy Imported figure is from StatsCan.  StatsCan Total Energy Consumed figure is 7,560,389 TJ and using this would result in a 47.2% ratio.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     93 In millions of $ kg per person per year kg per 1000$ of GNP In millions of $ kg per person per year kg per 1000$ of GNP Forestry products $12,536 $11,617 Lumber and wood products $38,727 $19,749 Metal Ores and Concentrates $13,921 $11,036 Primary Metal Products $44,387 $39,840 Non-metalic minerals & mineral products (c) $18,191 $16,785 Steel Aluminium Cement Stone Sand Gravel In millions of $ kg per person per year kg per 1000$ of GNP In millions of $ kg per person per year kg per 1000$ of GNP Forestry Products $5,518 $5,053 Lumber and wood products $12,796 $3,480 Metal ores and concentrates $1,678 $542 Primary metal prodcuts $1,888 $2,098 Non-metalic minerals and mineral products (c) $1,670 $1,891 Steel Aluminium Cement Stone Sand Gravel Outputs Inputs En17: Raw Material Consumption (2004-2006) (1) (a) Country - Canada (2) (b) Outputs Inputs Region: British Columbia (3) (b) (b) Statistics Canada National Economic Accounts (NEA) North American Industry Classification System categories used to present data. Data represent S-Level aggregation for both Canada and British Columbia. (c) NEA data for non-metalic minerals and non-metalic mineral products combined for this category. Sources (1)  Statistics Canada National Economic Accounts - Inputs and outputs, by industry and commodity, S- level aggregation and North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), annual (dollars x 1,000,000) http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.exe. (2) 2004 Data only available: http://estat.statcan.gc.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.pgm?Lang=E&RegTkt=&C2Sub=&Array_Pick=1&RootDir=ESTAT/&Vec=&ResultTemplate=E STAT/CII_Pick&ArrayId=3810013&C2DB= (3) CANSIM TABLE : Table 381-00131,3,4,5 Notes: (a) Volume of raw material inputs and outputs not available  - Data for inputs and outputs only available in millions of $.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     94 Mining and quarring Sewage sludge Dredged materials Household/resi dential Commercial & Industrial Bottom ash from Burnaby Incinerator Construction and demolition (d) Total in tonnes per year Total in kg per person and per year (f) Landfill (a) (g) 449,331 36,540 234772 720,643 1239.5 Incineration Green recycling (b) 12,700 12,700 21.8 Dry recycling (c) 30,400 30,400 52.3 Special wastes final disposal Other Total in tonnes per year 492,431 36,540 234,772 763,743 1313.7 Total in kg per person and per year 847.0 62.9 403.8 1,313.7 Mining and quarring Sewage sludge Dredged materials Household Construction and demolition (d) Total in tonnes per year Quantity which is exported Total in kg per person and per year (f) Landfill (e) 453,054 369,601 1,476,703 687.7 Incineration Green recycling 174,575 248,465 115.7 Dry recycling 193,464 702,857 1,225,016 570.5 Special wastes final disposal Other Total in tonnes per year 821,093 1,072,458 2,950,183 1373.9 Quantity which is exported Total in kg per person and per year 382.4 499.5 1,373.9 Notes: (a) Includes all municipal solid waste delivered to the Vancouver Landfill. (b) Includes yard waste delivered and composting activities at the Vancouver Landfil Facility. En18: Solid Waste Treatment (2003;2004) City - Vancouver (2003) (1) GVRD Landfill (2004)(2) Commercial, Light  Industrial & Institutional 654,048 73,890 328,695 1,056,633 382.4 Sources (1)http://vancouver.ca/engsvcs/solidwaste/PDF/ann_report2003.pdf (2) http://www.metrovancouver.org/about/publications/Publications/SolidWasteManagementAnnualReport2004.pdf (c) Includes all recyclable material collected via the City of Vancouver Blue Box and Apartment Recycling programs. (d) Includes road construction waste and demolition waste. (e) This figure represents the total amount of waste sent to the Cache Creek landfill from within GVRD. It does not include treated flyash exported from the GVRD waste-to- energy incineration facility (10,152 tonnes). (f) Vancouver 2003 population = 581,378 and GVRD 2004 population = 2,147,273 http://www.metrovancouver.org/about/publications/Publications/KeyFacts- MetroVancouverPopulationEstimates1996-2007.pdf source: BC STATS (g) The Vancouver landfill report unfortunately includes Delta, White Rock and claims to serve over 900,000 residents of Vancouver. It is the most accurate data available. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     95 Primary wastewater treatment plants Secondary wastewater treatment plants Tertiary wastewater treatment plants Total percentage of population connected to wastewater treatment plants % of population connected 100% 0% 0% 100% Total quantity of wastewater treated in millions of m3 per year DNAA Primary wastewater treatment plants Secondary wastewater treatment plants Tertiary wastewater treatment plants Total percentage of population connected to wastewater treatment plants % of population connected 38.10% 55.70% 0.00% 93.80% Total quantity of wastewater treated in millions of m3 per year 462.054 En19: Wastewater Treatment City - Vancouver (2008) (1) Total quantity of wastewater treated in millions of m3 per year (a) DNAA 0 0 (2) http://www.metrovancouver.org/about/publications/Publications/KeyFacts-MetroVancouverPopulationEstimates1996- 2007.pdf Notes: (a) Data calculated from the average daily flow of water (sewage) collected, multiplied by 365 days to calculate annual average. (b) Regional data represent the Greater Vancouver and Squamish-Lillooet Regional Districts. Original data provided on a municipal basis and data were aggregated for municipalities within the region by the Fraser Basin Council.   Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (2007) (1) (2) Quantity of wastewater treated in millions of m3 per year (a) 247.835 214.219 0 (1) Rick Gallilee, P.Eng. Wastewater Engineering Superintendent, Metro Vancouver, Operations & Maintenance, Waste Water Treatment Engineering Division. November 2008. Contact. SourcesVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     96 % fulfilling accessibility regulations / criteria % fulfilling regulations / criteria 0 0 0 0 NA NA % fulfilling accessibility regulations / criteria % fulfilling regulations / criteria 0 0 0 0 NA NA En24: Olympic Induced Housing (2006) (1) (a) City - Vancouver Net floor areas of residential housing [m²] Built directly for the Olympic Games Built indirectly for the Olympic Games [m²] Built directly for the Olympic Games Built indirectly for the Olympic Games Initial situation 0 0 Initial situation 0.00 0 Final situation NA NA Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Net floor areas of residential housing Initial situation 0 0 Initial situation 0 0 Notes: a) As of 2001, no housing had been built either directly or indirectly for the Olympic Games because the games had not yet been awarded to Vancouver. Construction of the Olympic Village is currently in progress.  Development plans were approved in 2005.  Completion of construction is scheuduled for October 2009. b) As of 2006, no housing had been built for the Olympic Games however, the contract was sold privately and a cofferdam was constructed in order to facilitate construction. The report states that the site should be servicing substantially by spring 2007. Final situation NA NA Sources (1) City of Vancouver, Southeast False Creek and Olympic Village Project Office.  http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/olympicvillage/contact.htm. (2) Ken Baker, VANOC Director of Environmental Sustainability ken_baker@vancouver2010.comVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     97 C ar bo n  m on ox id e (C O ) F or m al de hy d e R ad on L ea d S ul fa te s S ul fu r di ox id e vo la til e or g an ic  co m po u nd s (V O C ) P ar tic ul at es N um be r of  f ac ili tie s ex ce ed in g th e n at io na l s ta n da rd s G ym na si um s V el od ro m es S w im m in g po ol s S ka tin g ri nk s O th er in do or ve nu es C ar bo n  m on ox id e (C O ) F or m al de hy d e R ad on L ea d S ul fa te s S ul fu r di ox id e vo la til e or g an ic  co m po u nd s (V O C ) P ar tic ul at es N um be r of  f ac ili tie s ex ce ed in g th e n at io na l s ta n da rd s G ym na si um s V el od ro m es S w im m in g po ol s S ka tin g ri nk s O th er in do or ve nu es E n2 5:  In do or  A ir  Q ua lit y (2 00 6)  (1 ) ( a) S po rt  fa ci lit ie s in  th e ci ty  - V an co uv er O zo ne  (O 3) O ly m p ic  v en ue s O zo ne  (O 3) (1 ) P er so na l c om m un ic at io ns  w ith  V A N O C , E nv iro nm en t C an ad a,  B C  M in is try  o f Env iron m ent, G reater V an couver Regiona l District,  V an co uv er  C oa st al  H ea lth  A ut ho rit y (E nv iro nm en ta l H ea lth ),  a nd  R ec re at io n Fa ci lia tie s A ss oc ia tio n of  B C . A s of  2008,  no sy st em atic indoor  a ir qua lit y m on itoring pr ogra m  w as  in  e xi st en ce . N ei th er  th e B C  M in is tr y of  E nv iro nm en t, no r t he  G re at er  V an co uv er  R eg io na l D is tri ct  m on ito r i nd oo r a ir qu al ity . H ea lth  In sp ec to rs  o f t he  V an co uv er  C oa st al  H ea lth  A ut ho rit y m ay  p ot en tia lly  c on du ct  s om e oc ca si on al  te st in g if a co m pl ai nt  w as  fil ed , w hi ch  m ay  h av e w ar ra nt ed  te st in g.  V ol un ta ry  g ui de lin es  a nd  a  c od e of  p ra ct ic e fo r ic e ar en as  w er e pr op os ed  b y an  A d H oc  W or ki ng  G ro up  in  it s 19 96  re po rt  "I nd oo r A ir Q ua lit y in  Ic e A re na s. " T he  d eg re e to  w hi ch  th e gu id el in es  a nd  c od e of  p ra ct ic e ha ve  b ee n im pl em en te d by  in di vi du al  ic e ar en as  is  u nk no w n at  th is  tim e. As  o f 2007, the sc ope of  an ag ree m en t bet w een VANOC  and Env iro nm ent Canada fo r a ir qu al ity  m on ito rin g do es  n ot  c ur re nt ly  in cl ud e in do or  a ir qu al ity . S ou rc es N o te s:  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     98 Name of the facility Vancouver Landfill Vancouver Landfill Localization of the project Landfill gas and flare system upgrade Leachate collection and containment system upgrade New project or already planned project Approved in 1999 Approved in 2001 Direct relation to Olympic activities or context activities No No Type of treatment Solid Waste Wastewater Date of first planning of the project Start of construction 2000 2001 End of construction 2001 2002 Openning 2001 2002 Average yearly treatment capacity Total investment $5,400,000 $1,355,000 Funding sources Name of the facility Iona Sewage Treatment Localisation of the project Enhanced primary treatment assessment upgrade New project or already planned project 2001 Direct relation to Olympic activities or context activities No Type of treatment Wastewater Date of first planning of the project Start of construction End of construction 2001 Openning 2001 Average yearly treatment capacity 200 billion litres Total investment $300,000 Funding sources Notes: (a) Liquid waste treatment facilitites are operated by the Greater Vancouver Regional District and serve the entire region. En33: New Waste and Wastewater Treatment Facilities (2001) - No update for Baseline + 1 City - Vancouver (1) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (2) (a) Sources (1) City of Vancouver, Annual Report, Solid Waste Division 2002 http://vancouver.ca/engsvcs/solidwaste/PDF/ann_report2002.pdf. (2) GVRD Recycling and Waste & Sewerage Divisions.   Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     99 Socio-Cultural Indicators Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     100 Women Men Total Women Men Total Party 1 - COPE NA NA NA NA NA NA 0 1 1 Party 2 - NPA NA NA NA NA NA NA 4 3 7 Party 3 - VISION NA NA NA NA NA NA 0 3 3 Party x or minorities (b) NA NA NA NA NA NA 0 0 0 Totals NA NA NA NA NA NA 4 7 11 Women Men Total Women Men Total Party 1 - COPE NA NA NA NA NA NA 1 1 2 Party 2 - NPA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1 0 1 Party 3 - VISION NA NA NA NA NA NA 3 5 8 Party x or minorities (b) NA NA NA NA NA NA 0 0 0 Totals NA NA NA NA NA NA 5 6 11 Women Men Total Women Men Total Party 1 (Governing Party - Liberals) 5 19 24 NA NA NA 10 35 45 Party 2 (Opposition - NDP) NA NA NA NA NA NA 7 25 35 Party x or minorities (b) NA NA NA NA NA NA 0 0 0 Totals 5 19 24 NA NA NA 17 60 77 City - Vancouver (2008) (4) (a) Executive Level Legislative Level - Local Elected Officials Women Men Total Chamber 1 Chamber 2 Total Chamber 1 Chamber 2 (b) There are no political parties that have been specifically established to represent minorities. (d) Data provided is for Members of the Legislative Assembly elected in 2001. Chamber does not apply. Sources (1) City of Vancouver Clerk's Department http://vancouver.ca/ctyclerk/election2005/finalresults.htm#councillor (2) http://www.leg.bc.ca/mla/3-1-4.htm (3) http://www.leg.bc.ca/mla/3-1-5.htm Notes: (a) Executive level and Chamber do not apply (NA) (4) http://vancouver.ca/electionresults2008/ So1: Political Representation City - Vancouver (2005) (1) (a) Executive Level Legislative Level - Local Elected Officials Women Men Total Chamber 1 Chamber 2 (e) At the time of data assembly 2 ridings were vacant, Vancouver-Fraserview, and Vancover-Burrard, there are in total 79 ridings in BC Region - British Columbia (2005) (2) (3) (e) Executive Level (3) Legislative Level - Provincial Elected Officials (2) (d) Women Men  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     101 Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Economic NA NA Financial NA NA Institutional NA NA International NA NA Security NA NA Social NA NA Cultural NA NA Sport NA NA Environment NA NA Planning (b) NA NA Construction NA NA Energy NA NA Transport NA NA People with Disabilities NA NA OTHER NA NA Total NA NA Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Economic Financial Institutional International Security (c) Social Cultural Sport Environment Planning Construction Energy Transport People with Disabilities Total So2: Legislative Activity (2006) City - Vancouver (1) (a) Policies By-Laws Amendments Totals Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Policies Laws - Greater Vancouver Regional District (2) Laws - Greater Vancouver Water District (3) Laws - Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District (4) TOTAL Laws - Greater Vancouver Regional District Sources (1) City of Vancouver Archives Database - 2001 By-Law search: http://vancouver.ca/ctyclerk/archives/. (2) Index of Greater Vancouver Regional District Bylaws, GVRD Library. (3) Index of Greater Vancouver Water District Bylaws, GVRD Library. (4) Index of Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Bylaws, GVRD Library. Notes: (a) Some of the laws above include bylaws, which are amendments to pre-existing bylaws. However, these are officially adopted as new bylaws, therefore a distinction is not made between laws and amendments. (b) City of Vancouver bylaw data for the planning policy category includes soild waste services. (c) The security policy category was considered to include all aspects of public safety, including fire fighting, which is the case for the GVRD bylaw above.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     102 Definition Pressure group 1 The Anti Poverty Committee (2) A group of citizens responsible for active protests surrounding the 2010 Olympic Games, including the "Homes Not Games" campaign. The group protest the Games in Vancouver on the basis that funding for affordable housing is being reallocated to support the 2010 Olympic Games. Pressure Group 2" 2010 Watch (3) Defines itself as the only truly independent watchdog of the 2010 Olympic Games. Posts articles and discussion online that are critical of the Olympic Games in Vancouver. Pressure Group 3" No 2010: No 2010 Olympics on Stolen Native Land"   (3) (4) A militant group of activists in the Vancouver area that protests the Olympics in a somewhat radical fashion, seemingly organized and backed by First Nations though no direct responsibility has been taken. Definition Pressure group 1 Impact on Community Coalition (IOCC) (1) (a) An independent organization dedicated to ensuring that environmental, social, transportation, housing, economic and civil rights issues associated with the Vancouver/Whistler 2010 Olympic Games are addressed from a community perspective. Definition Pressure group 1 (name) NA (1)  IOCC Website: http://www.olympicsforall.ca/ (supplemented with local historical knowledge). (2) http://apc.resist.ca/ (3) http://2010watch.com/ (4) http://no2010.com/node/385 So3: Pressure Groups (2008) City - Vancouver Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Country - Canada Notes: Sources (a) Data for the region represent the Greater Vancouver Regional District; although all member organizations are located in the City of Vancouver, some have a regional area of interest.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     103 City - Vancouver Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (c) Number Number Ethnic type (2) (a) 28 38 (c) GVRD includes the city of Vancouver So4: Community Centres and Associations (2008) Neighbourhood type (1-4) 55 130 Religious type (b) DNAA DNAA Charitable type (3) 1794 4333 (b) Accurate data was not available (d) Methodology may be inconsistent with baseline (baseline method unknown) (4) YMCA: http://www.ymca.ca/eng_findy_bc.htm Sources (1) Red Book: http://www2.vpl.vancouver.bc.ca/DBs/RedBook/htmlpgs/bySubj/C.html#CO MMUNITY%20CENTRES%20see%20also%20boys%20and%20girls%20clu bs;%20camps%20(day);%20family%20places;%20neighbourhood%20hous es;%20parks;%20pottery;%20recreation;%20rental%20space (2) Boys and Girls Club: http://www2.vpl.vancouver.bc.ca/dbs/redbook/orgpgs/2/206.html (3) http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/haip/srch/sec/SrchLogin- e?login=true&srch=advanced Notes: (a) Whether it was Ethnic type of Neighbourhood type was decided by data assembler. Decision was based on the association's name and descriptionVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     104 minority 1 - Ethnic (2001) (a) City Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area population of visible minorities (1) 875,300 % of the population (1) 41.7% Political representation NA Life expectancy at birth DNAA % of population group with secondary education (4) (b) DNAA minority 2 - Aboriginal (2001) City Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area population of Aboriginal identity (2) 40,310 % of the population (2) 1.9% Political representation NA Life expectancy at birth (1998-2002) (3) DNAA population of Aboriginal identity 15 years and older (2) 30,465 % of population group with secondary education (2) (b) Male Female 39.6% 46.7% minority 3 - People with Disabilities City Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area population % of the population Political representation Life expectancy at birth % of population group with secondary education (b) StatsCan: requires additional analysis.  Data unavailable at this time (as of Notes: (a) Data for ethnic minority include visible minorities based on immigrants that arrived in Canada in (b) Based on population 15 years and over So5: Minorities (2006) (1) Statistics Canada. http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92- 591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1=933__&Geo2=PR&Code2=59&Data=Count&SearchText=vanc ouver&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=All&Custom= (3) BC Vital Statistics Agency. Regional Analysis of Health Statistics for Status Indians in British Columbia, 1992- 2002. http://www.vs.gov.bc.ca/stats/indian/index.html. - no update since Baseline (2) http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92- 594/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1=933__&Geo2=PR&Code2=59&Data=Count&SearchText=Vanc ouver&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=All&Custom= Sources:Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     105 Total Population (1) (a) Region: Greater Vancouver Regional District (2005) Region: British Columbia (2005) Country: Canada (2005) 16.50% 13.10% 11.40% DNAA DNAA DNAA $29,354    $24,836    $25,961(1)    $18,203    $15,836    $16,752(1)    Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area Region - British Columbia Low-income portion of the Initial minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal (a) minority 3 - Disabilities Final minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities Labour market exclusion Initial minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities Final minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities Service exclusion Initial minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities Final minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities Social isolation Initial minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities Final minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities Proportion of hpousehold that Initial minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities Final minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities (a) Low Income before tax. Large difference from 2001 possibly due to before/after tax definition. (1) Statistics Canada: http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/profiles/aboriginal/Details/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=PR&Co de1=01&Geo2=PR&Code2=01&Data=Count&SearchText=canada&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1 =All&Custom= Country wide stats Notes: So6: Poverty and Social Exclusion (2005) % of families and individuals with incomes below the LICO (1) (LICO-AT) (a) Average after-tax income of families and individuals that are in the bottom 20% of income earners Average earnings for the Aboriginal Population 15 Years and older (2) Median income for the Aboriginal Population older than 15 years of age (2) Sources (2) Statistics Canada:  http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92- 594/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1=933__&Geo2=PR&Code2=59&Data=Count&SearchTe xt=Vancouver&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=All&Custom=Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     106 Male Female Male Female total population (1) (a) 16.9% 17.7% 20.3% 19.5% minority 1 - Ethnic (d) 18.6% 21.2% 19.4% 21.8% minority 2 - Aboriginal 32.7% 26.5% 42.4% 36.0% minority 3 - Disabilities DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA total population (1) (a) 26.2% 27.8% 26.5% 29.2% minority 1 - Ethnic (d) 26.4% 25.3% 26.9% 25.6% minority 2 - Aboriginal 27.7% 26.6% 24.9% 25.8% minority 3 - Disabilities DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA total population (1) (a) 56.9% 54.5% 53.2% 51.3% minority 1 - Ethnic (d) 55.0% 53.5% 53.7% 52.6% minority 2 - Aboriginal 39.6% 46.9% 32.8% 38.3% minority 3 - Disabilities DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Prose Literacy Document Literacy total population (a) DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA immigrants - mother tongue either French/English DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA immigrants - foreign mother tongue DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Sources % of population with primary education (b) So7: Educational Level (2003;2006) Region - Vancouver CMA (2006) Region - British Columbia (2003) Gender Gender % of population with secondary education (c) % of population with tertiary education Average Literacy Score (2003) (2) Adult (16-65) literacy rate (1) http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/topics/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?Temporal=2006&PID=97686&GID=614145& METH=1&APATH=3&PTYPE=88971&THEME=75&AID=&FREE=0&FOCUS=&VID=&GC=99&GK=NA&RL=0&TPL=NA&SUB= &d1=0&d2=1&d3=0&d4=0&d5=2 Notes: (a) Total Population represents people 15 years of age and over. (b) As children are required to attend primary education in Canada, data is only collected on the number that do not graduate.  