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Olympic Games Impact (OGI) Study for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games: Baseline Report VANOC Oct 11, 2007

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1 OGI Baseline Report2OGI BaselIne RepORt – taBle Of COntents i.  Acknowledgements 4 1. Introduction 5 2. The Olympic Movement, the Paralympic Movement and the 2010 Winter Games 5  2.1.  the Olympic Movement            •  International Olympic Commitee 5            •  Olympic Games Host nation 6            •  agenda 6  2.2.  the paralympic Movement 6  2.3.   the 2010 Olympic and paralympic Winter Games             •  Host City selection process for the 2010 Winter Games 6            •  Vancouver Organizing Committee 7                •  Vancouver 2010 – sustainability in action 7 3. Olympic Games Impact Program 8     3.1.  OGI Reporting framework 8     3.2.  VanOC’s OGI process 8     3.3.  principles, practices and assumptions 10 4. National and Regional Context for the 2010 Games 11      4.1.  Host for the 2010 Winter Games                     •  Host nation – Country of Canada 11               •  Host Region for the 2010 Winter Games –                      province of British Columbia, Metro Vancouver,* squamish-lillooet Regional District 11               •  Host City for the 2010 Winter Games –                          City of Vancouver, Resort Municipality of Whistler 11     4.2.  Geographic Scales and Definitions for OGI 14 5. Study Outcomes and Next Steps 15      5.1.  study Results 15      5.2.  OGI program and VanOC’s sustainability Management and Reporting system 15      5.3.  next steps 16      5.4.  Identifying a Research partner 16      5.5.  Communications 16 6. Summary 16 Appendix A – Final List of OGI Indicators for VANOC Appendix B – Baseline Results for OGI Indicators All figures in this document are expressed in Canadian dollars. *The Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) changed its name to Metro Vancouver in August 2007. 3  OGI Baseline Report4 i. Acknowledgements The Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) would like to acknowledge the following members of the Olympic Games Impact (OGI) Program Advisory Committee for their contributions in preparing the OGI Baseline Report. The role of non-VANOC Advisory Committee members was to provide technical advice; their participation in the Advisory Committee does not reflect an official endorsement by the members or their respective organizations of the OGI indicators or the OGI Baseline Report. Ken Baker, VANOC Kelli Dawson, Environment Canada Jim Frankish, University of British Columbia Steve Litke, Fraser Basin Council Tim McEwan, British Columbia Progress Board Risa Smith, Environment Canada Rob VanWynsberghe, Impact of the Olympics on  Communities Coalition In addition to participating as a member of the Advisory Committee, the Fraser Basin Council1 was retained to acquire and collate the OGI indicator data and to prepare the OGI Baseline Report. Steve Litke, Clare Mochrie and Amy Leighton carried out this work on behalf of the Fraser Basin Council for VANOC. • • • • • • • Invaluable support and advice was continuously provided by staff and advisors of the International Olympic Committee. In particular, Michelle LeMaitre and Pierre Alain Hug were very helpful in assisting the OGI project team complete the work required for the OGI  Baseline Report. Financial assistance to enable the preparation of this report  was provided by VANOC and Environment Canada. The completion of this report would not have been possible without significant contributions from a wide variety of data providers who should be acknowledged. See Appendix B for the specific sources of indicator data relating to each of the OGI indicator worksheets. 1The Fraser Basin Council is a not-for-profit, non-governmental, charitable organization, with a mandate to educate on the need for economic, environmental and social sustainability in the fraser Basin.  through its projects, the Council encourages a good quality of life by helping decision makers and residents make responsible decisions about how we live, work and play in the Basin.  the Council does not take a position on any issue; rather it remains an advocate only for the sustainability of the Basin.  It accomplishes its work by acting as an impartial facilitator and brining together interests to solve sustainability challenges, drawing forth common threads of agreement upon which action can take place.  5 OGI Baseline Report 1. Introduction This report is submitted by the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in partial fulfillment of VANOC’s role in implementing the Olympic Games Impact Program (OGI) for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (2010 Winter Games). The IOC’s OGI Program includes a series of 126 indicators that measure the status of many environmental, socio-cultural and economic dimensions of the host city, region and nation. The purpose of the Program is to measure the impact of the Olympic and Paralympic Games through a consistent and comparable reporting system across all future Games, presented in a series of four reports developed by each Olympic Games Organizing Committee. The OGI Program is integrated into Games Management. Further, the third of the four OGI reports is a required volume of the Official Report of  the Olympic Games mandated by the Host City Contract. This report represents the first of four OGI reports for the 2010 Winter Games and provides a baseline against which indicator data in future reports will be compared and analyzed. Following this introduction, Section 2 of the Baseline Report provides relevant context-setting information regarding the Olympic Movement generally, and the 2010 Winter Games specifically. Section 3 provides additional information on the rationale for, and some common approaches to, measuring and reporting on sustainability. The OGI Program is described, as well as the principles, practices and approaches utilized by the OGI team in Vancouver to prepare the OGI Baseline Report in relation to the 2010 Winter Games. Section 4 offers an overview of the geographic region within which the 2010 Winter Games will occur. This is important in setting the context for the OGI indicator data. Section 5 provides a synopsis of the outcomes from the initial phase of the OGI program.  It also offers an overview of the Sustainability Management and Reporting System that VANOC has designed and implemented to monitor and report on its performance relative to its sustainability objectives. Further, this section outlines the next steps for the OGI program in Vancouver including the establishment of an OGI research partner and planned communication approaches.  Appendix A lists the context indicators that comprise the OGI Baseline Report while Appendix B presents the detailed indicator data tables for each of the OGI indicators included in the Baseline Report. Explanatory notes are provided at the beginning of  Appendix B to assist the reader in understanding the data tables.  2. The Olympic Movement, the Paralympic Movement      and the 2010 Winter Games http://www.olympic.org http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/WinterGames/Games 2.1 The Olympic Movement The Olympic Movement groups together all those who agree to be guided by the Olympic Charter and who recognize the authority of the International Olympic Committee, namely: the International Federations (IFs) for those sports included in an Olympic Games program; the National Olympic Committees (NOCs); the Organizing Committees of the Olympic Games (OCOGs); athletes, judges and referees, and all the organizations and institutions recognized by  the IOC. The goal of the Olympic Movement is to contribute to building a peaceful and better world by educating youth through sport, practiced without discrimination of any kind, in a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play. International Olympic Committee (IOC) The International Olympic Committee was founded on June 23, 1894 by the French educator Baron Pierre de Coubertin who was inspired to revive the Olympic Games of Greek antiquity. The IOC is the overarching authority of the Olympic Movement and is an international non-governmental, non-profit organization. The IOC exists to serve as an umbrella organization of the Olympic Movement. It owns all rights to the Olympic symbols, flag, motto, anthem and Olympic Games. Its primary responsibility is to supervise the organization of the summer and winter Olympic Games. The inaugural Olympic Games of the modern era opened in Athens on April 6, 1896. The first Olympic Games to take place after the First World War were held in Antwerp, Belgium in 1920. Sports included figure skating, while ice hockey made its Olympic debut. The following year, the IOC Congress decided that the organizers of the 1924 Olympic Games in France would host a separate ‘International Winter Sports Week,’ under the patronage of the IOC. This week proved to be a great success, and in 1925, the IOC decided to create separate Olympic Winter Games not connected to the Olympic Summer Games.6 Subsequently, at the 24th IOC Session held in Lisbon, Portugal in 1926, the 1924 events in Chamonix, France were retroactively designated as the first Olympic Winter Games. These first Olympic Winter Games in Chamonix attracted more than 258 athletes (11 women, 247 men) from 16 nations, competing in 16 events. Olympic Games Host Nation The IOC awards the organization of each summer and winter Olympic Games to the National Olympic Committee (NOC) of the country of the Host City and the Host City itself. For that purpose, the NOC forms an Organizing Committee for the Olympic Games (OCOG), which communicates directly with the IOC, receiving advice and instructions on hosting responsibilities. From the time of its constitution to its liquidation, the OCOG must comply with the Olympic Charter, the Host City Contract entered into (involving the IOC, the National Olympic Committee and the Host City), as well as instructions of the IOC Executive Board Agenda 21 Sport and Culture are the traditional pillars of the Olympic Games. At the Centennial Olympic Congress in 1994, the IOC created a new pillar, environment, while establishing a Sport and Environment Commission. In 1999, the IOC adopted its own version of the United Nations’ Agenda 21 for Sustainable Development. Called Sport for Sustainable Development, this statement outlines a program of action for using sport to advance sustainable development. To help implement this plan, the IOC established a formal collaboration with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The IOC version of Agenda 21 has three objectives: Improve socio-economic conditions in host communities Improve Games-based practices on environmental conservation Strengthen the inclusion of women, youth and indigenous peoples in the Games While sustainability is still a relatively new discipline within Olympic and Paralympic Organizing Committees, it is a “good fit” with the core values and ideals of the Olympic and Paralympic Movements. 2.2 The Paralympic Movement The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) was founded in 1989 and has become one of the largest sport organizations in the world. The IPC represents the vast majority of athletes with a disability. Through its ideals and activities, it seeks the continuous global promotion of the values of the Paralympic Movement, with a vision of inspiration and empowerment. • • • The Paralympic Games began after the Second World War as a sporting event intended to encourage English soldiers in wheelchairs to become active again. Over time, the Games evolved into an elite international competition involving a wide range of athletes from around the world. The first Olympic-style games for athletes with a disability – now called the Paralympic Games – were held after the Rome 1960 Olympic Summer Games. The first Paralympic Winter Games took place in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden in 1976. The Paralympic Games have taken place at the same venues as the Olympic Games since the Seoul 1988 Paralympic Summer Games in South Korea and the Albertville 1992 Paralympic Winter Games in France. In most Paralympic sports, competitors with similar disabilities compete against one another, according to the specified rules of a given sport. 2.3 The 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Host City Selection Process for the 2010 Winter Games The city of Vancouver was elected Host City of the XXI Olympic Winter Games in 2010 at the 115th IOC Session, held in Prague, Czech Republic on July 2, 2003. Eight cities applied to host the 2010 Winter Games: Andorra la Vella, Andorra; Bern, Switzerland; Harbin, China; Jaca, Spain; PyeongChang, Republic of South Korea; Salzburg, Austria; Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina; and Vancouver, Canada. Four Candidate Cities were selected from the eight Applicant Cities following an extensive applications review by a working group comprised of IOC administration members and external experts. However, one of the Candidate cities (Bern, Switzerland) withdrew its candidature shortly after it was selected. An assessment was made of each of the remaining Applicant City’s ability to stage high-level, international, multi-sport events, and their ability to organize quality Olympic Winter Games in 2010. Assessments were made against a set of 11 technical assessment criteria: government support and public opinion, general infrastructure, sports venues, Olympic Village, environmental conditions and impact, accommodation, transport, security, experience from past sports events, finance and general concept. The three Candidate Cities submitted their candidature files to the IOC in January 2003. These were subsequently analyzed in detail by the IOC Evaluation Commission. Members of the Commission also inspected the Candidate Cities before issuing a report in May 2003. The 2010 Winter Olympic Games will be held from February 12–28. The 2010 Paralympic Winter Games will be held from March 12–21. The 2010 Winter Games will be held at venues throughout the Metro Vancouver area and in Whistler. 7 OGI Baseline Report During the 2010 Olympic Winter Games, a projected 5,500 athletes and team officials will be involved in seven sports and 15 sport disciplines (alpine skiing, biathlon, bobsleigh, cross-country skiing, curling, figure skating, freestyle skiing, ice hockey, luge, Nordic combined, short track speed skating, skeleton, ski jumping, snowboard and speed skating) and 86 separate medal events. During the 2010 Paralympic Winter Games, a projected 1,350 athletes and team officials will be involved in five sports (alpine skiing, biathlon, cross-country skiing, ice sledge hockey and wheelchair curling) and 64 separate medal events. Vancouver Organizing Committee The Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) was established on September 30, 2003. VANOC’s mandate is to support and promote the development of sport in Canada by planning, organizing, financing and staging the 2010 Winter Games. In addition to the IOC-related obligations noted under ‘Olympic Games Host Nation’ above, other documents relevant to VANOC’s sustainability commitments include: 2002 – Multiparty Agreement for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games 2002-05 – a series of agreements between VANOC and the Four Host First Nations (FHFN) An Inner-City Inclusive Commitment Statement 2004-10 – requirements of federal and provincial environmental assessment legislation and project approvals VANOC is guided by a 20-member board of directors nominated by the Government of Canada, the Province of British Columbia, the City of Vancouver, the Resort Municipality of Whistler, the Canadian Olympic Committee, the Canadian Paralympic Committee and local First Nations. Vancouver 2010: ‘Sustainability in Action’ VanOC’s vision is: A stronger Canada whose spirit is raised by its passion for sport, culture and sustainability. VanOC’s mission is: To touch the soul of the nation and inspire the world by creating and delivering an extraordinary Olympic and Paralympic experience with lasting legacies. VanOC’s values are: Team: Fair play, respect, compassion, accountability and inclusion Trust: Integrity, honesty, respect, fairness and compassion Excellence: Recognition, compassion and accountability Sustainability: Financial, economic, social and environmental sustainability Creativity: Innovation, flexibility and adaptability • • • • • • • • • For the 2010 Winter Games, ‘sustainability’ means managing the social, economic and environmental impacts and opportunities of the Games to produce lasting benefits – locally and globally. VANOC recognizes the opportunity to demonstrate how sustainability, in all its aspects, can be incorporated throughout an Olympic and Paralympic Games. VANOC’s plan for the 2010 Winter Games contains specific initiatives to ensure the Games leave a positive legacy, not just for sport, but also for Canada’s environment, economy and local communities. These initiatives are based on the principle of maximizing opportunities and minimizing any negative impacts. In 2005-06, VANOC established a set of six corporate-wide sustainability performance objectives. These objectives are based on Bid Commitments, best management practices of other Organizing Committees and input from sustainability experts and key partners and stakeholders. They are now an integral part of VANOC’s strategic and business plans, and are being incorporated into the more detailed operational plans essential to delivering an extraordinary Olympic and Paralympic Games experience. VanOC’s sustainability performance objectives are: 1. accountability To behave ethically, set measurable performance targets and communicate openly about our progress and challenges To consult with external groups affected by our activities 2. environmental stewardship and Impact Reduction To conserve natural environments and manage, mitigate and offset negative impacts 3. social Inclusion and Responsibility To convene accessible Games that have a positive impact on socially and economically disadvantaged groups that otherwise would not benefit To care for our workforce, protect human rights and ensure  health and safety 4. aboriginal participation and Collaboration To partner with the Four Host First Nations to achieve an unprecedented level of Aboriginal participation in  the Games 5. Economic Benefits To demonstrate that sustainable innovation and practice makes good business sense 6. sport for sustainable living To use sport, and growing athlete and public interest in living more sustainably, to inspire action on local and global sustainability challenges • • • • • • • •8 3. Olympic Games Impact (OGI) Program 3.1 OGI Reporting Framework The IOC recognizes the importance of sustainable development and social responsibility, and as such initiated the OGI program in 2003 with objectives to: Measure the global impact1 of the Olympic Games Create a comparable benchmark across all future  Olympic Games Help those cities that are bidding for an Olympic Games and future organizers to identify potential legacies to maximize Games’ benefits The OGI program’s purpose is to enable the IOC to measure the long- term implications of Games organizations, and to analyze the impact of the Olympic Games on a given host city, region and nation. In its initial design, the OGI program utilized 154 environmental, socio- cultural and economic indicators to report on the status of the Host City, Region and Country, at multiple geographic scales, from a period beginning prior to the awarding of the Games to the Host City/Nation and ending three years following the the staging of the Games. Over the past year, following discussions with Olympic Games Organizing Committees for Torino 2006, Beijing 2008, Vancouver 2010 and London 2012, as well as the International Paralympic Committee, the IOC refined the OGI program, producing a new Technical Manual and reducing the number of indicators to 126,  while including additional information of value to the Paralympic Movement. The revised list of indicators is summarized below. • • • The OGI program includes a series of four reports comparing changes in the indicator data over time. The reports are to be prepared over the following timeline:    1.  Report 1 (Baseline*) – Prepared three years prior to the Games          (2007 for VANOC)    2.  Report 2 – Prepared one year prior to the Games         (2009 for VANOC)    3.  Report 3 – Prepared within one year after the Games         (2011 for VANOC)    4.  Report 4 – Prepared three years after the Games         (2013 for VANOC) 3.2 VANOC’s OGI Process In 2003-04, VANOC hired an external advisor to undertake a preliminary review of the initial OGI indicators. In particular, consideration was given to: potential sources of data availability of data cost implications for data collection and manipulation relevance of indicators cross-referencing the OGI indicators with locally  developed indicators for the 2010 Winter Games The results of this analysis were as follows: 72 OGI indicators were recommended for inclusion in the 2010 reporting framework (based on alignment with OCOG  management objectives and sustainability goals, as well as readily available data and modest cost implications) 25 OGI indicators were recommended for strong consideration to be included in the 2010 reporting framework (based on their relationship to OCOG objectives and sustainability goals, likelihood of available data at a reasonable cost, with potential for refinement of scope) 14 OGI indicators were recommended for potential consideration in the 2010 reporting framework (based on no direct relationship to OCOG management objectives, but possible data availability with minimal cost implications) 22 OGI indicators were not recommended for the 2010 reporting framework without substantive re-evaluation (based on poor alignment with OCOG objectives, low data availability and high cost implications) 26 OGI indicators were identified as requiring more investigation into data availability and cost implications • • • • • • • • • • Dimension of Sustainability Type of Indicator Mandatory Optional Total Environment Context 9 13 22  Event 11 1 12 Socio-Cultural Context 17 13 30  Event 12 8 18 Economic Context 16 12 28  Event 13 3 16 Sub-Totals Context 34 35 80 Event 39 12 46 Totals 73 47 126 1The term ‘global impact’ is defined as the ‘total’ or ‘holistic’ impact of the Games in the Host City, Region and Country. It does not refer to the ‘worldwide’ impact of the Games. *The Baseline Report is intended to profile the conditions of the Host City, Region and Country in the year that the NOC first applies to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games. For the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games the baseline year is 2001. Coincidentally, in Canada, 2001 was also a National Census year, which means data for a wide range of indicators are readily available for the specified time period.9 OGI Baseline Report In 2005, VANOC conducted additional analysis of the OGI indicators by referring to the external advisor’s report and undertaking its own internal review. In particular, VANOC focused its considerations on the relevance of the indicators to the 2010 Winter Games, as well as VANOC’s capacity to develop the indicators, including considerations for the cost of assembling the data. Following this review, VANOC recommended to the IOC the development of 105 indicators, including 94 OGI-specific indicators in addition to 11 locally-developed sustainability indicators. The 11 locally-developed indicators were intended to: be more directly linked to VANOC’s strategic objectives and outcomes be consistent with best practice by engaging VANOC’s partners and stakeholders focus in more detail on the Vancouver 2010 Bid Commitments pertaining to Aboriginal participation and inner-city inclusion In replying to VANOC’s recommended list of 105 indicators, the IOC reiterated its interest in comparing indicator data over time and across different Organizing Committees, and providing a broader context for understanding the impact of the Olympic and Paralympic Games on host cities and nations. The IOC restated that the ‘core’ indicators are obligatory and that replacement indicators are requested if the ‘flexible’ indicators cannot be completed. In summary, the IOC requested full implementation of the OGI indicators and/or the provision of alternate indicators where appropriate. In January 2006, VANOC established the OGI Advisory Committee (AC) to assist and provide advice to VANOC on the development of the OGI indicators and the first OGI report. The Fraser Basin Council (FBC) was retained as the Secretariat for the AC to provide advice to VANOC based on its experience with indicator development and measurement. Members of the AC included leading practitioners in the field of indicators and reporting, with representatives from the federal and provincial governments, the non-governmental sector and the academic community. The AC was invaluable in supporting the review and analysis of the OGI indicators in relation to Canadian context and capacity. This review process included identification of best available data for the OGI indicators, as well as review and analysis of indicator definitions, descriptions and methodologies. The AC also provided advice on OGI implementation and the selection of a future research partner. • • • The following is a summary of the AC process that was undertaken from January through July 2006: VANOC established the OGI Advisory Committee in  January 2006. An orientation meeting was held in February to familiarize the AC with the OGI program. Additional AC meetings were held from February 2006 through July 2006. OGI indicators were reviewed and tested by the AC, both with the group and individual members, including the OGI specifications (code, name, type, geographic scale, time period and definition/description), as well as the Canadian context (data sources, data availability in relation to OGI specifications, comments and explanatory notes, anticipated level of effort and recommended approach to address the OGI indicators). Several principles, practices and assumptions were established to guide VANOC’s approach in implementing the  OGI program. Sources of uncertainty and/or remaining questions for clarification were also identified during the review process. Further investigation was required to resolve these issues during the data acquisition phase and the subsequent preparation of the OGI Baseline Report. Data acquisition was initiated April 2006 and continued through July 2006. Ongoing updates were provided to the AC and the IOC from  April 2006 through June 2006 to seek advice on best available sources of data and to assist in the resolution of technical data- related issues. As OGI indicator worksheets were completed, necessary modifications to the data requirements were identified based on best available data sources and as definitions were developed; as part of VANOC’s implementation of the OGI program, these worksheets, modifications and definitions were reviewed with the AC and IOC staff. In July 2006, IOC staff met with representatives from the Torino, Beijing, Vancouver and London Olympic Games Organizing Committees (OCOGs) in Vancouver to discuss implementation of the OGI program. Discussions included feedback based on experience-to-date and sharing of perspectives and lessons learned with respect to measuring and reporting on the Games. There was a productive exchange between the IOC and members of the Organizing Committees and the IOC agreed to review the deliberations and consider refining the OGI program. A new list of OGI indicators was provided to VANOC in  December 2006, along with a draft Technical Manual.  • • • • • • • • • •10 2See Section 4 of this report for more precise regional definitions used for VANOC’s implementation of the OGI program. 