UBC Faculty Research and Publications

Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers for emission reduction of particulate matter from… Adderley, Christopher; Christen, Andreas Oct 10, 2014

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52383-Adderley_Christen_etal_Vegetative_Buffers_GF2.pdf [ 19.47MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52383-1.0103596.json
JSON-LD: 52383-1.0103596-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52383-1.0103596-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52383-1.0103596-rdf.json
Turtle: 52383-1.0103596-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52383-1.0103596-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52383-1.0103596-source.json
Full Text
52383-1.0103596-fulltext.txt
Citation
52383-1.0103596.ris

Full Text

	  	   	       Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers for emission reduction of particulate matter  from poultry facilities   Christopher Adderley1	  and	  Andreas Christen2	  	  1	  Research	  Technician,	  M.Sc.,	  Department	  of	  Geography,	  	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  Vancouver,	  Canada	  2	  Associate	  Professor,	  Department	  of	  Geography	  /	  Atmospheric	  Science	  Program,	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  Vancouver,	  Canada	   	  October	  10,	  2014	    2/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Acknowledgements This	  project	  was	  funded	  through	  Growing	  Forward	  2,	  a	  federal-­‐provincial-­‐territorial	  initiative	  and	  was	  carried	  out	  at	  the	  Department	  of	  Geography	  of	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  Vancouver	  Campus,	  Vancouver,	  BC,	  Canada.	  ENVI-­‐met	  simulations	  were	  conducted	  by	  Daryll	  Pauls	  under	  contract	  to	  the	  BC	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture	  for	  evaluation	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  at	  several	  poultry	  sites	  in	  the	  Fraser	  Valley	  BC.	  BC	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture	  staff	  provided	  buffer	  layouts,	  photos,	  valuable	  input	  and	  comments.	  	  	  In	  addition	  to	  the	  authors,	  these	  individuals	  contributed	  to	  the	  development	  of	  this	  project:	  • Daryll	  Pauls,	  B.Sc.	  in	  Atmospheric	  Science,	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  • Jacquay	  Foyle,	  Environmental	  Engineer,	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture	  • Dave	  Trotter,	  Agroforestry	  Specialist,	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture	  • Shabtai	  Bittman,	  Research	  Scientist,	  Agriculture	  and	  Agri-­‐food	  Canada	  	  Disclaimer	  Opinions	  expressed	  in	  this	  document	  are	  those	  of	  the	  authors	  and	  not	  necessarily	  those	  of	  Agriculture	  and	  Agri-­‐Food	  Canada	  and	  the	  British	  Columbia	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture.	  The	  Government	  of	  Canada,	  the	  British	  Columbia	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture	  or	  its	  directors,	  agents,	  employees,	  or	  contractors	  will	  not	  be	  liable	  for	  any	  claims,	  damages,	  or	  losses	  of	  any	  kind	  whatsoever	  arising	  out	  of	  the	  use	  of,	  or	  reliance	  upon,	  this	  information.	  	   	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   3/114	  	  	  Abstract	  Emissions	  of	  particulate	  matter	  from	  poultry	  facilities	  can	  impact	  local	  resources,	  animal	  and	  human	  health,	  and	  can	  be	  a	  potential	  pathway	  for	  the	  transmission	  of	  diseases.	  This	  report	  determines	  the	  effectiveness	  of	  various	  vegetative	  buffers	  layouts	  as	  a	  potential	  measure	  reducing	  particulate	  matter	  emissions	  leaving	  poultry	  facilities.	  Vegetative	  buffers	  modify	  the	  airflow	  and	  filter	  the	  air	  flowing	  through	  them,	  which	  can	  enhance	  the	  deposition	  of	  particulate	  matter	  on	  leaves	  and	  ground,	  and	  redistribute	  zones	  of	  major	  deposition.	  The	  report	  summarizes	  five	  case	  studies	  of	  poultry	  facilities	  in	  the	  Lower	  Fraser	  Valley,	  BC,	  Canada.	  It	  demonstrates	  that	  appropriate	  choice	  of	  vegetative	  buffer	  layout	  (composition	  and	  placement)	  can	  affect	  overall	  emissions	  from	  poultry	  facilities	  and	  hence	  reduce	  deposition	  on	  neighboring	  properties.	  The	  use	  of	  effective	  buffer	  layouts	  allows	  part	  of	  the	  emitted	  particulate	  matter	  to	  be	  intercepted	  before	  leaving	  the	  property.	  The	  simulations	  predict	  that	  the	  fraction	  of	  total	  PM10	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  the	  buffer	  ranges	  between	  0.62	  to	  4.38%.	  In	  relative	  terms,	  total	  deposition	  on	  the	  property	  can	  be	  increased	  between	  10.81%	  and	  29.37%	  with	  effective	  buffer	  configurations.	  Deposition	  on	  neighboring	  properties	  is	  predicted	  to	  be	  lowered	  between	  -­‐2.05	  and	  -­‐7.62%.	  	  In	  conditions	  where	  the	  buffer	  is	  placed	  directly	  in	  front	  of	  the	  source	  fans	  and	  wind	  directing	  particulate	  matter	  directly	  into	  the	  buffer,	  highest	  interception	  was	  achieved	  (filter	  effect).	  In	  other	  cases,	  buffers	  disrupt	  wind	  patterns	  modifying	  air	  flows	  and	  hence	  affect	  spatial	  deposition	  patterns	  (deflection	  effect).	  Layouts	  with	  corner	  structures	  were	  more	  effective,	  as	  were	  layouts	  including	  double	  rows	  and	  full	  enclosure	  around	  the	  emission	  sources.	  Although	  these	  simulations	  show	  that	  buffers	  can	  be	  effective	  to	  control	  (reduce)	  deposition	  on	  selected	  neighboring	  properties	  of	  concern	  (up	  to	  7.62%	  reduction),	  their	  impact	  is	  limited	  in	  terms	  of	  overall	  emission	  reduction	  to	  the	  environment	  as	  overall	  reduction	  simulated	  was	  less	  than	  3.12%.	  	  Keywords:	  Agriculture,	  emission	  control,	  particulate	  matter,	  poultry,	  vegetative	  buffers	  	   	  4/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Table of Contents 1.	  Introduction	  .............................................................................................................................................	  6	  2.	  Methods	  ...................................................................................................................................................	  8	  2.1	  Model	  Description	  and	  Setup	  .............................................................................................................	  8	  2.2	  Model	  Limitations	  ............................................................................................................................	  11	  2.3	  Analysis	  .............................................................................................................................................	  11	  3.	  Site	  I	  ........................................................................................................................................................	  13	  3.1	  Site	  Description	  ................................................................................................................................	  13	  3.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  ......................................................................................................................	  14	  3.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  .................................................................................................................	  14	  3.2.2	  Buffer	  Length	  .............................................................................................................................	  16	  3.2.3	  Buffer	  Corner	  Structures	  ...........................................................................................................	  18	  3.2.4	  Buffer	  Thickness	  ........................................................................................................................	  21	  3.2.5	  Buffer	  Porosity	  ..........................................................................................................................	  23	  3.2.6	  Crenellated	  Buffers	  ....................................................................................................................	  26	  3.3	  Summary	  ..........................................................................................................................................	  28	  4.	  Site	  II	  .......................................................................................................................................................	  30	  4.1	  Site	  Description	  ................................................................................................................................	  30	  4.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  ......................................................................................................................	  31	  4.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  .................................................................................................................	  31	  4.2.2	  Hedging	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Buffer	  Proximity	  ..............................................................................................	  33	  4.2.3	  Hedging	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Per-­‐Fan	  Buffers	  ...............................................................................................	  