This data therefore reflects the percentage of the population without high school graduation. (c) This represents the percentage of the population with a high school graduation certificate and/or some postsecondary qualifications. (d) Minority 1 data presented is for immigrants that arrived to Canada in the 1990s. Educational data for visible minorities is not collected.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     107 All recorded crimes  (a) Serious (or violent) recorded crimes against persons Recorded crimes against property J DNAA DNAA DNAA F DNAA DNAA DNAA M DNAA DNAA DNAA A DNAA DNAA DNAA M DNAA DNAA DNAA J DNAA DNAA DNAA J DNAA DNAA DNAA A DNAA DNAA DNAA S DNAA DNAA DNAA O DNAA DNAA DNAA N DNAA DNAA DNAA D DNAA DNAA DNAA Total number per year 23,755 128,137 Ratio : total annual number of recorded crimes per year divided by 1,000 population 10.8 58.3 All recorded crimes (c) Serious (or violent) recorded crimes against persons Recorded crimes against property J DNAA DNAA DNAA F DNAA DNAA DNAA M DNAA DNAA DNAA A DNAA DNAA DNAA M DNAA DNAA DNAA J DNAA DNAA DNAA J DNAA DNAA DNAA A DNAA DNAA DNAA S DNAA DNAA DNAA O DNAA DNAA DNAA N DNAA DNAA DNAA D DNAA DNAA DNAA Total number per year 52,513 245,063 Ratio : total annual number of recorded crimes per year divided by 1,000 population 12.4 57.7 Sources  115.1 So8: Crime Rates (2006) (1) Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area Pop'n 2,199,121 Total number per month (b) 253,095 Notes: (a) Includes all violent crimes, property crimes, other criminal code and criminal code offences recorded within the Vancouver CMA in 2006. (b) Monthly data for city and regional crime rates are not available. (c)  Includes all recorded crimes in British Columbia, including: Serious crime; property crime; criminal code offences (including traffic offences) Federal statutes and drug related offences. Region - British Columbia Pop'n 4,243,580 Total number per month (b) 541,551 127.6 (1) Statistics Canada -http://estat.statcan.ca Citation: http://estat.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.pgm?regtkt=&C2Sub=&ARRAYID=2520013&C2DB =&VEC=&LANG=E&SrchVer=&ChunkSize=&SDDSLOC=&ROO TDIR=ESTAT/&RESULTTEMPLATE=ESTAT/CII_PICK&ARRA Y_PICK=1&SDDSID=&SDDSDESC=Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     108  2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Birth rate (per 1,000 persons) 9.89 9.62 9.53 9.44 9.45 9.55 9.57 Death Rate (per 1,000 persons) 6.56 6.63 6.35 6.28 6.18 6.12 6.15 Source: BC Stats.  So9 Health: Birth and Death Rates, Vancouver 2001‐2007    2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Birth rate (per 1,000 persons) 10.03 9.90 9.70 9.70 9.60 9.55 9.66 Death Rate (per 1,000 persons) 6.77 6.92 6.98 7.02 7.07 7.07 7.08 Infant Mortality Rate (per 1,000 live births) DNAA 4.1 4.6 4.2 4.3 4.5 DNAA Source: BC Stats (http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca) and StatsCanada (for infant mortality rate) Table So9 Health ‐ (2a) Birth, Death and Infant Mortality Rates, British Columbia 2000‐2006    2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Birth rate (per 1,000 persons) 12.90 12.98 12.94 13.29 13.29 13.20 13.91 Death Rate (per 1,000 persons) 6.05 6.09 6.13 6.16 6.13 6.10 6.13 Infant Mortality Rate (per 1,000 live births) DNAA 5.6 7.3 6.6 5.8 6.8 DNAA Source: BC Stats (http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca) and StatsCanada Table So9 Health ‐ (2b) Birth, Death and Infant Mortality Rates, Alberta 2000‐2006    2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Birth rate (per 1,000 persons) 10.8 11.2 11.1 10.6 10.6 10.7 10.9 Death Rate (per 1,000 persons) 7.2 6.0 7.5 7.2 7.2 7.0 7.1 Infant Mortality Rate (per 1,000 live births) 5.1 5.2 5.4 5.3 5.3 5.4 4.7 Life expectancy at birth (years) 79.4 79.6 79.7 79.8 80 80.1 80.2 Source: StatsCanada and CIA Factbook (the figures in italic). 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Birth rate (per 1,000 persons) 14.2 14.2 14.1 14.1 14.1 14.1 14.1 Death Rate (per 1,000 persons) 8.7 8.7 8.7 8.4 8.3 8.3 8.3 Infant Mortality Rate (per 1,000 live births) 6.8 6.8 6.7 6.8 6.6 6.5 6.4 Life expectancy at birth (years) 77.1 77.3 77.4 77.1 77.4 77.7 77.9 Source: CIA Factbook. So9 Health: Birth, Death and Infant Mortality Rates, Canada 2000‐2006 Table So9 Health: Birth, Death and Infant Mortality Rates, US 2000‐2006   Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     109  2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Birth rate (per 1,000 persons) 10.03 9.90 9.70 9.70 9.60 9.55 9.66 Death Rate (per 1,000 persons) 6.77 6.92 6.98 7.02 7.07 7.07 7.08 Infant Mortality Rate (per 1,000 live births) DNAA 4.1 4.6 4.2 4.3 4.5 DNAA Source: BC Stats and StatsCanada. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Birth rate (per 1,000 persons) 12.90 12.98 12.94 13.29 13.29 13.20 13.91 Death Rate (per 1,000 persons) 6.05 6.09 6.13 6.16 6.13 6.10 6.13 Infant Mortality Rate (per 1,000 live births) DNAA 5.6 7.3 6.6 5.8 6.8 DNAA Source: BC Stats and StatsCanada.  So9 Health: Birth, Death and Infant Mortality Rates, British Columbia 2000‐2006 So9 Health: Birth, Death and Infant Mortality Rates, Alberta 2000‐2006   Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     110 Males 19-30 DNAA 31-50 DNAA 51-70 DNAA 71+ DNAA 19-30 2,957 31-50 2,908 51-70 2,373 71+ 1,964 19-30 2,737 31-50 2,510 51-70 2,204 71+ 1,871 Vegetables and Fruit Milk products Meat & alternatives Grain Products Region - British Columbia (2) 4.59 servings/32.3% 2.25 sevings/19.9% 148 grams/65.8% 6.44 servings/56.7% Country - Canada (2) (d) 5.16 servings 1.52 servings 203 grams 5.64 servings Total number of samples that don't meet the standards Total number of control Ratio Region - Greater Vancouver Water District (e) Coliform - BC Safe Drinking Water Regulation Guideline Days Guideline Exceeded Turbidity (NTU > 1) 77 Turbidity (NTU > 5) 0 Turbidity (NTU > 1) 69 Turbidity (NTU > 5) 34 Turbidity (NTU > 1) 53 Turbidity (NTU > 5) 4 Country - Canada DNAA DNAA Total number of samples that don't meet the Total number of control Ratio Region - GVRD DNAA DNAA DNAA Country - Canada DNAA DNAA DNAA Region - GVRD DNAA City - Vancouver Country - Canada DNAA Region - BC So10: Nutrition (2004-2007) (a) Mean Daily Energy Intakes (kcal) (2004) Females City - Vancouver DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Data on the Quality Control of the Quality of Food in Restaurants (g) Region - British Columbia (1) 1,919 1,966 1,668 1,563 Country - Canada (1) 1,902 1,850 1,969 1,507 Consumption of Key Foods (2004) (b) Data on quality control of drinking water - Greater Vancouver Water District (2007) (3) Capilano Water System (f) Seymour Water System (f) Coquitlam Water System (f) The Daily per capita Protein Supply Consumption of Alcohol  (4) (h) (2007/2008) 42, 925, 910 Litres 180, 706, 569 Litres Sources (1) Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, Nutrition (2004)  http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/cchs-nutri- escc/tab1_energ-eng.php (2)  Stats Canada: Average daily servings from the four food groups, by selected characteristics, household population aged 4 or older, Canada excluding territories, 2004    http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-620- m/2006002/t/4053659-eng.htm (4) British Columbia Liquor Distribution Branch 2007/2008 Annual Report: http://www.bcliquorstores.com/pdf/2007- 08_AnnualReport.pdf (f) Methods and terms are based on those of "Standard Methods of Water and Waste Water" 20th Edition 1998. Guidelines are taken from "Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality - Sixth Edition" Health and Welfare Canada 1996, updated to April 2002. (g) Comprehensive data for the quality of food in restaurants in 2006 is not available or accessible. (h) Data represent the amount of alcohol purchased from BC Liquour Stores in the 2007 / 2008 fiscal year. This figure does not include alcohol purchased from licensed venues or other private liquour stores. Data on the average amount of alcohol consumed by adults is not available. (3) http://www.metrovancouver.org/about/publications/Publications/QualityControlAnnualWaterReport2007- Volume1.pdf Notes: a) Due to limitations in data availability, there are variations to the requested OGI Technical Manual, including city and country scale data as well as a different presentation of data on the energy value associated with food intake. (b) Canadian adult population aged 19 years and over. (d) Average amount consumed per day by Canadians. (e) Provides a summary of the compliance of the water from GVRD member municipalities with the bacteriological requirements of the BC Safe Drinking Water Regulation (BCSDWR) in 2002.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     111 Total attendance (f) % of total attendance concernning people with disabilities (f) Number of venues Number of venues fulfilling accessibility criterias (g) Cinema (2) (2008) 17 Theatres (1) (b) 23 Halls (1) (c) 29 Performing Arts Venues (1) (d) 111 Museums (4) (2008) 9 Art Galleries (3) (2008) 35 Historic Buildings (5) (e) (2008) 255 Exhibition Venue (2008) 1 Total 479 Total attendance % of total attendance concernning people with disabilities (f) Number of venues Number of venues fulfilling accessibility criterias (g) Participation Rate (i) (7) DNAA Concert Theatrical Performance Popular Music Symphonic music Cultural festival Cultural/heritage dance Any other kind/type of cultural event So11: Cultural Activities (2005-2008) City - City of Vancouver (a) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (6) (h)Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     112 Sources (1) City of Vancouver Performing Arts Facilities inventory 2006 http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/facility_wac/facility.exe/facilitylist_all. (2) http://www.foundlocally.com/vancouver/Entertainment/EntMovieLocation s.htm. (3) http://www.welcometobc.ca/vanartgalleries/index2.html. (4) http://www.discovervancouver.com/museums.asp. (5) http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/commsvcs/BYLAWS/HERITAGE/Herita (6) Statistics Canada.  General Social Survey, 2005. (f) Data for attendance is not collected or readily available for all venues and is not feasible to collect data from each venue. (g) The British Columbia Building Code has evolved to include the following provisions regarding accessibility: parking and door-widths (1978), washrooms (1982), all accessibility aspects (1988), all accessibility aspects integrated within the code document (1992). In addition, many buildings originally constructed prior to these building code provisions may have been retrofitted; however, there is no single source of information to confirm the number of buildings accessible. (h) Accurate and reliable data for region-wide cultural venues and attendance rates are not readily available or accessible. Significant effort has been made to locate these data, but sources were not reliable or reputable. (7) Vital Signs - Metro Vancouver http://2007.vancouverfoundationvitalsigns.ca/?q=node/12#artseventatten dance Notes: (a) Data for 2001 not available. 