3.3 Principles, Practices and Assumptions The following principles and practices emerged from the AC process to guide VANOC’s approach to the development of, and reporting on, OGI indicators: Utilize best available, yet affordable, indicator data within the Host City, Region and Country for the appropriate  time scale. Develop and report on OGI indicators within the capacity of VANOC and its partners and advisors. Enhance OGI indicators with relevant and locally-derived indica- tors, particularly where data and capacity limitations necessitate the inclusion of alternative regional indicators. • • • Explore ways to integrate VANOC efforts to develop  indicators and data, with regional indicator initiatives where ap- propriate, to enhance delivery of OGI. Consider reasonableness, transparency and consistency  as additional key criteria for indicator selection and development. Plan to establish data collection mechanisms for the Event indicators as part of VANOC’s ongoing programs. Beyond meeting the minimum requirements of the IOC, VANOC and the AC were interested in advancing good indicator practices by providing advice and recommendations to VANOC, the IOC and other Organizing Committees based on local and regional experience with indicator development and use. During the AC process, several assumptions were established: The baseline OGI report, to be produced in 2007, will profile conditions from the year 2001 (to the extent that data  are available). Subsequent OGI reports will be produced and published in 2009, 2011 and 2013. The OGI Baseline Report will include indicators and data, but not an analysis or interpretation of the indicator data. Analysis and interpretation in the Baseline Report is inappropriate because only baseline data (2001) will be included. The AC cautioned VANOC on the attribution of indicator trends in association with the 2010 Winter Games, particularly in regards to specific OGI indicators, which are much more likely to be affected by factors other than the 2010 Winter Games. The selection of the OGI indicators and the preparation of the Baseline Report will be grounded using the following preliminary selection criteria:                  – Data are readily available for the time period of interest                  (2001-2013)               –  Data are readily available for the defined areas of interest                    for each OGI indicator, including one or more of the                  following geographic scales: Host Nation – Canada Host Region – British Columbia and the Metro Vancouver/Squamish Lillooet Region Host City – City of Vancouver Different indicators will require varying definitions of the Host Region due to variation associated with the corresponding data sets. The Host Region may vary in scale from Metro Vancouver to the Province of British Columbia.2  • • • • • • • • • • • • Several indicators were removed from this new list of indicators and some new additions included, as well as some revised designations (from mandatory to optional and vice versa). New indicator templates were also developed for some OGI indicators. In many cases, there were substantial changes in scope to pre-existing indicators, requiring additional research and data acquisition by the VANOC OGI project team. IOC staff also advised OCOGs that they were in discussion with the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) about potential refinements to the December 2006 indicators to  include data collection relevant to IPC interests.  In May 2007, the IOC provided the final list of indicators following discussions with the IPC. This list, summarized in the table within Section 3.1 above, includes five  additional indicators plus a range of modifications to  previously-defined OGI indicators to incorporate  Paralympic-related data. Between January and April 2007, the VANOC OGI project team undertook the necessary research to address the December 2006 list of OGI indicators. This work included inserting new and previously acquired data into new OGI templates. From May 2007 to August 2007, the VANOC OGI project team compiled data to address the remaining OGI indicators identified by the IOC in May 2007. A VANOC indicator list has been prepared, assigning one of the following four designations to each of the OGI indicators:               A: Yes – completed as defined  B: Yes – completed with modifications  C: Yes – completed with substitution  D: No – cannot be completed due to data and/or      resource limitations See Appendix A for the final list of VANOC OGI Indicators. • • • •11 OGI Baseline Report 3Information sources: Statistics Canada Census 2001 website (www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/home/index.cfm) 4Urban areas are defined as areas with more than 10,000 people 5Information Sources: Statistics Canada Census 2001 website; 2001 Census Profile - British Columbia; Greater Vancouver Regional District Key Facts online (www.gvrd.bc.ca/ growth/keyfacts.htm); Squamish Lillooet Regional District Regional Growth Strategy – Base Case Report (2005) 6Data Source: BC Statistics website http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/cen01/c2001bc.asp 7Data source: City of Vancouver website (www.city.vancouver.ca); Squamish Lillooet Regional District Regional Growth Strategy – Base Case Report (2005) 4. National and Regional Context for the 2010      Winter Games 4.1 Host for the 2010 Winter Games Host Nation – Country of Canada3  Land area: Canada has a total land area of 9,984,670 square kilometres. This is almost as large as all of Europe, which is 10,390,000 square kilometres in size. Population: In 2001, the Canadian population was 30,007,094. This represented a four per cent population increase (1.16 million people) since the previous census was undertaken in 1996. In 2001, three per cent of the total Canadian population (976,310 people) was of Aboriginal/ First Nations origin. Immigrants constituted 18 per cent of Canada’s population, with the majority from the United Kingdom, China and India. By means of comparison, the population of Europe is  705,000,000 people. Urbanization: According to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Canada is one of the most urbanized nations of all OECD member countries, with 79.7 per cent of the population living in urban areas4 and only 20.3 per cent in rural areas. The urban population increased by 5.2 per cent during the 1996-2001 period, while the population living in rural areas declined by 0.4 per cent. In 2001, 15.3 million people (51 per cent of Canada’s total population at the time) were living in four major urban areas: Toronto and adjacent region known as the ‘Golden  Horseshoe’ (Ontario) Montreal and adjacent regions (Quebec) The Lower Mainland region around Vancouver, including southern Vancouver Island (British Columbia) Calgary-Edmonton Corridor (Alberta) Host Region for the 2010 Winter Games – Province of British Columbia, Metro Vancouver, Squamish-Lillooet Regional District5  Land area: British Columbia has a total land area of 952,263 square kilometres, which is similar to the combined area of Germany, France and Belgium. Metro Vancouver covers an area of 2,879 square kilometres;  the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District, which includes the Resort Municipality of Whistler and the Sea-to-Sky Corridor, incorporates 16,354 square kilometres. • • • • Population: In 2001, British Columbia had a population of 3,907,738 people, representing 13 per cent of the total Canadian population and a growth rate of 4.9 per cent during the 1996-2001 period.6 At the time, British Columbia had the third largest provincial population in Canada after Ontario (11,410,046 people) and Quebec (7,237,588 people). About four per cent of the British Columbia population (170,025 people) in 2001 was of Aboriginal/First Nation descent, while 26 per cent of British Columbia’s population (1,009,820 people) was comprised of immigrants, with 43 per cent of these immigrants born in the United Kingdom, China, India and Hong Kong. In 2001, Metro Vancouver had a population of 2,073,662, representing 50.84 per cent of BC’s population; the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District (SLRD) had a population of 33,011. Both these regions of British Columbia are experiencing population growth. Urbanization: British Columbia is highly urbanized, with 84.7 per cent of the population (3,309,853 people) living in urban areas and only 15.3 per cent (597,885 people) living in rural areas. Of the Metro Vancouver population, 97.3 per cent live in urban areas and 78 per cent of the SLRD population live in urban areas. Host City for the 2010 Winter Games – City of Vancouver and the Resort Municipality of Whistler7 Land Area: The City of Vancouver has a total land area of 114 square kilometres and the Resort Municipality of Whistler has a total area of 162 square kilometres. Population: In 2001, the City of Vancouver population was 545,671. In 2003, the Resort Municipality of Whistler population was 9,480. Whistler is the only BC municipality with a population greater  than 5,000 to be listed among the top-25 fastest-growing municipalities in Canada. In the 1996-2001 period, Whistler experienced a population growth of 24 per cent, making it the 17th fastest-growing municipality in Canada. Also, during the 1991-1996 period, Whistler’s total population increased 61 per cent, making it the fastest-growing municipality in Canada during that period. More recently, Whistler has been approaching its designed growth limits while population growth has slowed.12  OGI Baseline Report note: The Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) changed its name to Metro Vancouver in August 2007. 13 OGI Baseline Report14 4.2 Geographic Scales and Definitions for OGI The OGI program typically involves reporting on data for multiple geographic scales including one or more of the following: Country (Country of Canada) Region (see regional definitions below) City (City of Vancouver) For many of the OGI indicators, regional-scale reporting is required. Research and data acquisition relating to the OGI program has indicated that it is necessary to use varying regional scales to enable reporting on regional data for different indicators. Regional definitions were largely determined by the availability/accessibility  of data and consideration was also given to the relevance of the  data relative to the impact of the Games (the regional scale most likely to detect effects/impacts). To ensure clarity in this report, the specific definition of the regional scale for each indicator is included in the “Notes” section of each OGI indicator worksheet. The following section represents the approach to regional reporting that will ensure high-quality data, a high degree of consistency among the OGI indicators and consistent reporting among all four OGI reports for the 2010 Winter Games, with consideration of existing data limitations. Regional Definitions Four regional definitions have been used for the OGI indicators.  These include: A.  Metro Vancouver and Squamish-Lillooet Regional District – All Olympic and context activities relating to the 2010 Winter Games will be undertaken within Metro Vancouver and the Squamish- Lillooet Regional District. In some cases, data are available – and will be aggregated – for representative municipalities or monitoring sites located within the two regional districts. B.  Metro Vancouver – For some OGI indicators, data are not available for the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District; therefore, the data represent only Metro Vancouver. This results from a broader jurisdictional role within Metro Vancouver, which includes functions for solid and liquid waste management, as well as transportation. • • • Capacity is also greater within Metro Vancouver due to the urban nature of this regional district, the strong base for tax revenue and a larger staff complement. C.  Province of British Columbia (BC) – For many of the OGI indicators, data are not available at a sub-provincial scale. In such cases data will represent the provincial scale. D.  Other (Other) – There are a few exceptions to the three regional definitions described above, depending on the administrative boundaries and structure of the related databases for specific indicators. For example, some tourism indicator data are available for a tourism region characterized as Vancouver, Coast and Mountains. This administrative boundary is larger than the combined two regions in A above, but it represents a “best or closest fit” in relation to Metro Vancouver and the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District. Details are clarified and provided in the OGI indicator data worksheets. There are two primary qualifications the OGI Advisory Committee identified in relation to the geographic scale of the OGI program as it relates to the 2010 Winter Games: The geography, economy and social structure of Canada is such that the actual impact of the 2010 Winter Games may be undetectable or not attributable in some cases where indicator data are collected and analyzed on the scale of the Host Nation. The jurisdictional roles and responsibilities, within Canada, to collect and report on indicator data create challenges for VANOC in reporting on the indicators vis-à-vis the specific OGI definitions and methodologies. This is a particular challenge at a national level, where data development and collection responsibilities are often dispersed, decentralized or incomparable across different regions in Canada. Similarly, some indicator data required at the regional scale are, in fact, the responsibility of municipalities. In Metro Vancouver alone, there are 21 municipalities and one electoral area. Under such circumstances, data may or may not be available from each municipality. Further, any data that are available may vary in quality, definition, scope and accessibility. In such cases, aggregation of municipal data, to report on the regional scale, may not be appropriate or feasible. • •15 OGI Baseline Report 5. Study Outcomes and Next Steps 5.1 Study Results The work to complete the Baseline Report has been substantial. This is both a result of the number of context indicators, many of which have extensive data requirements, and also because the OGI program is evolving and improving through its initial implementation phase. The Beijing 2008, Vancouver 2010 and London 2012 OCOGs are gaining experience as they work with the OGI program – experience they have shared with the IOC. Consequently, the IOC has refined the Program in ways such as collaboration with the IPC to add indicators and data of interest and value to the Paralympic Movement. In VANOC’s case, the advice of the OGI Advisory Committee was particularly helpful in outlining the issues associated with the identification and collection of baseline information and the  potential challenges of analyzing the changes in these indicators over time. In particular, discerning the relationship between the various indicators and the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games is fundamental to identifying the extent to which changes in the OGI indicators over time can be attributed to the 2010 Winter Games.  And, while this Baseline Report is delayed from its target completion date of Games minus four years (for VANOC, delivery of this report was in 2006), the result is an improved report – one that is responsive to the changes in the OGI program that have been incorporated by the IOC and IPC. VANOC expects to complete the next three reports under the OGI program on schedule: Report 2, in 2009 – context indicators; Report 3, in 2011 – context and event indicators; and Report 4, in 2013 – context indicators. The data for the indicators have been drawn exclusively from publicly available sources. The value in this approach is that the data are reliable, repeatable, accessible and affordable. Fortunately, Canada completed a national census during the 2001 period that served as the base year for VANOC’s OGI study. This provides data for numerous social and economic indicators. The national census is repeated every five years, which will provide updated information for the 2006 and 2011 years during the OGI study period.  Sourcing data, even from public organizations, has often proved challenging, requiring extensive inquiries to find available and appropriate material to “best fit” the definition, time period and geographic scale of the defined OGI indicators. Readers of the Baseline Report will see gaps in the indicator data forms provided in Appendix B where data have either been not available or accessible. This is principally a result of Canada’s diverse jurisdictional structure, where responsibility for public information resides with a multitude of government and “near government” organizations at the local, regional, provincial and national levels. New and better sources of data may be identified as the OGI program continues and collaboration with other indicator and data practitioners evolves. Every effort will be made to incorporate this improved data into future analysis and reporting.  Appendix B in this report summarizes the indicator data and is presented in spreadsheet form as per the indicator definitions and data forms provided by the IOC with the OGI Technical Manual. The data and information presented is purely baseline data without any analysis or interpretation. Subsequent OGI reports will incorporate more descriptive, tabular and graphic presentation that conveys both the data and the impact analysis in a more reader-friendly manner.  5.2 OGI Program and VANOC’s Sustainability Management and Reporting System As previously described, the OGI program is designed to research the impact of Olympic and Paralympic Games on the Host City, region and country using a standardized set of social, economic and environmental indicators. The purpose of the program is to build a consistent and comparable database of information regarding the impact of Olympic and Paralympic Games, over time, from all Games held. This in turn will allow for improved Games management and to assist potential Host Cities prepare for the opportunity to host the Games as they put together their candidatures. In addition to undertaking OGI research and reporting, VANOC has designed and implemented its own Sustainability Management and Reporting System (SMRS) and, in June 2007, also issued its first of five annual sustainability reports. The SMRS is a corporate performance management and reporting system that supports integrated planning and delivery of VANOC’s sustainability commitments and objectives. Regular reporting to internal and external audiences allows for both continuous improvement and transparent accountability relative to the specific commitments associated with the VANOC Games. VANOC has chosen to use the internationally recognized Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) framework of performance indicators for its annual sustainability reporting.    16 5.3 Next Steps With the completion of this Baseline Report, VANOC can now turn to the next phases of the OGI program, including continued data collection and development of methodologies for data and trend analysis methodology. Key to that work will be the establishment of a long-term agreement with a research institution to undertake data assembly, analysis and report preparation over the remaining six-year period of the OGI project. For the Baseline Report, VANOC collaborated with the Fraser Basin Council to provide this research capacity, given its extensive experience in sustainability indicator reporting and its objective perspective. The Council has been an excellent partner during this first phase, however, it does not have sufficient capacity to assume this role over the balance of the OGI study period. VANOC is currently in discussions with an internationally-respected post-secondary institution about serving  as the long-term OGI research partner.  In addition to identifying a long-term research partner, VANOC will also continue to: build collaborative relationships with sustainability indicator practitioners; participate in local and national indicator networks; work with senior governments and other VANOC partners on impact information; and continue sharing OGI experiences with the IOC, the IPC, other Organizing Committees and future bid cities. Over the next four years, the Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) will also be a key participant in the OGI Study, in preparation for its responsibility in assuming and managing the study after the third report is prepared, following the conclusion of the 2010 Winter Games. The COC will guide the work of the Research Partner to ensure that the fourth and final report is completed on schedule in 2013. 5.4 Identifying a Research Partner As mentioned above, for the balance of 2007, a key outcome for the OGI Study will be the formalization of a long-term relationship with an established research institution. Creating such a relationship with a respected research group will bring professional expertise and objectivity to the research methodology development, data collection and analysis and report preparation. VANOC remains responsible for OGI program implementation in cooperation with the COC. The research partner will provide essential administrative capacity to the study, co-ordinating and harnessing the efforts of multi-disciplinary faculty, staff, and post-graduate and undergraduate students to complete the OGI work.  In addition, the research partner will collaborate with indicator practitioners inside and outside of government, as well as other OGI program participants within the Olympic Family, including the IOC, IPC, Organizing Committees and their respective research partners, as well as future bid candidate cities.   5.5 Communication The OGI program and the resulting reports are part of Games management, and, as such, are internal reports to the IOC. There has, however, been demonstrated interest in these reports from VANOC stakeholders and key members of the public. Consequently, VANOC will make the Baseline Report available to the members of the public, but upon a request-only basis. A description of the OGI program is included on the VANOC website along with contact information for individuals to request a copy or more information. Completion of the Baseline Report is expected to be communicated to key VANOC stakeholders through a sustainability newsletter in  fall 2007.  6.  Summary The balance of this OGI Baseline Report is comprised of two  appendices. The first, Appendix A, summarizes the list ofindicators to be reported on by VANOC, including some of the key characteristics of those indicators. The second, Appendix B, incorporates the completed indicator data forms. Explanatory notes are provided at the beginning of Appendix B to assist the reader in understanding the terminology and organization of the indicator data forms. This Baseline Report includes only context indicators. Event indicators will be reported in the third OGI Report, following the conclusion of the 2010 Winter Games.  If readers of this document have any comments or questions  regarding this OGI Baseline Report, they are encouraged to  contact the Sustainability team at VANOC.   OGI Baseline Report 17 Appendix A – Final List of OGI Indicators for VANOCInternational Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Appendix A Summary of OGI Context Indicators for the VANOC OGI Baseline Report A B C D Total Environment 4 11 6 1 22 Socio-Cultural 3 10 13 4 30 Economic 8 14 6 0 28 Total 15 35 25 5 80 Designation of OGI Context Indicators Key to Designation by VANOC OGI Project Team D: No - not completed due to data and/or resource limitations C: Yes - completed with substitution B: Yes - completed with modifications (may include additional data) A: Yes - completed as defined Appendix AInternational Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Field # Context Indicator Name Modifications to Metrics (See specific OGI data forms for a more detailed explanation of modifications) Designation Man. Opt. (Deletions; Substitutions; Additions) A /B /C /D En 1  Renewable freshwater use 1 Volume of water reserves per sector DNAA for both scales; Modification to sector categ ories. C En 2 Public water supply 1 Data includes non-residential water consumption. B En 3 Water quality 1 Additional monitoring categories included. Data not available for some categories. B En 4 Greenhouse gas emissions 1 Data unavailable for some GHGs for some sources, especially at regional scale. B En 5 Air quality 1 Data unavailable for some pollutants for some sites; use of local / regional parameters. B En 6 Land use change 1 Data available for the Greater Vancouver Regional District; some variation in land use categories. Substitute data on area planted for increase in forested area due to available data. B En 7 Protected areas         1 Data unavailable for some sub-variables. B En 8 Threatened species    1 Additional categories of status included; Disaggregated data unavailable by type of animal / plant; data provided for additional categories of species status. B En 9 Housing Areas        1 Homelessness data substituted for informal settlements (available for two of three areas reported); residential area in Vancouver does not include apartments. B En 10 Public Open-air leisure areas       1 1 Data on accessibility is currently unavailable based on enquiries to City, GVRD, and BCRPA. B En 11 Transport networks        1 Data pending; additional sub-variables included;  accessibility data not available. B En 12 Daily travelling distance         1 1 Data pending; additional sub-variables included; accessibility data not available; different levels of data aggregation. C En 13 Road congestion         1 AM Peak Hour substituted for monthly mean due to available data. C En 14 Energy consumption by source      1 Some categories unavailable; available data use different sub-categories of energy sources. per capita consumption calculated using total energy consumption. C En 15 Energy consumption by use          1 Available data use different sub-categories of energy use. B En 16 Energy self-sufficiency          1 Data suppression and multiple data sources results in uncertainty in calculating accurate regional and country ratios. A En 17 Raw material consumption        1 Data category modification; data unavailable for many sub-variables. C En 18 Solid waste treatment 1 Multiple regional scales reported; Data unavailable for different types and sources of waste. Data unavailable for some treatment sub-categories. C En 19 Wastewater treatment 1 Data provided in cubic metres, data unavailable in tonnes. A En 24 Olympic-induced housing 1 1 NA A En 25 Indoor air quality 1 Data not available or accessible. D En 33 New waste and wastewater treatment facilities 1 NA A Sub-Total Context Indicators 9 13 3 D: No - not completed due to data and/or resource limitations Environment - Context Indicators Key to Designation by VANOC Project Team A: Yes - completed as defined B: Yes - completed with modifications (may include additional data) C: Yes - completed with substitution Type Paralympic or Accessibility component Appendix AInternational Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Field # Event Indicator Name Modifications to Metrics Designation Man. Opt. (Deletions; Substitutions; Additions) A /B /C /D En 20 Greenhouse gas emissions of Olympic Games 1 En 21 Olympic-induced land use changes 1 En 22 Olympic venues in protected sites 1 En 23 Food production consumed during Olympic Games 1 En 24 Olympic induced housing 1 En 25 Indoor air quality 1 En 26 Capacity of Olympic facilities 1 En 27 Life-cycle inventory of Olympic facilities 1 En 28 Operating and maintenance of Olympic facilities 1 En 29 Olympic induced transport infrastructure 1 En 30 Olympic transport impacts 1 En 31 Olympic energy consumption 1 En 32 Solid waste production of Olympic Games 1 En 33 New waste and wastewater treatment facilities 1 En 34 Life-cycle inventory of the Olympic Games 1 Sub-Total EVENT indicators 13 2 Type Environment - Event Indicators (to be included in OGI Report 3) Paralympic or Accessibility component Appendix AInternational Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Field # Context Indicator Name Modifications to Metrics (See specific OGI data forms for a more detailed explanation of modifications) Designation Man. Opt. (Deletions; Substitutions; Additions) A /B /C /D Soc 1 Political representation   1 1 Data available and relevant for elected officials only; Data not applicable for minority criteria; Elections held approximately every 3- 4 years. B Soc 2 Legislative activity    1 1 Data are 0 for some sectors due to scope of jurisdiction. A Soc 3 Pressure groups          1 Pressure groups recorded are those directly related to the Olympics. Data not available for country scale. A Soc 4 Community centres and associations          1 1 Data not available for some sub-variables. B Soc 5 Minorities 1 1 Data not available for some sub-variables; not available for people with disabilities. C Soc 6 Poverty and social exclusion 1 1 Data unavailable for most sub-variables; partial data provided. C Soc 7 Education level          1 1 Data not available for some sub-variables. B Soc 8 Crime rate         1 Data unavailable by month. C Soc 9 Health 1 1 Data unavailable for morbidity rate, hospitalisation rate and life expectancy at birth for people with disabilities. B Soc 10 Nutrition           1 Mean energy intake substituted for mean calorifica value; Additional data provided by age class and gender; City and Country data unavailable. C Soc 11 Cultural activities 1 1 Data unavailable for attendance rates and accessibility. Assumption of accessibility based on building code provisions. C Soc 12 Sports and physical activities 1 1 National data aquired for winter national sports organizations membership profile. C Soc 13 School sports        1 1 Data unavailable for country scale and for primary level. C Soc 14 Available sports facilities    1 1 Data not available for all categories and not available for accessibility. Assumption of accessibility based on building code provisions. B Soc 15 Exclusion, discrimination, racism and violence in sport 1 1 Limited data available for country scale; not available for discrimination, racism or violence. C Soc 16 Top-level sportsmen and women            1 1 Data provided for winter sports at country scale. B Soc 17 Professional leagues             1 NA A Soc 18 World and continental championships           1 1 Data available on events hosted; additional research required for event details. C Soc 19 