36	  4.2.4	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  with	  Shelterbelt	  ..................................................................................................	  40	  4.2.5	  Double-­‐Row	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  Buffers	  ...........................................................................................	  43	  4.2.6	  Buffer	  Age	  ..................................................................................................................................	  46	  4.3	  Summary	  ..........................................................................................................................................	  48	  5.	  Site	  III	  ......................................................................................................................................................	  50	  5.1	  Site	  Description	  ................................................................................................................................	  50	  5.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  ......................................................................................................................	  51	  5.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  .................................................................................................................	  51	  5.2.2	  Hedging	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Low	  Per-­‐Fan	  Structures	  ...................................................................................	  53	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   5/114	  	  	  5.2.3	  Hedging	  Cedar	  -­‐	  High	  Per-­‐Fan	  Buffers	  .......................................................................................	  58	  5.2.4	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Porosity	  ............................................................................................................	  60	  5.2.5	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Double	  Row	  Porosity	  ........................................................................................	  63	  5.2.7	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Buffer	  Thickness	  ...............................................................................................	  68	  5.2.8	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Per	  Fan	  Structures	  ............................................................................................	  70	  5.2.9	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Split	  Rows	  .........................................................................................................	  73	  5.3	  Summary	  ..........................................................................................................................................	  75	  6.	  Site	  IV	  .....................................................................................................................................................	  77	  6.1	  Site	  Description	  ................................................................................................................................	  77	  6.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  ......................................................................................................................	  78	  6.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  .................................................................................................................	  78	  6.2.2	  Open	  Buffers	  .............................................................................................................................	  79	  6.2.3	  Closed	  Buffers	  ...........................................................................................................................	  82	  6.2.4	  Diagonal	  Buffers	  ........................................................................................................................	  84	  6.2.5	  Zigzag	  Buffers	  ............................................................................................................................	  86	  6.2.6	  Double-­‐row	  Buffers	  ...................................................................................................................	  89	  6.3	  Summary	  ..........................................................................................................................................	  93	  7.	  Site	  V	  ......................................................................................................................................................	  94	  7.1	  Site	  Description	  ................................................................................................................................	  94	  7.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  ......................................................................................................................	  95	  7.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  .................................................................................................................	  95	  7.2.2	  Open	  Buffers	  .............................................................................................................................	  96	  7.2.3	  Closed	  Buffers	  ...........................................................................................................................	  99	  7.2.4	  Buffer	  Thickness	  ......................................................................................................................	  101	  7.2.5	  Other	  Buffer	  Layouts	  ...............................................................................................................	  105	  7.3	  Summary	  ........................................................................................................................................	  109	  8.	  Concluding	  Buffer	  Design	  Recommendations	  ......................................................................................	  110	  8.1	  Case	  studies	  summary	  ....................................................................................................................	  110	  8.2	  General	  design	  guidelines	  ..............................................................................................................	  111	  9.	  References	  ............................................................................................................................................	  114	  	  6/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  1. Introduction Emissions	  of	  fine	  particulate	  matter	  from	  poultry	  facilities	  can	  have	  impacts	  on	  local	  natural	  resources,	  animal	  and	  human	  health,	  and	  can	  be	  a	  potential	  pathway	  for	  the	  transmission	  of	  disease	  (Plewa	  and	  Lonc,	  2011).	  Controlling	  and	  reducing	  the	  amount	  of	  particulate	  matter	  leaving	  facilities	  is	  important	  -­‐	  this	  will	  decrease	  local	  and	  regional	  air	  pollution	  and	  reduce	  the	  possibility	  of	  the	  transmission	  of	  airborne	  pathogens.	  Generally,	  there	  are	  two	  options	  to	  reduce	  the	  quantity	  of	  particulate	  matter	  leaving	  a	  property	  with	  a	  poultry	  facility:	  (1) Emission control-­‐	  Reducing	  the	  amount	  of	  particulate	  matter	  leaving	  barn	  buildings	  through	  the	  use	  modified	  management	  practices	  or	  	  technical	  solutions	  such	  as	  electrostatic	  precipitators	  (e.g.	  Jerez,	  Mukhtar,	  &	  Faulker,	  2013)	  or	  filters.	  	  (2) Deposition control-­‐	  Enhancing	  deposition	  of	  already	  emitted	  particulate	  matter	  leaving	  the	  barn	  buildings.	  This	  increases	  deposition	  on	  the	  ground	  and	  vegetation	  (buffer)	  inside	  the	  property	  line,	  and	  consequently	  reduces	  emissions	  into	  atmosphere	  and	  depositing	  on	  neighboring	  properties.	  	  This	  report	  investigates	  the	  effectiveness	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  as	  a	  measure	  of	  deposition	  control.	  The	  study	  explores	  the	  effectiveness	  of	  various	  vegetative	  buffer	  layouts	  around	  poultry	  facilities	  to	  reduce	  emissions.	  The	  work	  builds	  upon	  earlier	  work	  by	  Pauls	  and	  Christen	  (2012)	  who	  simulated	  generic	  vegetative	  buffer	  layouts	  in	  a	  systematic	  approach,	  and	  found	  that	  vegetative	  buffers	  can	  reduce	  PM10	  emissions	  leaving	  the	  property	  by	  up	  to	  10%.	  The	  first	  option,	  the	  use	  of	  emission	  control	  at	  the	  source,	  will	  not	  be	  considered	  in	  this	  report.	  Vegetative	  buffers	  modify	  the	  airflow	  and	  filter	  the	  air	  flowing	  through	  them,	  which	  can	  enhance	  the	  deposition	  of	  particulate	  matter	  on	  leaves	  and	  ground.	  Deposition	  can	  be	  divided	  into	  two	  categories,	  wet	  and	  dry	  deposition	  (Oke,	  1987).	  Wet	  deposition	  occurs	  when	  atmospheric	  hydrometeors	  (rain,	  snow,	  etc)	  impact	  pollutant	  particles,	  thus	  removing	  them	  from	  the	  atmosphere.	  	  Dry	  deposition	  can	  be	  split	  into	  deposition	  by	  gravitational	  sedimentation	  and	  deposition	  by	  impaction	  on	  objects.	  In	  gravitational	  sedimentation,	  particles	  move	  towards	  a	  surface	  due	  to	  gravity.	  