2006 data, except Historic Buildings, which includes buidlings listed between 1974 & 2003. (b) Includes venues that may also be used for opera performances or concerts. (c) Includes venues that may also be used for concerts or theatrical performances. (d) Includes public performing arts venues such as clubs, studios, community centres, churches and gardens. (e) This figure represents all properties included on the City of Vancouver Council "List of Heritage Properties". These properties were designated as protected between 1974 and January 2003. Property types listed include residential, commercial, public and institutional.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     113 A ll S po rt s A ll S po rt s 92 5, 00 0            T ot al  M en W om en M en W om en (in cl ud in g co ac he s an d A lp in e S ki in g B ia th lo n B ob sl ei gh  a n d L ug e C ur lin g Fi gu re  S ka ti ng F re es ty le  S ki in g Ic e H oc ke y S pe ed  S ka ti ng R egion al sport 1 R in ge tt e R egion al sport 2 C ro ss  C ou nt ry  S ki in g T ot al  W in te r S po rt s A q ua tic s A rc he ry A th le tic s B ad m in to n B as eb al l B as ke tb al l B ox in g C an oe /K ay ak C yc lin g E qu es tr ia n Fe n ci ng Fo o tb al l G ym na st ic s H an db al l H oc ke y Ju d o M od er n P en ta th lo n S o1 2:  S po rt s an d P hy si ca l A ct iv iti es  (2 00 5)  (1 ) C ity  -  V an co uv er  N u m b er  o f cl ub s N um be r of  c lu bs  ex cl us iv el y fo r pe op le  w ith  di sa bi lit y In te gr at ed  cl ub s C lu b N on -c lu b T o ta ls W om en M en  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s C lu b N on -c lu b T O T A L R egion - B ri tis h C o lu mbi a W o m en  w it h di sa b ili tie s M en M en  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s W om en W om en  w ith  d is ab ili tie s M en N on -c lu b T o ta ls W om en W o m en  w it h di sa b ili tie s M en M en  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s W om en W om en  w ith  d is ab ili tie s M en M en  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s C lu b C lu b N on -c lu b T O T A L C ou n tr y - C an ad a N u m b er  o f cl ub s N um be r of  c lu bs  ex cl us iv el y fo r pe op le  w ith  di sa bi lit y In te gr at ed  cl ub s C lu b N on -c lu b N u m b er  o f cl ub s N um be r of  c lu bs  ex cl us iv el y fo r pe op le  w ith  di sa bi lit y In te gr at ed  cl ub s T o ta ls W om en W o m en  w it h di sa b ili tie s M en M en  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s W om en W om en  w ith  d is ab ili tie s M en M en  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s C lu b N on -c lu b T O T A L W in te r N at io na l S po rt s O rg an iz at io ns  -  M em be rs h ip  P ro fil e in  C om pe tit o rs C lu b / L ea gu e Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     114 R o w in g S ai lin g S h oo ti n g S o ft ba ll Ta bl e Te nn is T ae kw o n do Te nn is T ri at hl on V ol le yb al l W ei gh tl if tin g W re st lin g A ir  s po rt s B an d y B ill ar d  s po rt s B ou le s B o w lin g B ri dg e C h es s D an ce  s po rt G ol f K ar at e K o rf ba ll Li fe  s av in g M o to rc yc le ra ci n g M o un ta in ee ri n g an d cl im bi n g N et b al l O ri en te er in g P el ot a va sc a P o lo P ow er b o at in g R ac q u et b al l R ol le r sp or ts R u gb y S q ua sh S u m o S u rf in g T ug  o f W ar U n d er w at er sp o rt s W at er  s ki W u sh u A ll S po rt s 7, 31 4, 00 0        S ou rc es (1 ) S ta tis tic s C an ad a:  h ttp :// w w w .s ta tc an .g c. ca /d ai ly -q uo tid ie n/ 08 02 07 /t0 80 20 7b -e ng .h tm N ot es : (a ) A du lts  a ge s 15  y ea rs  a nd  o ld erVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     115 N or m al  sc ho ol s S pe ci fic  s ch oo ls  fo r pe op le  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s (g ) N or m al  sc ho ol s S pe ci fic  s ch oo ls  fo r pe op le  w it h di sa bi lit ie s (g ) N um be r of  h ou rs pe r w ee k C ity  - V an co uv er  (d ) 2.5 0 N A N um be r of  s ch oo l h ou rs gr ad es  4 -7  (1 ) 2.5 0 N A N A N A N um be r of  s ch oo l h ou rs gr ad es  8 -9 2.5 0 N A N A N A N um be r of  s ch oo l h ou rs gr ad es  1 0- 12 2.5 0 N A R eg io n - B ri tis h C ol um bi a( e) 2.5 0 N A N um be r of  s ch oo l h ou rs gr ad es  4 -7 2.5 0 N A N A N A N um be r of  s ch oo l h ou rs gr ad es  8 -9 2.5 0 N A N A N A N um be r of  s ch oo l h ou rs gr ad es  1 0- 12 2.5 0 N A C ou nt ry  - C an ad a (d ) (f ) D N A A D N A A N um be r of  s ch oo l h ou rs gr ad es  4 -7 D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A N um be r of  s ch oo l h ou rs gr ad es  8 -9 D N A A D N A A D N A A D N A A N um be r of  s ch oo l h ou rs gr ad es  1 0- 12 D N A A D N A A S ou rc es N ot es : (b )  H al f d ay  K in de rg ar te n pr og ra m s ar e ex pe ct ed  to  o ffe r 1 5 m in ut es  o f p hy si ca l a ct iv ity  d ur in g ea ch  s ch oo l d ay . S o1 3:  S ch oo l S po rt s (2 00 7)  (1 ) P ri m ar y le ve l ( a)  (b ) S ec on da ry  le ve l ( c) (1 )  B C  M in is try  o f E du ca tio n,  A ct  N ow  B C , P ro gr am  G ui de  fo r D ai ly  P hy si ca l A ct iv ity  K in de rg ar te n to  G ra de  1 2 ht tp :// w w w .b ce d. go v. bc .c a/ dp a/ pd fs /p ro gr am _g ui de .p df (a )  A s of  S ep te m be r 2 00 8 bo ar ds /a ut ho rit ie s m us t o ffe r 3 0 m in ut es  e ac h sc ho ol  d ay  o f p hy si ca l a ct iv ity  a s pa rt of  th e ed uc at io n pr og ra m  fo r K in de ga rte n to  G ra de  9 . (c )  S tu de nt s in  G ra de s 10 -1 2 ar e re sp on si bl e fo r t he ir ow n ph ys ic al  a ct iv ity  a nd  m us t d oc um en t i t t he m se lv es . (d ) T he  n um be r o f h ou rs  d ed ic at ed  to  p hy si ca l e du ca tio n in  th e se co nd ar y sc ho ol  c ur ric ul um  is  m an da te d at  th e pr ov in ci al  le ve l. (e ) R eg io na l d at a fo r t hi s in di ca to r r ep re se nt  th e pr ov in ce  o f B rit is h C ol um bi a. (f ) S ch oo l c ur ric ul um  a nd  ti m e al lo tm en ts  a re  th e re sp on si bi lit y of  th e pr ov in ce s an d th er ef or e va ry  a cr os s th e co un try  (D N A A ). (g ) N o sc ho ol s w er e id en tif ie d th at  w er e sp ec ifi ca lly  fo r p eo pl e w ith  d is ab ili tie s.  T he se  s tu de nt s ar e ty pi ca lly  in te gr at ed  w ith in  th e ed uc at io n sy st em .Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     116 Number % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Number % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Numbers % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Stadiums (1) (a) 0 4 4 Tennis courts (2) DNAA DNAA 181 Golf courses (3) (b) 0 11 11 Running tracks (2) (c) DNAA DNAA 7 Cycle racing tracks(4) 0 0 0 Motor/Motorcycle/ Kart racetracks (4) 0 0 0 Lakes (d) 0 0 0 Skiing pistes (5) 0 0 0 Luge/bobsleigh runs (6) 0 0 0 Ski jumps (7) 0 0 0 Other Open-air venue (e) NA NA NA Gymnasiums (f) DNAA DNAA DNAA Velodromes 0 0 0 Swimming pools (2) DNAA DNAA 14 Skating rinks (2) DNAA DNAA 8 Other Indoor venue x NA NA NA Number % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Number % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Numbers % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Stadiums (1)(a) 0 5 5 Tennis courts (2) (g) DNAA DNAA 624 Golf courses (3) (h) 0 69/61 69/61 Running tracks (2) (c) DNAA DNAA 36 Cycle racing tracks (4) 0 5 5 Motor/Motorcycle/ Kart racetracks (4) 0 3 3 Lakes (d) 0 1 1 Skiing pistes (i) (5) 0 3 3 Luge/bobsleigh runs (6) 0 0 0 Ski jumps (7) 0 0 0 Other Open-air venue (e) NA NA NA Gymnasiums (f) DNAA DNAA DNAA Velodromes 0 1 1 Swimming pools (l) (2) DNAA DNAA 78 Skating rinks (2) DNAA DNAA 41 Other Indoor venue x NA NA NA Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (m) Professional only Open to all Total So14: Available Sports Facilities (2008) City - Vancouver (1) Professional only Open to all TotalVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     117 (j) Data were not available or accessible (DNAA) on usage per year by type of facility, as requested in the original OGI data template. (k) The British Columbia Building Code has evolved to include the following provisions regarding accessibility: parking and door-widths (1978), washrooms (1982), all accessibility aspects (1988), all accessibility aspects integrated within the code document (1992). In addition, many buildings originally constructed prior to these building code provisions may have been retrofitted; however, there is no single source of information to confirm the number of buildings accessible. (m) Regional data represents the Greater Vancouver Regional District and includes facilities within the City of Vancouver. (7) Contact: High Performance Director, Ron Read, Ski Jumping Canada (d) There are no lakes in the city or region that are used soley for sporting purposes. (e) Data on open air venues is unavailable. (f) Data on the number of gymnasiums in the city and region is unavailable. (g) Aggregated data for tennis courts in the region is not available. (h) Includes public and private full-length golf courses in the GVRD. (i) This includes each of the skiing facilities  in Region - not individual ski-hill runs. (c) This figure includes Track and Field facilities only - does not include running trails in parkland or other locations. (5) http://www.bcskiing.com/                http://www.skicanada.org/skiarea/default.cfm?Dsp=SkiAreaList (6) http://www.bobsleigh.ca/Content/Home.asp?langid=1            Notes: (a) Includes BC Place, GM Place, Pacific Colliseum and Nat Bailey Stadium. Swanguard Stadium was added at the regional scale. (b) Includes public and private full-length courses in Vancouver area only - excludes "pitch n putt" courses. Sources (1) http://www.bcplacestadium.com/           http://www.generalmotorsplace.com/           http://www.pne.ca/venuerental/pacific_coliseum.htm    http://www.canadiansbaseball.com/natbaileystadium   (2) Contact: Shanon Meredith Operations Manager, BC Recreation and Parks Association  (3) http://www.bcgolfguide.com/search_courses.cfm (4) http://www.cyclingbc.net/itoolkit.asp?pg=VELODROMES    http://www.cyclingbcbmx.ca/itoolkit.asp?pg=FIND_A_TRACK         http://www.ababmx.com/index.php?page=default/tracks&search=British+Colu mbiaVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     118 Total for sport for athletes with disabilities (c) Total exclusion (b) discrimination racism violence Total for sport for athletes with disabilities (c) Total exclusion (b) 1 discrimination racism violence Total for sport for athletes with disabilities (c) Total exclusion (b) discrimination racism violence Total for sport for athletes with disabilities (c) Total exclusion (b) discrimination racism violence Total for sport for athletes with disabilities (c) Total exclusion (b) 3 discrimination racism violence Number of reported incident So15: Exclusion, Discrimination, Racism and Violence in Sport (2007/08) (1) Country - Canada (a) Biathalon Number of reported incident Bobsleigh Number of reported incident Snowboard Number of reported incident Alpine Number of reported incident WrestlingVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     119 Total for sport for athletes with disabilities (c) Total (d) exclusion (b) 1 discrimination racism violence (b) Database only focuses on cases that have been filed with the SDRCC. These cases are related to disputes over selection for a team or games, and have been classified as "exclusion" disputes. (c) There is no found data related to disputes in sports for athletes with disabilities.   (d) # for synchronized swimming Swimming Number of reported incident (1) http://www.crdsc- sdrcc.ca/eng/documents/SDRCC_AR2007_ENG.pdf (a) Cases on a provincial level are not recorded. Notes: Sources (2) http://www.adrsportred.ca/eng/links.cfm (3) http://highfive.ilogic.net/bc/Shared%20Documents/Discrimination.pdfVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     120 Number of top- level women Number of paralympic top- level women Number of top- level men Number of paralympic top- level men Total Total for paralympic top-level sportsmen and women National federation 1 National federation 2 National federation 3 National federation x Total Number of top- level women Number of paralympic top- level women Number of top- level men Number of paralympic top- level men Total Total for paralympic top-level sportsmen and women National federation 1 National federation 2 National federation 3 National federation x Total So16: Top-level Sportsmen and Women (2007, 2008) City RegionVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     121 World Championships Year Number of top- level women  (1) Number of paralympic top- level women  Number of top- level men  (1) Number of paralympic top-level men Total top-level sportsmen and women  (1) Total for paralympic top- level sportsmen and women Alpine Skiing (Alpine Canada) 2007 1 3 (2) 4 1 (2) 5 4(2) Bobsled & Luge (Bobsleigh and Skeleton Canada; (Canadian Luge Association) 2008 4 N/A 0 N/A 4 N/A Cross Country Skiing (Cross Country Canada) 2007 0 2 (2) 2 3 (2) 2 5(2) Figure Skating (Skate Canada) 2008 5 N/A 5 N/A 10 N/A Freestyle Skiing (Canadian Freestyle Ski Association) 2007 4 N/A 4 N/A 8 N/A Snowboarding (Canadian Snowboard Federation) 2007 2 N/A 2 N/A 4 N/A Speed Skating (Speed Skating Canada) 2008 8 N/A 8 N/A 16 N/A Biathalon (Paralympic) N/A N/A 0 (1) N/A 1 (1) N/A 1 (1) Sledge Hockey (Paralympic) N/A N/A 0 (1) N/A 1 team (15 players) (1) N/A 1 team (15 players) (1) Total 24 5 25 5 + 1 team of 15 49 10 + 1 team of 15 Country - Canada (2007,2008) (a, b, c) Sources Notes: (a) Top level is defined as  athletes ranked 8th place or higher for Olympic events. (1) Sport Canada. Special Data Tabulation with assistance from Senior Program Officer, Sport Canada (Rob Paradis, 2008). (2) International Paralympic Committee ‐ Participation and Medalists Report IX Paralympic Winter Games,  Torino, Italy, 2006.  http://www.paralympic.org/release/Main_Sections_Menu/Sports/Results/paralympics_search.html?games=20 06PWG&medal=medals&sport=31&gender=all&npc=CAN    (c) Paralympic figures are from the 2006 Paralympic Games (d) Other figures are from the most recent World Championships (2007 or 2008) as indicated. (b) Top level is defined as athletes ranked 3rd place or higher for Paralympic events.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     122 City - Vancouver Professional Leagues Number of teams Women Men Total National Hockey League (1) 0 1 1 Canadian Football League (2) 0 1 1 Western Hockey League (3) 0 1 1 Minor League Baseball (Single A Short Season) (4) 0 1 1 United Soccer League - First Division (5) 0 1 1 United Soccer League - Women's League (6) 1 0 1 Total 1 5 6 Region - British Columbia (b) Number of teams Women Men Total Western Hockey League (3) 0 5 5 Western Lacrosse Association (7) 0 7 7 Total 0 12 12 6 Vancouver Whitecaps Womens http://www.uslsoccer.com/teams/2008/22395.html 7 Western Lacrosse Association http://www.theboxrocks.com/about.asp (a) Professional league is defined by the provision of a salary for the athletes. (b)  Regional data are presented for the region of British Columbia, excluding the City of Vancouver. Notes: So17: Professional Leagues 2008 (a) Sources 1 Vancouver Canucks http://www.nhl.com/index.html 2 Canadian Football League http://www.cfl.ca/ 3 Western Hockey League http://whl.ca/about/?id=671 4 Minor League Baseball http://web.minorleaguebaseball.com/index.jsp 5 Vancouver Whitecaps Mens http://www.uslsoccer.com/teams/2008/22394.htmlVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     123 World or Continental Championships (date(s)) Host City Total duration Total number of days of competition Number of events Number of athletes Number of organizers Number of spectators Budget of the competition Total winter sports Speed Skating(5) ISU World Cup Short Track October 24th-26th 2008 Vancouver 5 days 3 days 29 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Speed Skating(6) ISU Single Distances Speed Skating Championships March12-15 2009 Vancouver 3 days 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Figure Skating(7) ISU Four Continents Figure Skating Championships February 2nd-8th 2009 Vancouver 5 days 4 days 14 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Freestyle Skiing (1) FIS Freestyle World Cup February 5th- 7th 2009 Vancouver 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Snowboarding (1) FIS Snowboarding World Cup February 13th-15th 2009 Vancouver 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Curling(8) World Junior Curling Championships March 5th-15th 2009 Vancouver 11 days 10 days 31 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Hockey (1) IIHF Women's Four Nations Tournament August 31- September 6th 2009 Vancouver 7 days 7 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Paralympic Winter Sports Wheel Chair Curling(8) WCF World Wheelchair Curling Championships February 21-28 2009 Vancouver 9 days 8 days 18 (i) DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Ice Sledge Hockey (1) IPC Ice Sledge Hockey Four Nations Tournament February 23rd- March 1st 2009 Vancouver 8 days 7 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Summer Sports Gymnastics (Artistic)(9) North Shore Invitational Februrary 15th- 17th 2008 Vancouver 3 days 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Judo(10) Pan-American Judo Union Pacific International Tournament February 23rd 2008 Vancouver 1 day 1 day DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Triathlon (11) 2008 Vancouver BG ITU World Triathlon Championships June 6th-June 8th 2008 Vancouver 7 days 3 days 10 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Winter Sports World or Continental Championships (date(s)) Host City Total duration Total number of days of competition Number of events Number of athletes Number of organizers Number of spectators Budget of the competition Nordic Combined (1) FIS Nordic Combined World Cup January 16th-17th 2009 Whistler 2 days 2 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Cross Country Skiing (1) FIS Cross Country Skiing World Cup January 16th-18th 2009 Whistler 3 days 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Ski Jumping (1) FIS Ski Jumping World Cup January 24th-25th 2009 Whistler 2 days 2 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Biathlon (2) IBU Junior/Youth World Championships January 28th-February 3rd Canmore 6 days 6 days 16 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Biathlon (2) IBU Biathlon World Cup March 11th-15th 2009 Whistler 4 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Bobsleigh and Skeleton (3)(ii) FIBT Bobsleigh and Skeleton World Cup February 2nd-7th 2009 Whistler 7 days 7 days 21 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Luge (4) FIL Luge World Cup February 16-21 2009 Whistler 5 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Ski Jumping(1) Ladies Continental Cup December 17th and 18th 2008 Whister 2 days 2 days 2 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Curling(8) World Women's Curling Championship March 22-30 2008 Vernon DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Paralympic Winter Sports Cross Country Skiing and Biathlon(1) IPC Cross Country Skiing and Biathlon World Cup Final March 4th-7th 2009 Whistler 4 days 21 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Alpine Skiing(12) IPC Alpine Skiing World Cup Finals March 9- 14th 2009 Whistler 5 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Alpine Skiing(12) IPC Alpine Skiing North America and National Championships March 23rd- March 26th 2009 Sun Peaks 4 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Summer Sports Baseball(13) World Baseball Challenge July 18th-25th 2009 British Columbia 7 days 7 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Triathlon(11) Pan Am Continental Cup August 16th- August 23rd 2008 Kelowna, British Columbia 7 days 7 days 10 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA So18: World and Continental Championships - 2008-09 (1) (a) Vancouver Metropolitan Area (b) Region - British Columbia (c) Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     124 Country - Canada (d) World or Continental Championships (date(s)) Host City Total duration Total number of days of competition Number of events Number of athletes Number of organizers Number of spectators Budget of the competition Curling(8) Ford World Men's Curling Championships April 4th 2009- April 12th 2009 Moncton, New Brunswick 8 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Bobsleigh and Skeleton(3) FIBT Americas Cup November 2nd-9th 2008 Calgary, Alberta 7 days 7 days 28 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA  Skeleton(3) FIBT InterContinental Cup November 30th-December 4th 2008 Calgary, Alberta 5 days 5 days 10 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Luge(4) Suzuki Challenge Cup February 13th 2009 Calgary, Alberta 1 day 1 day DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Luge (4) FIL Viessman World Cup February 13th- 14th 2009 Calgary, Alberta 2 days 2 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Short Track Speed Skating(6) Samsung ISU World Cup Short Track February 1st-3rd 2008 Quebec City, Canada 3 days 3 days 54 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Short Track Speed Skating(6) World Junior Short Track Speed Skating Championships January 9th-11th 2009 Sherbrooke, Canada 3 days 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Figure Skating (7) Grand Prix of Figure Skating - HomeSense Skate Canada October 31st- November 2nd 2008 Ottawa, Canada 3 days 3 days DNAA 39 DNAA DNAA DNAA Speed Skating(14) Summer Classic August 8th-10th 2008 Ottawa, Canada 3 days 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Speed Skating(14) Olympic Oval Invitational October 31st- November 2nd 2008 Calgary, Alberta 3 days 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Speed Skating(14) Can Am #1 November 20th-23rd 2008 Calgary, Alberta 4 days 4 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Speed Skating(14) Can Am #2 December 12th-14th 2008 Calgary, Alberta 3 days 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Ice Hockey(1) International Ice Hockey Federation U20 Women's World Championships December 26th 2008-January 5th 2009 Ottawa,Ontario DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Summer Sports Baseball(13) XXII World Junior Baseball Championships July 25th-August 3rd 2008 Edmonton, Alberta 10 days 10days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Cycling(15) Coupe du Monde UCI XCO 6 / DHI/4X 7 / UCI World Cup XCO 6 / DHI/4X 7 August 1st-2nd 2008 Bromont, Canada 2 days 2days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Fencing(16) Canadian Fencing Federation Junior World Cup October 24th-26th 2008 Montreal, Canada 3 days 2 days 6 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Fencing(16) Epee Internationale May 29th-June 1st 2006 Montreal, Canada 4 days 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Gymnastics (Artistic)(9) L'International Gymnix 2008 February 26th- March 3rd 2008 Montreal, Canada 7 days 7 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Rowing(17) Royal Canadian Henley Regatta August 5th 2008-August 10th 2008 St. Catherines, Canada 6 days 6 days 82 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Rowing(17) RCA Canadian Masters Tournament August 15th-August 17th 2008 Ontario, Canada 3 days 3 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Sailing (18) International Lightning Class Youth World Championships July 14th-July 18th 2009 Montreal, Canada 5 days 5 days DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Wheel Chair Tennis (19) Tennis Canada International Championship 2008 November 27th- 30th 2008 Montreal, Canada 4 days 4 days 11 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Notes: (i) includes all possible events (ii)Both a bobsleigh and skeleton championship (iii) Does not include World Cup events, races etc as the indicator calls for Championships only. No World Cup championships will be occuring in Canada in 2008-2009 Sources Canada (1) http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/athletes-and-sports/upcoming-sport-events/-/56986/f896fm/index.html (2) http://www.biathlonworld.com/en/events.html/do/showevent?EventId=BT0809JWRLCH__ (3) http://www.fibt.com/index.php?id=64&L=0 (4) http://www.fil-luge.org/events.html (5)http://www.vancouvershorttrack2008.com/ (6) http://www.isu.org/vsite/vnavsite/page/directory/0,10853,4844-182959-200177-nav-list,00.html (7) http://www.fourcontinents2009.com/ (9) http://www.fig-gymnastics.com/vsite/vnavsite/page/directory/0,10853,5187-188470-205692-nav-list,00.html (11) http://triathloncanada.com/rtecontent/document/2008TriathlonCanadaMasterCalendar_July29.pdf?uid=NationalChampionships (8) http://www.worldcurling.org/championships2008-2009.html (10) http://www.intjudo.eu/?Menu=Calendar&Action=List&m_calendar_type_id=2&m_calendar_id=302&lang_id=2&mid=8 (12) http://www.paralympic.org/release/Winter_Sports/Alpine_Skiing/Calendar?sport=Alpine%20Skiing (13) http://www.ibaf.org/event_calendar/ (14) http://www.isu.org/vsite/vnavsite/page/directory/0,10853,4844-128612-129920-nav-list,00.html (15) http://www.uci.ch/templates/BUILTIN-NOFRAMES/Template3/layout.asp?MenuId=MTUyMjU (16) http://www.fie.ch/Competitions/Calendar.aspx (17) http://www.worldrowing.com/display/modules/events/dspEvent.php?eventid=35180 (18) http://www.sailing.org/regattainfo.php?rgtaid=11015 (19) http://www.itftennis.com/wheelchair/tournaments/tournamentoverview.asp?tournament=1100017194Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     125 M ed al s  by   fe m al e  at hl et es N um be r  of  fe m al e  at hl et es M ed al s  by  m al e  at hl et es N um be r  of  m al e  at hl et es M ed al s  to ta l A th le te s  to ta l M ed al s  pe r  fe m al e  at hl et e M ed al s  pe r  m al e  at hl et e To ta l  m ed al s  pe r  at hl et e N um be r  of  s po rt   di sc ip l. M ed al s  pe r  di sc ip l. Po p. ,  m ln . M ed al s  pe r  m ill io n  pe op le Ra nk  b y  to ta l  m ed al s Tu ri n  20 06 16 88 8 10 7 24 19 5 0. 18 2 0. 07 5 0. 12 3 15 1. 60 33 0. 72 7 3 Sa lt  L ak e  Ci ty  2 00 2 9. 5' 1 66 7. 5' 1 91 17 15 7 0. 14 4 0. 08 2 0. 10 8 D N AA D N AA 31 0. 54 8 4 N ag an o  19 98 8 64 7 90 15 15 4 0. 12 5 0. 07 8 0. 09 7 12 1. 25 28 0. 53 6 4 1   In  2 00 2,  C an ad a  w on  a  m ix ed ‐p ai rs  fi gu re  s ka ti ng  c om pe ti ti on , h en ce  t he  o ne  m ed al  d iv id ed  in  h al f b y  th e  tw o  ge nd er sVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     126 Samples collected Number of A- sample tests carried out Number of A- sample adverse analytical findings Number of B-samples analysed Number of B- sample confirmations Total doping control tests (a) Total Infractions (a) Aquatics- Swimming,                    Diving,                       Waterpolo                   Synchronized Swimming 193 21 50 36 0 0 0 0 Archery 12 0 Athletics 320 5 Badminton 14 0 Baseball 18 0 Basketball 90 0 Boxing 45 2 Canoe/Kayak 167 0 Cycling 153 0 Equestrian 13 0 Fencing 13 0 Football 166 9 Gymnastics 55 0 Handball 6 0 Field Hockey 57 0 Judo 54 0 Modern Pentathlon 6 0 Rowing 101 0 Sailing 6 0 Shooting DNAA DNAA Softball 26 0 Table Tennis 10 0 Taekwondo 19 0 Tennis DNAA DNAA Triathlon 52 0 Volleyball 49 0 Weightlifting 63 1 Wrestling 97 0 Biathlon 27 0 Bobsleigh 66 3 Curling 8 0 Ice Hockey 165 0 Luge 36 0  Figure Skating 12 0 Speed Skating 124 0 Skiing(c) 77 0 So20: National Anti-Doping Controls (2007-2008) (1) Country - Canada (domestic testing program) (b) Winter sportsVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     127 Archery DNAA DNAA Athletics DNAA DNAA Boccia DNAA DNAA Bowls DNAA DNAA Cycling DNAA DNAA Equestrian DNAA DNAA Football 5-a-Side DNAA DNAA Football 7-a-Side DNAA DNAA Goalball DNAA DNAA Judo DNAA DNAA Powerlifting DNAA DNAA Rowing DNAA DNAA Sailing DNAA DNAA Shooting DNAA DNAA Swimming DNAA DNAA Table Tennis DNAA DNAA Volleyball DNAA DNAA Wheelchair Basketball 56 2 Wheelchair Dance Sport DNAA DNAA Wheelchair Fencing DNAA DNAA Wheelchair Rugby 28 0 Wheelchair Tennis 8 0 Alpine Skiing DNAA DNAA Ice Sledge Hockey DNAA DNAA Nordic Skiing DNAA DNAA Wheelchair Curling 4 0 Total for Paralympic sports DNAA DNAA Notes: (a) The data represent the tests and test results only for the domestic testing program. (b) This data includes Junior, CIS and CCAA Football sports as the indicator calls for all domestic doping statistics (c) This data includes Ski Jumping, Nordic Skiing and Alpine Skiing Paralympic summer sports Paralympic winter sports Sources (1) Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport. 2007 Year-End Statistics. http://www.cces.ca/pdfs/CCES-MR- 2007-08Results-E.pdfVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     128 Number of medias Coverage Number of medias Coverage Number of medias Coverage Number of medias Coverage Newspaper Magazines Radio stations Television channels Total So21: Media Specializing in Sport City Region Country Total Please note any additional comments you may have on an attached file (Word) Sources 1 2 3 4 5 xVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     129 City - Vancouver Region - British Columbia Country - Canada Total (c) Number of medias Number of medias Number of medias Number of medias Newspaper/ magazines (1) 5 Radio stations (2) 1 1 4 4 Television channels (3) (4) 0 0 15 15 Total (a) 1 1 19 24 So21: Media Specializing in Sport  (a) 2008 (b) The same magazines are available at the national, provincial and city level. (c) All Vancouver media are considered to be in BC and all BC media are considered to be in Canada. The totals (by media type) do not double count this circumstance. 5 Sources (1) Magazines Canada http://www.cmpa.ca/index.php. (2) Radio Locator http://www.radio-locator.com/. (3) Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission (4) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_channel Notes: (a) Only current data for 2008 were available from the identified sources.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     130 Original Hours Repeated Total Professional Amateur So22: Sports Broadcasting (2006) (1) (a) Country - Canada Source (1) Canada Radio-television and Telecommunications Commision http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/BCASTING/ann_rep/annualrp.htm. Notes: (a) Data is not available as requested. No data were identified at the city or regional scale.  Limited national data aggregated for amateur and professional sports was reported by one of the national broadcasters (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation), filed with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. Annual Reports of other national broadcasters were also reviewed but no additional data on sports broadcasting was identified.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     131 Absolute number (6) Relative number 318 255 [x] Number of cable channels (2006) (d) Number of households connected to cable (2006) Public stations Commercial stations Public stations Commercial stations 1 2 7 7 Public stations Commercial stations Public stations Commercial stations Public stations Commercial stations 3 (f) (g) 0 0 22 0 26 Top 10 Newspapers by distribution Newspaper 1 Star (Toronto) Newspaper 2 Globe and Mail (Toronto) Newspaper 3 Le Journal de Montreal (Montreal) Newspaper 4 La Presse (Montreal) Newspaper 5 The National Post Newspaper 6 The Toronto Sun Newspaper 7 The Vancouver Sun Newspaper 8 The Province (Vancouver) Newspaper 9 Gazette (Montreal) Newspaper 10 Citizen (Ottawa) 2(b) [x] So23: Information Media (2006-2008) (a) Number of newspaper - British Columbia (2008) (d) Circulation of British Columbian newspapers (2003) Absolute number (6) Relative number Neutral / independent Commited to a particular ideology / political party Broadcasting stations (2006) (3, 4) Cable channels (1, 2) (d) Number of channels on national level with terrestrial distribution (e) Number of regional stations (c) 36 2,387,000 (l) Number of radio stations (5) National Regional - Greater Vancouver - Squamish- Local Content diversity - Canada (2007) (6) Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Sources (1) Cable stations http://www.shaw.ca/en-ca/ProductsServices/Television/ChannelsInMyArea/. (2) http://estat.statcan.ca/cgi-win/CNSMCGI.EXE (3) http://www.britishcolumbia.com/news/tv.html. (4) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_television_stations_in_Canada_by_call_sign.        11 Nov. 2008 (5) Radio Stations http://www.bcpassport.com. (6) http://www.cna-acj.ca/en/aboutnewspapers/circulation (7) http://www.world-newspapers.com/british-columbia.html. (l) This data encompasses all Western Provinces. Notes: (a) The Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission does not maintain or publish lists of radio and television stations. Neither (b) Includes the Province and the Vancouver Sun, which are distributed province-wide. (c) This figure includes Global BC (Canwest Global is a national TV station with broadcasting in each province).  Data represent the province of BC.       (d) Consists of the number of subscribers to television programming services. (e) This figure includes only those TV stations which are available nationally.         (f) Candian Broadcasting Corporation is a Crown-owned Entity (CBC includes SRC - french); therefore it is designated for the purposes of this data table as public.         (g) This includes CBC radio stations 1 & 2 - as well as the National CBC French radio station. These stations are available at regional and city (i) This figure represnts basic subscribers within BC. Data for city scale were not available. (j) This figure represents the number of basic cable channels available in Vancouver. Regional data not available. (k) Data represent the regional districts of Squamish Lillooet and Greater Vancouver. Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     132 Number of households equipped % of individuals Number of households equipped % of individuals total number % of individuals Fixed telephone lines (2007)(a)(2)(4) 90% 86.20% 86.90% Mobile cellular phone users (2007) (2)(a) 76.20% 72.40% Computer (2000)(4)(a) 83.60% 79.90% 75.40% Radio receivers Television(4)(a) 98.00% 98.30% 99.00% Internet acess from home (2007) (1)(3)(b) 1,566,269 (5)(c) 74.40% 3,002,845.5 (d)(5) 73.6% 22,651,744 (e)(6) 68.60% Local / native website [per 1,000 inhabitants] (b) Internet use was provided by individual use only. So24: Information and Communications Technology (2006; 2007) City - Vancouver Region - British Columbia (h) Country - Canada (1)http://estat.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.pgm?regtkt=&C2Sub=&ARRAYID=3580122&C2DB=&VEC=&LANG=E&SrchVer=&ChunkSize=&SDDS LOC=&ROOTDIR=ESTAT/&RESULTTEMPLATE=ESTAT/CII_PICK&ARRAY_PICK=1&SDDSID=&SDDSDESC= (2) http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/080423/d080423d.htm (3) http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/profiles/community/Details/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1= 933__&Geo2=PR&Code2=59&Data=Count&SearchText=Vancouver&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=All& GeoLevel=&GeoCode=933 (4) http://estat.statcan.ca/cgi-win/CNSMCGI.EXE?Lang=E&CANSIMFILE=EStat\English\CII_1_E.htm (5) http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/profiles/community/Details/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1= 933__&Geo2=PR&Code2=59&Data=Count&SearchText=Vancouver&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=All& GeoLevel=&GeoCode=933 (6) http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html Sources Notes: (a) the data provided is for households only as Stats Canada currently does not currently collect data on individual users.  (c) Calculated using Vancouver population data. Population 2,116, 581 (d) Calculated using BC Population of 4,113,487 (e)Calculated using July 2008 population data, 33,311,389  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     133 C ity  -  V an co uv er R eg io n  - G re at er  V an co uv er  R eg io na l D is tr ic t C o un tr y si n gl es 44 .2 % 40 .3 % 37 .1 % se ni or s 8. 9% 14 .5 % 35 .0 % pe op le  w ith  d is ab ili tie s D N A A D N A A 23 ,6 23 47 ,8 57 D N N A D N N A D N N A 59 3 (2 00 1- 20 04 ) D N A A D N A A N A 3, 57 7 D N N A 1, 29 1 (2 00 5) 2, 17 4 (2 00 5) D N N A 21 .0 % D N N A 74 8 (2 00 3) 99 0 (2 00 3) D N N A N ot es : (a ) T he  p er ce nt ag e of  lo w  in co m e fa m ili es  re pr es en ts  th e pe rc en t o f t he  p op ul at io n th at  fa lls  b el ow  th e lo w  in co m e cu t-o ff (L IC O ) r at e.   D at a on  si ng le s is  fo r "u na tta ch ed  p er so ns  1 5 ye ar s an d ol de r" ; d at a on  s en io rs  is  fo r t ho se  a ge d 65  a nd  o ld er ; p eo pl e w ith  d is ab ili tie s re pr es en ts  a du lts  ag ed  2 5 to  5 4 w ith  d is ab ili tie s w ith  p er so na l i nc om es  <  $ 15 ,0 00 . (5 ) G re at er  V an co vu er  R eg io na l D is tri ct .  D is cu ss io n P ap er  o n a R eg io na l A ffo rd ab le  H ou si ng  (6 ) C an ad ia n C en tre  fo r P ol ic y A lte rn at iv es  (2 00 4)  H om e In se cu rit y:  T he  S ta te  o f S oc ia l H ou si ng  (7 ) G V R D  H om el es sn es s C ou nt , 2 00 2. (8 ) C ity  o f V an co uv er : R ep or t t o C ou nc il:   S he lte rle ss  in  2 00 4.   (9 ) S ta tis tic s C an ad a.  C A N S IM  T ab le  2 02 -0 80 2 - P er so ns  in  lo w  in co m e.  2 00 1. (1 0)  C ity  o f V an co uv er , S ou th ea st  F al se  C re ek  a nd  O ly m pi c V ill ag e P ro je ct  O ffi ce .  N um be r of  a ff o rd ab le  h ou si ng  u ni ts  b u ilt  fo r th e O ly m pi c an d pa ra ly m pi c N um be r of  h ou se ho ld s on  w ai tin g lis ts  fo r so ci al  h ou si n g N u m be r of  h om el es s pe op le  ( 20 05 ) %  o f ho m el es s w ith  d is ab ili ti es  (p hy si ca l) (2 00 5) N um be r of  p la ce s in  h om el es s sh el te rs  (2 00 3) S ou rc es (1 ) B C  S ta ts  C om m un ity  P ro fil es . 2 00 1. (2 ) S ta tis tic s C an ad a,  In co m e T re nd s:  1 98 0- 20 05 . (3 ) S ta tis tic s C an ad a.   P ar tic ip at io n an d  A ct iv ity  L im ita tio n S ur ve y,  2 00 1. (4 ) C ity  o f V an co uv er .  R ep or t t o C ou nc il:   T he  S ta te  o f S oc ia l H ou si ng , O ct ob er  2 00 1.   S o 31 : H om el es s,  L ow -R en t M ar ke t a nd  A ff or d ab le  H ou si ng  (2 00 0,  2 00 1,  2 00 2,  2 00 6) %  o f lo w  in co m e fa m ili es  (a ) N um be r of  a ff o rd ab le  h ou si ng  a n d so ci al  h o us in g un its  (2 00 6 C en su s) %   o f af fo rd ab le  h ou si ng  a n d so ci al  h o us in g un its N um be r of  n ew  a ff or da bl e ho u si n g an d so ci al  h ou si ng s bu ilt  d ur in g th e N ew  N on -M ar ke t H ou si ng  P ro je ct s (a s of  J u ne  3 0,  2 00 8)Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     134 Name of the media Langage of the media Circulation or audience figure Sources Africa So43: Host City's Media Image Number of media in the panel Keywords used Name of the software used Asia Notes: (a) Resources are not available at this time to establish a media panel and implement the recommended methodology for this OGI indicator. Contact has been made with the VANOC Communications Department to consider opportunities to measure and report on this indicator. America Europe Oceania (1) No known sources for this indicator.Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     135 City Region Country Ambulant Visual Wheelchair Hearing Mental Psychological Sources So44: Perceptions about People with Disabilities in Society Date of the survey Number of people with disabilities in the sample Please add the questionnaire and the results to this file Notes: (a) The OGI methodology states that a questionaire is to be developed by the OCOG in conjuction with the scientific committee of the IPC. At this time, resources are not available to develop and implement the questionnaire, and no existing data sources for this information could be identified. Therefore, no data are available. (1) No known sources for this indicator.  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     136 Number of People Receiving Support % of Adults with Disabilities Number of People Receiving Support (c) % of Adults with Disabilities (d) Number of People Receiving Support % of Adults with Disabilities Ambulant Visual Wheelchair Hearing Mental Others (name) Ambulant Visual Wheelchair Hearing Mental Others (name) So45: Support Network for Disabled People (2006) (1) (b) City - Vancouver Region - British Columbia Country - Canada Rate of people who have access to support from the state (a) DNAA 18.4% DNAA 16.6% Per capita expenses of the country for welfare services (d) definition of adults: 15 and over (2) http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-628-x/2007003/t/4183086-eng.htm (1) Statistics Canada.  Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, 2006. http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89- 628-x/2007003/t/4125051-eng.htm Notes: (a) The number of people receiving support from the state represents the number that claimed and received medical and disability tax credits. (b) Data were unavailable for specific types of disabilities and for per capita expenses for welfare services. (c) in the baseline, "support" was identified as medical expense tax credit for people with disabilities in both regions, what's problematic is that 2006 PALS does not use the same categorization SourcesVersion date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     137 In st it ut io ns Q ua lif ic at io n / D eg re e/ D ip lo m a P ro g ra m N u m be r of  gr ad ua te s pe r ye ar N u m be r of  p ro fe ss io n al s em p lo ye d F or  a th le te s w it h di sa b ili tie s F or  p eo pl e w ith  di sa bi lit ie s T o ta l Fo r at h le te s w it h di sa bi lit ie s F or  p eo pl e w ith  d is ab ili ti es T o ta l A th le te s w ith  di sa bi lit ie s P eo pl e w ith  di sa bi lit ie s T ot al O th er  tr ai n in g  p ro gr am s (2 00 7)  (1 ) (b ) N at io na l C oa ch in g In st itu te  - V an co uv er Q ua lif ic at io n - L ev el  4 - N at io na l C oa ch in g C er tif ic at io n P ro gr am  - N C I D ip lo m a in  H ig h P er fo rm an ce  C oa ch in g T w o- ye ar  pr og ra m In st it ut io ns Q ua lif ic at io n / D eg re e/ D ip lo m a P ro g ra m N um be r of  g ra du at es  p er  y ea r N u m be r of  pr of es si o na ls  em pl oy ed A th le te s w it h di sa b ili tie s P eo p le  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s T o ta l A th le te s w it h di sa bi lit ie s P eo p le  w ith  d is ab ili ti es T o ta l A th le te s w ith  di sa bi lit ie s P eo pl e w ith  di sa bi lit ie s T ot al O th er  tr ai n in g  p ro gr am s (2 00 3)  (1 ) (b ) N at io na l C oa ch in g In st itu te s - V an co uv er ; V ic to ria Q ua lif ic at io n - L ev el  4 - N at io na l C oa ch in g C er tif ic at io n P ro gr am  - N C I D ip lo m a in  H ig h P er fo rm an ce  C oa ch in g T w o- ye ar  pr og ra m ; O ne - ye ar  p ro gr am S o4 6:  P ro fe ss io n al  S po rt  E du ca tio n  fo r P eo pl e w ith  D is ab ili ti es  (2 00 7)  (a ) C it y - V an co uv er Q u al ifi ca tio n N u m b er  o f c o ur se s D u ra tio n of  c o ur se s A tt en de es  p er  y ea r N um b er  o f pr of es si o na ls  ac ti ng  a s in st ru ct or s N um b er  o f pr of es si o na ls  ac tu al ly  em pl oy ed N um b er  o f pr of es si o na ls  ac tu al ly  em pl oy ed P ro vi n ci al - B ri ti sh  C ol um bi a Q u al ifi ca tio n N u m b er  o f c o ur se s D u ra tio n of  c o ur se s A tt en de es  p er  y ea r N um b er  o f pr of es si o na ls  ac ti ng  a s in st ru ct or s  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     138 In st it ut io ns Q ua lif ic at io n / D eg re e/ D ip lo m a P ro g ra m N um be r of  g ra du at es  p er  y ea r N u m be r of  pr of es si o na ls  em pl oy ed A th le te s w it h di sa b ili tie s P eo p le  w ith  di sa bi lit ie s T o ta l A th le te s w it h di sa bi lit ie s P eo p le  w ith  d is ab ili ti es T o ta l A th le te s w ith  di sa bi lit ie s P eo pl e w ith  di sa bi lit ie s T ot al O th er  tr ai ni ng  p ro gr am s (2 00 3)  (1 ) (b ) N at io na l C oa ch in g In st itu te s - H al ifa x;  C al ga ry ; M on tré al ; To ro nt o;  S as ka to on ; To ro nt o;  V an co uv er ; V ic to ria ; W in ni pe g Q ua lif ic at io n - L ev el  4  - N at io na l C oa ch in g C er tif ic at io n P ro gr am  - N C I D ip lo m a in  H ig h P er fo rm an ce  C oa ch in g Tw o- ye ar  p ro gr am ; O ne -y ea r p ro gr am ; C us to m iz ed  le ar ni ng  p ro gr am s U ni ve rs ity  o f A lb er ta  (2 ) ( 5) U nd er gr ad ua te  pr og ra m s:  B ac he lo r of  P hy si ca l E du ca tio n an d B ac he lo r o f S ci en ce /K in es io lo gy  Fa cu lty  o f P hy si ca l E du at io n an d R ec re at io n:  B sc K in  an d E du ca tio n pr og ra m s w ith  co ur se s ab ou t di sa bi lit y tra in in g.  U ni ve rs ity  o f R eg in a (3 ) ( 5) B ac he lo r i n H um an  K in et ic s w ith  a  M aj or  in  A da pt ed  P hy si ca l A ct iv ity  Th e Fa cu lty  o f K in es io lo gy  a nd  H ea lth  S tu di es S t. Fr an ci s X av ie r (4 ) ( 5) B ac he lo r i n H um an  K in et ic s w ith  s ev er al  co ur se s co nc er ni ng  A da pt ed  P hy si ca l A ct iv ity  a nd  P hy si ca l A ct iv ity  a nd  S po rt fo r P eo pl e w ith  D is ab ili tie s H um an  K in et ic s/  S ch oo l o f E du ca tio n C ou nt ry  -  C an ad a Q u al ifi ca tio n N u m b er  o f c o ur se s D u ra tio n of  c o ur se s A tt en de es  p er  y ea r N um b er  o f pr of es si o na ls  ac ti ng  a s in st ru ct or s N um b er  o f pr of es si o na ls  ac tu al ly  em pl oy ed (5 ) F in al  R ep or t_  A LA  F in al  P os t S ec on da ry  S ca n Ju ne  2 00 8 O :\O G I-F ile s\ O G I-U B C -1 _M H \U B C  W or ks he et s\ S o4 6 (a ) T he  p ro fe ss io na l s po rt ed uc at io n pr og ra m s ou tli ne d m ay  o r m ay  n ot  h av e sp ec ifi c co m po ne nt s th at  a re  d ed ic at ed  to  p eo pl e / a th le te s w ith  d is ab ili tie s.  It  is  g en er al ly  a cc ep te d th at  N at io na l S po rts  O rg an iz at io ns  in  C an ad a ha ve  a  m an da te  a nd  re sp on si bi lit y to  b e in cl us iv e of  pe op le  / at hl et es  w ith  d is ab ili tie s in cl ud in g th e ed uc at io n of  c oa ch es . (b ) B as ed  o n re se ar ch  to  d at e,  n o ce nt ra l s ou rc e of  d at a ha s be en  id en tif ie d to  a ss es s th is  in di ca to r u si ng  th e da ta  s pe ci fic at io ns  o ut lin ed  a bo ve . T he  N at io na lly  re co gn iz ed  c oa ch in g as so ci at io n w as  id en tif ie d as  a n ap pr op ria te  s ou rc e of  o ve rv ie w  d at a.  " C an ad a' s ei gh t N at io na l C oa ch in g In st itu te s (N C Is ) o ffe r q ua lif ie d co ac he s a on ce -in -a -li fe tim e op po rtu ni ty  to  le ar n fro m  a  v ar ie ty  o f e xp er ts  in  th e fie ld s of  c oa ch in g,  s po rt sc ie nc e,  le ad er sh ip , b us in es s,  a nd  te ch no lo gy  a nd  to  s ha re  e xp er ie nc es , s tra te gi es , a nd  c ha lle ng es  w ith  fe llo w  co ac he s. " (1 ) U ni ve rs ity  a n d C o lle g e P ro gr am s (2 00 7)  (5 ) (1 ) C oa ch in g A ss oc ia tio n of  C an ad a.  2 00 7.  