Results at the Olym. Games & world champ's        1 1 Data available for most variables; unable to acquire data on national ranking by sport. B Soc 20 National anti-doping controls 1 1 Substitution of data variables based on source data. C Soc 21 Media specializing in sport   1 Data reflects Canadian media; only current data is available. B Soc 22 Sports broadcasting            1 1 Data unavailable based on research to date. D Soc 23 Information media       1 Geographic scale defined by media distributed and accessible at that scale; international media not included due to uncertainty and variability. B Soc 24 Information and communications technology 1 Data unavailable for some variables. C Soc 31 Homeless, low-rent market and affordable housing 1 1 Data unavailable for some variables. B Type Paralympic or Accessibility component Socio-Cultural - Context Indicators D: No - not completed due to data and/or resource limitations A: Yes - completed as defined B: Yes - completed with modifications C: Yes - completed with substitution Key to Designation by VANOC Project Team Appendix AInternational Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Soc 43 Host city's media image 1 Unable to complete due to resource limitations. D Soc 44 Perceptions of people with disabilities in society 1 1 Unable to complete (survey yet to be developed by IPC). D Soc 45 Support network for disabled people 1 1 Data unavailable for per capita expenses. C Soc 46 Professional sport education for people with disabilities 1 1 Data unavailable for people/athletes with a disability; overview data provided for training and education in sport, physical education and coaching. C Soc 48 Accessibility of public services 1 1 Assumption of accessibility based on building code provisions. D  Sub-Total Context Indicators 17 13 22 Field # Event Indicator Name Modifications to Metrics Designation Man. Opt. (Deletions; Substitutions; Additions) A /B /C /D So 25 Political involvement in the organisation of the Games 1 So 26 Deferment and abandonment of public policies 1 So 27 Votes connected with the Olympic Games 1 So 28 Consultation with specific groups 1 So 29 Opinion polls 1 So 30 Participation of minorities in Olympic Games 1 So 31 Homeless, low-rent Market and affordable Housing 1 So 32 Olympic educational activities 1 So 33 Olympic arts designers and participants 1 So 34 Cultural programme 1 So 35 Recognition of Olympic logos and mascots 1 So 36 Reported Complaints about Racism, Discrimination and Violence During the Games 1 So 37 National sport development 1 So 38 Volunteers 1 So 39 Spectators 1 So 40 Attending Events - Affordable Games 1 So 41 Promotion of Minorities and Indigenous Population (Youth, Seniors, Equity Seeking Groups) 1 So 42 People working in Context Activities (non-accredited) 1 So 43 Host city's media image 1  Sub-Total Event Indicators 12 7 Type Socio-Cultural - Event Indicators (to be included in OGI Report 3) Paralympic or Accessibility component Appendix AInternational Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Field # Context Indicator Name Modifications to Metrics (See specific OGI data forms for a more detailed explanation of modifications) Designation Man. Opt. (Deletions; Substitutions; Additions) A /B /C /D Ec 1 Employment by economic activity        1 NAICs categories substituted for ISIC categories; thousands of people substituted for FTEs due to data availability. B Ec 2 Employment indicators 1 NA A Ec 3 Siize of companies      1 Data available reflect different business sizes; data on FTEs not available. B Ec 4 Quality management of companies      1 Data not available or accessible for ISO certification by company size. B Ec 5 Motor vehicle population   1 Data not available for Country scale and inacccessible for Region scale (previously purchased data has been provided for Region scale). C Ec 6 Public transport   1 1 Data for Country scale and accessibility not available. B Ec 7 Hotel infrastructure             1 1 Data unavailable for city and country scale, accessibility and different classes of accommodation. Assumption of accessibility based on building code provisions. B Ec 8 Hotel occupancy rate     1 1 Data unavailable for city scale, persons with disabilities and different classes of accommodation. C Ec 9 Tourist nights       1 Data unavailable by month. B Ec 10 Airport traffic 1 1 Data unavailable for destinations, disaggregated arrivals and departures and aircraft movements. C Ec 11 Foreign organization establishments      1 Data unavailable for public foreign organizations. B Ec 12 Hosting of international events       1 1 Data unavailable for country scale. B Ec 13 Wages          1 Data unavailable for median wages by gender and ratio. B Ec 14 GINI income distribution index       1 Data unavailable by region. B Ec 15 Consumer price index     1 1992 used as the original date of reference for calculation purposes. A Ec 16 Price indexes       1 The consumer price index for shelter was used for the housing prices index; index for water, fuel and electricity cannot be disaggregated; index for building prices not available. C Ec 17 Hotel price index 1 Data unavailable for different classes of accommodation, accessibility, and maximum rate. C Ec 18 Real estate market 1 Partial data available; not available per square metre; disaggregated data not available for new versus existing housing. C Ec 19 Economic balance (import / export)          1 NA A Ec 20 Dynamics of service activities      1 NA A Ec 21 Investment risks       1 Data not available for Euromoney indicator. B Ec 22 Foreign direct investment 1 NA A Ec 23 Economic role of the state  1 NA A Ec 24 Structure of public spending         1 Data available for different categories of public spending; some data unavailable. B Ec 25 Structure of fiscal revenue 1 Data available for more specific categories of fiscal revenue. B Ec 26 Public debt       1 Data not available at city scale; net financial debt substituted for gross financial debt due to data availability. B Ec 27 Jobs created in context and event activities 1 1 NA A Ec 44 Employability of people with disabilities 1 1 NA A Sub-Total Context Indicators 16 12 7 Key to Designation by VANOC Project Team Economic - Context Indicators A: Yes - completed as defined B: Yes - completed with modifications C: Yes - completed with substitution D: No - not completed due to data and/or resource limitations Paralympic or Accessibility component Type Appendix AInternational Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Field # Event Indicator Name Type Modifications to Metrics Designation Man. Opt. (Deletions; Substitutions; Additions) A /B /C /D Ec 27 Jobs created in Olympic and context activities 1 Ec 28 Composition of committees by sector 1 Ec 29 New Olympic-related businesses 1 Ec 30 Size and quality management of contracted companies 1 Ec 31 Olympic Family vehicles 1 Ec 32 Breakdown of visitor spending 1 Ec 33 Structure of OCOG revenue 1 Ec 34 Structure of OCOG expenditure 1 Ec 35 Total operating expenditure (Olympic activities) 1 Ec 36 Total capital expenditure (Olympic activities) 1 Ec 37 Total capital expenditure (context activities) 1 Ec 38 Total wages paid (Olympic activities) 1 Ec 39 Catalyst effect of the Games 1 Ec 40 Ratios specific to Olympic activities 1 Ec 41 Public share of expenditure (Olympic activities) 1 Ec 42 Public share of expenditure (context activities) 1 Ec 43 Tax revenue from Olympic activities 1 Sub-Totals Event Indicator 14 3 Economic - Event Indicators (to be included in OGI Report 3) Paralympic or Accessibility component Appendix AAppendix B – Baseline Results for OGI Indicators  OGI Baseline Report 18Environmental IndicatorsHeaders and Footers each OGI data form includes a standard header to identify the IOC, OGI project, OCOG and date of the report. a standard footer includes the OGI indicator number (e.g. en1). Geographic Scale The geographic scale is identified at the top of each table of data. In many cases data are provided for multiple geographic scales if requested in the OGI technical Manual and if data are available. see also section 4.2 of the report for a description and reference map. the following are the typical geographic scales for this OGI report: Time Period to the extent possible, data are presented for the reference year 2001 as per the OGI technical Manual. Where data are unavailable for 2001, data are presented for the next closest year. In some cases, data for different variables from different sources may relate to different time periods. this is indicated within the spreadsheet at the applicable scale location. Data Sources Data sources are listed below the data tables. numeric values are assigned based on the order in which the data are presented within the spreadsheet (from top to bottom and from left to right). In most cases the specific source organizations are listed along with the name of the report or data product if applicable. Where web-based data were acquired, the web links are provided; however, it should be noted that website addresses are subject to change over time. In some cases individual contact names or titles have also been provided. Notes In many cases, explanatory notes are provided to assist the reader in understanding the data such as data definitions, limitations and other explanatory notes. alphabetic values are assigned based primarily on the order in which the data are presented within the spreadsheet (from top to bottom and from left to right). However, in some cases the order may have changed during the process of editing the spreadsheet or adding/deleting data during the evolution of the OGI project. these notes may also include methodological descriptions to ensure that other researchers can follow a consistent approach with future OGI reporting. DNAA – Refers to data being either unavailable (no source could be identified during the research process) or inaccessible (a very substantial research effort or cost would be required), largely due to the numerous data sources that would be involved, which substantially increases research effort and typically decreases data comparability. Where there is a mix of data and Dnaa, the acronym has been included. Where there is a dominance of Dnaa in the table, the cells are shaded with no acronym. NA – this means that the OGI data variable is not applicable. The Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) changed its name to Metro Vancouver in august 2007. References to the GVRD still exist in the appendices. Appendix B – OGI Indicator Data Forms – Explanatory Notes City Vancouver Region Greater Vancouver Regional District (RD); or Greater Vancouver RD and Squamish- Lillooet RD; or Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area; or British Columbia Country Canada International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Actual external inflow Internal flow Total renewable fresh water ressources Annual withdrawals of freshwater Total [in millions of m3] [in millions of m3] [in millions of m3] [%] Actual external inflow Internal flow Total renewable fresh water ressources Annual withdrawals of freshwater Total [in millions of m3] [in millions of m3 ] [in millions of m3] [%] Country  En1: Renewable Fresh Water Use 1 2 Please note any additional comments you may have on an attached file (Word) Region Sources 3 4 5 x En1International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Volume [m3] Ground Water Regional River Other River Volume [m3] per annum Agriculture Commercial & Institutional Industrial Domestic Other (b) TOTAL (c) Volume [m3] Ground Water Country's own River International Rivers Volume [m3] Agriculture Mining and other primary Industries Industrial Domestic TOTAL 456,505,595 100% 272,963,060 35,269,950 7.7 DNAA 110,611,520 37,661,065 Country: Canada (2) (d) 1996 TOTAL Water Reserves % of Total % of Total DNAA 24.2 8.3 59.8 Water USE  En1: Renewable Fresh Water Use Region: Greater Vancouver - Squamish Lillooet (1999) (1) (a) TOTAL Water Reserves Water Consumption 3,036,000,000 101,000,000 1,163,000,000 440,000,000 4,740,000,000 % of Total (d) Data for Canada is for 1996. Data for 2001 is not available. This data set represents the total water consumption, which is defined by the source as: "Consumption is that part of water that is evaporated, incorporated into products or crops, consumed by humans or livestock, or otherwise removed from the local hydrologic environment." 24.5 9.3 100 Sources (1) Municipal Use Database (1999). Special data aggregation by the Fraser Basin Council (2) Human Activity and the Enviornment (2003) - Statistics Canada (Table 2.1). % of Total 64.1 (c) This is the total water USE for the categories provided by the Municipal Use Database (1999) - agricultural water use is not specifically identifed by the source. 2.1 Notes: (a) Data for GVSL region is for 1999 as 2001 data is not available. Data not available for all municipalities for all categories. Data for GVSL represents water USE (which is assumed to be equal to distribution), which does not necessarily represent total "consumption". Data for annual wateruse has been calculated by the Fraser Basin Council using the daily water use figure provided in the Municipal Use Database for municipalities within the Greater Vancouver / Squamish - Lillooet Region, multiplied by 365 days per year. (b) "Other" category is not defined by the source, but it is likely this figure includes agricultural water use data. En1International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Vancouver (2001) (1) (a) Greater Vancouver  - Squamish Lillooet  ( 1999 )  ( 2 )  ( b) Canada (1999) (3, 4) (c) Data represent the % of Canadian population connected to the public water supply as reported by  responding municiaplities in 2001. % calculated from the Municiapal Use Database using categories: Percent_WPopTrt, Percent_WPopOth & Percent_WPopNoTt. This includes all residential populations served in 2001 by a water distribution system (mains). It does not include the population served by private systems (e.g. wells) or by water haulage from other jurisdictions (= 38.90%). (b) Data represent municipalities within the Greater Vancouver - Squamish Lillooet regional districts for 1999 (2001 data unavailable). 1999 population for these regions = 1,950,302. (4) Municipal Use Database 2001 - Municipal Aggregations Imputed Database; http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/use/e_data.htm. Sources Notes: (a) Per capita figures include non-residential water consumption. Vancouver Population (2001) = 545,671. 446,441,828 7,242,079,671 (3) Municipal Water Use in Canada 1999 http://www.ec.gc.ca/TKEI/air_water/watr_use_t1_e.cfm. (1) Greater Vancouver Regional District Water Consumption Statistics http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/water/pdfs/ConsumptionStatistics2004.pdf. (2) Municipal Use Database (1999). Special data aggregation by the Fraser Basin Council. 219 229 233 En2: Public Water Supply (1999; 2001) Total PWS per capita (m3 per person per year) Total Public Water Supply (PWS) (m3) 119,501,949 Population connected to PWS 100% 96.20% 61.10% (c) En2International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Concentration of intestinal enteroccoci [ISO 7899]  Concentration of Fecal Coliform (a) Kitsilano beach  (Station 501) DNAA 20-43 MPN / 100mL Kitsilano Beach (Station 502) DNAA 20 - 111 MPN / 100mL Kitsilano beach  (Station 503) DNAA 20 - 181 MPN / 100mL Kitsilano beach  (Station 542) DNAA 23 - 82MPN / 100mL Sunset Beach  (Station 401) DNAA 20 - 60 MPN/100mL Sunset Beach  (Station 402) DNAA 23 - 101 MPN / 100mL Sunset Beach  (Station 403) DNAA 26 - 187 MPN / 100mL Sunset Beach  (Station 404) DNAA 23 - 117 MPN / 100mL False Creek West End (E207815) 1-19 CFU / 100mL DNAA Concentration of nitrate (NO3/l) Total of phosphorus (P/l) Site 1 (name) DNAA DNAA Concentration of Ammonia - N (b) Concentration of Nitrite - N (c) Concentration of of orthophosphate (P/l) Fraser River (North Arm at Oak St Bridge) 0.018 - 0.06 mg/L 0.002 - 0.006 mg/L DNAA Fraser River (Near Boundary Rd) 0.028 - 0.095 mg/L 0.001 - 0.004 mg/L DNAA Fraser River (near McDonald Slough) 0.067 - 0.078 mg/L 0.004 - 0.006 mg/L DNAA Concentration of intestinal enteroccoci [ISO 7899] Concentration of Fecal Coliform (d) Ambleside Beach (Station 14) DNAA 23 - 80 MPN / 100mL Ambleside Beach (Station 16) DNAA 20 - 188 MPN / 100mL Ambleside Beach (Station 19) DNAA 20 - 123 MPN / 100mL Concentration of nitrate (NO3/l) Total of phosphorus (P/l) Site x (name) DNAA DNAA Concentration of Ammonia - N (e) Concentration of Nitrite - N (f) Concentration of of orthophosphate (P/l) Fraser River (Near Patullo Railroad Bridge) 0.051 - 0.082 mg/L 0.004 - 0.006 mg/L DNAA Fraser River (MacMillan Island) 0.015 - 0.023 mg/L 0.001 - 0.004 mg/L DNAA Fraser River (Barnston Island) 0.018 - 0.026 mg/L 0.001 - 0.005 mg/L DNAA Fraser River (Upstream Saperton bar) 0.013 - 0.023 mg/L 0.002 - 0.005 mg/L DNAA Sources Number of sites monitored Euthrophisation of lakes and ponds Euthrophisation of rivers Bathing Water Quality En3: Water Quality (2003) (1) City - Vancouver Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Bathing Water Quality Euthrophisation of lakes and ponds Euthrophisation of rivers Number of sites monitored (e) Measured between Feb 11 - Mar 27 2003. (f) Measurements taken between Feb 12 - Mar 20 2003. (1) Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection Water Quality in BC - Objectives attainment in 2003. (a) Data represent the geometric mean from measurements taken during the main bathing season from April - October 2003. (b) Measurements taken between Feb 12 - Mar 12 2003. (c) Measurements taken between Feb 12 - Mar 20 2003. (d) Data represents the geometric mean from measurements taken during main bathing season from April - October 2003. Notes: En3International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Carbon dioxide (CO2) Methane (CH4) Nitrous oxide (N2O) Hydro- fluoro- carbons (HFC) Perfluoro- carbon (PFC) Sulphur- hexa- fluorides (SF6) Total (b) Carbon dioxide (CO2) Methane (CH4)* Nitrous oxide (N2O)* Hydro- fluoro- carbons (HFC)* Perfluoro- carbon (PFC)* Sulphur- hexa- fluorides (SF6)* Total [in millions of tonnes of CO2 per year] Sources Notes: (1) Environment Canada (2001) http://www.ec.gc.ca/pdb/ghg/query/index_e.cfm. 63.5 (2) BC Ministry of Environment State of the Environment Reporting 1999 http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/soerpt/996greenhouse/gchange.html. 24,280 DNAA 133.1 DNAA DNAA DNAA 60,800 4,320 DNAA Total [in millions of tonnes of CO2 per year] Waste treatment process En4: Greenhouse Gas Emissions 39,000 1,600 Country - Canada (2001)  (1) (a) Industrial process DNAA 3,100  (kilotonnes CO 2  equivalent) DNAA 48,020 Agricultural process Waste treatment process DNNA 280 39.3 48.8 37.6 DNAA DNAA 25,800 35,000 1,00023,000 Agricultural process Total [in millions of tonnes of CO2 per year] 3.1 Region - British Columbia (1999) (2) (d) Industrial process 4.3 (a) Data are developed, compiled, and reported annually by the Greenhouse Gas Division of Environment Canada in accordance with the requirements of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Data represent CO2 equivalents on the basis of their global warming potential (GWP). (b) Row totals have been calculated from the source data and therefore include only CO2,  CH4,  N2O,  HFCs,  and SF6 (in kilotonnes CO2 equivalent). Data for PFCs are not available. (c) Column totals have been calculated from the source data and therefore only include industrial, agricultural and waste processes. Data for energy and land use sources are not included. (d) Regional data represent the province of British Columbia in 1999. Dis-aggregated data for each greenhouse gas is not available. This figure represents all GHG's and all sectors and therefore is not comparable to the total GHG emission figure for Canada. En4International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of days when the air quality limit is exceeded divided by the total numbe r of days when validated measurements are taken (% per year) (f)   PM10 Sulphur- dioxide (SO2) Ozone (O3) Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) Fine suspended particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 micro metres or less (PM10) Canada wide standard = 30Ug/m3 24hr mean. Sulphur- dioxide (SO2) Annual WHO guideline: 0.019ppm Ozone (O3) (2) (b) NO WHO annual or daily guideline. CWS 8hr Max = 0.065 ppm. Data represent number of hours exceeding CWS in 2001 Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) Annual WHO guideline: 0.021ppm Site 2: Vancouver (Kitsilano) (1) 13 µg/m³ 0.002 ppm 0 0.021 ppm Region: Richmond Vancouver Airport (1) 13 µg/m³ 0.002 ppm 0 0.019 ppm Region: Whistler (2) 8.5 µg/m³(c) DNAA 0 0.008 ppm (d) (f) Data representing the % of days per year exceeding air quality limit is not available. City (b) Ozone data represent the number of hours the Canada Wide Standard 8-hour mean was exceeded in 2001 at specific monitoring sites within the Greater Vancouver and Squamish-Lillooet Regional Districts that are in close proximity to the Olympic sites. (1) GVRD Tecnhical Appendix Air Quality Data 2001 - Data provided GVRD Policy and Planning Department.     Sources (2) Environment Canada National Air Pollution Surveillence Network - Annual Summary for 2001. http://www.etc-cte.ec.gc.ca/napsstations/main.aspx.    Region: Greater Vancouver - Squamish Lillooet Regional Districts Region En5: Air Quality (2001) (1) (2) (a) (e) 0.005 ppm 0 0.026 ppm Site 1: Vancouver (Downtown) (1) DNAA City - Vancouver (e) The data represent specific monitoring sites within the Greater Vancouver and Squamish-Lillooet Regional Districts that are in close proximity to the Olympic sites.      (d) Data available for 6 months of year - data unavailable for other months. (c) Data available for 4 months of year - data unavailable for other months. Notes: (a) Data represents annual mean concentration unless otherwise stated, data not available for number of days exceedin g WHO guideline. En5International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % City Country Region *For urban areas, data should also be provided for the extent of derelict and contaminated land (area in km2) km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % km 2 % City Country Region *For urban areas, data should also be provided for the extent of derelict and contaminated land (area in km2) Others Others NA Notes: In iti al  s itu at io n Fin al  s itu at io n Sources Forest Industrial, commercial, and transport units Unproductive Urban fabric* Forest (1) BC Ministry of Environment. Baseline Thematic Mapping data: ArcInfo polygonal coverage btm_gvrd_utm (UTM projection). (2006).  Agricultural Urban fabric* Industrial, commercial, and transport units Agricultural TotalUnproductive En6: Land Use Changes Total En6International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Land Use Area (ha) Area (% of total) Area (ha) Area (% of total) Agriculture/Urban  Mix 17,393 4.7% NA NA Agriculture 31,733 8.6% NA NA Alpine 6,624 1.8% NA NA Avalanche Chutes 6,388 1.7% NA NA Barren Surfaces 659 0.2% NA NA Burn 0 0.0% NA NA Estuary 5,181 1.4% NA NA Forest Old (> 140 years) 68,436 18.5% NA NA Forest Young 67,399 18.2% NA NA Highway 457 0.1% NA NA Glaciers and snow 247 0.1% NA NA Fresh Water 8,831 2.4% NA NA Recently Logged 5,806 1.6% NA NA Selectively Logged 0 0.0% NA NA Mine 2,132 0.6% NA NA Recreation 1,178 0.3% NA NA River 8,363 2.3% NA NA Transmission 835 0.2% NA NA Urban 95,910 26.0% NA NA Wetland 6,140 1.7% NA NA Salt Water 35,602 9.6% NA NA  Total 369,314 100% NA NA Final Situation Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (2002) (1) En6: Land Use Changes               Initial Situation En6International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Total Area (km 2 ) % of total land area Number of listed sites DNAA DNAA (g) Data on the area of National Parks is not Available. Data request to Parks Canada was not fulfilled. Region - British Columbia (a) This includes Mt Revelstoke, Glacier, Yoho, Kootenay and Pacific Rim National Parks - data not available for Gwaii Haanas. Excludes data for Gulf Islands Reserve, which was created in 2003. (b) National Parks are a country-wide system of representative natural areas of Canadian significance. By law, they are protected for public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment, while being maintained in an unimpaired state for future generations.     (c) Strictly protected areas in this document are those that have been classified as IUCN classes I-III, other protected areas are those designated IUCN IV-VI. World Heritage Sites 100% National Historic Sites (2006) (3) En7: Protected Areas (2001; 2006) 6 Provincial Parks (2006) (1) 13.80%130,900 km 2 National Parks (2006) (2) (b) 4831.62km 2 (a) 0.01% 777 (2001) Total BC Land area 950,000 km2 World Heritage Sites (2001) DNAANational Parks (b) (g) National Historic Sites  (3) (2006) DNAA 7 793 TOTAL protected areas 6%~ 610,000 km2 DNAA 3 Country - Canada Strictly Protected Sites (2001)  (4) (c) ~ 120,000 km 2 (f) DNAA (e) (e) Two of the three World Heritage Sites straddle the border between BC and a neighbouring province. Therefore it is not possible to calculate the % area in relation to total BC land area. (f) The area for two of the three World Heritage sites is available. Data requested for Sgang Gwaay village site in Haida Gwaii BC 22 march 2007. 41 157 (2) BC Parks - www.bcparks.com. (3) Parks Canada http://www.pc.gc.ca/progs/lhn-nhs/index_E.asp. (4) Environment Canada Environment Signals National Indicators Series (2002)  - Protected Areas and Biodiversity indicator. 13 (d) Only includes area of Saguenay St. Lawrence Marine Park; area data not available for Fathom Five marine park. DNAA Notes: (1) BC Parks http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/facts/stats.html. 1850 (2002) 2 DNAA DNAA National Marine Conservation Areas (2006) DNAA Sources 1 138 km 2 (d) En7International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Invertabr ates Fishes Reptiles Amphibians Birds Mamals Vascular plants Mosses Lichens Fungi Algae Number of known species % of endangered % of vulnerable Molluscs (not Invertabr ates) Fishes Butterflies and Moths Amphibians & Reptiles Birds Mamals Vascular plants Mosses Lichens Fungi Algae Number of known species % of total endangered  % of total threatened (no vulnerable category) Invertab rates Fishes Reptiles Amphibians Birds Mamals Vascular plants Mosses Lichens Fungi Algae Number of known species % of endangered % of vulnerable Invertab rates Fishes Reptiles Amphibians Birds Mamals Vascular plants Mosses Lichens Fungi Algae Number of known s pecies % of endangered %  of vulnerable Region En8: Threatened Species Plants Animals Plants Region Animals Plants Initial Situation Final Situation Country Animals Plants Country - Canada Animals En8International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number % (f) Number % (g) Number % (h) Total Number Assessed in Canada (j) 361 100% 140 100% 5 100% Endangered (b) 20 5.5% 9 6.4% 2 40.0% Threatened (c) 14 3.9% 5 3.6% 0 0.0% Special Concern (d) 32 8.9% 3 2.1% 3 60.0% Extinct (e) 3 0.8% 0 0.0% 0 0.0% Total 69 16.0% 17 12.1% 5 100.0% Number % (f) Number % (g) Number % (h) Total Number Assessed in Canada (j) 361 100% 140 100% 5 100% Endangered (b) 52 14.4% 45 32.1% 2 40.0% Threatened (c) 43 11.9% 30 21.4% 0 0.0% Special Concern (d) 105 29.1% 43 30.7% 3 60.0% Extinct (e) 11 3.0% 0 0% 0 0.0% Total 211 58.4% 118 84.3% 5 100.0% Source Animals (a) En8: Threatened Species (2000) (1) Region - British Columbia (i) Plants Vascular plant Non-vascular plant (j)   Total includes species designated in the Extinct, Extripated, Endangered, Threatened, and Special Concern categories, as well as the Not at Risk and Data Deficient categories. (i)   Based on Historic Range of Occurrence.  Species may not be exclusive to BC. (h)  Percentage based on total number of non-vascular plants assessed in Canada = 5. (a)  Animals = Vertebrates. (b)  Endangered = A wildlife species facing imminent extirpation or extinction. (d)  Special Concern = A wildlife species that may become a threatened or an endangered species because of a combination of biological characteristics and identified threats. (e)  Extinct = A wildlife species that no longer exists. (f)   Percentage based on total number of animals assessed in Canada = 361. (g)  Percentage based on total number of vascular plants assessed in Canada = 140. (c)  Threatened = A wildlife species likely to become endangered if limiting factors are not reversed. (1) COSEWIC.  Canadian Species at Risk - November 2000.  