The	  gravitational	  settling	  is	  quantified	  by	  the	  settling	  velocity	  vs,	  which	  is	  dependent	  on	  particle	  density,	  diameter,	  aerodynamic	  properties,	  and	  the	  laminar	  boundary	  layer	  resistances	  of	  the	  surface	  (Seinfeld	  and	  Pandis,	  2006).	  The	  amount	  of	  deposition	  by	  sedimentation	  depends	  on	  the	  concentration	  of	  airborne	  particulate	  matter	  and	  wind	  (residual	  time	  over	  a	  surface).	  A	  vegetative	  buffer	  can	  reduce	  wind	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   7/114	  	  	  and	  reduce	  turbulent	  mixing,	  thus	  increasing	  local	  concentrations,	  which	  will	  lead	  to	  increased	  gravitational	  sedimentation.	  Deposition	  by	  impaction	  occurs	  when	  a	  particle	  collides	  with	  a	  surface	  (e.g.	  ground,	  leaves,	  structures)	  and	  is	  deposited	  there.	  This	  process	  is	  also	  more	  significant	  when	  concentrations	  are	  higher	  as	  a	  result	  of	  a	  vegetative	  buffer.	  The	  buffer	  provides	  additional	  surfaces	  in	  the	  form	  of	  individual	  leaves	  that	  increase	  the	  surface	  area	  available	  for	  particles	  to	  impact.	  Figure	  1.1	  illustrates	  the	  effect	  of	  adding	  a	  vegetative	  buffer	  to	  a	  situation	  where	  particulate	  matter	  emissions	  are	  present.	  	  Figure	   1.1:	   Hypothesized	   effect	   of	   vegetative	   buffers	   on	   pollutants	   near	   poultry	   barns.	   a.	   shows	   the	   situation	   before	   the	  addition	  of	  a	  buffer	  and	  b.	  shows	  the	  reduction	  due	  to	  the	  installation	  of	  vegetation.	  In	  this	  report,	  the	  effect	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  on	  particulate	  matter	  deposition	  will	  be	  examined.	  This	  will	  be	  done	  via	  numerical	  simulation	  using	  the	  micrometeorological	  flow	  and	  air	  pollution	  model	  ENVI-­‐met	  (described	  in	  Section	  2.1)	  to	  simulate	  air	  flow,	  emission,	  dispersion	  and	  depositing	  of	  particles	  below	  10	  μm	  in	  diameter	  (PM10).	  Five	  poultry	  facilities	  located	  in	  the	  Lower	  Fraser	  Valley,	  BC,	  Canada	  will	  be	  modeled	  and	  numerous	  vegetative	  buffer	  layouts	  and	  species	  compositions	  will	  be	  explored	  with	  the	  aim	  of	  reducing	  the	  deposition	  on	  neighboring	  properties	  and	  increasing	  deposition	  on	  the	  buffer	  and	  the	  facility's	  property.	  	  The	  report	  will	  firstly	  describe	  ENVI-­‐met	  and	  outline	  the	  steps	  taken	  to	  simulate	  deposition	  at	  each	  site	  and	  for	  each	  buffer	  and	  the	  analysis	  framework	  (Section	  2).	  The	  analysis	  methods	  will	  also	  be	  described.	  Each	  site	  will	  then	  be	  examined	  in	  detail	  and	  candidate	  buffer	  configurations	  chosen	  and	  compared	  (Sections	  3-­‐7).	  The	  report	  will	  make	  general	  conclusions	  about	  best	  practices	  to	  follow	  when	  defining	  8/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  vegetative	  buffers,	  drawing	  from	  the	  five	  case	  studies	  and	  the	  work	  by	  Pauls	  and	  Christen	  (2011)	  (Section	  8).	  2. Methods 2.1	  Model	  Description	  and	  Setup	  Simulation	  of	  air	  flow,	  particulate	  matter	  emission,	  dispersion	  and	  deposition	  will	  be	  done	  using	  the	  building	  and	  buffer-­‐resolving	  micrometeorological	  model	  ENVI-­‐met	  version	  3.1,	  Beta	  V.	  ENVI-­‐met	  is	  a	  3-­‐dimensional	  Eulerian	  computational	  fluid	  dynamics	  model	  (CFD)	  that	  is	  designed	  to	  simulate	  interactions	  between	  surfaces,	  buildings,	  plants	  and	  atmosphere.	  ENVI-­‐met	  is	  freeware	  and	  was	  programmed	  primarily	  for	  urban	  climate	  applications	  under	  the	  lead	  of	  Prof.	  Michael	  Bruse,	  Johannes	  Gutenberg-­‐Universität	  Mainz,	  Germany	  (Bruse	  and	  Flehr,	  1998).	  The	  air	  in	  ENVI-­‐met	  can	  contain	  particulate	  matter	  and	  gaseous	  emissions	  and	  can	  thus	  model	  PM10	  sources,	  dispersion	  and	  deposition	  (gravitational	  settling,	  impaction).	  It	  should	  be	  noted	  that	  the	  model	  only	  resolves	  dry	  deposition,	  not	  wet	  deposition	  and	  will	  not	  account	  for	  deposition	  of	  particulate	  matter	  by	  processes	  such	  as	  rain.	  For	  additional	  information	  on	  the	  particulars	  and	  functioning	  of	  the	  software,	  as	  well	  as	  a	  detailed	  description	  of	  the	  algorithms	  and	  methods	  used,	  refer	  to	  Bruse	  (2007). ENVI-­‐met	  contains	  an	  editor	  that	  allows	  the	  digitization	  of	  real-­‐world	  landscapes	  using	  a	  grid	  cell-­‐based	  model.	  Each	  of	  the	  five	  sites	  was	  modeled	  using	  a	  combination	  of	  site	  photography	  and	  aerial	  photography	  sourced	  from	  Google	  Maps.	  The	  modeled	  domain	  included	  the	  poultry	  barn	  buildings	  and	  the	  associated	  property,	  plus	  adjacent	  properties	  that	  were	  subject	  to	  potential	  particulate	  matter	  deposition.	  Both	  structures	  and	  vegetation	  were	  modeled,	  using	  a	  horizontal	  grid	  cell	  size	  of	  1.2	  m,	  with	  24	  vertical	  layers.	  The	  horizontal	  extents	  of	  the	  sites	  varied	  between	  140	  and	  280	  m	  in	  the	  x-­‐domain	  and	  160	  and	  150	  m	  in	  the	  y-­‐domain.	  Specific	  domain	  modeling	  considerations	  for	  each	  site,	  including	  source	  locations,	  vegetation	  descriptions	  and	  exact	  domain	  sizes	  are	  described	  in	  Sections	  3	  to	  7	  for	  each	  site.	  ENVI-­‐met	  runs	  were	  configured	  with	  meteorological	  and	  simulation	  parameters	  in	  order	  to	  be	  representative	  of	  the	  regional	  climatology.	  The	  location	  for	  simulation	  was	  set	  to	  49.17°N	  by	  123.08°W	  in	  Abbotsford,	  BC,	  Canada.	  The	  simulation	  start	  time	  was	  12:00	  for	  a	  total	  run	  duration	  of	  60	  minutes	  for	  each	  buffer	  layout	  and	  set	  of	  meteorological	  conditions.	  A	  neutral	  situation	  was	  simulated,	  with	  wind	  speeds	  of	  3	  ms-­‐1	  at	  10	  m	  a.g.l,	  which	  is	  representative	  of	  the	  region.	  Wind	  directions	  were	  chosen	  based	  on	  wind	  measurements	  taken	  from	  Environment	  Canada	  (Figure	  2.1).	  In	  most	  cases	  the	  average	  wind	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   9/114	  	  	  direction	  was	  taken	  as	  225°	  (from	  the	  southwest),	  though	  some	  runs	  were	  also	  performed	  using	  directions	  of	  255°	  and	  215°	  (respectively	  closer	  to	  the	  west	  and	  the	  south).	  Table 2.1: Vegetation types used in site buffers with selected ENVI-met parameters. Plant	  Name	   Plant	  Type	   Height	  	  (m)	   Leaf	  Area	  Density	  (m3	  m-­‐3)	   Albedo	  Excelsa	  (cedar)	   Coniferous	   10.0	   2.0	   0.2	  Excelsa	  (cedar)	  (young)	   Coniferous	   10.0	   2.0	   0.2	  Deciduous	  (Porosity	  Level	  1/5)	   Deciduous	   10.0	   1.5	   0.2	  Deciduous	  (Porosity	  Level	  2/5)	   Deciduous	   10.0	   1.0	   0.2	  Deciduous	  (Porosity	  Level	  3/5)	   Deciduous	   10.0	   0.5	   0.2	  Peaked	  Shelterbelt	   Coniferous	   10.0	   1.8	   0.2	  Hedging	  Cedar	  A	   Coniferous	   2.0	   2.0	   0.2	  Hedging	  Cedar	  B	   Coniferous	   3.0	   2.0	   0.2	  Hedging	  Cedar	  C	   Coniferous	   4.0	   2.0	   0.2	  	  10/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	   2.1:	  Wind	   roses	   for	   a.	   Chilliwack	   (WMO	   ID	   71113,	   49°10'19"	   N,	   121°55'28"	  W)	   and	   b.	   Abbotsford	   Airport	   (WMO	   ID	  71108,	  49°1'31"	  N,	  122°21'36"	  W)	  weather	  stations	  (2008-­‐2011	  data)	  for	  summer	  months.	  Wind	  speeds	  are	  consistently	  from	  the	  southwest.	  (Data	  Source:	  Environment	  Canada,	  MSC)	  	   	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   11/114	  	  	  All	  sites	  were	  simulated	  in	  a	  control	  state	  before	  buffers	  were	  added,	  in	  order	  to	  provide	  a	  basis	  for	  reduction	  comparison.	  All	  other	  layout	  and	  meteorological	  parameters	  were	  identical	  for	  these	  runs.	  Control	  runs	  were	  simulated	  by	  default	  with	  225°	  winds	  except	  in	  cases	  where	  buffer	  layouts	  included	  other	  wind	  directions.	  Additional	  ENVI-­‐met	  parameters	  used	  are	  listed	  in	  Table	  2.2.	  Table 2.2: Additional ENVI-met meteorological and layout parameters used in all simulations. The barn internal temperature was erroneously entered and is 20 K higher than expected; this is not expected to affect the simulation as ENVI-met does not simulate air transfer between building and atmosphere, and the conductive heat transfer effects will be significantly lower than any other factors with these meteorological conditions.  Parameter	   Value	  Initial	  atmospheric	  temperature	   293	  K	  Relative	  humidity	  (2m)	   50%	  Barn	  internal	  temperature	   318	  K	  (44ºC)	  Wall	  heat	  transmission	  	   1.94	  W	  m-­‐2	  K-­‐1	  Roof	  heat	  transmission	   6	  W	  m-­‐2	  K-­‐1	  Wall	  albedo	   0.2	  Roof	  albedo	   0.4	  	  2.2	  Model	  Limitations	  All	  model	  runs	  were	  run	  for	  an	  hour	  before	  data	  extraction,	  so	  we	  assume	  that	  a	  steady	  state	  was	  reached.	  A	  previous	  study	  by	  Pauls	  and	  Christen	  (2011)	  found	  that	  this	  was	  a	  relevant	  assumption.	  The	  air	  vented	  and	  loaded	  with	  particulate	  matter	  (i.e.	  the	  emission	  source)	  was	  also	  not	  heated	  as	  ENVI-­‐met	  does	  not	  allow	  this,	  with	  sources	  emitting	  PM10	  at	  a	  fixed	  rate	  into	  the	  grid	  cell	  occupied.	  