A nn ua l R ep or t 2 00 7- 20 08 . h ttp :// w w w .c oa ch .c a/ en g/ ab ou t_ ca c/ do cu m en ts /A nn ua lR ep or t_ 20 07 -0 8. pd f (2 ) ht tp :// w w w .p hy se da nd re c. ua lb er ta .c a/ un de rg ra du at e. cf m (3 )h ttp :// ki ne si ol og y. ur eg in a. ca /a pa .h tm l (4 ) h ttp :// w w w .s tfx .c a/ ca le nd ar /2 00 8- 20 09 _C al en da r.p df   S ou rc es N ot es :Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix A: Results for OGI Indicators     139 N um be r of  bu ild in gs  ac ce ss ib le %  o f t he  to ta l nu m be r of  bu ild in gs Numbe r of  bu ild in gs  ac ce ss ib le %  o f t he  to ta l nu m be r of  bu ild in gs N um be r of  bu ild in gs  ac ce ss ib le %  o f t he  to ta l nu m be r of  bu ild in gs N um be r of  bu ild in gs  ac ce ss ib le %  o f t he  to ta l n um be r of  b ui ld in gs N um be r of  bu ild in gs  ac ce ss ib le %  o f t he  to ta l nu m be r of  bu ild in gs A dm in is tr at io n of fic es P os t o ff ic es P ol ic e of fic es S oc ia l O ff ic es H os pi ta ls A ir po rt s O th er s (n am e) S ou rc es (1 ) P er so na l c om m un ic at io n.  C an ad ia n B ar rie r F re e D es ig n (b ar rie rf re ed es ig n@ dc cn et .c om ). N ot es : (a ) T he  B rit is h C ol um bi a B ui ld in g C od e ha s ev ol ve d to  in cl ud e th e fo llo w in g pr ov is io ns  re ga rd in g ac ce ss ib ili ty : p ar ki ng  a nd  d oo r- w id th s (1 97 8) , w as hr oo m s (1 98 2) , a ll ac ce ss ib ili ty  a sp ec ts  (1 98 8) , a ll ac ce ss ib ili ty  a sp ec ts  in te gr at ed  w ith in  th e co de  d oc um en t ( 19 92 ). In  a dd iti on , m an y bu ild in gs  o rig in al ly  c on st ru ct ed  p rio r t o th es e bu ild in g co de  p ro vi si on s m ay  h av e be en  re tro fit te d;  h ow ev er , t he re  is  n o si ng le  s ou rc e of  in fo rm at io n to  c on fir m  th e nu m be r o f b ui ld in gs  a cc es si bl e. S o4 8:  A cc es si bi lit y of  P ub lic  S er vi ce s (2 00 6)  (1 ) ( a) C ity  - V an co uv er W he el ch ai r us er s M ob ili ty  im pa ir ed V is ua lly  im pa ir ed H ea ri ng  im pa ir ed M en ta lly  im pa ir ed  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments     140 Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments     141 The following governmental investments were considered as part of the analysis for the OGI Pre-Games Report. Games-related Governmental Investments Games-related governmental investments are investments made by various levels of government (sometimes in partnership with non-governmental partners) that were in response to the 2010 Games. Such investments were either newly created initiatives or existing initiatives that were modified in response to the 2010 Games. Fifty Games- related investments were identified. The investments are arranged chronologically by their start year.    Government Partners  Start Year Investment V an co uv er  M et ro  V an co uv er  W hi st le r B C  C an ad a Other Partners 1988 Canadian Olympic School Program    ? ? RBC 1988 Olympic Legacy Coaching Fund (OLCF)     ? Canadian Olympic Committee 2000 2010 Legacies Now ?  ? ? ? Vancouver Foundation, RBC, CTV, Bell, and 3M 2002 Multi-party Agreement (MPA) for the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games ?  ? ? ? Canadian Olympic Committee, Canadian Paralympic Committee, Vancouver Bid Corp (now VANOC) 2002 Shared Legacies Agreement    ?  Squamish First Nations, Lil'wat Nation, Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation 2003 2010 Vision for British Columbians with Disabilities ?   ?   2003 Ensuring Vancouver's Olympic and Paralympic Legacy ?      2003 Olympic Youth Legacy for Physical Activity, Sport, Culture, and the Arts (renamed in 2004 as Get Out!) ?      2004 2010 Commerce Centre    ?   2004 Own the Podium    ? ? Provincial and territorial governments, corporate partners, and the Canadian sport community. 2004 Spirit of BC    ?  2010 Legacies Now Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments     142   Government Partners  Start Year Investment V an co uv er  M et ro  V an co uv er  W hi st le r B C  C an ad a Other Partners 2004 Whistler Museum Masterplan   ?    2004 Whistler2020   ?    2005 ActNow BC    ?  2010 Legacies Now, Union of BC Municipalities, BC Recreation and Parks Association, and BC Health Living Alliance 2005 Podium Canada (Own the Podium and Road to Excellence initiatives)    ? ? Other government partners, corporate partners, sport partners, and performance partners 2005 Regional Parks and Greenways Plan (RPGP) - Greenspaces Natural Places  ?     2006 2010 Garden Plots by 2010 ?     Vancouver Food Policy Council 2006 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Strategic Plan ?      2006 2010 Speakers' Bureau ?  ? ? ? 2010 Legacies Now, VANOC, and Four Host First Nations 2006 Active Communities Vancouver ?   ?  BC Recreation and Parks Association and 2010 Legacies Now 2006 BC Explorer    ?  Union of British Columbia Municipalities, Western Economic Diversification, Northern Development Initiative Trust, Island Coastal Economic Trust 2006 BC-Canada Place Pavilion    ?   2006 Celebration Plaza   ?  ? VANOC 2006 Olympic Legacy Affordable Housing (Memorandum of Understanding or MOU)    ?  VANOC 2006 Project Civil City ?      2006 SportsFunder    ?  VANOC 2007 2010 Business Summits    ? ? VANOC and Four Host First Nations 2007 2010 Winter Games Economic Opportunities ?      Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments     143   Government Partners  Start Year Investment V an co uv er  M et ro  V an co uv er  W hi st le r B C  C an ad a Other Partners Delivery Plan 2007 Arts Partners in Creative Development (APCD) ?   ?  Canadian Council for the Arts, Vancouver Foundation, VANOC, and 2010 Legacies Now 2007 Community Land Bank (CLB) Agreement   ? ?  Squamish and Lil'wat Aboriginal bands 2007 Host a City Happening Community Grant Program ?      2007 Legacy Reserve Fund ?      2007 Olympic and Paralympic Marks Act     ?  2007 South East False Creek Olympic Village Community Benefits Agreement ?     Millennium Southeast False Creek Properties Limited and Building Opportunities with Business Inner-city Society (BOB) 2008 2010 International Media Centre (BCIMC)    ?   2008 2010 Olympic Games Tourism Strategy     ? Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) 2008 2010 Winter Games Building By-law Relaxation By-law 9747 ?     VANOC 2008 2010 Winter Games Sign Designation & Relaxation Bylaw 9687 ?      2008 2010 Winter Games Strategic Framework   ?    2008 Athletes' Village Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 1831   ?    2008 BC Regional Innovation Chair in Tourism and Sustainable Rural Development    ?  Vancouver Island University and BC Real Estate Foundation 2008 BC Stories    ?  Union of British Columbia Municipalities, Western Economic Diversification, Northern Development Initiative Trust, Island Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments     144   Government Partners  Start Year Investment V an co uv er  M et ro  V an co uv er  W hi st le r B C  C an ad a Other Partners Coastal Economic Trust 2008 British Columbia Showcase at Robson Square    ?   2008 Investing in the Dream: 2010 Winter Games Budget   ?    2008 Olympic and Paralympic Liquor License   ?    2008 Olympic and Paralympic Public Art Program ?      2008 Share the Excitement!    ?   2008 Taxation Exemption for Not-For-Profit Organizations Bylaw   ?    2008 The Olympic Line - Vancouver 2010's Streetcar (Downtown Streetcar 2010 Demonstration Project) ?     Bombardier Transportation 2009 Zoning Amendment Bylaw (Temporary Use Permits) No. 1877, 2008   ?    Non-Games-related Governmental Investments Non-Games-related governmental investments are investments made by various levels of government and are not identified as being newly created or modified in response to the Games. Some of these investments, such as the Canada Line Rapid Transit Project, were catalyzed by the 2010 Games (happened sooner than if Vancouver/Whistler was not the 2010 Host) but were not created or modified as a result of the Games. The government does not classify such projects as Olympics-related investments. Thirty-three non-Games-related investments were considered for the OGI study. This is not an exhaustive list, as priority was given to Games-related investments. However, these non-Games- related investments could potentially affect trends for OGI indicators and were therefore included. We acknowledge that our approach has its limitations and we may have missed some significant non-Games-related investments. Should you feel this to be the case, please contact us at rvanwyns@ogi-ubc.ca to let us know which important investments were missed.  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments     145   Government Partners  Start Year Investment V an co uv er  M et ro  V an co uv er  W hi st le r B C  C an ad a Other Partners 1976 Athlete Assistance Program (AAP)     ? National sport organizations and Sport Canada 1986 Sport Canada Policy on Women in Sport     ?  1991 Demolition for Social Housing Bylaw 6788 ?      1994 Rural Area Tree Protection Bylaw No. 1038   ?    1995 Directions on Greening Government Operations     ?  1996 Livable Region Strategic Plan (LRSP)  ?     1999 National Homelessness Initiative (NHI)     ?  2000 Vancouver Agreement ?   ? ? Partnerships have been created at three levels: 1) local; 2) national; and 3) international. 2001 Protected Area Network (PAN) Policy   ?    2002 Canada Line Rapid Transit Project ?   ? ? Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority and Vancouver Airport Authority 2002 Canadian Sport Policy     ?  2002 Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve (LSCR) Management Plan  ?     2002 Sustainable Region Initiative (SRI)  ?    Business Council of BC, Smart Growth BC, United Way of the Lower Mainland and Fraser Basin Council 2003 3 Ways to Home: The Regional Homelessness Plan for Greater Vancouver  ?   ?  2003 Climate Change Action Plans (Corporate and Community) ?      2003 Single Room Accommodation By-law 8733 ?      Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments     146   Government Partners  Start Year Investment V an co uv er  M et ro  V an co uv er  W hi st le r B C  C an ad a Other Partners 2003 Vancouver Convention Centre Expansion Project    ? ? Tourism Vancouver 2004 Canadian Policy Against Doping in Sport     ? Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport 2004 Sport for Development and Peace     ? Commonwealth Games Canada, Canadian Sport Leadership Corps, Right 2 Play (R2P) and Conference of the Youth and Sports Ministers of French-speaking Countries 2005 Southeast False Creek Official Development Plan Bylaw 9073 ?      2005 Sport Canada's Policy on Aboriginal Peoples' Participation in Sport     ?  2006 Canada's Clean Air Act (Bill C-30: An Act to amend the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Energy Efficiency Act and the Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act)     ?  2006 EcoDensity ?      2006 Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) ?      2006 Policy on Green Procurement     ?  2006 Policy on Sport for Persons with a Disability     ?  2007 Bylaw No. 1061 - A Bylaw to Authorize the Dedication of Land as Regional Park  ?     2007 Bylaw to Adopt the Financial Plan for the Years 2008-2012 (Bylaw No. 1070, 2007)  ?     2007 Cheakamus Community Forest   ?   Squamish Nation and Lil'wat Nation 2007 Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act     ?  Version date: December 1, 2009 OGI-UBC Pre-Games Technical Report Appendix B: List of Governmental Investments     147   Government Partners  Start Year Investment V an co uv er  M et ro  V an co uv er  W hi st le r B C  C an ad a Other Partners 2007 Metro Vancouver Affordable Housing Strategy  ?     2008 Federal Policy for Hosting International Sports Events     ?  2008 Official Community Plan (OCP)   ?     

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