Notes: Animals (a) Plants Vascular plant Non-vascular plant Country -  Canada En8International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 In km2 41.61 (a) DNAA Number of occupants 545,671 (b) 628 (g) Occupants per km2 13,114 (c) DNAA In km2 4.29 DNAA Number of occupants 9480 DNAA Occupants per km2 2,209 DNAA in km2 407 DNAA number of occupants 2,073,662 1,050 (h) occupants per km2 5095 DNAA En9: Housing Areas City - Vancouver 2002, 2006 (5) Residential area occupied by formal settlements Residential area occupied by informal settlements (3) (4) Ratio of living space to the number of inhabitants DNAA City - Whistler 2003 (d) (h) Data represents the 2002 homelesness count for the Greater Vancouver Regional District. Residential area occupied by informal settlements Residential area occupied by formal settlements Ratio of living space to the number of inhabitants DNAA Region - GVRD 2001, 2002 (e) Residential area occupied by formal settlements Residential area occupied by informal settlements (3) (4) Ratio of living space to the number of inhabitants DNAA (f) (1) Resort Municipality of Whistler Annual Monitoring Report 2003/04. (2) GVRD Policy and Planning Department 2001 Land Use key facts: http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/growth/keyfacts/landuse.htm. (g) Data represents the 2002 homelessness count for the City of Vancouver, including the University Endowment Lands. (a) Data includes residential area zoned: single family housing (28.5km2); single family with suite (8.55km2); and duplex, rowhouses or multifamily housing (4.56km2). Data  includes all roads and parks within these zoned areas. Data for the area zoned for apartments or multistory housing is not available from the City of Vancouver. Data represents 2006. (b) Population includes  ALL people living in the City of Vancouver area. Data for the population living in areas zoned for single family; single family with suite; or duplex, rowhouses or multifamily is not available or accessible. (c) This figure is calculated from population data for all of Vancouver as data for population living in the reported residential zoned areas is not available.  As such this number does not acurately  represent the total number of occupants per km2. (d) These data represents the Resort Municpality of Whistler for 2003. (5) City of Vancouver - Community Services Library. Sources (e) Regional data represent the Greater Vancouver Regional District and includes Single Family Residential/Duplex 363km2; Townhouses and Low-rise Apartments  40km2 and High-rise Apartments 4km2. (f)  Data on the area of living space is not available for Whistler or GVRD. Notes: (3) GVRD Homelessness Count 2002 http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/homelessness/pdfs/research_project.pdf. (4) Statistics Canada. 2001 Census. En9International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Total  number of  public open  air area  (2006) Total  Population  (2001) Total number of  public open air  area accessible  to people with  disabilities (e ) Total area of public - open air [km2] (1998)  (b) Total area of  public-open air  [km2] accessible  to people with  disabilities (e ) % compare to  the total built - up area (e ) % of the total  area complying  with criteria of  accessibilty (e ) total number of  m2 divided by  total number of  inhabitants [m2/  inhabitants] (b ) total number of  m2 accessible to  people with  disabilities  divided by total  number of  inhabitants [m2/  inhabitant s ]  (e ) Number of  inhabitants living  within 300m of  public open-air  area that is larger  than 5000m2  (optional ) City - Vancouver  (1998) 201 (1) (a ) 545,67 1 DNA A 9,710km2 (2 ) DNA A DNA A DNA A 17,794.6 1 DNA A DNA A Region - Greater  Vancouver Regional  District (2006 ) 21 (3) (c ) 2,073,66 2 DNA A 128.5 km2 (d ) DNA A DNA A DNA A 62 DNA A DNA A (d) Figure calculated from GVRD Liveable Region Strategic Plan Annual Report 2002 (2001 data), page 38. Total Greenzone Area =  205,520 ha; Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) = 53,700 ha. The ALR has been removed from the final figure for open-space leisure  areas . (e) Unable to acquire baseline data on accessibility for people with disabilities in open air leisure areas. Contacted City of  Vancouver,  Greater Vancouver Regional District, and BC Recreation and Parks Association . (3) GVRD website: http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/parks/locations.htm (2006 ) Notes : (a) This figure includes neighbourhood parks, seawall walks, major parks and botanical gardens. This figure does not include t h e Univerisity of British Columbia University Endowment Lands or any parks administered by the Greater Vancouver Regional Distric t . (b) Data calculated from table 1, pg 4 GVRD Liveable Region Strategic Plan Green Zone Issues and Policy Options document (2005 ) . This document uses data from 1998. Greenzone area of Vancouver has not changed since then . (c) This is the figure for the number of regional parks and conservation reserves managed by the Greater Vancouver Regional  District. Data for the number of open space leisure areas is not available for each municiaplity within the GVRD.  En10: Public open-air Leisure Areas (1998; 2001; 2006 ) Source s (1) City of Vancouver Parks & Gardens webpage: http://vancouver.ca/parks/parks/index.htm . (2) GVRD Liveable Region Strategic Plan Green Zone Issues and Policy Options document  (2005).  En1 0International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Usable length [km] Density [km/km2] % of compliance with accessibility criteria Usable length [km] Density [km/km2] % of compliance with accessibility criteria Waterways (e) (2001) Number of waterways: 8 (Burrard Inlet, English Bay, False Creek, Fraser River, Boundary Bay, Pitt River, Straight of Georgia, Indian Arm) Underground railways and tramways (4) (d) (2001) Sum - SkyTrain: 47.6 km Sum - SkyTrain bi-directional: 95.2 km Railways (3) (6) (7) (c) Sum - West Coast Express: 57.1 km (2001) Sum - Rail: 631.0 km (2006) Sum - Rail inside major yards: 195.0 km Sum - Rail outside major yards: 436.0 km Pedestrian streets (2001) 0 km Cycle paths (2) (b) (2006) Sum - Designated Cycling Facilities - Road: 755.5 km Sum - Designated Cycling Facilities - Off Street: 572.7 km Secondary or regional roads Highways (1) (2006) Sum - Highway, Freeway - Road: 404.6 km Sum - Highway, Freeway - Lane: 899.8 km Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Motorways (1) (a) (2006) Sum - Arterial, Collector, Local, Lane, Ramp, Strata, Restricted, Service, Recreation - Road: 9097.3 km Sum - Arterial, Collector, Local, Lane, Ramp, Strata, Restricted, Service, Recreation - Lane: 15829.4 km Waterways (e) (2001) Number of waterways: 4 (Burrard Inlet, English Bay, False Creek, Fraser River) Underground railways and tramways (4) (d) (2001) Sum - SkyTrain: 14.1 km Sum - SkyTrain bi-directional: 28.2 km Railways (3) (6) (7) (c) Sum - West Coast Express: 7.3 km (2001) Sum - Rail: 69.2 km (2006) Sum - Rail inside major yards: 19.0 km Sum - Rail outside major yards: 50.2 km Pedestrian streets (2001) 0km Cycle paths (2) (b) (2006) Sum - Designated Cycling Facilities - Road: 178.8 km Sum - Designated Cycling Facilities - Off Street: 49.4 km Secondary or regional roads Highways (1) (2006) Sum - Highway, Freeway - Road: 7.6 km Sum - Highway, Freeway - Lane: 16.9 km En11: Transport Networks (2001-2006) City - Vancouver Motorways (1) (a) (2006) Sum - Arterial, Collector, Local, Lane, Ramp, Strata, Restricted, Service, Recreation - Road: 1638.9 km Sum - Arterial, Collector, Local, Lane, Ramp, Strata, Restricted, Service, Recreation - Lane: 2807.8 km En11International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 (f) This file was used to clip the boundaries of the GVRD and Vancouver City and includes bridges. This source applies to all data. (4) SkyTline.shp (Translink) (5) GVRDcatchbridges.shp, GVRDcatchbridgesVanCity.shp (Translink) (6) RailYards.shp (Translink) (7) WCXLine.shp (Translink) (f) Specific Notes (a) Data for Motorways category includes all paved roads, excluding highways: METHODOLOGY NOTES: All the values for motorways and highways were calculated from the Digital Road Atlas (DRA, version 20060501) for 2006.  • Motorways: defined as any road that is “paved” under the RD_SURFACE field and is “Arterial, Collector, Local, Lane, Ramp, Strata, Restricted, Service, or Recreation” under the RD_CLASS field • Highways: defined as any road that is “paved” under the RD_SURFACE field and is “Highway or Freeway” under the RD_CLASS field • Road: defined as the length of roadway • Lane: defined as the length of lane km whereas the roadway length is multiplied by the NUMLANES_L and NUMLANES_R fields for each direction.  Any features with values as “R” or “N” in the NUMLANES fields had the lane kms calculated as the roadway length in only one direction. • The values “Ferry, Resource, and Trail” were not included in the calculations. (b) This figure includes both on-road and off-road cycling facilities. METHODOLOGY NOTES: All the values for cycle paths were calculated from the All_routes dataset within the Cycling_Network database for June 2006.  • Only designated routes were included • Road: defined as the length of roadway • Off Street: defined as the length of off street features. Off Street is also defined as any cycling facilities that are separ ated from vehicular traffic by a physical barrier. • It is estimated that approximately 40km (road) of new facilities are developed each year.  This would equate to ~200km since 2001. (c) This figure includes heavy-rail only (commuter and freight). METHODOLOGY NOTES: All the values for West Coast Express (WCE) were calculated from the WCE shapefile.  • The total WCE kms was calculated from this file as a simple sum of all lengths. All the values for railways were calculated from the rail_TRIM shapefile purchased in the early 1990s.  • The total rail kms was calculated from this file as a simple sum of all lengths. • Since a large portion of the rail lines are located within rail yards, a temporary file was created to arbitrarily identify m ajor rail yards. The lengths were then calculated again to determine the overall length of track inside and outside the yards separately. • This data does not distinguish between freight and passenger rail. • Due to lack of metadata, the accuracy of these numbers cannot be guaranteed. General Notes All data was purchased from Translink, which collated the data from multiple sources and prepared the custom tabulation represented on the table above. (1) roads_GVRD.shp (Translink) (2) Cycling_Network.mdb, All_routes (Translink) (3) Rail_TRIM.shp (Translink) Unable to acquire data on accessibility for people with disabilities.    (d) This figure includes the travelled length of  SkyTrain tracks: METHODOLOGY NOTES: All the values for SkyTrain were calculated from the SkyTline shapefile for June 2006. • The total SkyTrain kms was calculated from this file as a simple sum of all lengths minus ~0.8km for the VCC extension which did not exist in 2001. • The bi-directional length was calculated by doubling the length minus ~1.6km for the VCC extension which did not exist in 2001.  • The bi-directional length may be of interest as some future tracks may only consist of single directional track. City data represents the City of Vancouver including the University of British Columbia, including surrounding bodies of water to the borders at some point between two municipalities. (Total area = 115 square km) Data represent 2001 where available and is interpolated where data does not exist for 2001 period (see specific notes). Regional data represent the Greater Vancouver Regional District. (Total area = 2877 square km) Sources En11International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Total  number of  trip s Average  tim e Total number  of trip s Average  tim e Total number  of trip s Average  tim e Total number  of trip s Average  tim e Total number  of trip s Average  tim e Total number  of trip s Average tim e mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l En12: Daily travelling distanc e Regio n Walkin g Cyclin g Motorcyclin g Private ca r Tax i Collective transpor t Schoo l All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Wor k All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Recreatio n All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Social  relationshi p All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Shopping  All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Othe r All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s En1 2International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l Tax i Collective transpor t Tota l Schoo l All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Walkin g Cyclin g Motorcyclin g Private ca r Wor k All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Recreatio n All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Social  relationshi p All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Shopping  All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Othe r All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s En1 2International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y % distance in km  per capita per  da y mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l mobilit y sensor y menta l (a) Data are not available for average trip time, nor for people with disabilities, nor for distance in km per capita per day . (b) Data represent an extrapolation based on the trip diary survey. 2004 data are presented because a large sample size was ne c essary to acquire more accurate data by both mode of transportation and  purpose of trip . (c) Data for recreation and social relationships are combined as per the trip diary survey parameters of the data source . (d) Country scale data are not available.  Walkin g Collective transpor t Tota l Schoo l All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Cyclin g Motorcyclin g Private ca r Tax i Wor k All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Recreatio n All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Social  relationshi p All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Shopping  All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s Source s Notes :Othe r All the populatio n People with  disabilitie s (1) 2004 Trip Diary Survey Database (Translink) . 2 En1 2International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec AM Peak Hour (e) Duration in hours per day of very slow-moving (< 10 km/h) and stationary traffic (c) 2,720 Extent in km per day of such slow or stationary traffic (d) 17,106 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec AM Peak Hour (e) Duration in hours per day of very slow-moving (< 10 km/h) and stationary traffic (c) 8,629 Extent in km per day of such slow or stationary traffic (d) 51,651 (e) The AM Peak hour is essentially representative of the 7:30-8:30 AM time period. (a) City data represent the City of Vancouver including University of British Columbia. Data are interpolated for 2001. (b) Monthly mean data are not collected or available at either city or regional scale. Shaded cells were included in the original OGI data template, but data were unavailable so different indicator metrics were used. (f) Regional data represent the Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area, which is equivalent to the Greater Vancouver Regional District. (c) The data represents an average # of hours per day (aggregate) during the AM Peak hour that vehicles experience slow speeds (less than 10kmph) (based on days for which data were sampled, and then interpolated for all of 2001). (d) The data represents an average # of kilometres per day (aggregate) during the AM Peak hour on which these vehicles would be experiencing slow speeds (on days for which data were sampled, and then interpolated for all of 2001). Notes: Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (f) Monthly mean (b) Sources (1) EMME/2 models - various data provided by TransLink. En13: Road Congestion (2001) (1) City - Vancouver (a) Monthly mean (b) En13International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 (e) Gigajoules [Gj] Energy consumption per capita Total energy intensity per year Crude Oil x DNAA (d) Refined petroleum products 381,516,000 93.1 GJ Natural gas 282,449,000 69Gj Coals x DNAA (d) DNAA DNAA Primary electricity & hydro 212,953,000 52Gj Solar Geothermal Tidal Wind Biomass Waste Total 876,918,000 214.1Gj En14: Energy Consumption by Source (2001) (1) Renewable energy Fossil fuels Region - British Columbia (a) (c) Nuclear energy (f) En14International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Gigajoules [Gj] Energy consumption per capita Total energy intensity per year Fossil fuels Crude Oil x DNAA (d) Refined petroleum products 2,885,859,000 92.8Gj Natural gas (inlcuding gas plant natural gas liquids) 2,422,650,000 77.9Gj Coals 48,285,000 1.5Gj DNAA DNAA Primary electricity, hydro and nuclear 1,866,560,000 60Gj Solar Geothermall Tidal Wind Biomass Waste Total 7,223,354,000 232.4Gj Sources Country - Canada (b) Renewable energy Nuclear energy (g) (f) There are no nuclear power plants located in British Columbia. (g) Data for nuclear energy consumption is aggregated with primary electricity and hydro electricity. Disaggregated data for nuclear energy is not available. (e) Data categories have a similar coverage, but different degrees of aggregation and disaggregation compared with the OGI worksheet template.      (c) Regional data represent the region of British Columbia.       (d) Data not available or accessible (I.e., percentages could not be calculated because of data suppression).       x = Data supressed to meet the confidentiality requierments of the Statistics Act.       (a) 97.5% of final energy demand is represented by the three energy sources reported. (b) 97.9% of final energy demand is represented by the four energy sources reported.       (1) Statistics Canada -  CANSIM Table 128-0009 - Supply and demand of primary and secondary energy in terajoules, annual.    Notes: En14International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Sector Gigajoules Percentages Industry 448,160,000,000 41.28% Transport 344,471,000,000 31.73% Households 141,128,000,000 13.00% Commercial and Institutional (not service) 133,793,000,000 12.32% Agriculture 18,106,000,000 1.67% Total 1,085,658,000,000 100.00% Sector Gigajoules Percentages Industrial (a) 3,176,000,000 38.65% Commercial and Institutional 1,130,000,000 13.75% Transport 2,306,000,000 28.06% Households 1,399,000,000 17.03% Agriculture 206,000,000 2.51% Total 8,217,000,000 100.00% Notes: (a) Industrial aggregated data not provided - estimated from each industry sector energy use (tables provided by NRCan Office of Energy Effeciency. (b) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia.   En15: Energy Consumption by Use (2001, 2002) Region - British Columbia (2002) (1) (b) Country - Canada (2001) (2) Sources (1) Ministry of Energy and Mines report (2002). (2) NRCan - Energy Effeciency Trends in Canada 1990 - 2002 (2004) http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data _e/Trends04/chapter_2.cfm?attr=0. En15International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Gigajoule % ratio (d) Energy Imported (1) (a) 19,414,000 Energy Consumed (2) (b) 1,085,658,000,000 Gigajoule % ratio (d) Energy Imported (1) 3,326,721,000 Energy Consumed (3) (b) 8,217,000,000 (1) Statistics Canada -  CANSIM Table 128-0009 - Supply and demand o f primary and secondary energy in terajoules, annual.  (2) Ministry of Energy and Mines report (2002) Notes: En16: Energy Self-Sufficiency (2001, 2002) Value Total annual energy consumption [Gj] x 100 Ratio of the annual energy imports [Gj] (divided by) (d) This ratio is calculated from data acquired from two separate sources and therefore may not be an accurate representation of the total energy self sufficiency. 40.49% 0.0018% Region - British Columbia (2001) Country - Canada (2002) (c) (3) NRCan - Energy Effeciency Trends in Canada 1990 - 2002 (2004) http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/Trends04/cha pter_2.cfm?attr=0 (a) Data for BC are only available for imported crude oil, natural gas and primary electricty from hydro and nuclear sources; therefore total exports and imports are incomplete, and thus, inaccurate. (b) See En15 for detals of energy consumption. (c) Data represent 2002 (Data for 2001 are unavailable). Sources En16International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 In millions of $ kg per person per year kg per 1000$ of GNP In millions of $ kg per person per year kg per 1000$ of GNP Forestry products $12,519 $11,434 Lumber and wood products $32,397 $15,860 Metal Ores and Concentrates $11,332 $8,442 Primary Metal Products $36,121 $32,629 Non-metalic minerals & mineral products ( c) $15,260 $14,853 Steel Aluminium Cement Stone Sand Gravel In millions of $ kg per person per year kg per 1000$ of GNP In millions of $ kg per person per year kg per 1000$ of GNP Forestry Products $4,972 $4,807 Lumber and wood products $10,936 $3,299 Metal ores and concentrates $1,063 $340 Primary metal prodcuts $1,659 $1,712 Non-metalic minerals and mineral products (c) $1,407 $1,610 Steel Aluminium Cement Stone Sand Gravel (c) NEA data for non-metalic minerals and non-metalic mineral products combined for this category. (b) Statistics Canada National Economic Accounts (NEA) North American Industry Classification System categories used to present data. Data represent S-Level aggregation for both Canada and British Columbia. (a) Volume of raw material inputs and outputs not available  - Data for inputs and outputs only available in millions of $. Notes: En17: Raw Material Consumption (2001) (1) (a) Country - Canada (b) Sources Inputs Region: British Columbia (b) Outputs Inputs Outputs (1)  Statistics Canada National Economic Accounts - Inputs and outputs, by industry and commodity, S- level aggregation and North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), annual (dollars x 1,000,000) http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.exe. En17International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Mining and  quarrin g Sewage  sludg e Dredged  material s Household/res i dentia l Commercial  & Industria l Bottom ash  from Burnaby  Incinerato r Construction  and  demolitio n Total in tonnes  per yea r Total in kg  per person  and per year  (g) Landfil l 390,197 (a ) 32,90 0 162,370 (d ) 585,46 7 1072.9 Incineratio n Green recyclin g 45,100 (b ) 45,10 0 82.7 Dry recyclin g 28,693 (c ) 28,69 3 52.6 Special wastes  final disposa l Othe r Total in tonnes per  yea r 463,99 0 32,90 0 162,37 0 659,26 0 1208.2 Total in kg per  person and per  yea r 850 60.3 297.6 1,208 Mining and  quarrin g Sewage  sludg e Dredged  material s Househol d construction  and  demolitio n Total in tonnes  per yea r Quantity  which is  exporte d Total in kg per  person and per  year (g ) Landfil l 356,40 8 410,040 (d ) 1,023,40 9 382,194 (f ) 691.3 City - Vancouver (2001) (1 ) En18: Solid Waste Treatmen t Region - GVRD (2002) (2 ) Commercial, Light  Industrial & Institutiona l 667,00 1 En1 8International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Incineratio n 264,361 (e ) 10,15 2 127.5 Green recyclin g 125,25 4 0 238,68 6 115.1 Dry recyclin g 135,79 0 668,44 3 1,229,69 3 593 Special wastes  final disposa l Othe r Total in tonnes per  yea r 617,45 2 668,44 3 3,166,18 9 392,34 6 1,526.90 Quantity which is  exporte d 392,34 6 189.2 Total in kg per  person and per  yea r 298 520.1 1,527 189.2 (2) GVRD Solid Waste Management 2002 Annual Report http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/recycling-and-garbage/pdfs/SolidWasteManagementAnnual R eport2002.pdf.    (1) City of Vancouver Solid Waste Division Annual Report (2001) . Source s 113,43 2 Notes:  (e) This figure represents the total amount of waste from within GVRD sent to the waste-to-energy incineration  facility . 425,46 0 (a) Includes all municipal solid waste delivered to the Vancouver Landfill . (b) Includes yard waste delivered and composting activities at the Vancouver Landfil Facility . 1,205,89 3 581.5 (f) This figure represents the total amount of waste sent to the Cache Creek landfill from within GVRD. It does not  include treated flyash exported from the GVRD waste-to-energy incineration facility (10,152 tonnes) . (g) Vancouver 2001 population = 545,671 and GVRD 2001 population = 2,073,662 (Statistics Canada 2001 Census  data) . (c) Includes all recyclable material collected via the City of Vancouver Blue Box and Apartment Recycling programs . (d) Includes road construction waste and demolition waste . En1 8International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Primary wastewater treatment plants Secondary wastewater treatment plants Tertiary wastewater treatment plants Total percentage of population connected to wastewater treatment plants % of population connected 100% 0% 0% 100% Total quantity of wastewater treated in millions of m3 per year 151.8 Primary wastewater treatment plants Secondary wastewater treatment plants Tertiary wastewater treatment plants Total percentage of population connected to wastewater treatment plants % of population connected 39.30% 51.80% 0.60% 91.70% Total quantity of wastewater treated in millions of m3 per year 379.7 Sources (b) Regional data represent the Greater Vancouver and Squamish-Lillooet Regional Districts. Original data provided on a municip al basis and data were aggregated for municipalities within the region by the Fraser Basin Council.   (a) Data calculated from the average daily flow of water (sewage) collected, multiplied by 365 days to calculate annual average . City - Vancouver En19: Wastewater Treatment (1999) (1) Region - Greater Vancouver Squamish Lillooet (b) 3.65178.9197.1 Quantity of wastewater treated in millions of m3 per year (a) Total quantity of wastewater treated in millions of m3 per year (a) Notes: 00151.8 (1) Municipal Use Database, Environment Canada. Aggregated by the Fraser Basin Council (filename - MUD- FraserBasin.xls) (1999).   En19International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 % fulfilling accessibility regulations / criteria % fulfilling regulations / criteria 0 0 NA NA % fulfilling accessibility regulations / criteria % fulfilling regulations / criteria 0 0 NA NA [m²] Net floor areas of residential housing Net floor areas of residential housing Sources (1) City of Vancouver, Southeast False Creek and Olympic Village Project Office.  http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/olympicvillage/contact.htm. Built indirectly for the Olympic Games 0 0 Built directly for the Olympic Games 0 [m²] a) As of 2001, no housing had been built either directly or indirectly for the Olympic Games because the games had not yet been  awarded to Vancouver. Construction of the Olympic Village is currently in progress.  Development plans were approved in 2005.  