This	  assumes	  that	  a	  rapid	  thermal	  mixing	  of	  the	  warm	  internal	  barn	  air	  with	  ambient	  cooler	  air	  occurs,	  which	  does	  not	  hold	  under	  low-­‐wind	  situations.	  	  2.3	  Analysis	  After	  simulations	  were	  completed,	  the	  data	  was	  imported	  into	  the	  Interactive	  Data	  Language	  (IDL,	  version	  8.1)	  analysis	  environment	  for	  post-­‐processing.	  For	  all	  analysis	  and	  graphs	  in	  section	  3,	  deposition	  values	  are	  given	  as	  normalized	  deposition	  (D*),	  derived	  from	  the	  predicted	  deposition	  rate	  in	  a	  grid	  cell	  D0	  (in	  µg	  m-­‐2	  s-­‐1),	  the	  area	  of	  the	  grid	  cell	  a	  (m2)	  and	  the	  total	  emission	  rate	  of	  all	  sources	  in	  the	  domain	  C	  (µg	  s-­‐1),	  as	  defined	  in	  Equation	  2.1.	  Normalizing	  deposition	  accounts	  for	  varying	  source	  strengths	  between	  sites	  and	  hence	  allows	  intercomparison	  between	  the	  five	  sites	  under	  different	  situations	  as	  12/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  well	  as	  any	  other	  cases	  with	  differing	  emission	  strength.	  It	  does	  not	  change	  the	  deposition	  patterns	  or	  relative	  magnitudes	  of	  the	  results.	   	   𝐷∗ = 𝐷?𝑎𝐶 	   (2.1) 	  In	  this	  report,	  we	  are	  interested	  in	  a	  comparative	  approach,	  i.e.	  comparing	  the	  change	  in	  D*	  between	  a	  control	  case	  and	  for	  the	  various	  buffer	  layouts	  in	  question.	  Each	  site	  is	  divided	  into	  four	  zones	  A	  through	  D,	  with	  A	  being	  the	  barn	  and	  property	  (facility)	  and	  the	  others	  describing	  surrounding	  properties.	  For	  each	  site,	  target	  zones	  are	  chosen;	  these	  are	  the	  sites	  in	  which	  we	  wish	  to	  reduce	  deposition.	  Other	  zones	  are	  referred	  to	  as	  non-­‐target	  zones.	  	  The	  deposition	  for	  each	  set	  of	  zones	  is	  calculated,	  and	  the	  values	  for	  each	  zone	  from	  the	  control	  layout	  are	  compared	  to	  the	  corresponding	  zone	  from	  each	  buffer	  case,	  creating	  percent	  changes:	  	   %  𝑐ℎ𝑎𝑛𝑔𝑒 =   𝐷∗ ™???? − 𝐷∗ ™?␥??𝐷∗ ™?␥?? ×100%	   (2.2) Here	  D*	  refers	  to	  the	  normalized	  deposition	  in	  a	  zone)	  for	  each	  set	  of	  zones	  (property,	  target	  zones	  and	  non-­‐target	  zones).	  This	  is	  a	  measure	  of	  buffer	  redistributive	  effectiveness.	  An	  effective	  buffer	  will	  increase	  deposition	  in	  zone	  A	  and	  decrease	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones.	  These	  changes	  are	  provided	  in	  graphical	  (example	  in	  Figure	  3.3a)	  and	  tabular	  (Table	  3.4)	  forms.	  	  We	  can	  also	  examine	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  throughout	  the	  simulated	  area.	  The	  fraction	  of	  the	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  a	  given	  zone	  can	  be	  calculated	  from	  the	  total	  emissions	  and	  the	  deposition.	  	  In	  addition,	  using	  ENVI-­‐met’s	  classification	  files,	  we	  can	  extract	  deposition	  on	  the	  buffer	  itself.	  Comparing	  these	  values	  gives	  information	  on	  effectiveness	  of	  buffer	  filtration,	  layouts	  with	  a	  higher	  proportion	  of	  deposition	  on	  the	  vegetative	  buffer	  will	  have	  higher	  filtration	  and	  are	  desirable.	  This	  is	  presented	  in	  a	  tabular	  fashion	  (Figure	  3.3b)	  and	  a	  graphical	  fashion	  (Table	  3.3).	  Lastly	  we	  can	  derive	  total	  emissions	  from	  the	  site	  to	  the	  environment	  (outside	  the	  domain	  of	  the	  simulation).	  Given	  steady-­‐state	  conditions,	  all	  particulate	  matter	  in	  the	  air,	  not	  deposited,	  will	  eventually	  leave	  the	  domain.	  We	  sum	  all	  deposition	  over	  the	  site	  and	  compare	  it	  to	  the	  total	  emitted	  quantity	  from	  the	  sources	  inside	  the	  site.	  This	  is	  done	  for	  both	  the	  control	  layout	  and	  the	  buffer	  layouts	  so	  a	  percent	  change	  can	  be	  calculated	  for	  each	  buffer	  configuration	  (examples	  in	  Tables	  3.3	  and	  3.4)	  Reductions	  in	  total	  emissions	  from	  the	  site	  to	  the	  environment	  are	  desirable.	  	   	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   13/114	  	  	  3. Site I 3.1	  Site	  Description	  Site	  I	  consists	  of	  a	  two-­‐story	  poultry	  barn	  (L	  =	  100	  m,	  W	  =	  15	  m,	  H	  =	  8	  m)	  with	  an	  east-­‐west	  orientation	  equipped	  with	  tunnel	  ventilation	  fans	  (Figure	  3.1c)	  at	  the	  eastern	  end.	  Raspberry	  fields	  to	  the	  north	  and	  east	  surround	  the	  barns	  and	  there	  have	  been	  cases	  where	  they	  have	  been	  affected	  by	  particulate	  matter	  deposition	  in	  the	  summer	  months.	  The	  area	  was	  digitized	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  3.1a	  for	  simulations	  with	  the	  vertical	  axis	  of	  the	  domain	  aligned	  to	  north.	  Vegetation	  parameters	  were	  chosen	  to	  match	  the	  vegetation	  present	  at	  the	  site	  (see	  Table	  2.1),	  with	  the	  berry	  bushes	  given	  a	  height	  of	  1.2	  m.	  PM10	  sources	  were	  placed	  at	  the	  eastern	  end	  of	  the	  barn	  covering	  the	  tunnel	  fan	  exhaust	  areas	  at	  a	  height	  of	  1.5	  m.	  The	  combined	  barn	  and	  field	  areas	  to	  be	  simulated	  span	  an	  area	  of	  240	  by	  200	  m.	  	  Figure	  3.1:	  a.	  Schematic	  map	  of	  Site	  I,	  showing	  barns	  to	  the	  southeast	  and	  berry	  fields	  to	  the	  north	  and	  east.	  PM10	  source	  areas	  are	  indicated	  in	  red.	  Blue	  arrow	  indicates	  direction	  and	  magnitude	  of	  the	  mean	  wind.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  zones	  for	  Site	  I	  showing	  barn	  (A)	  and	  berry	  plots	  (B-­‐D)	  in	  the	  modeled	  domain	  of	  240	  by	  200	  m.	  c.	  Partial	  panorama	  taken	  from	  centre	  of	  Site	  I,	  showing	  barn	  and	  example	  of	  installed	  buffer	  (Photos:	  BC	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture).	  14/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  The	  site	  was	  subdivided	  into	  4	  zones	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  3.1b,	  with	  zone	  A	  being	  the	  barn	  area	  delineated	  by	  the	  properly	  line,	  and	  zones	  B	  to	  D	  comprising	  the	  neighboring	  berry	  plots	  located	  to	  the	  north	  and	  east.	  A	  small	  shed	  is	  located	  in	  zone	  B	  but	  there	  are	  otherwise	  no	  built	  structures.	  For	  this	  site,	  the	  target	  zones	  for	  a	  reduction	  in	  PM10	  deposition	  are	  zones	  C	  and	  D.	  3.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  3.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  Sixteen	  different	  buffer	  layouts	  were	  simulated	  with	  varying	  buffer	  dimensions,	  placements	  and	  composition.	  Buffers	  were	  divided	  loosely	  into	  five	  categories	  examining	  length	  variation,	  corner	  structures,	  buffer	  thickness,	  buffer	  porosity	  and	  crenellated	  structures.	  The	  vegetation	  configurations	  for	  each	  layout	  are	  described	  below	  in	  Table	  3.1.	  Table	  3.1:	  List	  of	  layouts	  with	  description	  of	  buffer	  composition	  for	  each	  simulated	  configuration.	  	  Layout	  ID	   Layout	  Description	  control	   Control	  layout	  with	  no	  modification	  1	   Hedge	  of	  Excelsa	  on	  east	  property	  line	  extending	  2.5	  m	  wider	  than	  the	  barn.	  2	   Hedge	  of	  Excelsa	  on	  east	  property	  line	  extending	  10m	  wider	  than	  the	  barn.	  	  3	   Hedge	  of	  Excelsa	  on	  east	  property	  line	  extending	  10m	  wider	  than	  the	  barn	  to	  the	  south,	  and	  to	  property	  line	  on	  the	  north.	  4	   Hedge	  of	  Excelsa	  on	  east	  property	  line	  extending	  10m	  wider	  than	  the	  barn	  to	  the	  south,	  and	  to	  property	  line	  on	  the	  north.	  Hedging	  extends	  10m	  west	  on	  the	  north	  line.	  5	   Same	  as	  4	  with	  additional	  wind	  breaks	  on	  the	  south	  side	  in	  a	  diagonal	  pattern.	  6	   Same	  as	  4	  with	  zigzag	  pattern	  on	  both	  north	  and	  south	  sides	  of	  barn.	  7	   Same	  as	  4,	  but	  with	  hedge	  extension	  to	  the	  west	  on	  southern	  line.	  8	   Same	  as	  7	  but	  with	  north/south	  hedges	  extended	  further.	  9	   Same	  as	  7,	  but	  corners	  boxed	  in	  towards	  the	  barn.	  10	   Same	  as	  7,	  but	  smaller	  corners	  and	  doubled	  Excelsa	  hedge	  thickness	  11	   Same	  as	  7,	  but	  hedge	  is	  of	  double	  thickness	  12	   Same	  as	  8,	  but	  hedge	  is	  of	  double	  thickness	  13	   Same	  as	  9,	  but	  hedge	  is	  of	  double	  thickness	  14	   Same	  as	  8,	  but	  row	  of	  deciduous	  trees	  outside	  the	  Excelsa	  row	  (porosity	  level	  1/5)	  15	   Same	  as	  8,	  but	  row	  of	  deciduous	  trees	  outside	  the	  Excelsa	  row	  (porosity	  level	  2/5)	  16	   Same	  as	  8,	  but	  row	  of	  deciduous	  trees	  outside	  the	  Excelsa	  row	  (porosity	  level	  3/5)	  	  ENVI-­‐met	  simulations	  were	  undertaken	  for	  the	  above	  layouts	  with	  meteorological	  conditions	  typical	  for	  the	  area.	  In	  all	  cases,	  a	  wind	  speed	  of	  3.0	  m	  s-­‐1	  measured	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level	  was	  used.	  A	  225	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   15/114	  	  	  degree	  wind	  direction	  was	  used	  for	  all	  runs.	  This	  accounted	  for	  the	  typical	  summer	  wind	  directions	  in	  the	  study	  area.	  In	  total	  15	  simulation	  runs	  were	  completed,	  summarized	  in	  Table	  3.2.	  Table	  3.2:	  List	  of	  ENVI-­‐met	  runs	  showing	  layout	  used	  and	  corresponding	  wind	  direction	  relative	  to	  geographic	  north.	  All	  wind	  speeds	  were	  3	  m	  s-­‐1	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level.	  Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	   	   Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	  site1_control_225_3	   control	   225	   	   site1_9_225_3	   9	   225	  site1_1_225_3	   1	   225	   	   site1_10_225_3	   10	   225	  site1_2_225_3	   2	   225	   	   site1_11_225_3	   11	   225	  site1_3_225_3	   3	   225	   	   site1_12_225_3	   12	   225	  site1_4_225_3	   4	   225	   	   site1_13_225_3	   13	   225	  site1_5_225_3	   5	   225	   	   site1_14_225_3	   14	   225	  site1_6_225_3	   6	   225	   	   site1_15_225_3	   15	   225	  site1_7_225_3	   7	   225	   	   site1_16_225_3	   16	   225	  site1_8_225_3	   8	   225	   	   	   	   	  	  A	  map	  showing	  deposition	  of	  PM10	  for	  the	  control	  case	  in	  a	  wind	  of	  225	  is	  shown	  in	  Figure	  3.2	  below.	  It	  shows	  a	  distinct	  plume	  impinging	  on	  the	  north-­‐eastern	  section	  of	  the	  area	  (zones	  C	  and	  D).	  This	  layout’s	  target	  zones	  for	  reduction	  are	  therefore	  C	  and	  D.	  	  Figure	  3.2:	  Deposition	  map	  for	  control	  run	  with	  a	  wind	  direction	  of	  225°.	  	  	  16/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  3.2.2	  Buffer	  Length	  	  Layouts	  1	  to	  3	  were	  used	  to	  examine	  the	  effects	  of	  increasing	  buffer	  length	  on	  deposition	  patterns.	  These	  three	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  3.3	  below,	  showing	  the	  exact	  configuration	  of	  the	  buffer	  and	  its	  composition.	  	  Figure	  3.3:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  01,	  02,	  03,	  showing	  variation	  in	  vegetative	  buffer	  length.	  	  Figure	  3.4:	  	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  I	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   17/114	  	  	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  3.4	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  within	  the	  simulated	  area.	  Figure	  3.4a	  shows	  the	  percent	  change	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case,	  and	  Figure	  3.4b	  shows	  how	  deposition	  is	  distributed	  for	  each	  buffer	  layout.	  Table	  3.3:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  variations	  in	  length	  of	  buffer.	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.84	   5.00	   0.12	   -­‐	   92.05	  1	   2.77	   4.53	   0.15	   0.43	   92.13	  2	   2.48	   4.15	   0.18	   1.17	   92.02	  3	   1.85	   3.60	   0.20	   2.68	   91.67	  	  Table	  3.4:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  variations	  in	  length	  of	  buffer.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  1	   2.26	   -­‐1.84	   0.52	   0.08	  2	   3.41	   -­‐2.7	   0.93	   -­‐0.02	  3	   5.43	   -­‐4.03	   1.73	   -­‐0.38	  	  Figure	  3.5:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  1,	  b.	  Layout	  2,	  c.	  Layout	  3.	  Tables	  3.3	  and	  3.4	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  increasing	  buffer	  length	  on	  deposition	  in	  the	  site.	  Layout	  3	  with	  the	  longest	  buffer	  increases	  deposition	  on	  the	  property	  by	  +5.43%	  versus	  layout	  1's	  increase	  of	  18/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  +2.26%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  is	  decreased	  by	  -­‐4.03%	  in	  layout	  3	  and	  by	  -­‐1.84%	  in	  layout	  1's	  shorter	  buffer.	  The	  longer	  buffer	  also	  intercepts	  up	  to	  2.68%	  of	  the	  total	  emissions	  from	  the	  site	  and	  the	  shorter	  buffer	  only	  intercepts	  0.43%	  as	  it	  partially	  misses	  the	  plume.	  Longer	  buffers	  also	  have	  the	  capacity	  to	  slightly	  reduce	  site	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  -­‐	  the	  longest	  buffer	  achieved	  a	  reduction	  of	  0.38%	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  atmosphere	  outside	  the	  simulated	  area.	  	  Figure	  3.5	  maps	  the	  changes	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case	  for	  each	  of	  the	  three	  layouts.	  It	  can	  be	  seen	  from	  Figure	  3.5c	  that	  the	  longer	  buffer	  is	  the	  most	  effective,	  increasing	  deposition	  on	  the	  buffer	  and	  sowing	  a	  small	  decrease	  in	  deposition	  on	  the	  berry	  patches.	  3.2.3	  Buffer	  Corner	  Structures	  Layouts	  4,	  7,	  8	  and	  9	  examined	  the	  effect	  of	  adding	  corner	  structures	  to	  one	  or	  both	  ends	  of	  the	  longest	  buffer	  from	  section	  3.2.3	  (Layout	  3).	  These	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  3.6	  below.	  	  	  Figure	  3.6:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  04,	  07,	  08	  and	  09,	  showing	  configurations	  of	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  3.7	  shows	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition.	  	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   19/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.7:	  	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  I	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  3.5:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures.	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.84	   5.00	   0.12	   -­‐	   92.05	  4	   1.43	   3.41	   0.09	   3.32	   91.76	  7	   1.35	   3.44	   0.05	   3.36	   91.81	  8	   1.36	   3.46	   0.04	   3.40	   91.74	  9	   1.35	   3.44	   0.05	   3.37	   91.79	  	  Table	  3.6:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  4	   7.72	   -­‐5.61	   0.24	   -­‐0.29	  7	   6.58	   -­‐5.2	   -­‐0.67	   -­‐0.24	  8	   6.35	   -­‐4.82	   -­‐0.83	   -­‐0.30	  9	   6.55	   -­‐4.83	   -­‐0.67	   -­‐0.25	  20/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.8:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  4,	  b.	  Layout	  7,	  c.	  Layout	  8,	  d.	  Layout	  9.	  Tables	  3.5	  and	  3.6	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  various	  corner	  structures	  on	  deposition	  in	  the	  site.	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +7.72%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  4	  and	  the	  lowest	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  8	  at	  +6.35%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  is	  similarly	  decreased	  in	  these	  layouts	  (-­‐5.61%	  and	  -­‐4.82%).	  However,	  this	  pattern	  is	  reversed	  when	  examining	  buffer	  interception.	  3.40%	  of	  the	  emissions	  are	  intercepted	  in	  layout	  8,	  and	  3.32%	  in	  layout	  4.	  This	  is	  also	  seen	  when	  comparing	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  -­‐	  layout	  8	  shows	  the	  highest	  reduction	  at	  -­‐0.30%,	  though	  layout	  4	  is	  almost	  the	  same	  at	  0.29%.	  	  Figure	  3.8	  shows	  maps	  of	  deposition	  changes	  for	  these	  four	  layouts.	  Patterns	  are	  similar	  in	  all	  cases	  with	  strong	  interception	  by	  the	  buffer	  in	  the	  northeast	  corner	  and	  a	  reduction	  in	  the	  deposition	  plume	  in	  the	  fields.	  Corner	  structures	  in	  the	  northwest,	  southwest	  and	  southeast	  do	  not	  appear	  to	  contribute	  significantly	  to	  changing	  the	  buffer’s	  performance.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   21/114	  	  	  3.2.4	  Buffer	  Thickness	  Layouts	  10	  through	  13	  were	  configured	  to	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  a	  second	  row	  of	  Excelsa	  cedar	  trees	  placed	  behind	  the	  buffer	  (Figure	  3.9).	  These	  layouts	  are	  otherwise	  identical	  to	  the	  corner	  structures	  simulated	  previously	  (Layouts	  4,	  7,	  8	  and	  9).	  	  	  Figure	  3.9:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  10,	  11,	  12	  and	  13	  showing	  vegetative	  buffers	  of	  doubled	  thickness.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  3.10	  shows	  the	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  and	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  in	  each	  layout.	  	  	  Figure	  3.10:	  	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  I	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  22/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Table	  3.7:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  width.	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.84	   5.00	   0.12	   -­‐	   92.05	  10	   1.00	   3.22	   0.08	   4.38	   91.32	  11	   0.92	   3.31	   0.04	   4.40	   91.34	  12	   0.93	   3.34	   0.03	   4.39	   91.31	  13	   0.94	   3.33	   0.04	   4.32	   91.38	  	  Table	  3.8:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  width.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  10	   11.53	   -­‐6.59	   0.4	   -­‐0.72	  11	   9.33	   -­‐5.6	   -­‐0.82	   -­‐0.71	  12	   9.06	   -­‐4.97	   -­‐0.98	   -­‐0.73	  13	   9.22	   -­‐4.97	   -­‐0.84	   -­‐0.67	  	  Tables	  3.7	  and	  3.8	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  doubled	  thickness	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  I.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +11.53%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  10	  and	  the	  lowest	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  12	  at	  +9.06%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  is	  similarly	  decreased	  in	  these	  layouts	  (-­‐6.59%	  and	  -­‐4.97%).	  