Completion of construction is scheuduled for October 2009. Notes: Initial situation Final situation NA NA En24: Olympic Induced Housing (2001) (1) (a) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Built indirectly for the Olympic Games Initial situation Final situation City - Vancouver NA 0 Built directly for the Olympic Games NA En24International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Carbon  monoxide  (CO ) Formaldehyde Rado n Lea d Sulfate s Sulfur  dioxid e volatile  organic  compoun d s (VOC ) Particulate s Number of facilities  exceeding the  national standards  Gymnasium s V elodrome s Swimming  pool s Skatin g rink s Oth er indoo r venue s Carbon  monoxide  (CO ) Formaldehyde Rado n Lea d Sulfate s Sulfur  dioxid e volatile  organic  compoun d s (VO C ) Particulate s Number of facilities  exceeding the  national standards  Gymnasium s V elodrome s Swimming  pool s Skatin g rink s Oth er indoo r venue s (1) Personal communications with VANOC, Environment Canada, BC Ministry of Environment, Greater Vancouver Regional District, V a ncouver  Coastal Health Authority (Environmental Health), and Recreation Faciliaties Association of BC . As of 2001, no systematic indoor air quality monitoring program was in existence. Neither the BC Ministry of Environment, nor t he Greater Vancouver Regional  District monitor indoor air quality. Health Inspectors of the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority may potentially conduct some o ccasional testing if a complaint was  filed, which may have warranted testing. Voluntary guidelines and a code of practice for ice arenas were proposed by an Ad Hoc  Working Group in its 1996 report  "Indoor Air Quality in Ice Arenas." The degree to which the guidelines and code of practice have been implemented by individua l  ice arenas is unknown at this  time. As of 2007, the scope of an agreement between VANOC and Environment Canada for air quality monitoring does not currently  include indoor air quality . Source s Notes : En25: Indoor Air Quality (2001) (1) ( a ) Sport facilities in the city - Vancouv er Ozone (O3 ) Olympic venu es Ozone (O3 ) En2 5International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Name of the facility Vancouver Landfill Vancouver Landfill Localization of the project Landfill gas and flare system upgrade Leachate collection and containment system upgrade New project or already planned project Approved in 1999 Approved in 2001 Direct relation to Olympic activities or context activities No No Type of treatment Solid Waste Wastewater Date of first planning of the project Start of construction 2000 2001 End of construction 2001 2002 Openning 2001 2002 Average yearly treatment capacity Total investment $5,400,000 $1,355,000 Funding sources Name of the facility Iona Sewage Treatment Localisation of the project Enhanced primary treatment assessment upgrade New project or already planned project 2001 Direct relation to Olympic activities or context activities No Type of treatment Wastewater Date of first planning of the project Start of construction End of construction 2001 Openning 2001 Average yearly treatment capacity 200 billion litres Total investment $300,000 Funding sources (a) Liquid waste treatment facilitites are operated by the Greater Vancouver Regional District and serve the entire region. Sources Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (2) (a) (2) GVRD Recycling and Waste & Sewerage Divisions. City - Vancouver (1) En33: New Waste and Wastewater Treatment Facilities (2001) (1) City of Vancouver, Annual Report, Solid Waste Division 2002 http://vancouver.ca/engsvcs/solidwaste/PDF/ann_report2002.pdf. Notes: En33Social IndicatorsInternational Olympic Committee OGI VANOC 2007-Aug31 Women Men Total Women Men Total Party 1 - COPE NA NA NA NA NA NA 2 7 9 Party 2 - NPA NA NA NA NA NA NA 0 2 2 Party x or minorities (b) NA NA NA NA NA NA 0 0 0 Totals NA NA NA NA NA NA 2 9 11 Women Men Total Women Men Total Party 1 (Governing Party - Liberals) 5 21 26 NA NA NA 18 59 77 Party 2 (Opposition - NDP) NA NA NA NA NA NA 2 0 2 Party x or minorities (b) NA NA NA NA NA NA 0 0 0 Totals 5 21 26 NA NA NA 20 59 79 So1: Political Representation (2001; 2002) City - Vancouver (2002) (1) (a) Executive Level Legislative Level - Local Elected Officials Women Men Total Chamber 1 Chamber 2 Region - British Columbia (2001) Executive Level (3) (c) Legislative Level - Provincial Elected Officials (2) (d) Women Men Total Chamber 1 Chamber 2 (1) City of Vancouver Clerk's Department http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/ctyclerk/election2002/2002results.htm. (2) Elections BC http://www.elections.bc.ca/elections/sov01/elect_mem.htm. Notes: (3) Legislative Library of British Columbia - Cambell Cabinet 37th Parliament 2001 - 2005 Sources (b) There are no political parties that have been specifically established to represent minorities. (a) Executive level and Chamber do not apply (NA); data reflects local government officials elected in 2002. (c) Data provided is for Members of the Executive Council of the Government of British Columbia elected in 2001. There are no Opposition Party members elected to the Executive Council. (d) Data provided is for Members of the Legislative Assembly elected in 2001. Chamber does not apply. So1International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Economic 12 12 NA NA 12 12 Financial 35 35 NA NA 35 35 Institutional NA NA International NA NA Security NA NA Social 4 4 NA NA 4 4 Cultural 13 13 NA NA 13 13 Sport NA NA Environment 2 2 NA NA 2 2 Planning (b) 58 58 NA NA 58 58 Construction NA NA Energy NA NA Transport 12 12 NA NA 12 12 People with Disabilities 0 0 NA NA 0 0 OTHER 12 12 NA NA 12 12 Total 0 148 NA NA 148 148 Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Voted Implemented Economic 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Financial 7 7 0 0 1 1 8 8 Institutional 3 3 3 3 2 2 8 8 International 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Security (c) 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 Social 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cultural 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Sport 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Environment 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 Planning 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Construction 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Energy 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Transport 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 People with Disabilities 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 12 12 3 3 3 3 18 18 Notes: (a) Some of the laws above include bylaws, which are amendments to pre-existing bylaws. However, these are officially adopted as new bylaws, therefore a distinction is not made between laws and amendments. (b) City of Vancouver bylaw data for the planning policy category includes soild waste services. (c) The security policy category was considered to include all aspects of public safety, including fire fighting, which is the case for the GVRD bylaw above. Sources (1) City of Vancouver Archives Database - 2001 By-Law search: http://vancouver.ca/ctyclerk/archives/. (2) Index of Greater Vancouver Regional District Bylaws, GVRD Library. (3) Index of Greater Vancouver Water District Bylaws, GVRD Library. (4) Index of Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Bylaws, GVRD Library. Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Policies Laws - Greater Vancouver Regional District (2) Laws - Greater Vancouver Water District (3) Laws - Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District (4) TOTAL Laws - Greater Vancouver Regional District So2: Legislative Activity (2001) City - Vancouver (1) (a) Policies By-Laws Amendments Totals So2International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Definition Pressure group 1 The 'NO' Campaign A group of citizens that formed in the period preceding the Olympics Referendum to promote a negative outcome in relation to the City of Vancouver referendum on the 2010 Games. Pressure group 2 The 'YES' Campaign A group of citizens that formed in the period preceding the Olympics Referendum to promote a positive outcome in relation to the City of Vancouver referendum on the 2010 Games. Definition Pressure group 1 Impact on Community Coalition (IOCC) (1) (b) An independent organization dedicated to ensuring that environmental, social, transportation, housing, economic and civil rights issues associated with the Vancouver/Whistler 2010 Olympic Games are addressed from a community perspective. Definition Pressure group 1 (name) NA Sources (1)  IOCC Website: http://www.olympicsforall.ca/ (supplemented with local historical knowledge). Notes: (a) The NO and YES campaigns were formed in response to the public referendum held in Vancouver in 2002. These groups no longer exist and it is not possible to verify membership. (b) Data for the region represent the Greater Vancouver Regional District; although all member organizations are located in the City of Vancouver, some have a regional area of interest. So3: Pressure Groups (2002) City - Vancouver (a) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Country - Canada So3International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 City - Vancouver (2006) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (2001) Number Number So4: Community Centres and Associations (2001; 2006) Notes: (a) Data for this category includes community centres listed within GVRD (including Vancouver). It does not include sites listed as "recreation centres". (b)  Accurate, reliable, comprehensive data are not available for this category. Charitable type (2006) DNAA 38 (3) (c) (3) BC Societies Web Page: http://societies.bc.ca. (1) The Red Book 2001 - Information Services Vancouver. Ethnic type (c)  Data for this category sourced from the BC Societies Webpage by searching for organizations termed as "charitable" status. Classification is based on the location where the Charitable organization office is based, not on the geographic scope/focus of the organization. Religious type (b) DNAA DNAA (2) City of Vancouver http://vancouver.ca/parks/cc/index.htm. Sources 18 (1) 24 (1) Neighbourhood type 28 (2) 65 (1) (a) So4International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 City Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area minority 1 - Ethnic (2001) (a) population of visible minorities (1) 725,655 % of the population (1) 36.9% Political representation NA Life expectancy at birth DNAA % of population group with secondary education (4) (b) 23% City Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area minority 2 - Aboriginal (2001) population of Aboriginal identity (2) 36,860 % of the population (2) 1.9% Political representation NA Life expectancy at birth (1998-2002) (3) (b) 68.9 % of population group with secondary education (2) Male Female 45.9% 27.4% City Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area minority 3 - People with Disabilities population % of the population Political representation Life expectancy at birth % of population group with secondary education (4) Statistics Canada - 2001 Census (Education in Canada: Raising the standard). Sources (b) Data represent the life expectancy for Status Indians within the Vancouver Health Service Delivery Area. (3) BC Vital Statistics Agency. Regional Analysis of Health Statistics for Status Indians in British Columbia, 1992-2002. http://www.vs.gov.bc.ca/stats/indian/index.html. So5: Minorities (2001, 1998-2002) (1) Statistics Canada. Visible minority population, by census metropolitan areas (2001 Census.). http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/demo53e.htm. (2) Statistics Canada. Population reporting an Aboriginal identity, by age group, by census metropolitan areas (2001 Census). http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/demo41e.htm. (a) Data for ethnic minority include visible minorities based on immigrants that arrived in Canada in the 1990s. Notes: So5International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Region: Greater Vancouver Regional District (2001) Region: British Columbia (2001) Country: Canada (2001) 22.50% 19.00% 15.50% DNAA $9,400 $11,900 $24,749 $21,403 $21,435 (3) $15,160 $13,242 $13,525 Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area Region - British Columbia minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal (a) minority 3 - Disabilities minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities minority 1 - Ethnic minority 2 - Aboriginal minority 3 - Disabilities (a) Upon consultation with Statistics Canada, data appear to be unavailable with respect the specified variables for minorities . Low-income data are provided for the overall population at multiple geographic scales to provide some context for this indicator. In addition, aver age and median incomes are presented for the Aboriginal population. Notes: Sources (1) Statistics Canada - Income Trends in Canada (1995 - 2004). (2) Statistics Canada. Community Profiles. 2001 Census. (3) Statistics Canada. 2002. 2001 Census Aboriginal Population Profiles.  Released June 17, 2003. Last modified: 2005-11-30.  Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 93F0043XIE.  http://www12.statcan.ca/english/profil01/AP01/Details/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=5915022&Geo 2=PR&Code2=59&Data=Count&SearchText=Vancouver&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=59&B1=All&Custo m=. 4 5 x Social isolation Initial Final Proportion of hpousehold that lack necessities Initial Final Labour market exclusion Initial Final Service exclusion Initial Final So6: Poverty and Social Exclusion (2001) Low-income portion of the population Initial Final % of families and individuals with incomes below the LICO (1) Average after-tax income of families and individuals that are in the bottom 20% of income earners (1) Average earnings for the Aboriginal Population (2) Total Population (1) (a) Median income for the Aboriginal Population older than 15 years of age (3) So6International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Male Female Male Female total population (1) (a) 24.4% 25.3% 28.2% 27.9% minority 1 - Ethnic (3) (d) 25.2% 29.3% 25.9% 30.3% minority 2 - Aboriginal (4) 34.1% 29.4% 42.2% 36.7% minority 3 - Disabilities (5) DNAA DNAA 33.1% 24.8% total population (1) (a) 35.7% 26.9% 24.0% 27.1% minority 1 - Ethnic (3) (d) 21.7% 24.2% 20.5% 23.8% minority 2 - Aboriginal (4) 45.9% 27.4% 25.0% 26.8% minority 3 - Disabilities (5) DNAA DNAA 23.0% 26.8% total population (1) (a) 50.9% 47.8% 47.7% 45.0% minority 1 - Ethnic (3) (d) 53.2% 46.5% 53.6% 45.9% minority 2 - Aboriginal (4) 39.7% 43.3% 32.8% 36.5% minority 3 - Disabilities (5) DNAA DNAA 43.9% 48.3% Prose Literacy Document Literacy total population (a) DNAA DNAA 281 282 immigrants - mother tongue either French/English DNAA DNAA 269 269 immigrants - foreign mother tongue DNAA DNAA 234 238 (b) As children are required to attend primary education in Canada, data is only collected on the number that do not graduate.  This data therefore reflects the percentage of the population without high school graduation. (c) This represents the percentage of the population with a high school graduation certificate and/or some postsecondary qualif ications. Average Literacy Score (2003) (2) (d) Minority 1 data presented is for immigrants that arrived to Canada in the 1990s. Educational data for visible minorities is  not collected. (4) Statistics Canada - 2001 Census, Selected Educational Characteristics - Aboriginal Population.  http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/standard/themes/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?Temporal=2001&PID=73639& GID=517806&METH=1&APATH=3&PTYPE=55496&TH. (a) Total Population represents people 15 years of age and over. (5) Statistics Canada - Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (2001). Notes: Sources (1) Statistics Canada - Community Profiles, 2001.   http://www12.statcan.ca/english/Profil01/CP01/Details/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1=933__&Geo2=PR&Code2=59& Data=Count&SearchText=vancouver&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Education&Custom=. So7: Educational Level (2001; 2003) Region - Vancouver CMA (2001) Region - British Columbia (2001) Gender Gender (2) Statistics Canada - International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (2003) http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/89-617-XIE/ 89- 617-XIE2005001.pdf. (3) Statistics Canada - 2001 Census (Education in Canada: Raising the standard). % of population with primary education (b) % of population with secondary education (c) % of population with tertiary education Adult (16-65) literacy rate So7International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 All recorded crimes  (a) Serious (or violent) recorded crimes against persons Recorded crimes against property J DNAA DNAA DNAA F DNAA DNAA DNAA M DNAA DNAA DNAA A DNAA DNAA DNAA M DNAA DNAA DNAA J DNAA DNAA DNAA J DNAA DNAA DNAA A DNAA DNAA DNAA S DNAA DNAA DNAA O DNAA DNAA DNAA N DNAA DNAA DNAA D DNAA DNAA DNAA Total number per year 21,881 152,722 Ratio : total annual number of recorded crimes per year divided by 1,000 population 40.1 279.9 All recorded crimes (c) Serious (or violent) recorded crimes against persons Recorded crimes against property J F M A M J J A S O N D Total number per year 49,851 264,246 Ratio : total annual number of recorded crimes per year divided by 1,000 population 12.2 64.5 Sources (1) Statistics Canada - Canadian Crime Statistics 2001 - catalogue no. 85-205-XIE. (a) Includes all violent crimes, property crimes, other criminal code and criminal code offences recorded within the Vancouver CMA in 2001. (b) Monthly data for city and regional crime rates are not available. (c)  Includes all recorded crimes in British Columbia, including: Serious crime; property crime; criminal code offences (including traffic offences) Federal statutes and drug related offences. Notes: So8: Crime Rates (2001) (1) Total number per month (b) 470,410 862.1 Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area 514,358 125.6 Region - British Columbia Total number per month (b) So8International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Men Women Total Rate 1 DNNA DNNA 9.62 Heart diseases 120 59.5 85.8 Cancer 179.3 119.1 144.7 Stroke 53.3 37 44.3 Accidents 39.4 16.7 27.6 Chronic lower resp. disease 72.2 36.7 51 Suicide 15.8 6 10.9 Homicide DNNA DNNA 2.08 HIV 16.2 3 9.6 Others [name] DNNA DNNA DNNA Total 698.7 640.2 669.2 Rate 3 11 11 21 Rate 4 DNNA DNNA DNNA Rate 5 DNNA DNNA DNNA Total population (2) 77.2 83.0 80.1 Total people with disabilities DNNA DNNA DNNA Wheelchair user DNNA DNNA DNNA Mobility impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Visually impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Hearing impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Mentally impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Rate 7 67.6 72.0 69.7 Rate 8 DNAA DNAA 9.0% Men Women Total Rate 1 DNNA DNNA 9.7 Heart diseases 130.3 64.9 93.4 Cancer 187.4 135.2 157 Stroke 58.5 42.2 49.4 Accidents 41.5 17.7 29.3 Chronic lower resp. disease 67.4 40.3 50.8 Suicide 16 5 10.4 Homicide DNNA DNNA 2.06 HIV 41 1 2.5 Others [name] DNNA DNNA DNNA Total 710.6 658.6 684.4 Rate 3 96 71 167 Rate 4 DNNA DNNA DNNA Rate 5 DNNA DNNA 352,898 Total population (2) 78.0 82.9 80.4 Total people with disabilities DNNA DNNA DNNA Wheelchair user DNNA DNNA DNNA Mobility impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Visually impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Hearing impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Mentally impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Rate 7 67.3 70.5 68.9 Rate 8 19.1% 17.2% 18.2% So9: Health Rate 6 Life expectancy at birth (2001- 2005) Prevalence of adults who are obese (2003) (6) Death rate per 100,000 population (2001) (1) Infant mortality rate (5) Healthy Life expectance (2) (a) (b) (2001) Morbidity rate Region - British Columbia Healthy Life expectance (2001) (2) (a) Prevalence of adults who are obese (1999) (3) Life expectancy at birth Rate 6 Infant mortality rate (5) Morbidity rate Hospitalization rate per head of population Birth rate (1) Hospitalization rate per head of population (8) (d) City - Vancouver (c) Birth rate (7) Rate 2 Death rate per 100,000 population (2001) (1) Rate 2 So9International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Men Women Total Rate 1 DNNA DNNA 10.5 Heart diseases 153.9 79 111.2 Cancer 223.2 148.9 179.1 Stroke 57.8 42 48.7 Accidents 35.6 16.4 25.6 Chronic lower resp. disease 65.9 36.3 47.3 Suicide 17.9 4.9 11.3 Homicide DNNA DNNA 1,78 HIV 2.2 0.4 1.3 Others [name] DNNA DNNA DNNA Total 728.2 687.8 707.8 Rate 3 983 753 1737 Rate 4 DNNA DNNA DNNA Rate 5 DNNA DNNA 2,818,650 Total population (2) 77.0 82.1 79.6 Total people with disabilities DNNA DNNA DNNA Wheelchair user DNNA DNNA DNNA Mobility impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Visually impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Hearing impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Mentally impaired DNNA DNNA DNNA Rate 7 66.9 70.2 68.6 Rate 8 23.0% 23.0% 23.0% Rate 2 (2) Statistics Canada: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/82-221- XIE/2006001/tables/1341.htm. (2001) Rate 6 Sources (1) Statistics Canada: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/82-221- XIE/2006001/tables/1hlthsta/deaths3.htm. (2001) (3) BC Nutrition Survey - Report on Physical Activity and Body Weight (1999) (table 19). (5) Sources: Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Birth and Death Databases (2001) Birth rate (1) Infant mortality rate (5) Country Death rate per 100,000 population (2001) (1) (4) Statistics Canada - http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/050706/d050706a.htm (2004) Hospitalization rate per head of population (8) (d) Prevalence of adult who are obese (2004) (4) Life expectancy at birth Morbidity rate (d) Data is total hospitalizations; the per capita rate was not available. (7) BC Vital Statistics, 2001. Notes: (a) Disability-free life expectancy is a more comprehensive indicator than that of life expectancy because it introduces the concept of quality of life. It is used to distinguish between years of life free of any activity limitation and years experienced. (b) These data represent the City of Vancouver and the City of Richmond. Disaggregated data is not available. (8) CIHI, 2001.  http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=media_19nov2003_2_e#charts. (c) Data is for Vancouver Health Services District with the exception of the obesity data, which relates to the Vancouver CMA. (6) Statistics Canada. Canadian Community Health Survey, 2003. Healthy Life expectance (2001) (2) (a) So9International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Males City - Vancouver Age DNAA 19-30 2,883 31-50 2,624 51-70 2,324 71+ 2,013 DNAA Vegetables and Fruit Milk products Meat & alternatives grain products Region - British Columbia (2) (3) (c) 32.30% 19.90% 65.80% 56.70% Country - Canada (1) (d) 5.16 servings  1.52 servings 203 gram 5.64 servings Total number of samples that don't meet the standards Total number of control Ratio Region - Greater Vancouver Water District (e) Coliform - BC Safe Drinking Water Regulation 8 220 0.0364 Guideline Days Guideline Exceeded Turbidity (NTU=0.38-1.4) 19 13 other physical and chemical parameters 0 Turbidity (NTU=0.38-1.4) 116 14 other physical and chemical parameters 0 Turbidity (NTU=0.38-1.4) 16 14 other physical and chemical parameters 0 Country - Canada DNAA DNAA Consumption of key foods (1999; 2004) (b) Capilano Water System (f) Seymour Water System (f) Data on quality control of drinking water - Greater Vancouver Water District (2002) (4) Coquitlam Water System (f) So10: Nutrition (1999-2004) (a ) 1,669 1,508 Mean Daily Energy Intakes (kcal) (2002) Females Country - Canada DNAA DNAA Region - British Columbia (2) 1,971 1,812 So10International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Total number of samples that don't meet the standards Total number of control Ratio Region - GVRD DNAA DNAA DNAA Country - Canada DNAA DNAA DNAA Region - GVRD DNAA City - Vancouver Country - Canada DNAA Region - BC a) Due to limitations in data availability, there are variations to the requested OGI Technical Manual, including city and country scale data as well as a different presentation of data on the energy value associated with food intake. (f) Methods and terms are based on those of "Standard Methods of Water and Waste Water" 20th Edition 1998. Guidelines are taken from "Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality - Sixth Edition" Health and Welfare Canada 1996, updated to April 2002. Notes: (e) Provides a summary of the compliance of the water from GVRD member municipalities with the bacteriological requirements of the BC Safe Drinking Water Regulation (BCSDWR) in 2002. (b) Canadian adult population aged 18 years and over. (c) Proportion of BC population consuming the recommend daily intake of the food group. (d) Average amount consumed per day by Canadians. Data on the quality control of the quality of food in restaurants (g) (5) British Columbia Liquor Distribution Branch 2000/01 Annual Report: http://www.bcliquorstores.com/en/about/corp_publications/annualreport. Consumption of alcohol (2001) (5) (h) (4) The Greater Vancouver Water District Quality Control Annual Report 2002; Volume 1 (ISSN  1480-7777). (1) Nutrition: Findings from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2004): http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/82-620-MIE/2006002/tables.htm. (2)  BC Nutrition Survey (1999) http://www.healthservices.gov.bc.ca/prevent/nutrition/pdf/nutrientsreport.pdf.    (3) BC Nutrition Survey - Report on Food Group Use http://www.health.gov.bc.ca/prevent/nutrition/index.html. 28,144,169 Litres 178,381,219 Litres The daily per capita protein supply (g) Comprhensive data for the quality of food in restaurants in 2001 is not available or accessible. (h) Data represent the amount of alcohol purchased from BC Liquour Stores in 2000 / 2001. This figure does not include alcohol purchased from licensed venues or other private liquour stores. Dat a on the average amount of alcohol consumed by adults is not available. Sources So10International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Total attendance ( f)  % of total attendance concernning people with disabilities ( f) Number of venues Number of venues fulfilling accessibility criterias (g) Cinema (2) 16 Theatres (1) (b) 23 Halls (1) (c) 29 Performing Arts Venues (1) (d) 50 Museums (4) 9 Art Galleries (3) 19 Historic Buildings (5) (e) 181 Exhibition Venue 1 Total 328 Total attendance % of total attendance concernning people with disabilities ( f) Number of venues Number of venues fulfilling accessibility criterias (g) Participatio n Rate ( i) Concert 38.0% Theatrical Performance 21.4% Popular Music 22.3% Symphonic music 11.1% Cultural festival 20.5% Cultural/heritage dance 13.9% Any other kind/type of cultural event 8.3% City - City of Vancouver (2006) (a) So11: Cultural Activities (2005; 2006) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (2005) (6) (h) So11International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 (3) http://www.welcometobc.ca/vanartgalleries/index2.html. Sources (4) http://www.discovervancouver.com/museums.asp. (5) http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/commsvcs/BYLAWS/HERITAGE/Heritag e.htm. Notes: (1) City of Vancouver Performing Arts Facilities inventory 2006 http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/facility_wac/facility.exe/facilitylist_all. (2) http://www.foundlocally.com/vancouver/Entertainment/EntMovieLocations .htm. (6) Statistics Canada.  General Social Survey, 2005. (i) The data represent the percentage of the population that has attended a concert, performance, festival, etc. during the year of the survey (2005). (e) This figure represents all properties included on the City of Vancouver Council "List of Heritage Properties". These properties were designated as protected between 1974 and January 2003. Property types listed include residential, commercial, public and institutional. (h) Accurate and reliable data for region-wide cultural venues and attendance rates are not readily available or accessible. Significant effort has been made to locate these data, but sources were not reliable or reputable. (a) Data for 2001 not available. 