High	  buffer	  interception	  at	  similar	  levels	  (4.38%,	  4.40%	  and	  4.39%)	  is	  found	  for	  layouts	  10,	  11	  and	  12	  respectively.	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  by	  up	  to	  -­‐0.73%	  in	  the	  case	  of	  layout	  12.	  	  Figure	  3.11	  maps	  the	  deposition	  change	  for	  these	  layouts.	  Patterns	  are	  similar	  to	  the	  single-­‐row	  buffers	  but	  intensified	  with	  higher	  buffer	  deposition	  and	  higher	  reductions	  visible	  in	  the	  berry	  fields.	  	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   23/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.11:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  10,	  b.	  Layout	  11,	  c.	  Layout	  12,	  d.	  Layout	  13.	  3.2.5	  Buffer	  Porosity	  Layouts	  14	  through	  16	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  using	  a	  two-­‐row-­‐buffer	  as	  above,	  but	  with	  the	  outer	  row	  of	  Excelsa	  cedar	  replaced	  by	  deciduous	  trees	  of	  varying	  porosities	  from	  low	  to	  high	  (Figure	  3.12).	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  3.13	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  and	  describes	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  shows	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  within	  each	  layout.	  	  	  	  24/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.12:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  14,	  15	  and	  16	  showing	  addition	  of	  deciduous	  rows	  with	  varying	  porosity.	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.13:	  	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  I	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   25/114	  	  	  Table	  3.9:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  porosities.	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.84	   5.00	   0.12	   -­‐	   92.05	  14	   1.26	   3.44	   0.04	   6.43	   88.83	  15	   1.20	   3.28	   0.04	   6.00	   89.48	  16	   1.15	   3.11	   0.04	   5.64	   90.06	  	  Table	  3.10:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  14	   17.61	   -­‐4.30	   -­‐0.74	   -­‐3.22	  15	   16.31	   -­‐4.81	   -­‐0.78	   -­‐2.56	  16	   15.37	   -­‐5.55	   -­‐0.78	   -­‐1.99	  	  Tables	  3.9	  and	  3.10	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  changing	  porosity	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  I.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +17.61%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  14	  with	  the	  highest	  second-­‐row	  porosity	  and	  the	  lowest	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  16	  at	  +15.37%	  with	  the	  lowest	  second-­‐row	  porosity.	  Interception	  of	  PM10	  by	  the	  buffer	  also	  follows	  this	  pattern	  with	  layout	  14	  interception	  6.43%	  of	  emission.	  However,	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  follows	  an	  opposite	  trend,	  with	  lower	  buffer	  porosities	  leading	  to	  higher	  reduction	  (up	  to	  -­‐5.55%)	  in	  target	  zone	  deposition.	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  significantly	  by	  up	  to	  -­‐3.22%	  in	  layout	  14	  with	  high	  second-­‐row	  porosity.	  Figure	  3.14	  shows	  high	  deposition	  on	  the	  buffer	  and	  a	  corresponding	  reduction	  in	  the	  plume	  entering	  the	  berry	  fields.	  All	  three	  layouts	  show	  similar	  patterns,	  but	  the	  higher	  on-­‐buffer	  deposition	  is	  visible	  in	  Figure	  3.14a	  for	  layout	  14.	  	  26/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.14:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  14,	  b.	  Layout	  15,	  c.	  Layout	  16.	  3.2.6	  Crenellated	  Buffers	  Layouts	  5	  and	  6	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  adding	  crenellated	  structures	  to	  the	  layout	  4	  buffer	  (longest	  buffer).	  These	  structures	  are	  mapped	  below	  in	  Figure	  3.15.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  3.16	  makes	  these	  comparisons	  showing	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  are	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  describing	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts.	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.15:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  05	  and	  06,	  showing	  addition	  of	  crenellated	  and	  diagonal	  buffer	  structures.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   27/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.16:	  	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  I	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  3.11:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  buffers	  with	  crenellated	  structures.	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.84	   5.00	   0.12	   -­‐	   92.05	  5	   1.20	   3.43	   0.06	   3.08	   92.23	  6	   1.07	   3.38	   0.07	   2.82	   92.65	  	  Table	  3.12:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  I	  for	  buffers	  with	  crenellated	  structures	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  5	   4.93	   -­‐5.39	   -­‐0.28	   0.18	  6	   4.22	   -­‐5.24	   -­‐0.05	   0.61	  	  Tables	  3.11	  and	  3.12	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  these	  buffer	  configurations	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  I.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +4.93%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  5,	  which	  contains	  slashed	  diagonal	  buffers	  to	  the	  south.	  The	  highest	  interception	  by	  the	  buffer	  (3.08%)	  also	  occurs	  in	  this	  layout.	  In	  both	  cases,	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  increase	  instead	  of	  decreasing	  –	  this	  increase	  is	  lowest	  in	  layout	  5	  (+0.18%).	  	  28/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.17	  shows	  the	  deposition	  change	  patters	  for	  both	  buffers.	  It	  appears	  that	  Layout	  6	  diverts	  the	  plume	  such	  that	  it	  does	  not	  intersect	  the	  corner	  of	  the	  buffer,	  thus	  decreasing	  interception	  and	  therefore	  effectiveness	  of	  the	  configuration.	  Layout	  5	  shows	  similar	  patterns	  to	  most	  of	  the	  cornered	  layouts	  examined	  for	  this	  site.	  	  	  Figure	  3.17:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  5,	  b.	  Layout	  6.	  3.3	  Summary	  Overall,	  Site	  I	  benefited	  from	  the	  installation	  of	  a	  buffer,	  with	  reductions	  in	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  of	  up	  to	  -­‐3.22%	  in	  the	  case	  of	  the	  overall	  most	  effective	  buffer.	  Table	  3.13	  summarizes	  the	  buffers	  that	  were	  most	  effective	  in	  each	  subcategory	  at	  reducing	  emissions	  in	  the	  target	  zones.	  	  	  Table	  3.13:	  Summary	  of	  buffer	  effectiveness	  for	  Site	  I.	  Category	   Most	  effective	  layout	   Reduction	  in	  target	  zones	  (%)	   Increase	  on	  property	  (%)	   Buffer	  interception	  (%)	   Environmental	  emissions	  reduction	  (%)	  Length	   3	   -­‐4.03	   +5.43	   2.68	   -­‐0.38	  Corners	   4	   -­‐5.61	   +7.72	   3.32	   -­‐0.29	  Doubling	   10	   -­‐6.59	   +11.53	   4.38	   -­‐0.72	  Porosity	   14	   -­‐4.30	   +17.61	   6.43	   -­‐3.22	  Crenellation	   5	   -­‐5.39	   +4.93	   3.08	   +0.18	  Cornered	  buffers	  were	  in	  general	  the	  most	  effective	  –	  all	  cases	  of	  high	  buffer	  effectiveness	  included	  at	  least	  a	  corner	  in	  the	  northeast	  of	  the	  site.	  In	  case	  of	  a	  linear	  buffer	  oblique	  to	  the	  mean	  airflow,	  the	  plume	  is	  more	  easily	  displaced	  along	  the	  buffer’s	  front	  until	  the	  plume	  reaches	  the	  end	  of	  the	  buffer	  and	  again	  turns	  around	  into	  the	  mean	  wind.	  A	  corner	  structure	  funnels	  the	  flow	  between	  the	  two	  sections,	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   29/114	  	  	  builds	  up	  higher	  dynamic	  pressure	  near	  the	  corner	  so	  the	  plume	  is	  either	  forced	  through	  the	  buffer	  and/or	  must	  moves	  up	  and	  over	  the	  buffer.	  	  It	  can	  be	  concluded	  that	  simple	  linear	  buffers	  should	  hence	  be	  avoided	  to	  maximize	  reductions	  in	  deposition	  on	  neighboring	  properties	  and	  account	  for	  variations	  in	  wind	  direction.	  It	  is	  also	  evident	  from	  the	  simulations	  that	  increasing	  the	  buffer	  thickness	  increases	  the	  effectiveness	  of	  the	  buffer,	  both	  sets	  of	  highly	  effective	  layouts	  included	  double	  rows	  of	  buffer	  vegetation.	  Interestingly,	  the	  most	  effective	  double-­‐rowed	  layouts	  combined	  a	  10	  m	  tall	  Excelsa	  inner	  buffer	  with	  a	  second	  row	  of	  taller	  (15	  m)	  deciduous	  trees.	  Of	  these	  layouts,	  those	  with	  an	  outer	  row	  of	  low-­‐porosity	  deciduous	  trees	  were	  most	  effective.	  This	  layout	  has	  an	  increasing	  porosity	  with	  height	  meaning	  it	  creates	  a	  flow	  where	  progressively	  with	  height	  the	  unobstructed	  flow	  is	  reached	  without	  sharp	  dynamic	  pressure	  differences.	  The	  lack	  of	  strong	  pressure	  differences	  reduces	  flow	  deflection	  around	  and	  over	  the	  buffer,	  and	  rather	  creates	  a	  steady	  flow	  though	  the	  buffer.	  