2006 data, except Historic Buildings, which includes buidlings listed between 1974 & 2003. (b) Includes venues that may also be used for opera performances or concerts. (c) Includes venues that may also be used for concerts or theatrical performances. (d) Includes public performing arts venues such as clubs, studios, community centres, churchs and gardens. (g) The British Columbia Building Code has evolved to include the following provisions regarding accessibility: parking and door-widths (1978), washrooms (1982), all accessibility aspects (1988), all accessibility aspects integrated within the code document (1992). In addition, many buildings originally constructed prior to these building code provisions may have been retrofitted; however, there is no single source of information to confirm the number of buildings accessible. (f) Data for attendance is not collected or readily available for all venues and is not feasible to collect data from each venue. So11International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 All Sports All Sports  Total Men Women Men Women (including coaches and officials) Alpine Skiing 6,149 4,815 3,425 2,355 20,841 Biathlon 380 242 3,045 2,494 6,380 Bobsleigh and Luge 287 127 593 565 2,091 Curling 14,595 5,209 178,994 132,998 358,501 Figure Skating 2,370 37,162 35,658 105,326 187,118 Freestyle Skiing 353 119 680 359 1,726 Ice Hockey 462,288 43,421 0 0 569,393 Speed Skating 2,218 1,522 3,340 2,139 11,139 Regional sport 1 Ringette 566 24,562 711 3,299 37,081 Regional sport 2 Cross Country Skiing 3,020 2,111 24,839 20,002 54,587 Total Winter Sports 1,248,857 Aquatics Archery Athletics Badminton Baseball Basketball Boxing Canoe/Kayak Cycling Equestrian Fencing Football Gymnastics Handball Hockey Judo Modern Pentathlon Rowing Sailing Shooting Softball Table Tennis Taekwondo Tennis Triathlon So12: Sports and Physical Activities (2000) (1) City - Vancouver Number of clubs Number of clubs exclusively for people with disability Integrated clubs Club Men with disabilities Non-club Totals 611,516 520,822 Women with disabilities Club Totals Number of clubs exclusively for people with disability Women Women with disabilities Men Women Women with disabilities Men Men with disabilities Women Women with disabilities Men Women Women with disabilities Men Non-club Region - British Columbia Number of clubs Non- club Country - Canada Integrated clubs Club Non-club Totals Women Club TOTAL Women with disabilities Number of clubs Number of clubs exclusively for people with disability Integrated clubs Men with disabilities Competitors Club Non- club TOTAL Club / League Men with disabilities Winter National Sports Organizations - Membership Profile for 2000 (1) (a) TOTALMen Men with disabilities Club Non- club Men Men with disabilities Women So12International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Volleyball Weightlifting Wrestling Air sports Bandy Billard sports Boules Bowling Bridge Chess Dance sport Golf Karate Korfball Life saving Motorcycle racing Mountaineering and climbing Netball Orienteering Pelota vasca Polo Powerboating Racquetball Roller sports Rugby Squash Sumo Surfing Tug of War Underwater sports Water ski Wushu (a) Both competitors and club / league members are fee-paying registered members of the organization. The difference between th e two categories is that Competitors will engage in inter- club or inter-provincial competition (or higher) while the Club/League members may not compete at all (i.e. registered recreati onal members in cross country skiing)  or may only participate in intra-club competition (i.e. an intra-club Curling league). Notes: Sources (1) Sport Canada. Summary Report 2000. So12International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Normal schools Specific schools for people with disabilities (e) Normal schools Specific schools for people with disabilities (e) NA NA Number of school hours grades 4-7 2.38 NA NA NA Number of school hours grades 8-10 2.58 NA NA NA Number of school hours grades 4-7 2.38 NA NA NA Number of school hours grades 8-10 2.58 NA DNAA DNAA Number of school hours grades 4-7 DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of school hours grades 8-10 DNAA DNAA (e) No schools were identified that were specifically for people with disabilities. These students are typically integrated wit hin the education system. ( a) In the primary years, teachers determine time allotments for all subject areas, including physical education and sports; the refore there is variation among teachers, schools and school districts, and no central available source of data. (b) The number of hours dedicated to physical education in the secondary school curriculum is mandated at the provincial level. (c) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (d) School curriculum and time allotments are the responsibility of the provinces and therefore vary across the country (DNAA). Notes: Sources (1) BC Ministry of Education, Required Areas of Study, Recommended Time Allotments, and Graduation Requirements http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/resourcedocs/k12educationplan/k12program/k12prog_10.htm. So13: School Sports (2001) (1) Primary level (a) Secondary level (b) Number of hours per week or per year City - Vancouver Region - British Columbia (c) Country - Canada (d) So13International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Number % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Numbers % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Stadiums (a) 0 4 4 Tennis courts 0 200 (4) 200 Golf courses (b) 0 10 (3) 10 Running tracks (c) 0 0 (5) 0 Cycle racing tracks 0 0 0 Motor/Motorcycle/ Kart racetracks 0 0 0 Lakes (d) 0 0 0 Skiing pistes 0 0 0 Luge/bobsleigh runs 0 0 0 Ski jumps 0 0 0 Open-air venue (e) DNAA DNAA DNAA Gymnasiums (f) DNAA DNAA DNAA Velodromes 0 0 0 Swimming pools 0 15 (2) 15 Skating rinks 0 10 (1) 10 Indoor venue x DNAA DNAA DNAA Professional only Open to all Total numbers So14: Available Sports Facilities (2006) City - Vancouver (1) So14International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Number % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Numbers % fulfilling accessible criterias (k) Stadiums (a) 0 5 (1) (6) 5 Tennis courts (g) DNAA DNAA DNAA Golf courses (h) 0 72 (3) 72 Running tracks (c) 0 11 (5) 11 Cycle racing tracks 0 DNAA DNAA Motor/Motorcycle/ Kart racetracks 0 3 (6) 3 Lakes (d) 0 0 0 Skiing pistes (i) 0 3 3 Luge/bobsleigh runs 0 0 0 Ski jumps 0 0 0 Open-air venue (e) DNAA DNAA DNAA Gymnasiums (f) DNAA DNAA DNAA Velodromes 0 1 (6) 1 Swimming pools (l) 0 34 (2) 34 Skating rinks DNAA DNAA DNAA Indoor venue x DNAA DNAA DNAA Professional only Open to all Total Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (m) So14International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 (l) This figure represents the number of community aquatic centres and pools as listed in the Vancouver Information Services Red Book (2001). This is the only combined data source available for 2001. (m) Regional data represents the Greater Vancouver Regional District and includes facilities within the City of Vancouver. Sources (1) City of Vancouver http://vancouver.ca/parks/cc/index.htm. (2) Information Services Vancouver - Red Book (2001). (3) BC Golf Guide: www.bcgolfguide.com/search_courses.cfm. (4) Vancouver Park Board: www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/parks/info/stats/index.htm. (5) Technical Manager - Track and Field, BC Athletics, Personal Communication. (6) BC Adventure Website www.bcadventure.com/adventure/explore/vancouver/cities/burnaby.htm. Notes: (a) Includes BC Place, GM Place, Pacific Colliseum and Nat Bailey Stadium. Swanguard Stadium was added at the regional scale. (b) Includes public and private full-length courses in Vancouver area only - excludes "pitch n putt" courses. (c) This figure includes Track and Field facilities only - does not include running trails in parkland or other locations. (d) There are no lakes in the city or region that are used soley for sporting purposes. (e) Data on open air venues is unavailable. (f) Data on the number of gymnasiums in the city and region is unavailable. (g) Aggregated data for tennis courts in the region is not available. (k) The British Columbia Building Code has evolved to include the following provisions regarding accessibility: parking and door-widths (1978), washrooms (1982), all accessibility aspects (1988), all accessibility aspects integrated within the code document (1992). In addition, many buildings originally constructed prior to these building code provisions may have been retrofitted; however, there is no single source of information to confirm the number of buildings accessible. (h) Includes public and private full-length golf courses in the GVRD. (i) This includes each of the skiing facilities  in Region - not individual ski-hill runs. (j) Data were not available or accessible (DNAA) on usage per year by type of facility, as requested in the original OGI data template. So14International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Total for sport for athletes with disabilities ( c) Total (2002) (d) exclusion ( b) 1 discrimination racism violence Total for sport for athletes with disabilities ( c) Total (2002) (d) exclusion (b) 1 discrimination racism violence Total for sport for athletes with disabilities ( c) Total (2002) (d) exclusion (b) 1 discrimination racism violence Total for sport for athletes with disabilities ( c) Total (2002) (d) exclusion (b) 1 discrimination racism violence Number of reported incident Snowboard Number of reported incident Alpine Number of reported incident Bobsleigh Country - Canada (a) So15: Exclusion, Discrimination, Racism and Violence in Sport (2002) (1) Biathalon Number of reported incident So15International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Total for sport for athletes with disabilities ( c) Total (2002) (d) exclusion ( b) 1 discrimination racism violence Total for sport for athletes with disabilities ( c) Total (2002) (d) exclusion (b) 4 discrimination racism violence Swimming Number of reported incident Wrestling Number of reported incident (1) Sport Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada (SDRCC) http://www.adrsportred.ca/pdf/major_games_eng.pdf. Notes: (d) 2002 data include cases where a mediator is involved, which will be comparable with data in subsequent years. 2001 data were not used as the reference year because no mediators were involved in 2001 cases. (c) There is no found data related to disputes in sports for athletes with disabilities.   (b) Database only focuses on cases that have been filed with the SDRCC. These cases are related to disputes over selection for a team or games, and have been classified as "exclusion" disputes. (a) Cases on a provincial level are not recorded. Sources So15International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of top- level women Number of paralympic top- level women Number of top- level men Number of paralympic top- level men Total Total for paralympic top- level sportsmen and women National federation 1 National federation 2 National federation 3 National federation x Total Number of top- level women Number of paralympic top- level women Number of top- level men Number of paralympic top- level men Total Total for paralympic top- level sportsmen and women National federation 1 National federation 2 National federation 3 National federation x Total So16: Top-level Sportsmen and Women (2001, 2002) City Region So16International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of top- level women (2001) (1) Number of paralympic top- level women (2002) (2) Number of top- level men (2001) (1) Number of paralympic top- level men (2002) (2) Total top- level sportsmen and women (2001) (1) Total for paralympic top- level sportsmen and women (2) Alpine Skiing (Alpine Canada) 2 2 1 7 3 9 Bobsled & Luge (Bobsleigh and Skeleton Canada; (Canadian Luge Association) 5 0 4 0 9 0 Cross Country Skiing (Cross Country Canada) 4 2 0 1 4 3 Figure Skating (Skate Canada) 3 0 3 0 6 0 Freestyle Skiing (Canadian Freestyle Ski Association) 3 0 4 0 7 0 Snowboarding (Canadian Snowboard Federation) 1 0 1 0 2 0 Speed Skating (Speed Skating Canada) 7 0 6 0 13 0 Biathalon (Paralympic) 0 1 0 1 0 2 Sledge Hockey (Paralympic) 0 0 0 1 team 0 1 team (15 players) Total 25 5 19 9 (+ 1 Team of 15 players) 44 14 (+ 1 Team of 15 players) (1) Sport Canada. Special Data Tabulation with assistance from Senior Program Officer, Sport Canada. 2007.Sources (2) Canadian Paralympic Committee - Canadian Performance VIII Paralympic Winter Games, Salt Lake City, USA, March 7 - 16 2002.    (c) Data for paralympic sports represents results from the 2002 Winter Paralympic Games in Salt Lake City only. Top level is de fined as athletes ranked 8th place or higher at the 2002 Winter Paralympic Games. Notes: (a) Top level is defined as  athletes ranked 8th place or higher. (b) Data for relevant olympic or paralympic sport is provided, along with associated National Sport Organization or "Sporting Federartion". Country - Canada (2001, 2002) (a, b, c) So16International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Women Men National Hockey League (1) 0 1 1 Canadian Football League (2) 0 1 1 Western Hockey League (3) (b) 0 1 1 Minor League Baseball (Single A Short Season) (4) 0 1 1 United Soccer League - First Division (5) 0 1 1 United Soccer League - Women's League (5) 1 0 1 Total 1 5 6 Women Men Western Hockey League (3) 0 5 5 Western Lacrosse Association (6) 0 7 7 Total 0 12 12 Sources 1 Vancouver Canucks http://canucks.nhl.com/. 2 BC Lions http://www.bclions.com/. 4 Vancouver Canadians Baseball http://www.canadiansbaseball.com 5 United Soccer League http://www.uslsoccer.com. 3 Vancouver Giants http://www.vancouvergiants.com/ 6 Western Lacrosse Association http://www.theboxrocks.com. Region - British Columbia (c) Number of teams Total So17: Professional Leagues 2001 (a) Number of teams Total Professional League s City - Vancouver (b) The Vancouver Giants were established in 2001 with their first full season being 2001- 2002. (a) Professional league is defined by the provision of a salary for the athletes. Notes: (c) Regional data are presented for the region of British Columbia, excluding the City of Vancouver. So17International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 World or Continental  Championships  (dat e( s)) Host Cit y Total duratio n Total number of days  of competitio n Number of  event s Number of  athlete s Number of  organizer s Number of  spectator s Budget of the  competitio n Total winter sport s 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A World or Continental  Championships  (dat e( s)) Host Cit y Total duratio n Total number of days  of competitio n Number of  event s Number of  athlete s Number of  organizer s Number of  spectator s Budget of the  competitio n Biathlo n 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Bobsleig h 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Curlin g 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Ice Hocke y 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Luge 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Skatin g 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Skiin g Freestyle Ski World  Championships (January, 2001 ) Whistler, B C Disabled Skiin g Disabled Skiing World Cup  Finals (March, 2001 ) Whistler, B C Paralympic sport 2 (name ) 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Paralympic sport x (name ) 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A World or Continental  Championships  (dat e( s)) Host Cit y Total duratio n Total number of days  of competitio n Number of  event s Number of  athlete s Number of  organizer s Number of  spectator s Budget of the  competitio n Biathlo n 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Bobsleig h Skeleton, Luge & Women's  Bobsleigh World Championship  (February, 2001 ) Calgary, Albert a Curlin g 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Ice Hocke y Women's World Hock e y Championship (April, 2000 ) Mississa u ga,  Ontari o Luge See bobsleigh abov e Skatin g 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A So18: World and Continental Championships - 2000-01 (1) (a ) City (b ) Region - British Columbia (c)  Country - Canada (d ) So1 8International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Skiin g 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Snowboar d Coupe du monde de Surf des  neiges (December, 2000 ) Mont Ste-Anne,  Quebe c Paralympic sport 1 (name ) 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Paralympic sport 2 (name ) 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Paralympic sport x (name ) 0 N A N A N A N A N A N A N A N A Notes :Source s (1) Sport Canada, Hosting Program (events) database. http://www.pch.gc.ca/ . 2 3 4 5 x (a) Data were only acquired for winter sports for the fiscal year from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001 . (b) No events were hosted in the City of Vancouver . (c) Data represent the region of British Columbia . (d) Data represent events held in Canada excluding British Columbia . So1 8International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Women Men Women Men Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 1 2 2 Number of medals 0 0 0 2 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 2 8 0 4 (d) Number of medals 1 1 1 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 1 team 1 team 1 team 1 team Number of medals 1 1 1 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 1 team 1 team 1 team 1 team Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 1 6 3 6 Number of medals 4 5 4 5 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 17 23 15 15 Number of medals 3 0 2 2 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 17 13 20 22 So19: Results at the Olympic / Paralympic Games and World Championships (2000-2002) Biathlon Bobsleigh Winter sports (2001; 2002) (a) (c) Country - Canada Results at Olympic Games (1) (2) Results at World Championships (3) (b) Curling Ice Hockey Luge Skating Skiing So19International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Women Men Women Men Number of medals 7 5 DNAA DNAA National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 2 7 DNAA DNAA Number of medals 0 0 DNAA DNAA National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 1 team DNAA DNAA Number of medals 0 3 DNAA DNAA National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 2 1 DNAA DNAA Number of medals 0 0 DNAA DNAA National ranking DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 0 DNAA DNAA (4) Canadian Paralympic Committee - Canadian Performance VIII Paralympic Winter Game s Salt Lake City, USA, March 7 - 16 2002. (3) Canadian Olympic Committee - Personal communication, Assistant, High Performance. Sources Paralympic Winter Sports (2002) (a) Country - Canada Results at Olympic Games (4) Results at World Championships Alpine skiing Ice sledge hockey Nordic skiing Wheelchair curling (2) Canadian Olympic Committee http://www.olympic.org/uk/athletes/results/search_r_uk.asp. (1) Canadian Olympic Committee: http://www.olympic.ca/EN/athletes/query/form.shtml. So19International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Women Men Women Men Number of medals National ranking Number of participating athletes from the country Number of medals National ranking Number of participating athletes from the country Number of medals National ranking Number of participating athletes from the country Number of medals National ranking Number of participating athletes from the country Notes: (a) Data for Summer Sports is for the 2000 Olypmic Games held in Sydney, Australia; data for Winter  Olympic & Paralympic Sports is for the 2002 Winter Garms held in Salt Lake City, USA. (b) Data for Summer & Winter World Championships is for 2001. (c) Data for number of participating athletes is the total number of Canadian athletes or teams competing at the Olympic Games or World Championships in one sporting category. It is important to note that an athlete may compete in more than one medal event. (d) Data for recognised sports not available. Recognized sports (d) Results at  Olympic Games Results at World Championships Air sports Bandy Billard sports Boules, Etc. So19International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Women Men Women Men Number of medals 1 1 3 1 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 23 16 14 14 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 1 0 3 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 15 20 26 24 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 2 3 6 7 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 0 0 1 team Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 12 12 1 team 1 team Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 7 0 5 Aquatics Archery Athletics Summer  Sports (2000; 2001) (a) (c) Country - Canada Results at Olympic Games (1) (2) Results at World Championships (3) (b) Badminton Baseball Basketball Boxing So19International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of medals 1 1 0 1 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 7 9 5 16 Number of medals 0 0 3 1 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 8 8 10 7 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 6 0 3 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 3 1 3 7 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 0 0 1 team Number of medals 1 1 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 8 3 10 6 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 0 0 0 Canoe/kayak Cycling Equestrian Fencing Football Gymnastics Handball So19International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 1 team 1 team 1 team Number of medals 0 1 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 4 2 5 6 Modern Pentathlon Number of medals 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 12 18 12 9 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 2 7 5 3 Number of medals 0 0 1 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 5 4 7 9 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 15 0 1 team 0 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 4 2 4 4 Number of medals 1 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 1 0 4 4 Number of medals 0 1 0 0 Field Hockey Judo Sailing Shooting Softball Table tennis Taekwondo So19International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 6 4 5 5 Number of medals 0 1 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 2 1 3 3 Number of medals 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 0 4 6 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 1 1 4 4 Number of medals 0 0 0 0 National ranking DNAA DNAA DNAA DNAA Number of participating athletes from the country 0 4 0 7 Tennis Triathlon Volleyball Weightlifting Wrestling So19International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Samples collected Number of A- sample tests carried out Number of A- sample adverse analytical findings Number of B-samples analysed Number of B- sample confirmations Total doping control tests (a) Total Infractions (a) Aquatics - Swimming,                   Diving,                      Waterpolo                   Synchronized Swimmin g       150 14 30 4 Archery 17 Athletics 573 2 Badminton 4 Baseball 28 Basketball 111 1 Boxing 78 Canoe/Kaya k 64 Cycling 89 Equestrian 27 Fencing 14 Football 197 1 Gymnastics 35 Handball 18 Field Hocke y 31 1 Judo 108 Modern Pentathlon no data Rowing 48 Sailing 10 Shooting 13 Softball 24 Table Tennis 10 Taekwondo 16 1 Tennis 2 Triathlon 26 Volleyball 58 Weightlifting 45 3 Wrestling 42 Biathlon 6 1 Bobsleigh 94 1 Curling 29 Ice Hocke y 73 Luge 50  Figure Skating 42 Speed Skating 207 Skiing 12 So20: National Anti-Doping Controls (2000-2001) (1) Winter sports Country - Canada (domestic testing program) So20International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Archery Athletics Boccia Bowls Cycling Equestrian Football 5-a-Side Football 7-a-Side Goalball Judo Powerlifting Rowing Sailing Shooting Swimming Table Tennis Volleyball Wheelchair Basketball 11 Wheelchair Dance Sport Wheelchair Fencing Wheelchair Rugby Wheelchair Tennis Alpine Skiing Ice Sledge Hockey Nordic Skiing Wheelchair Curling Total for Paralympic sports (1) Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport. 2001 Year-End Statistics. http://www.cces.ca/pdfs/CCES-MR- 2001YearEndStats-E. pdf. Notes: (a) The data represent the tests and test results only for the domestic testing program. Paralympic summer sports Paralympic winter sports Sources So20International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of medias Coverage Number of medias Coverage Number of medias Coverage Number of medias Coverage Newspaper Magazines Radio stations Television channels Total Please note any additional comments you may have on an attached file (Word) So21: Media Specializing in Sport 1 2 3 Sources 4 5 x City Region Country Total So21International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 City - Vancouver Region - British Columbia Country - Canada Total (c) Number of medias Number of medias Number of medias Number of medias Newspaper/ magazines (1) 18 Radio stations (2) 3 3 10 10 Television channels (3) 2 2 18 18 Total (a) 5 5 28 46 (c) All Vancouver media are considered to be in BC and all BC media are considered to be in Canada. The totals (by media type) do not double count this circumstance. So21: Media Specializing in Sport (2007) (a) 18 (b) Notes: (a) Only current data for 2007 were available from the identified sources. (b) The same magazines are available at the national, provincial and city level. Sources (1) Magazines Canada http://www.cmpa.ca/index.php. (2) Radio Locator http://www.radio-locator.com/. (3) Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission http://support.crtc.gc.ca/broadlist/datalist.aspx?indx=10&lang=e. So21International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Original Hours Repeated Total Professional 584.2 12.5 596.7 Amateur 554.9 67.8 622.7 Live Not Live Live Not Live Aquatics Archery Athletics Badminton Baseball Basketball Boxing Canoe/Kayak Cycling Equestrian Fencing Football Gymnastics Handball Hockey Judo Modern Pentathlon Rowing Sailing Shooting Softball Table Tennis Taekwondo Tennis Triathlon Volleyball Weightlifting Wrestling Total Source (1) Canada Radio-television and Telecommunications Commision http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/BCASTING/ann_rep/annualrp.htm. So22: Sports Broadcasting (2001) (1) (a) City [minutes] Radio Broadcast Television Broadcast Total Country - Canada (a) Data is not available as requested. No data were identified at the city or regional scale.  Limited national data aggregated for amateur and professional sports was reported by one of the national broadcasters (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation), filed with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. Annual Reports of other national broadcasters were also reviewed but no additional data on sports broadcasting was identified. Notes: So22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Biathlon Bobsleigh Curling Ice Hockey Luge Skating Skiing Total TOTAL Air sports Bandy Billiard sports Boules Bowling Bridge Chess Dance sport Golf Karate Korfball Life saving Motorcycle racing Mountaineering and climbing Netball Orienteering Pelota vasca Polo Powerboating Racquetball Roller sports Rugby Squash Sumo Surfing Tug of War Underwater sports Water ski Wushu Winter sports Recognized sports So22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Archery Athletics Boccia Bowls Cycling Equestrian Football 5-a-Side Football 7-a-Side Goalball Judo Powerlifting Rowing Sailing Shooting Swimming Table Tennis Volleyball Wheelchair Basketball Wheelchair Dance Sport Wheelchair Fencing Wheelchair Rugby Wheelchair Tennis Winter Sports Alpine Skiing Ice Sledge Hockey Nordic Skiing Wheelchair Curling Total for Paralympic sports Paralympic sports So22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Live Not Live Live Not Live Aquatics Archery Athletics Badminton Baseball Basketball Boxing Canoe/Kayak Cycling Equestrian Fencing Football Gymnastics Handball Hockey Judo Modern Pentathlon Rowing Sailing Shooting Softball Table Tennis Taekwondo Tennis Triathlon Volleyball Weightlifting Wrestling Total Biathlon Bobsleigh Curling Ice Hockey Luge Skating Skiing Total TOTAL Winter sports [minutes] Radio Broadcast Television Broadcast Total Region So22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Air sports Bandy Billard sports Boules Bowling Bridge Chess Dance sport Golf Karate Korfball Life saving Motorcycle racing Mountaineering and climbing Netball Orienteering Pelota vasca Polo Powerboating Racquetball Roller sports Rugby Squash Sumo Surfing Tug of War Underwater sports Water ski Wushu Recognized sports So22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Archery Athletics Boccia Bowls Cycling Equestrian Football 5-a-Side Football 7-a-Side Goalball Judo Powerlifting Rowing Sailing Shooting Swimming Table Tennis Volleyball Wheelchair Basketball Wheelchair Dance Sport Wheelchair Fencing Wheelchair Rugby Wheelchair Tennis Winter Sports Alpine Skiing Ice Sledge Hockey Nordic Skiing Wheelchair Curling Total for Paralympic sports Paralympic sports So22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Live Not Live Live Not Live Aquatics Archery Athletics Badminton Baseball Basketball Boxing Canoe/Kayak Cycling Equestrian Fencing Football Gymnastics Handball Hockey Judo Modern Pentathlon Rowing Sailing Shooting Softball Table Tennis Taekwondo Tennis Triathlon Volleyball Weightlifting Wrestling Total Biathlon Bobsleigh Curling Ice Hockey Luge Skating Skiing Total TOTAL Winter sports Country [minutes] Radio Broadcast Television Broadcast Total So22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Air sports Bandy Billard sports Boules Bowling Bridge Chess Dance sport Golf Karate Korfball Life saving Motorcycle racing Mountaineering and climbing Netball Orienteering Pelota vasca Polo Powerboating Racquetball Roller sports Rugby Squash Sumo Surfing Tug of War Underwater sports Water ski Wushu Recognized sports So22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Archery Athletics Boccia Bowls Cycling Equestrian Football 5-a-Side Football 7-a-Side Goalball Judo Powerlifting Rowing Sailing Shooting Swimming Table Tennis Volleyball Wheelchair Basketball Wheelchair Dance Sport Wheelchair Fencing Wheelchair Rugby Wheelchair Tennis Winter Sports Alpine Skiing Ice Sledge Hockey Nordic Skiing Wheelchair Curling Total for Paralympic sports Paralympic sports So22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Absolute number Relative number 343,486 [x] Number of cable channels (2006) (d) Number of households connected to cable (2001) Public stations Commercial stations Public stations Commercial stations 1 (e) 2 (e) 7 7 Public stations Commercial stations Public stations Commercial stations Public stations Commercial stations 3 (f) (g) 0 0 21 0 26 Top 10 Newspapers by distribution Newspaper 1 Star (Toronto) Newspaper 2 Globe and Mail (Toronto) Newspaper 3 Le Journal de Montreal (Montreal) Newspaper 4 National Post (Toronto) Newspaper 5 Sun (Toronto) Newspaper 6 Sun (Vancouver) Newspaper 7 La Presse (Montreal) Newspaper 8 Province (Vancouver) Newspaper 9 Gazette (Montreal) Newspaper 10 Citizen (Ottawa) So23: Information Media (2001-2006) (a) Number of channels on national level with terrestrial distribution Number of regional stations (c) Relative number Number of newspaper - British Columbia (2006) (7) (d) Content diversity - Canada (2003) (6) 2 (b) [x] Circulation of British Columbian newspapers (2003) (6) (h) Absolute number Broadcasting stations (2006) (3, 4) (d) Cable channels (1, 2) 36 (j) 1,046,459 (i) Yes Yes Yes Yes Commited to a particular ideology / political party Neutral / independent Yes NoYes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No No Number of radio stations (5) National Regional - Greater Vancouver - Squamish- Lillooet Regional Districts (k) Local So23International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 (a) The Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission does not maintain or publish lists of radio and television stat ions. Neither does Industry Canada. (2) Shaw Communications Inc Annual Report 2001. (3) http://www.britishcolumbia.com/news/tv.html. (4) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_television_stations_in_Canada_by_call_sign.        (5) Radion Stations http://www.bcpassport.com. Notes: (e) This figure includes only those TV stations which are available nationally.         (f) Candian Broadcasting Corporation is a Crown-owned Entity (CBC includes SRC - french); therefore it is designated for the pu rposes of this data table as public.         (g) This includes CBC radio stations 1 & 2 - as well as the National CBC French radio station. These stations are available at regional and city scale, but have only been included once at country scale.       (7) http://www.world-newspapers.com/british-columbia.html. Sources (6) www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/images/pdf/Top%20100%20Daily.pdf. (b) Includes the Province and the Vancouver Sun, which are distributed province-wide. (c) This figure includes Global BC (Canwest Global is a national TV station with broadcasting in each province).  