Adding	  crenellations	  or	  other	  structures	  was	  ineffective,	  tending	  failing	  to	  reduce	  environmental	  emission	  significantly	  and	  performing	  in	  some	  cases	  almost	  as	  poorly	  as	  a	  simple	  linear	  buffer.	  	  	  	   	  30/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  4. Site II 4.1	  Site	  Description	  Site	  II	  consists	  of	  a	  large	  single-­‐story	  barn	  (L	  =67	  m,	  W	  =	  22	  m,	  H	  =	  8	  m)	  with	  hooded	  fan	  ventilation.	  There	  are	  9	  hooded	  fans	  on	  the	  north	  and	  south	  sides	  of	  the	  barn	  (shown	  in	  Figure	  4.1b).	  To	  the	  north	  and	  east	  are	  located	  several	  berry	  fields,	  with	  neighboring	  built	  structures	  located	  to	  the	  west	  and	  northwest.	  The	  area	  was	  digitized	  as	  per	  Figure	  4.1a	  for	  simulations;	  vegetation	  parameters	  were	  matched	  to	  site	  vegetation.	  PM10	  sources	  were	  placed	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  4.1a	  at	  the	  locations	  of	  the	  exhaust	  fans.	  The	  entire	  simulated	  area	  covers	  a	  248	  by	  156	  m	  area.	  	  Figure	  4.1:	  a.	  Schematic	  map	  of	  Site	  II,	  showing	  barns	  to	  the	  southeast	  and	  berry	  fields	  to	  the	  north	  and	  east.	  PM10	  source	  areas	  are	  indicated	  in	  red.	  Blue	  arrow	  indicates	  direction	  and	  magnitude	  of	  the	  mean	  wind.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  zones	  for	  Site	  II	  showing	  barn	  (A),	  neighboring	  structures	  (B)	  and	  additional	  fields	  (C-­‐D)	  in	  the	  modeled	  domain	  of	  248	  by	  156	  m.	  c.	  Partial	  panorama	  taken	  from	  centre	  of	  Site	  II,	  showing	  the	  barn	  and	  fans	  (Photo:	  BC	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture).	  The	  site	  was	  subdivided	  into	  4	  zones	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  4.1b,	  with	  zone	  A	  being	  the	  barn	  area	  and	  farmhouse	  delineated	  by	  the	  properly	  line.	  Zone	  B	  includes	  additional	  built	  structures	  and	  field	  to	  the	  north.	  Zones	  C	  to	  D	  comprising	  the	  neighboring	  berry	  plots	  located	  to	  the	  northeast	  and	  east.	  For	  this	  site,	  the	  target	  zones	  for	  a	  reduction	  in	  PM10	  deposition	  are	  zones	  C	  and	  D.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   31/114	  	  	  4.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  4.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  Thirty	  different	  buffer	  layouts	  were	  simulated	  with	  varying	  buffer	  dimensions,	  placements	  and	  composition.	  Buffers	  were	  divided	  into	  two	  primary	  categories	  -­‐	  those	  using	  hedging	  cedar	  (from	  3	  to	  5	  m	  in	  height)	  and	  those	  using	  Excelsa	  cedar	  (10	  m	  in	  height).	  Hedging	  cedar	  runs	  were	  divided	  into	  two	  categories,	  examining	  the	  effect	  proximity	  of	  the	  buffer	  to	  the	  barn	  and	  examining	  the	  effect	  of	  small	  buffer	  structures	  placed	  around	  exhaust	  fans.	  The	  vegetation	  configurations	  for	  each	  layout	  are	  described	  below	  in	  Table	  4.1.	  Table	  4.1:	  List	  of	  layouts	  with	  description	  of	  buffer	  composition	  for	  each	  simulated	  configuration.	  Layout	  ID	   Layout	  Description	  control	   Control	  layout	  with	  no	  modification	  1	   Hedge	  of	  Excelsa	  on	  east	  property	  line	  extending	  2.5	  m	  wider	  than	  the	  barn.	  2	   Hedge	  of	  Excelsa	  on	  east	  property	  line	  extending	  10m	  wider	  than	  the	  barn.	  	  3	   Hedge	  of	  Excelsa	  on	  east	  property	  line	  extending	  10m	  wider	  than	  the	  barn	  to	  the	  south,	  and	  to	  property	  line	  on	  the	  north.	  4	   Hedge	  of	  Excelsa	  on	  east	  property	  line	  extending	  10m	  wider	  than	  the	  barn	  to	  the	  south,	  and	  to	  property	  line	  on	  the	  north.	  Hedging	  extends	  10m	  west	  on	  the	  north	  line.	  5	   Same	  as	  4	  with	  additional	  wind	  breaks	  on	  the	  south	  side	  in	  a	  diagonal	  pattern.	  6	   Same	  as	  4	  with	  zigzag	  pattern	  on	  both	  north	  and	  south	  sides	  of	  barn.	  7	   Same	  as	  4,	  but	  with	  hedge	  extension	  to	  the	  west	  on	  southern	  line.	  8	   Same	  as	  7	  but	  with	  north/south	  hedges	  extended	  further.	  9	   Same	  as	  7,	  but	  corners	  boxed	  in	  towards	  the	  barn.	  10	   Same	  as	  7,	  but	  smaller	  corners	  and	  doubled	  Excelsa	  hedge	  thickness	  11	   Same	  as	  7,	  but	  hedge	  is	  of	  double	  thickness	  12	   Same	  as	  8,	  but	  hedge	  is	  of	  double	  thickness	  13	   Same	  as	  9,	  but	  hedge	  is	  of	  double	  thickness	  14	   Same	  as	  8,	  but	  row	  of	  deciduous	  trees	  outside	  the	  Excelsa	  row	  (porosity	  level	  1/5)	  15	   Same	  as	  8,	  but	  row	  of	  deciduous	  trees	  outside	  the	  Excelsa	  row	  (porosity	  level	  2/5)	  16	   Same	  as	  8,	  but	  row	  of	  deciduous	  trees	  outside	  the	  Excelsa	  row	  (porosity	  level	  3/5)	  17	   Same	  as	  16,	  but	  no	  outer	  hedge	  18	   Same	  as	  17,	  but	  further	  out.	  20	   Same	  as	  18,	  but	  further	  out	  22	   Same	  as	  20,	  but	  further	  out	  23	   Same	  as	  22,	  but	  further	  out	  24	   Same	  as	  23,	  but	  no	  southern	  hedge	  25	   Northern	  perimeter	  thick	  Excelsa,	  two	  rows	  of	  Excelsa	  to	  the	  east	  26	   As	  25,	  but	  with	  tall	  Excelsa	  trees	  	  	   	  32/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  ENVI-­‐met	  simulations	  were	  undertaken	  for	  the	  above	  layouts	  with	  meteorological	  conditions	  typical	  for	  the	  area.	  In	  all	  cases,	  a	  wind	  speed	  of	  3.0	  m	  s-­‐1measured	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level	  was	  used.	  A	  225	  degree	  wind	  direction	  was	  used	  for	  all	  runs.	  This	  accounted	  for	  the	  typical	  summer	  wind	  directions	  in	  the	  study	  area.	  In	  total	  25	  simulation	  runs	  were	  completed,	  summarized	  in	  Table	  4.2.	  Table	  4.2:	  List	  of	  ENVI-­‐met	  runs	  showing	  layout	  used	  and	  corresponding	  wind	  direction	  relative	  to	  geographic	  north.	  All	  wind	  speeds	  were	  3	  m	  s-­‐1	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level.	  Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	   	   Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	  site2_control_225_3	   control	   225	   	   site2_13_225_3	   13	   225	  site2_1_225_3	   1	   225	   	   site2_14_225_3	   14	   225	  site2_2_225_3	   2	   225	   	   site2_15_225_3	   15	   225	  site2_3_225_3	   3	   225	   	   site2_16_225_3	   16	   225	  site2_4_225_3	   4	   225	   	   site2_17_225_3	   17	   225	  site2_5_225_3	   5	   225	   	   site2_18_225_3	   18	   225	  site2_6_225_3	   6	   225	   	   site2_20_225_3	   20	   225	  site2_7_225_3	   7	   225	   	   site2_22_225_3	   22	   225	  site2_8_225_3	   8	   225	   	   site2_23_225_3	   23	   225	  site2_9_225_3	   9	   225	   	   site2_24_225_3	   24	   225	  site2_10_225_3	   10	   225	   	   site2_25_225_3	   25	   225	  site2_11_225_3	   11	   225	   	   site2_26_225_3	   26	   225	  site2_12_225_3	   12	   225	   	   	   	   	  	  	  Figure	  4.2:	  Deposition	  map	  for	  control	  run	  with	  a	  wind	  direction	  of	  225°.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   33/114	  	  	  A	  map	  showing	  deposition	  of	  PM10	  for	  the	  control	  case	  in	  a	  wind	  of	  225	  is	  shown	  in	  Figure	  3.2	  below.	  It	  shows	  a	  distinct	  plume	  impinging	  on	  the	  north-­‐eastern	  section	  of	  the	  area	  (zones	  C	  and	  D).	  This	  layout’s	  target	  zones	  for	  reduction	  are	  therefore	  C	  and	  D.	  4.2.2	  Hedging	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Buffer	  Proximity	  	  Layouts	  1	  to	  5	  were	  used	  largely	  to	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  a	  perimeter	  of	  hedging	  cedar	  placed	  around	  the	  barn.	  In	  addition,	  the	  effects	  of	  using	  a	  thicker	  or	  split-­‐row	  perimeter	  were	  also	  examined.	  These	  three	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  4.3	  below,	  showing	  the	  exact	  configuration	  of	  the	  buffer	  and	  its	  composition.	  	  Figure	  4.3:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  01	  to	  05,	  showing	  variation	  in	  vegetative	  buffer	  length.	  34/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.4:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  II	  by	  zone.b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  4.4	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  within	  the	  simulated	  area.	  Figure	  4.4a	  shows	  the	  percent	  change	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case,	  and	  Figure	  4.4b	  shows	  how	  deposition	  is	  distributed	  for	  each	  buffer	  layout.	  Table	  4.3:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  variations	  in	  proximity	  of	  cedar	  buffer.	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   6.13	   1.55	   1.35	   -­‐	   90.97	  1	   5.95	   1.17	   1.34	   0.70	   90.85	  2	   5.88	   1.06	   1.33	   1.10	   90.63	  3	   5.21	   1.53	   1.35	   0.50	   91.41	  4	   5.10	   1.50	   1.36	   0.78	   91.26	  5	   5.32	   1.47	   1.36	   0.93	   90.92	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   35/114	  	  	  	  Table	  4.4:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  variations	  in	  proximity	  of	  cedar	  buffer.