Data represen t the province of BC.       (d) Only current (2006) data available. (1) Cable stations http://www.shaw.ca/en-ca/ProductsServices/Television/ChannelsInMyArea/. (h) This figure represents the total circulation of BC newspapers provincially and nationally. It does not represent the circul ation in BC (i) This figure represnts basic subscribers within BC. Data for city scale were not available. (j) This figure represents the number of basic cable channels available in Vancouver. Regional data not available. (k) Data represent the regional districts of Squamish Lillooet and Greater Vancouver. So23International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of households equipped % of individuals Number of households equipped % of individuals total number % of individuals Fixed telephone lines (2001) 20,805,058 (1) (a) 66.9% (1) Mobile cellular phone users (2003) 68.4 (2) (b) 20,842,858 (3) (f) 65.8  (2) (b) Computer (2000) 2,673,949 (3) (e) 66.2% (2) (c) 17,891,707 (3) (g) 58.3% (2) (c) Radio receivers Television Internet acess from home (2000) 2,003,442 (3) (c) 49.6% (2) (c) 14,613,454 (3) (d) 48.7%  (2) Local / native website [per 1,000 inhabitants] (d) Calculated using 2001 Census data for Canadian population. (e) Calculated using year 2000 BC population data of 4,039,198. (g) Calculated using year 2000 Canadian population data of 30,689,035. Sources (3) Population Statistics: www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca. (2)  Literacy and Digital Technologies: Linkages and Outcomes Research Paper - Statistics Canada 2005 ISBN: 0-662-42253-8. (1) Statistics Canda Broadcasting and Telecommunications Sevice Bulletin - Vol 33 No. 4 (catalogue no. 56-001-XIE). (f) Calculated using year 2003 Canadian population data of 31,676,077. Notes: (a) Data provided for number of fixed access paths connected to the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN). 2001 data. So24: Information and Communications Technology (2000 - 2003) (b) % of individuals using cell phone technology in a typical month (2003 data). (c) 2000 data. Region - British Columbia (h)City - Vancouver Country - Canada So24International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 City - Vancouver Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Country singles 43.1% (1) 39.8% (1) 30.8% (9) seniors 15.8% (9) 22.7% (2) 15% (2) people with disabilities DNAA DNAA 47% (3) 20,133 units (4) 47,220 units (5) DNNA 8.5% (4) DNNA DNNA DNAA DNAA DNAA 0 (10) 0 (10) NA DNNA 9408 (6) DNNA 628 (7) 1121 (7) DNNA 12.4% (8) 15% (7) DNNA 559 (8) 682 (7) DNNA % of homeless with disabilities (physical) Number of places in homeless shelters (2000) %  of affordable housing and social housing units Number of new affordable housing and social housings built during the preceeding year Number of affordable housing units built for the Olympic and paralympic Games Number of households on waiting lists for social housing So31: Homeless, Low-Rent Market and Affordable Housing (2000, 2001, 2002, 2006) (8) City of Vancouver: Report to Council:  Shelterless in 2004.  http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/ctyclerk/cclerk/20040224/rr1b.htm. (5) Greater Vancovuer Regional District.  Discussion Paper on a Regional Affordable Housing Strategy for Greater Vancouver November 24, 2006.  http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/growth/pdfs/RAHS_draft_Dec2006.pdf. (4) City of Vancouver.  Report to Council:  The State of Social Housing, October 2001.  http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/ctyclerk/cclerk/011016/rr1.htm. (3) Statistics Canada.  Participation and  Activity Limitation Survey, 2001. (2) Statistics Canada, Income Trends: 1980-2005. (1) BC Stats Community Profiles. 2001. % of low income families (a) Number of affordable housing and social housing units Number of homeless people (2002) (a) The percentage of low income families represents the percent of the population that falls below the low income cut-off (LICO) rate.  Data on singles is for "unattached persons 15 years and older"; data on seniors is for those aged 65 and older; people with disabilities represents adults aged 25 to 54 with disabilities with personal incomes < $15,000. (6) Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (2004) Home Insecurity: The State of Social Housing Funding in BC.  Data from 2003 obtained from BC Housing, Administrative Data from Research and Corporate Planning.  http://policyalternatives.ca/documents/BC_O. (7) GVRD Homelessness Count, 2002. Notes: (9) Statistics Canada. CANSIM Table 202-0802 - Persons in low income. 2001. (10) City of Vancouver, Southeast False Creek and Olympic Village Project Office.  http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/olympicvillage/contact.htm. See En24. Sources So31International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Name of the media Langage of the media Circulation or audience figure (a) Resources are not available at this time to establish a media panel and implement the recommended methodology for this OGI indicator. Contact has been made with the VANOC Communications Department to consider opportunities to measure and report on this indicator. Notes: So43: Host City's Media Imag e 4 3 2 (1) No known sources for this indicator. Sources x 5 Oceania Number of media in the panel Keywords used Asia Africa America Europe Name of the software used So43International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 City Region Country Ambulant Visual Wheelchair Hearing Mental Psychological So44: Perceptions about People with Disabilities in Society 4 3 2 (1) No known sources for this indicator.  Number of people with disabilities in the sample Please add the questionnaire and the results to this file Date of the survey (a) The OGI methodology states that a questionaire is to be developed by the OCOG in conjuction with the scientific committee of the IPC. At this time, resources are not available to develop and implement the questionnaire, and no existing data sources for this information could be identified. Therefore, no data are available. Notes: x Sources 5 So44International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of People Receiving Support % of Adults with Disabilities Number of People Receiving Support % of Adults with Disabilities Number of People Receiving Support % of Adults with Disabilities Ambulant Visual Wheelchai r Hearing Mental Others (name) Ambulant Visual Wheelchai r Hearing Mental Others (name) (b) Data were unavailable for specific types of disabilities and for per capita expenses for welfare services. Rate of people who have access to support from the state (a) Per capita expenses of the country for welfare services ( ) p p g pp p y credits. (1) Statistics Canada.  Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, 2001. 276,960 Notes: Sources 9.1% So45: Support Network for Disabled People (2001) (1) (b) Country - CanadaCity - Vancouver Region - British Columbia 37,590 9.9% So45International Olympi c Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Institution s Qualification /  Degree/Diplom a Progra m Number of  graduates  per yea r Number of  professionals  employe d For athletes  with  disabilitie s For people  with  disabilitie s Tota l For  athletes  with  disabilitie s For people  with  disabilitie s Tota l A thletes with  disabilitie s People with  disabilitie s Tota l Other training  programs (2003) (1)  (b) National Coaching  Institute -  Vancouve r Qualification - Level  4 - National  Coaching  Certification  Program - NCI  Diploma in High  Performance  Coachin g Two-year  progra m University (2007) (2 ) University of  British Columbi a Undergraduate,  graduate and  doctorate program s Faculty of  Education -  School of  Human  Kinetic s Vocational trainin g Qualification 1  (name ) Institution s Qualification /  Degree/Diplom a Progra m Number of  graduates  per yea r Number of  professionals  employe d Athletes  with  disabilitie s People  with  disabilitie s Tota l Athletes  with  disabilitie s People with  disabilitie s Tota l A thletes with  disabilitie s People with  disabilitie s Tota l Other training  programs (2003) (1)  (b) National Coaching  Institutes -  Vancouver;  Victori a Qualification - Level  4 - National  Coaching  Certification  Program - NCI  Diploma in High  Performance  Coachin g Two-year  program; One - year progra m University (2007) (2 ) Qualification 1  (name ) Vocational training  (2007) (2) Douglas Colleg e Post-Degree  Diploma in Physical  Educatio n Physical  Educatio n Number of  professionals  acting as  instructor s Attendees per yea r Number of course s Duration of course s Qualificatio n Number of  professionals  acting as  instructor s Number of course s So46: Professional Sport Education for People with Disabilities (2003; 2007) (a ) Attendees per yea r Duration of course s Number of  professionals  actually  employe d Number of  professionals  actually  employe d Qualificatio n City - Vancouve r So4 6International Olympi c Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Institution s Qualification /  Degree/Diplom a Progra m Number of  graduates  per yea r Number of  professionals  employe d Athletes  with  disabilitie s People  with  disabilitie s Tota l Athletes  with  disabilitie s People with  disabilitie s Tota l A thletes with  disabilitie s People with  disabilitie s Tota l Other training  programs (2003) (1)  (b) National Coaching  Institutes - Halifax;  Calgary; Montréal;  Toronto; Saskatoon;  Toronto; Vancouver;  Victoria; Winnipe g Qualification - Level 4  - National Coaching  Certification Program  - NCI Diploma in High  Performance  Coachin g Two-year  program; One - year program;  Customized  learning  program s University of Albert a Undergraduate  program s Faculty of  Physial Eduation  and Recreatio n University of  Manitob a Bachelor of Physical  Education; Bachelor  of Kinesiology;  Master of Science;  Master of Artrs  (Recreation Studies);  PhD Applied Health  Sciences) . Faculty of  Kinesiology and  Recreation  Managemen t University of  Western Ontari o Undergraduate,  graduate and  doctorate program s Western  Kinesiology  Schoo l Vocational trainin g Qualification 1  (name ) (a) The professional sport education programs outlined may or may not have specific components that are dedicated to people / a thletes with disabilities. It is generally accepted that National Sports Organizations in Canada have a mandate and responsibi l ity to be  inclusive of people / athletes with disabilities including the education of coaches . Attendees per yea r Notes : (b) Based on research to date, no central source of data has been identified to assess this indicator using the data specifica t ions outlined above. The Nationally recognized coaching association was identified as an appropriate source of overview data. " Canada's eight  National Coaching Institutes (NCIs) offer qualified coaches a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to learn from a variety of expert s  in the fields of coaching, sport science, leadership, business, and technology and to share experiences, strategies, and chal l enges with fellow  coaches." (1 ) Number of  professionals  actually  employe d Number of  professionals  acting as  instructor s (2) Various on-line University and College Program listings. (2007) . Country - Canad a Source s Qualificatio n Number of course s Duration of course s (1) Coaching Association of Canada. 2007. Annual Report 2003-04. http://www.coach.ca . University (2007) (2 ) So4 6International Olympi c Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Number of  buildings  accessibl e % of the  total  number of  building s Number of  buildings  accessibl e % of the  total  number of  building s Number of  buildings  accessibl e % of the  total  number of  building s Number of  buildings  accessibl e % of the total  number of  building s Number of  buildings  accessibl e % of the  total  number of  building s Administration offic e s Post office s Police office s Social Office s Hospital s Airport s Others (name )  (a) The British Columbia Building Code has evolved to include the following provisions regarding accessibility: parking and do o r-widths (1978), washrooms (1982), all  accessibility aspects (1988), all accessibility aspects integrated within the code document (1992). In addition, many building s  originally constructed prior to these  building code provisions may have been retrofitted; however, there is no single source of information to confirm the number of  buildings accessible . Source s Notes : (1) Personal communication. Canadian Barrier Free Design (barrierfreedesign@dccnet.com) . City - Vancouve r Hearing impaire d Mentally impaire d So48: Accessibility of Public Services (2001) (1) (a ) Visually impaire d Wheelchair user s Mobility impaire d So4 8Economic IndicatorsInternational Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 NAICS (b) FTEs (thousands) (c) % A-Agriculture, hunting and forestry Agriculture 25.5 1.3% B-Fishing C-Mining and quarrying D-Manufacturing Manufacturing 194.9 10.1% E-Electricity, gas and water supply Utilities 10.5 0.5% F-Construction Construction 110.7 5.8% H-Hotels and restaurants Accommodation and food services 163.7 8.5% I-Transport, storage and communications Transportation and warehousing 112.4 5.8% J-Financial intermediation Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 120.9 6.3% K-Real estate, renting and business activities Business, building and other support services 71.2 3.7% L-Public administration and defense; compulsory social security Public administration 89.5 4.7% M-Education Educational services 138.3 7.2% N-Health and social work Health care and social assistance 196.8 10.2% O-Other community, social and personal service activities Other services 98.3 5.1% P- Activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated production activities of privatehouseholds Professional, scientific and technical services 139.2 7.2% Q-Extraterritorial organisations and bodies Information, culture and recreation 105.6 5.5% Total 1,921.6 100.0% Ec1: Employment by Economic Activity (2001) Region - British Columbia (1) (a) Trade 15.8% Forestry, fishing, mining, oil and gas 2.1%40.7 303.3 G-Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles and personal and household goods Ec1International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 NASIC (b) FTEs (thousands) (c) % A-Agriculture, hunting and forestry Agriculture 323.3 2.2% B-Fishing 1.9% C-Mining and quarrying 0.0% D-Manufacturing Manufacturing 2,229.0 14.9% E-Electricity, gas and water supply Utilities 124.4 0.8% F-Construction Construction 824.3 5.5% H-Hotels and restaurants Accommodation and food services 943.2 6.3% I-Transport, storage and communications Transportation and warehousing 775.8 5.2% J-Financial intermediation Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 876.7 5.9% K-Real estate, renting and business activities Business, building and other support services 537.2 3.6% L-Public administration and defense; compulsory social security Public administration 785.4 5.3% M-Education Educational services 981.6 6.6% N-Health and social work Health care and social assistance 1,540.4 10.3% O-Other community, social and personal service activities Other services 666.8 4.5% P- Activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated production activities of privatehouseholds Professional, scientific and technical services 986.5 6.6% Q-Extraterritorial organisations and bodies Information, culture and recreation 709.4 4.7% Total 14,946.2 100.0% 15.8% (1) Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey (unpublished data presented by BC Stats)  http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/dd/handout/naicsann.pdf . (2) Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey  http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/econ40.htm. Country - Canada (2) (c) Data in thousands of persons; the number of FTEs specifically was not available. Forestry, fishing, mining, oil and gas 278.9 Trade 2,363.3 G-Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles and personal and household goods Sources (a)  Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (b) Statistics collected in accordance with North American Standard Industry Classification (NASIC); ISIC data not available. Notes: Ec1International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Region - British Columbia ( a) Country - Canada migratory balance divided by permanent resident population 16.1% 8.5% Ec2: Employment Indicators (2001) 7.4% 7.4% Net migration rate (4) number of active persons divided by the permanent population number of active women divided by the active population Global activity rate (1)(b) Women in the active population (2) Unemployment rate (3) 66.4% 59.6% 60.5% number of unemployed divided by active population 65.2% Notes: (a) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (b) Global activity rate has been taken to mean "participation rate", which is defined as the percentage of the general population [over the age of 15] who are currently employed or are actively seeking employment. Sources (4) Statistics Canada Annual Demographic Statistics 2001. (3)  Statistics Canada Census 2001 http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/standard/prprofile/prprofile.cfm?G=59. (2)  Statistics Canada Census 2001 http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/standard/themes/RetrieveProductTable .cfm?Temporal=2001&PID=79667&GID=431515&METH=1&APATH=3&PTYPE=55440&TH EME=46&AID=0&FREE=0&FOCUS=0&VID=0&GC=0&GK=0&SC=1&SR=1&RL=0&CPP=9 9&R. (1)  Statistics Canada Census 2001 http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/standard/prprofile/prprofile.cfm?G=59. Ec2International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 (a) Number of entreprises % Total FTEs (b) % Micro (1-9) No Employees 87,983 52.4% Small (10-49) 1 to 19 Employees 68,748 41.0% Medium (50-249) 20 to 49 Employees 6,790 4.0% Large (250 and more) 50+ Employees (c) 4,344 2.6% Total 167,865 100.0% (a) Number of entreprises % Total FTEs (b) % Micro (1-9) No Employees 1,576 49.9% Small (10-49) 1 to 19 Employees 1,343 42.6% Medium (50-249) 20 to 49 Employees 154 4.9% Large (250 and more) 50+ Employees (c) 83 2.6% Total 3,156 100.0% (a) Number of entreprises % Total FTEs (b) % Micro (1-9) No Employees 158,317 50.1% Small (10-49) 1 to 19 Employees 138,119 43.7% Medium (50-249) 20 to 49 Employees 12,153 3.8% Large (250 and more) 50+ Employees (c) 7,149 2.3% Total 315,738 100.0% Number of enterprises % Total FTEs (b) % Micro (1-9) No Employees 788,934 84.6 Small (10-49) 1 to 19 Employees 203,256 21.8 Medium (50-249) 20 to 49 Employees 45,352 4.9 Large (250 and more) 50+ Employees (c) 9,328 1.0 1,046,870 100.0% Ec3: Size of Companies (2001) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (1) (d) Country - Canada (2) Region - Squamish Lillooet Regional District (1) (d) Region - British Columbia (1) (d) (b) Data were not available for the number of employees (FTEs) by size of business as requested by the original OGI data template. (c) The number of large businesses (50+ employees) was not provided but was calculated from totals minus the other 3 sizes. (d) Regional data for this indicator represent the Greater Vancouver Regional District, the Squamish Lillooet Regional District  and the Province of British Columbia. Notes: Total (1) BC Statistics http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/bus_stat/busind/sm_bus/bus_est.pdf. (2) Statistics Canada data extraction from the Canadian Business Patterns CD-ROM. Sources (a) Data were not available for the exact sizes as requested by the original OGI data template. Ec3International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 (b) Number of entreprises % ISO 14000 ( 1 )  ( c)  % ISO 9000 ( 1 )  ( d) % SA 8000 ( 2 ) Micro (1-9) No Employees 158,317 0 Small (10-49) 1 to 19 Employees 138,119 0 Medium (50-249) 20 to 49 Employees 12,153 0 Large (250 and more) 50+ Employees 7,149 0 Total 315,738 297 1,045 0 Number of entreprises % ISO 14000 (1) (c) % ISO 9000 (1) (d) % SA 8000 (2 ) Micro (1-9) No Employees 788,934 0 Small (10-49) 1 to 19 Employees 203,256 0 Medium (50-249) 20 to 49 Employees 45,352 0 Large (250 and more) 50+ Employees 9,328 0 Total 1,046,870 2,565 20,814 0 Ec4: Quality Management of Companies (2007) Region - British Columbia (a) Country - Canada (c) Data available was not aggregated by company size; totals are for ISO 14001. (d) Data available was not aggregated by company size; totals are for ISO 9001. Notes: (2) SAI http://www.sa- intl.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=document.showDocumentByID&nodeID=1&DocumentID=142. Sources (1) WhosRegistered.com Global  http://www.whosregistered.com/iso/form.php. (a) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (b) Data were not available for the number of employees (FTEs) by size of business as requested by the original OGI data templa te. Ec4International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of vehicles Mean age Type of energy used Atmospheric pollutants emissions classes Morisation rate Type of vehicle Number of vehicles (1) % Mean Model Year (2) Private cars [vehicle per thousand people] Class 1 (Passenger) 1,039,421 73.8 1994 Rental cars [vehicle per thousand people] Class 2 (Commercial) 197,144 14.0 1992 Taxis [vehicle per thousand people] Class 3 (Motorcycle) 20,882 1.5 1991 Motocycles and scooters [vehicle per thousand people] Class 4 (Trailer) 72,545 5.2 1990 light good vehicles [vehicle per thousand people] Class 5 (Motorhome) 14,075 1.0 1986 Heavy good vehicles [vehicle per thousand people] Class 6 (Commercial Trailer) 22,243 1.6 1991 Buses [vehicle per thousand people] Total 1,366,310 97.1 NA Total [vehicle per thousand people] Number of vehicles Mean age Type of energy used Atmospheric pollutants emissions classes Morisation rate Private cars [vehicle per thousand people] Rental cars [vehicle per thousand people] Taxis [vehicle per thousand people] Motocycles and scooters [vehicle per thousand people] light good vehicles [vehicle per thousand people] Heavy good vehicles [vehicle per thousand people] Buses [vehicle per thousand people] Total [vehicle per thousand people] Notes: (a) Area data = ICBC territories D, E and H. It is estimated that the GVRD area would have approximately 10% less vehicles than the ICBC territories data represented here. Ec5: Motor Vehicle Population (2001) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (a) Sources Ec5: Motor Vehicle Population Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Country (b) (1) ICBC data (provided by Translink). (2) AirCare Data (provided by Translink). Ec5International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Type of network 1 (name ) Type of network 2 (name ) Type of network 3 (name ) Type of network x (name ) Tota l Rail networ k (West Coast  Express ) 70.4 37 (2001) (1) (a) (b)  100 % 8 100 % 2,290,00 0 DNA A DNA A DNA A See  column 2 See column 3 N A See column 6 N A N A Light rapid transit  networ k (Skytrain ) 69.8 210 cars (2002) (2) (c ) 100 % 33 100 % 69,370,00 0 DNA A DNA A DNA A See  column 2 See column 3 N A See column 6 N A N A Conventional bus  networ k (Coast Mountain  Bus Company &  West Vancouver  Municipal Transit  System ) 394 5 1212 (2001) (3) (d ) 100% (January 2008 ) DNA A DNA A 199,710,00 0 DNA A DNA A DNA A See  column 2 See column 3 N A See column 6 N A N A Community  shuttle bus  networ k 793.3 7 (2002) (4 ) 100 % N A DNA A 5,960,00 0 DNA A DNA A DNA A See  column 2 See column 3 N A See column 6 N A N A Boats (Ferries  and SeaBus) (5 ) DNA A 4 (2001) (5) (e ) DNA A 4 DNA A DNA A DNA A DNA A DNA A See  column 2 See column 3 N A See column 6 N A N A Tota l DNA A 1470 DNA A DNA A DNA A DNA A DNA A DNA A DNA A N A N A N A N A N A N A Type of network 1 (name ) Type of network 2 (name ) Type of network 3 (name ) Type of network x (name ) Tota l Passengers  journey s % of  passengers  with  disabilities  journey s vehicle - kilometre s % of passenegers  with disabilities  kilometre s Vehicle  stoc k % of vehicle  accesible for  people with  disabilitie s Type of  fue l For buses and coach service s Total number of  vehicle s % of vehicles for  people with  disabilitie s Total number of  station s % of stations  accessible for  people with  disabilitie s Number of  passengers  journey s Number of  passengers with  disabilities  journey s Number of  passengers  kilometre s Length of the  network [km ] Passenger  journey s % of  passengers  with  disabilities  journey s Vehicle - kilometre s Count ry % of passenegers  with disabilities  kilometre s Vehicle  stoc k % of vehicle  accesible for  people with  disabilitie s Type of  fue l Length of the  network [km]  (2007) (6) % of vehicles for  people with  disabilitie s For buses and coach service s Total number of  vehicles (2001; 2002 ) % of vehicles for  people with  disabilities (2007) (6)  (g) Total number of  stations (2007) (6 ) % of stations  accessible for  people with  disabilities (2007)  (6) (g ) Number of  passenger  journeys  (2006) (6) (h ) Number of  passengers with  disabilities  journey s Number of  passenger  kilometre s Number of  passengers  journey s Length of the  network [km ] % of  passengers  with  disabilities  journey s Vehicle - kilometre s Total number of  vehicle s Vehicle  stoc k % of vehicle  accesible for  people with  disabilitie s Type of  fue l Passengers  journey s % of stations  accessible for  people with  disabilitie s Ec 6: Public transpor t Region - Greater Vancouver Regional Distric t Source s Total number of  station s City - Vancouv er Number of  passengers with  disabilities  journey s % of passenegers  with disabilities  kilometre s Number of  passengers  kilometre s For  buse s an d coac h service s (1) West Coast Express: Tim Shaver, Finance Manager (correspondence) . (2) BC Rapid Transit Company: Ian Graham, Senior Operations Planner (correspondence) . (3) Coast Mountain Bus Company: Janet Yuen, Performance Analyst (correspondence) . (4) West Vancouver Municipal Transit Ltd: Greg Currie, Transit Manager . (5) Fraser River Marine Transportation Ltd: Kimberley Bloom, Manager of Finance & Administration . (6) TransLink (Greater Vancouver Transit Authority). Ian Fisher, Transportation Planner, Transit Planning. 2007 . Notes : (a) WCE = West Coast Express passenger trains. This figure excludes all freight trains / cars . (f) City and country scale data are not available or accessible (DNAA) . (g) Data represent vehicles and stations that are wheelchair accessible . (h) Data represent the number of passenger boardings . (b) There are 5 trains. However, data represent individual rail cars as each car is comparable (approx. number of passengers) t o a large  (c) Individual cars have been counted for this figure as there is no set number of SkyTrains - the number of trains varies on a  daily basis . (d) This figure includes buses from the Coast Mountain Bus Company and West Vancouver Municipal Transit System . (e) This figure includes 2 SeaBuses, which cross Burrard Inlent as wel as 2 Albion Passenger ferries crossing the Fraser River ,  which will be  Ec 6International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of establishments % of establishments accessible for people with disabilities (b) Number of rooms or beds % of rooms or beds accessible for people with disabilities (b) Average rate (beds per establishment) Class 1 (name) Hotels 183 24,580 134.3 Class 2 (name)      151+ Rooms 53 15,238 287.5 Class 3 (name)      76-150 Rooms 59 6,354 107.7 Class x (name)      1-75 Rooms 71 2,988 42.1 Class x (name) Motels                        45 1,743 38.7 Total 411 50,903 123.9 Number of establishments % of establishments accessible for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds % of rooms or beds accessible for people with disabilities Average rate (beds per establishment) Class 1 (name) Fishing lodges 168 1,859 11.1 Class 2 (name) Hotels 681 57,288 84.1 Class 3 (name)      251+ Rooms 36 14,316 397.7 Class x (name)      151-250 Rooms 48 8,885 185.1 Class x (name)      76-150 Rooms 180 18,497 102.8 Class x (name)      1-75 Rooms 417 15,590 37.4 Class x (name) Motels                        859 22,280 25.9 Class x (name) Vacation Rentals      406 7,978 19.7 Class x (name) Miscellaneous 359 7,611 21.2 Total 2,473 97,016 39.2 Ec7: Accommodation Infrastructure (2001, 2004) Region - Greater Vancouver (2001) (1) (a) (b) Region - British Columbia (2001) (1) (a) (b) Ec7International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of establishments % of establishments accessible for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds % of rooms or beds accessible for people with disabilities Average rate Class 1 (name) Class 2 (name) Class 3 (name) Class x (name) Total 16,331 Sources Country - Canada (2004) (1) BC Statistics. http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/bus_stat/busind/tourism/trra2006.csv. Notes: (a) Data were unavailable at the city scale; however, regional data are provided for two different regional scales, including Greater Vancouver and British Columbia. (b) The British Columbia Building Code has evolved to include the following provisions regarding accessibility: parking and door-widths (1978), washrooms (1982), all accessibility aspects (1988), all accessibility aspects integrated within the code document (1992). In addition, many buildings originally constructed prior to these building code provisions may have been retrofitted; however, there is no single source of information to confirm the number of buildings accessible. Ec7International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities 6,547 Total number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) 12,192 Total number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities x 100 Class x (name) x 100x 100 Class 2 (name) x 100 Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (b) Ec8: Accommodation Occupancy Rate (2003) (1) (a ) x 100 x 100 Class 2 (name) x 100 Class 1 (name) x 100 Average rate x 100 53.70% Class 1 (name) x 100 x 100 Region - British Columbia (b) x 100 x 100 Class x (name) x 100 Ec8International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 12,192 Total number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) 22,747 Total number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Number of rooms or beds occupied (divided by) Number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) Number of rooms or beds available Number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities 74,857 rooms occupied Total number of rooms or beds occupied by people with disabilities (divided by) 142,856 rooms available Total number of rooms or beds available for people with disabilities Sources Average rate x 100 Class x (name) x 100 x 100 x 100 52.40% (1) Smith Travel Research, 2003. Canadian Lodging Outlook HVS International - Canada. April 2003 Year- to-Date. http://www.hotel-online.com/News/PR2003_2nd/Jun03_CanadianReview.html. Notes: (a) Occupancy rates by hotel class were not available. (b) Data were unavailable at the city scale; however, regional data are provided for two different regional scales, including Greater Vancouver and British Columbia. Class 2 (name) x 100 Class 1 (name) x 100 x 100 x 100 Country - Canada x 100 53.60% Average rate x 100 Ec8International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 Origin s Month s Number of  tourists  % A verage length of  stay s Number of  tourists  % Average  length of stay s Number of  tourists  % Average  length of  stay s Number of  tourists  % Average  length of  stay s J F M A M J J A S O N D Tota l 6,406,000 47.0% 2.7 3,184,200 20.9% 4.1 5,660,800 37.1% 4.1 15,251,000 100.0% DNA A J F M A M J J A S O N D Tota l 18,656,000 61.0% 2.7 3,577,000 11.7% 4.1 27,023,000 88.3% 4.1 30,600,000 100.0% DNA A J F M A M J J A S O N D Tota l DNA A DNA A DNA A 73,859,000 79.0% DNA A 19,580,000 21.0% DNA A 93,439,000 100.0% DNA A (a) City data represent the Vancouver Coast and Mountains Tourism Region, which includes the Greater Vancouver Regional Distri c t and the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District. It also  includes the Fraser Valley to Hope and North along Highway One to Merritt.  (b) Data source (Tourism Canada) defines Tourist as a person who took a trip of one night or more . Country -  Canada (2001)  (2) (b ) Notes : Ec9: Tourist Nights (1998; 2001 ) Abroa d Tota l (1 ) BC Visitor Study - Report on Travel in British Columbia: The Report on Visitors to Vancouver Coast & Mountains Tourism Region ( 1998) . Region - British Columbi a Country - Canad a City -  Vancouver  Coast and  Mountains  (1998) (1) (a)  Region - British  Columbia  (1998) (1) Source s (2 ) Canadian Tourism Facts and Figures (2001) - Tourism Canada www.tourismcanada.com . Ec9International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A A D with  disabilitie s without  disabilitie s with  disabilitie s without  disabilitie s with  disabilitie s without  disabilitie s with  disabilitie s without  disabilitie s with  disabilitie s without  disabilitie s with  disabilitie s without  disabilitie s with  disabilitie s without  disabilitie s D A D A D A D A A D D A D A A D A D A terminal  passenger s transit  passenger s terminal  passenger s scheduled  airline s Number o f aircrafts  movements (d ) Tota l charter  ailine s private air transpor t Sep t Oc t Number o f passengers (d ) transit  passenger s May Jun charter ailine s scheduled airline s Jan Feb Marc h Apri l D A D A D A Jul Au g No v De c No v De c Apri l May Jun Cit y Ec10: Airport Traffic (2001) (e ) Jul Au g Sep t Oc t Jan Feb Marc h Tota l Ec1 0International Olympic Committe e OGI VANO C October 200 7 A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D Total number o f passengers  arriving and  departing (1) (b ) A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A D A A D without  disabilitie s Airport 1 Airport 2 Airport 3 Airport x Airport 1 Airport 2 Airport 3 Airport x Airport 1 Airport 2 Airport 3 Airport x Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (Vancouver International Airport) (a ) Marc h Feb Jan Jul Jun May Apri l Au g (c) Disaggregated data for freight arrivals and departures is not available . (2) YVR Cargo Volume (Tonnes) 1992 - 2003 . Source s Country x with disabilitie s Destination for  departing  passenger s (d) Data is not available for passengers with disabilities or for the number of aircraft movements by scheduled or charter fli g hts . Country 1 Country 2 Jan Tota l De c 920,21 0 1,110,09 2 7,711,980  (49.8% ) Oc t No v Sep t 228,67 4 19,01 5 20,78 1 22,30 2 18,79 0 21,27 4 No v De c Tota l Arrivals (2 ) 1,799,74 0 1,161,92 5 1,064,99 1 Sep t Oc t 1,679,26 7 1,480,69 0 1,381,67 5 1,241,64 4 16,62 5 19,69 5 1,220,56 8 1,146,89 0 1,269,07 0 Feb Marc h Totail air freight in tons - Vancouver International  Airport 2001 (2) (c ) 17,01 9 Apri l 16,40 1 19,33 8 19,59 4 17,84 0 May Jun Jul Au g Notes : (a) Regional data for this indicator represent the Greater Vancouver Regional District.  (b) Data represents 2001. Disagregated data unavailable for arrivals and departures. It is not possible to disaggregate passen g ers that are transferring to connecting flights, which represents  approximately 30% of the total passengers at the Vancouver airport . (1) Vancouver International Airport Facts: www.yvr.ca/authority/facts/ . Departur e Tota l 7,764,782  (50.2% ) 15476762  (100% ) Ec1 0International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Europe America Asia Oceania Africa Total Number of Private foreign organizations 181 426 320 24 5 956 Number of Public foreign organizations Europe America Asia Oceania Africa Total Number of Private foreign organizations 2,264 4,411 768 97 36 7,576 Number of Public foreign organizations Sources NA Ec11: Foreign Organization Establishments (2001) (1) Region - Brisith Columbia Country - Canada (1) Statistics Canada, Industrial Organization and Finance Division, custom tabulation. Notes: Ec11International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Women Men Ratio [≤;≥ 1] Annual Earnings $26,793.00 $40,665.00 0.66 Mean Weekly Wage $515.25 $782.02 0.66 Mean Hourly Wage $13.74 $20.85 0.66 Median DNAA DNAA DNAA Women Men Ratio [≤;≥ 1] Annual Earnings $24,401.00 $38,039.00 0.64 Mean Weekly Wage $469.25 $731.52 0.64 Mean Hourly Wage $12.51 $19.51 0.64 Median DNAA DNAA DNAA Women Men Ratio [≤;≥ 1] Annual Earnings $24,390.00 $38,347.00 0.64 Mean Weekly Wage $469.04 $737.44 0.64 Mean Hourly Wage $12.51 $19.67 0.64 Median DNAA DNAA DNAA (a) The source data represent average annual earnings in 2000 as reported in the 2001 Census by Statistics Canada. This was divided by 52 weeks per year, to calculate mean weekly wages; then divided by 37.5 hours per week to calculate mean hourly wages. Notes: Region - British Columbia Country - Canada Ec13: Wages (2000) (1) (a) Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area Sources (1) Statistics Canada. Earnings Groups, Total Work Activity1, for Both Sexes, for Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas(1) and Census Agglomerations - 20% Sample Data. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/highlight/Earnings/CMA_Menu1.cfm? Lan g =E. Ec13International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Sources (1) United Nations Development Program - Human Development Report: Beyond Scarcity - Power, Poverty and the Global Water Crisis: http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/data/indicators.cfm?x=148&y=1&z=1. Notes: (a) Gini Income Distribution Index not calculated at the regional level. Country - Canada (1) Gini Income Distribution Index 32.6 Ec14: Gini Income Distribution Index (2000) (1) Region - British Columbia (a) Gini Income Distribution Index DNAA Ec14International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Index at G-108 (2 years prior to the Host City Election) Sources (a) CPI is calculated monthly, so data represents annual averages. Consumer Price Index of the region (1) Statistics Canada data prepared by BC Stats: http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/dd/handout/CPIAN.pdf. J Consumer Price Index of the country A D Notes: JM JA Consumer Price Index of the region Consumer Price Index of the country Ec15: Consumer Price Index (2001) (1) (a) 115.2 116.4 Consumer Price Index of the region - British Columbia 1992 = 100 Consumer Price Index of the country - Canada Year x+n Consumer Price Index of the country Year x+2 Consumer Price Index of the region Year x+1 Consumer Price Index of the country Consumer Price Index of the region Monthly basis during the Olympic period OSF M N Ec15International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Reference year G-108 (2 years prior to the Host City Election) Region - British Columbia (1) (a) Country - Canada (2) Building prices DNAA DNAA Water prices Electricity prices Housing prices 101.2 (c) 112.8 (c) Region Country Building prices Water prices Electricity prices Housing prices Region Country Building prices Water prices Electricity prices Housing prices (a) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (b) Published as part of the consumer price index for shelter (1992=100); represents the index for water, fuel and electricity. (c) Consumer Price Index, shelter (1992=100). Sources (1) Statistics Canada Consumer Price Index, shelter (BC) http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/econ157k.htm. (2) Statistics Canada Consumer Price Index, shelter (Canada) http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/econ157a.htm. Notes: Ec16: Price Indices (2001) Year x+1 Year x+n 1992= 100 137.6 (b) 136.4 (b)  Ec16International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Single Double Suite Single Double Suite Single Double Suite Single Double Suite Single Double Suite Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Ec17: Hotel Price Index (2001) (1) (a) $100.75 DNNA $105.91 DNNA Class 4 Class 5 $98.88 DNNA Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 April MayNumber of rooms accessible for people with disabilities January February March $103.88 DNNA $124.87 DNNA January February March April May Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District Average price for all hotel classes and room sizes Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (b) Ec17International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. DecemberJuly August September October NovemberJune $147.04 DNNA$141.11 DNNA $143.75 DNNA $130.43 DNNA DNNA$109.07 DNNA $99.07 DNNA Overall for the year October November December Overall for the year $94.23 DNNA $120.57 Price June July August September Ec17International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Single Double Suite Single Double Suite Single Double Suite Single Double Suite Single Double Suite Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Notes: Class 3 Class 4 Class 5 Sources Class 1 Class 2 Region - British Columbia Number of rooms accessible for people with disabilities January February March April May (b) Data were unavailable at the city scale, therefore data are presented for two different regional scales. (a)  Tourism BC does not collect information on maximum prices or the average prices for different classes of hotels and room sizes. There is currently no count of the number of accessible hotel rooms available. $114.69 DNNA $117.83 DNNA $117.45 DNNA $104.88 DNNA January February $113.99 DNNA March April May (1) Tourism BC. Year in Review 2001. http://www.tourismbc.com/PDF/TBC2001_06_YIR_2.0.pdf (data as supplied by Pannell Kerr Forster Consulting).   Average price for all hotel classes and room sizes Region - British Columbia (b) Ec17International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. Mean Max. November DecemberSeptember OctoberJune July August $127.75 DNNA $111.13 DNNA$119.60 DNNA $100.31 DNNA $93.25 DNNA$136.62 DNNA $135.94 DNNA $118.22 DNNA June July August September October Price November December Overall for the year Ec17International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Local currency / square metre US $ / square metre(c) Local currency / square metre US $ / square metre (a) (b) Number of Residential Properties Sold Average Residential Price ($ local currency) Average Residential Price ($US currency) Average Owner's Major Payments     ($ local currency) Average Owner's Major Payments ($US currency) Average Rental Price ($ local currency) Average Rental Price ($US currency) Bachelor $621 $929.20 One-Bedroom $726 $1,086.31 Two-Bedroom $919 $1,375.10 Three-Bedroom $1,060 $1,586.08 Bachelor $573 $857.38 One-Bedroom $665 $995.04 Two-Bedroom $772 $1,155.14 Three-Bedroom $874 $1,307.77 (1) Canadian Real Estate Association and BC Real Estate Association - Produced by: BC STATS, March 2007 http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/dd/handout/mls.pdf. (2) BC Statistics. "Regional Shelter Costs for Households in British Columbia, 2001 Census".  http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/cen01/facts/cff0117.PDF. (3) GVRD, "Average Apartment Rents 1998-2005", Produced by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.  http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/growth/keyfacts/rent.htm. (4) Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, "Rental Housing Report: 2001 Survey, BC". http://dsp-psd.pwgsc.gc.ca/Collection- R/CMHC/RM/NH12-62E/NH12-62-2001E.pdf. (d) Exchange rate of 1.4963 was used to calculate 2001 US currency based on the conversion rate on  2nd January 2001 (http://www.edc.ca/currencyconverter/index_e.asp). Sources $220,952 $330,610 $904 $1,353 Notes: (a) Data were unavailable at the city scale, therefore data are presented for two different regional scales.      (b) Detailed data distinguishing between the costs of new and existing real estate was not available. (c) Data were unavailable on a square metre basis. existing Region - British Columbia new 68,105 existing Ec18: Real Estate Market (2001) Real estate for sale (1) (2) (c) (d) Real estate for rent (3) (4) (d) Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District new 28,176 $284,806 $426,155 $1,057 $1,547 Ec18International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Imports Exports Year = 2001 31.6% 38.0% Year x+1 Year x+2 Year x+3 Year x+4 Year x+5 Year x+6 Year x+7 Year x+8 Year x+9 Year x+10 Year x+11 Year x+12 Sources (1) Statistics Canada http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/gblec02a. htm?sdi=imports. Ec19: Economic Balance (Import-Export) (2001) (1) Ratio of total value of import or exports over the nominal GDP (1) Country - Canada Ec19International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Sources (a) For consistency, the GDP figure quoted is that from the same OECD report. Notes: Ec20: Dynamics of Service Activities (2001) (1) Country - Canada Ratio of the net balance of services to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Difference between the value of services exported and that of services imported [in the country's currency] -5.044 (divided by) Gross Domestic Product (a) 896.5 x 100 Rate [%] -56.26% Year x+1 Ratio of the net balance of services to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Difference between the value of services exported and that of services imported [in the country's currency] (divided by) x 100 Rate [%] Gross Domestic Product Year x+2 Ratio of the net balance of services to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Difference between the value of services exported and that of services imported [in the country's currency] (divided by) x 100 Rate [%] Gross Domestic Product Rate [%] Gross Domestic Product (1) OECD Statistical Profile for Canada http://stats.oecd.org/WBOS/ViewHTML.aspx?QueryName=1 77&QueryType=View&Lang=en. Year x+n Ratio of the net balance of services to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Difference between the value of services exported and that of services imported [in the country's currency] (divided by) x 100 Ec20International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Rating 84.5 DNAA (a) AA1 AA+ Rating Rating Rating 85.5 AAA/Stable/A-1+ M oody - Sovereign long-term debt rating (f oreign currency)  ( 3 )  ( 2001 ) Standard and Poor - Sovereign long-term debt rating ( foreign currency)  ( 2001 )  ( 4 )  Ec21: Investment Risks (2001 ) Country - Canada 2001 Euromoney (2) Political Risk  Services (ICRG)  (1)  (C omposite Risk  Rating - Januar y,  2001 ) Y ear x+1 Political Risk Services (ICRG) Euromoney Moody Standard and Poor Y ear x+2 Political Risk Services (ICRG) (2007) 2007 (b) Political Risk Services (ICRG) Euromoney Moody Standard and Poor Euromoney Moody 5 (4) Standard and Poor http://www.standardpoor.com. (3) Moody http://www.moodys.com. (2) Euromoney http://www.euromoney.com. (1) Political Risk Services (ICRG) http://www.prsgroup.com. Standard and Poor (2007 ) (b) Data for 2007 were acquired during the acquisition of 2001 baseline data. Sources x Notes: (a) Data access through Euromoney has been confirmed to be contingent upon a Ec21International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Year Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) - Cdn millions of $ Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) - US millions of $ (a) 2001 $340,429 $227,509 2002 $356,819 $223,297 2003 $364,708 $231,590 2004 $380,951 $295,313 2005 $415,561 $345,248 Year x +5 [in millions US $] Year x +6 [in millions US $] Year x +7 [in millions US $] Year x +8 [in millions US $] Year x +9 [in millions US $] Year x +10 [in millions US $] Year x +11 [in millions US $] Year x +12 [in millions US $] Notes: (a) Rates in US dollars calculated based on exchange rates calculated on January 2 of the listed year. Ec22: Foreign Direct Investment (2001-2005) (1) (2) Sources (1) http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.exe?Lang=E&Accessible=1 &ArrayId=V1477&ResultTemplate=CII\S NA___&RootDir=CII/&Interactive=1&Out Fmt=HTML2D&Array_Retr=1&Dim=- #HERE. (2) Export Development Canada -  Currency Coversion Calculator: http://www.edc.ca/currencyconverter/ind ex_e.asp. Ec22International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Sums of public spending Ratio of public spending to GDP Sums of tax revenue Ratio of tax revenue to GDP Region (a) $27,914 20.9% $28,067 2.5% Country (b) $184,612 16.7% $193,825 17.5% Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Sums of public spending Ratio of public spending to GDP Sums of tax revenue Ratio of tax revenue to GDP Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Region [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] Country [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP] [country currenc'y at constant price] [% of the nominal GDP]year x+12 (1) Statistics Canada http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.exe?Lang=E&Accessible=1&ArrayId=V1329&ResultTemplate=CII\SNA___&RootDir=CII\&Interactive=1&Out Fmt=HTML2D&Array_Retr=1&Dim=-#HERE. year x+8 year x+9 year x+10 year x+11 year x+12 year x+11 COUNTRY Revenue year X Sources year x+1 year x+2 year x+3 year x+4 year x+5 year x+6 year x+7 Ec23: Economic Role of the State (2001) (1) year x+2 year x+10 year x+9 year x+8 year x+7 year x+6 year x+5 year x+4 year x+3 (a) Data represent spending and revenue of the Provincal Government of British Columbia. (b) Data represent the spending and revenue of the Federal Government of Canada. Notes: Region - British Columbia and Country - Canada Spending (millions of $) Revenue (millions of $) 2001 year x+1 Spending Ec23International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Amount ($ millions) % 0 Administration General government $94.36 12.7% Police protection $135.10 18.2% Fire protection $71.77 9.7% 2 Education and training 3 Culture and leisure (excluding sport ) 4 Health 5 Social affairs Planning and development $54.96 7.4% Engineering $86.30 11.6% Water utility $59.48 8.0% Solid waste $29.77 4.0% Sewer utility $61.85 8.3% 8 Public economy Community and cultural services $61.88 8.3% 9 Finance and taxation DNAA DNAA DNAA 10 Sport Recreation and parks $86.57 11.7% Total Total $742.06 Amount ($ millions) (b) % 0 Administration General government services $312 1.0 1 Public security Protection of persons and property $1,225 3.9 2 Education and training Education $5,878 18.8 3 Culture and leisure (excluding sport) Recreation and culture $301 1.0 4 Health Health $9,019 28.9 5 Social affairs Social services $4,910 15.7 6 Transport and communications Transportation and communication $1,289 4.1 7 Environment Environment $145 0.5 8 Public economy Labour, employment and immigration $68 0.2 9 Finance and taxation General purpose transfers to other government subsectors $26 0.1 10 Sport Sport DNAA DNAA Housing $140 0.4 Regional planning and development $83 0.3 Research establishments $13 0.0 Resource conservation and industrial development $1,500 4.8 Total $27,914 Ec24: Structure of Public Spending (2001) Region  - British Columbia (2) (a) City - Vancouver (1) Transport and communications 6 Public security1 Environment (d) 7 (d) Ec24International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Amount ($millions) (c) % of total 0 Administration General government services $15,968 3.8% 1 Public security Protection of persons and property $32,978 7.8% 2 Education and training Education $63,522 15.0% 3 Culture and leisure (excluding sport) Recreation and culture $10,871 2.6% 4 Health Health $70,465 16.6% 5 Social affairs Social services $110,145 25.9% 6 Transport and communications Transportation and communication $17,979 4.2% 7 Environment Environment $9,222 2.2% 8 Public economy Labour, employment and immigration $2,882 0.7% 9 Finance and taxation General purpose transfers to other government subsectors $0 0.0% 10 Sport Sport / Housing $3,723 0.9% Regional planning and development $1,847 0.4% Research establishments $1,419 0.3% Resource conservation and industrial development $15,713 3.7% Total $424,557 (d) Data are not available or accessible for the expenditure categories requested on the original OGI data template. Notes: (a) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. (b) Based on total revenues. Consolidated revenues were not available at the provincial level. (c) Based on consolidated revenues. (2) Statistics Canada http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.exe?Lang=E&Accessible=1&ArrayId=V1328&ResultTemplate=CII\SNA___&RootDir=CII\&Interactive=1& OutFmt=HTML2D&Array_Retr=1&Dim=-#HERE. Country - Canada (2) (d) Sources (1) City of Vancouver Annual Financial Report 2001 http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/corpsvcs/financial/pdf/AR2001.pdf. Ec24International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Amount % Direct taxation Property tax , solid waste, sewer and other $413,610 52.4% Water fees $56,487 7.2% Solid waste fees $31,770 4.0% Sewer fees $28,831 3.7% Other fees $182,939 23.2% Revenue sharing, grants and contributions $11,381 1.4% Investment income $22,926 2.9% Rental and lease income $38,496 4.9% Sale of property $2,824 0.4% Total $789,264 100% Amount % Direct taxation Income Taxes $7,369 24.4% Indirect taxation Consumption Taxes $6,322 20.9% Property and related taxes $2,161 7.2% Other taxes $591 2.0% Health and drug insurance premiums $895 3.0% Contributions to social security plans $866 2.9% Sales of goods and services $2,357 7.8% Investment income $6,075 20.1% Other revenue from own sources $271 0.9% General purpose transfers from other government subsectors $2,632 8.7% Specific purpose transfers from other government subsectors $677 2.2% Total $30,216 100% Amount % Direct taxation Income Taxes $191,144 42.8% Indirect taxation Consumption Taxes $87,870 19.7% Property and related taxes $41,063 9.2% Other taxes $15,157 3.4% Health and drug insurance premiums $2,178 0.5% Contributions to social security plans $30,087 6.7% Sales of goods and services $34,689 7.8% Investment income $37,749 8.4% Other revenue from own sources $7,020 1.6% Total $446,957 100% Ec25: Structure of Fiscal Revenue (2001) (a) Region - British Columbia (2) City - Vancouver (1) Sources (1) City of Vancouver Annual Financial Report http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/corpsvcs/financial/pdf/AR2001.pdf. (3) Statistics Canada http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.exe?Lang=E&Accessible=1&ArrayId=V1328&ResultTemplate=CII\SNA___&RootDir=CI I\&Interactive=1&OutFmt=HTML2D&Array_Retr=1&Dim=-#HERE. Country - Canada (3) Other revenue Other revenue Indirect taxation Other revenue Notes: (a) Tax data in Canada is not classified into "direct" and "indirect" forms of taxation, as per the request of the original OGI  data template. As income tax and conumption tax are the most common forms of direct and indirect taxation (respectively), these represent the best avail able alternative source of data. (2) Statistics Canada http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.exe. Ec25International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Value [in the currency of the country] (in real terms) DNAA $133,514 5.86% The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) x 100 The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Value The net (not gross) debt of the public administration per inhabitant (divided by) Country - Canada (2) Value [in the currency of the country] (in real terms) $7,822 (a) (1) x 100 Rate (%) Region - British Columbia (1) (a) (b) Ec26: Public Debt (2001 ) Value The net (not gross) debt of the public administration per inhabitant City The gross debt of the public administration per inhabitant DNAA Rate (%) The gross debt of the public administration per inhabitant Value [in the currency of the country] (in real terms) (b) Regional data for this indicator represent the province of British Columbia. The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) $1,108,048 1.59% Sources (1) Statistics Canada http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/040811/d040811a.htm. (2) Statistics Canada http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/060322/d060322d.htm. Value ($ millions) The net (not gross) debt of the public administration per inhabitant $17,640 (2) (a) Notes: (a) Debt is expressed here in terms of NET financial debt per capita as opposed to gross. The gross debt of the public administration per inhabitant x 100 Rate (%) Ec26International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Number of Olympic activities Number of Context activities Total for all job categories 0 0 Number of Olympic activities Number of Context activities Total for all job categories 0 0 Olympic activities Context activities Total for all job categories 0 0 x 4 5 Ec27: Jobs Created in Olympic and Context Activities (2001) (1) (a) City - Vancouver Region - Greater Vancouver Regional District (a) As of 2001, no jobs were created for either Olympic or context activities because the games had not yet been awarded to Vancouver. It is estimated that in 2001, approximately 25 jobs were associated with the bid phase (Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation). These jobs do not relate to the employment sectors listed within the OGI data collection form for indicator Ec27. Notes: Country - Canada Sources 1 Personal communication with VANOC. 2 3 Ec27International Olympic Committee OGI VANOC October 2007 Country - Canada Region - British Columbia Region - Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area Median annual earnings of persons with disabilities ($) Median of wages for people with disabilities $27,300$26,000 Percentage of active persons with disabilities (as a % of total population with disabilities) 12.5%13.1% Percentage of active persons with disabilities (as a % of total active population) Ratio 3 Ratio 4 Ratio 5 Active people with disabilities on active population Active people with disabilities on people with disabilities population Number of unemployed people with disabilities to the number of people with disabilities working mean of wages for people with disabilities Ratio 1 Ec44: Employability of People with Disabilities (2001) (1) (a) 10.9% 68.4% 1.7% 68.2%69.8% 1.9%1.5% Percentage of unemployed persons with disabilities (as a % of the number of persons with disabilities working) Ratio 2 Notes: (a) Percentages are provided instead of ratios (as per the OGI Technical Manual) and new row headings are provided as defined by the data source. $28,600 $21,700 Sources (1) Statistics Canada. Income Statistics Division. Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. 2001. Custom Table. R27085PD. 2 Average annual earnings of persons with disabilities ($) $19,800$19,600 Ec4417 OGI Baseline Report18

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