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  1	   2.70	   -­‐2.92	   -­‐0.26	   -­‐0.12	  2	   4.59	   -­‐3.75	   -­‐0.15	   -­‐0.35	  3	   -­‐1.05	   0.11	   -­‐0.03	   0.43	  4	   0.34	   -­‐0.10	   0.23	   0.29	  5	   1.41	   -­‐0.37	   0.31	   -­‐0.06	  	  Figure	  4.5:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  1,	  b.	  Layout	  2,	  c.	  Layout	  3,	  d.	  Layout	  4,	  e.	  Layout	  5.	  36/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Tables	  4.3	  and	  4.4	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  increasing	  buffer	  length	  on	  deposition	  in	  the	  site.	  Layout	  2	  with	  a	  thick	  buffer	  furthest	  from	  the	  barn	  increases	  deposition	  on	  the	  property	  by	  the	  highest	  amount	  (+4.59%).	  Ineffective	  layouts	  include	  3	  (thin	  buffer	  close	  to	  barn),	  which	  reduces	  property	  deposition	  by	  -­‐1.05%,	  and	  4	  (thin,	  split	  buffer)	  which	  has	  a	  small	  increase	  of	  0.34%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  is	  follows	  similar	  patterns,	  with	  deposition	  decreased	  by	  -­‐3.75%	  in	  layout	  3,	  and	  increases	  or	  low	  decreases	  in	  layouts	  3	  and	  4.	  Buffer	  interception	  is	  highest	  in	  layout	  2	  (1.10%	  of	  total	  emissions)	  and	  lowest	  in	  layout	  3	  (0.50%).	  This	  pattern	  also	  holds	  when	  looking	  at	  the	  change	  in	  total	  environmental	  emissions,	  layout	  3	  is	  the	  best	  with	  a	  -­‐0.35%	  reduction,	  while	  layouts	  3	  and	  4	  are	  the	  worst,	  increasing	  emission	  by	  +0.43	  and	  0.29%.	  Figure	  4.5	  maps	  the	  changes	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case	  for	  each	  of	  the	  three	  layouts.	  It	  can	  be	  seen	  that	  most	  layouts	  show	  little	  change,	  with	  some	  small	  amount	  of	  deposition	  on	  hedging	  to	  the	  north.	  Layout	  3	  shows	  the	  most	  change,	  an	  increase	  in	  deposition	  near	  the	  northeast	  of	  the	  buffer.	  	  4.2.3	  Hedging	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Per-­‐Fan	  Buffers	  Layouts	  6	  to	  10	  examined	  the	  effect	  of	  adding	  small	  buffer	  structures	  around	  each	  fan.	  These	  take	  the	  form	  of	  diagonal	  patterns,	  linear	  features	  and	  zigzags.	  These	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  4.6	  below.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   37/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.6:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  06	  to	  10,	  showing	  configurations	  of	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  4.7	  shows	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition.	  	  	  38/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.7:a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  II	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  4.5:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures.	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   6.13	   1.55	   1.35	   -­‐	   90.97	  6	   4.42	   1.58	   1.36	   0.62	   92.02	  7	   4.18	   1.60	   1.35	   0.80	   92.08	  8	   3.29	   1.67	   1.32	   2.32	   91.40	  9	   3.29	   1.67	   1.32	   2.32	   91.40	  10	   2.89	   1.62	   1.35	   2.67	   91.47	  	  Tables	  4.5	  and	  4.6	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  per-­‐fan	  buffers	  in	  the	  site.	  These	  buffers	  are	  generally	  ineffective	  and	  almost	  all	  decrease	  deposition	  on	  the	  property	  by	  up	  to	  -­‐1.52%	  in	  layout	  6.	  The	  only	  exception	  is	  layout	  10	  with	  a	  minimal	  increase	  of	  0.06%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  follows	  a	  similar	  pattern,	  with	  all	  buffer	  layouts	  causing	  an	  increase	  in	  deposition,	  which	  is	  highest	  in	  layouts	  8	  and	  9	  at	  +3.08%.	  The	  lowest	  change	  is	  +1.11%	  in	  layout	  6.	  Buffer	  interception	  is	  largely	  in	  two	  categories	  -­‐	  the	  diagonal	  and	  zigzag	  layouts	  with	  0.62	  to	  0.80%	  and	  the	  superior	  linear/enclosed	  layouts	  at	  2.32	  to	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   39/114	  	  	  2.67%.	  Environmental	  emissions	  are	  increased	  in	  all	  cases,	  layouts	  6	  and	  7	  have	  the	  highest	  increase	  of	  +1.05	  and	  +1.10%.	  The	  lowest	  increases	  are	  in	  layouts	  8	  and	  9	  at	  0.43%	  Table	  4.6:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  6	   -­‐1.52	   1.11	   -­‐0.01	   1.05	  7	   -­‐0.76	   1.7	   -­‐0.25	   1.10	  8	   -­‐0.44	   3.08	   -­‐0.93	   0.43	  9	   -­‐0.44	   3.08	   -­‐0.93	   0.43	  10	   0.06	   2.56	   -­‐0.33	   0.50	  	  Figure	  4.8:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  46	  b.	  Layout	  7,	  c.	  Layout	  8,	  d.	  Layout	  9,	  e.	  Layout	  10.	  	  40/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.8	  shows	  maps	  of	  deposition	  changes	  for	  these	  four	  layouts.	  Patterns	  are	  similar	  in	  all	  cases	  with	  minimal	  change	  outside	  of	  the	  property	  area.	  Deposition	  increases	  and	  minor	  decreases	  along	  the	  plume	  are	  visible	  in	  layouts	  8	  and	  9	  near	  the	  eastern	  edge	  of	  the	  barn.	  	  4.2.4	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  with	  Shelterbelt	  Layouts	  12	  through	  16	  were	  configured	  to	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  an	  inner	  layer	  of	  Excelsa	  cedar	  coupled	  with	  an	  outer	  perimeter	  of	  shelterbelt	  trees.	  Layouts	  12	  and	  13	  examine	  the	  necessity	  of	  a	  full	  outer	  shelterbelt	  ring	  and	  the	  other	  layouts	  examine	  changes	  to	  the	  inner	  Excelsa	  buffer.	  	  Figure	  4.9:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  12	  to	  16,	  showing	  buffers	  using	  Excelsa	  and	  shelterbelt	  trees.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   41/114	  	  	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  4.10	  shows	  the	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  and	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  in	  each	  layout.	  	  	  Figure	  4.10:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  II	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  4.7:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  width.	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   6.13	   1.55	   1.35	   -­‐	   90.97	  12	   4.59	   0.83	   1.14	   3.20	   90.25	  13	   4.01	   0.86	   1.09	   3.10	   90.95	  14	   5.29	   0.90	   1.11	   2.90	   89.79	  15	   4.49	   0.85	   1.06	   3.44	   90.15	  16	   4.37	   0.84	   1.01	   3.91	   89.87	  	  Tables	  4.7	  and	  4.8	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  Excelsa	  and	  shelterbelt	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  II.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  is	  found	  with	  layout	  12	  (+16.63%),	  using	  full	  Excelsa	  and	  shelterbelt	  perimeters.	  The	  lowest	  increase	  comes	  layout	  site	  15	  (+11.94%),	  which	  uses	  a	  half-­‐shelterbelt	  perimeter	  and	  a	  half-­‐Excelsa	  inner	  ring.	  Target	  zone	  deposition	  reduction	  is	  highest	  in	  layout	  42/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  15	  (-­‐5.23%)	  with	  layout	  12	  a	  close	  second.	  Lowest	  reduction	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  16	  at	  -­‐4.68%	  (using	  a	  double-­‐row	  Excelsa	  inner	  ring).	  Layout	  16	  does	  however	  show	  the	  highest	  buffer	  interception	  at	  3.91%	  of	  all	  emissions,	  the	  lowest	  interception	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  14	  at	  only	  2.90%.	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  the	  most	  in	  layout	  14	  (-­‐1.18%)	  and	  the	  least	  in	  layout	  13	  (-­‐0.02%).	  Table	  4.8:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  width.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  12	   16.63	   -­‐5.23	   -­‐2.84	   -­‐0.73	  13	   13.22	   -­‐4.72	   -­‐4.98	   -­‐0.02	  14	   14.86	   -­‐5.09	   -­‐4.66	   -­‐1.18	  15	   11.94	   -­‐5.3	   -­‐6.24	   -­‐0.82	  16	   14.37	   -­‐4.68	   -­‐7.01	   -­‐1.10	  	  	  Figure	  4.11:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  12,	  b.	  Layout	  13,	  c.	  Layout	  14,	  d.	  Layout	  15,	  e.	  Layout	  16.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   43/114	  	  	  Figure	  4.11	  maps	  the	  deposition	  change	  for	  these	  layouts.	  Deposition	  increases	  are	  strongly	  visible	  on	  buffers	  to	  the	  northeast	  and	  particularly	  on	  the	  corners	  of	  the	  closer	  buffers.	  Minor	  decreases	  are	  visible	  to	  the	  northeast	  of	  the	  barns	  in	  zones	  C	  and	  D.	  	  4.2.5	  Double-­‐Row	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  Buffers	  	  	  Figure	  4.12:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  17,	  18,	  20,	  22,	  23	  and	  24	  showing	  doubled	  Excelsa	  buffers.	  	  	  44/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Layouts	  17,	  18,	  20,	  22,	  23	  and	  24	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  using	  a	  two-­‐row	  Excelsa	  buffer	  without	  any	  outer	  shelterbelt	  layer	  (Figure	  4.12).	  Layouts	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  proximity	  to	  the	  barn	  of	  these	  buffers.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  4.13	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  and	  describes	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  shows	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  within	  each	  layout.	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.13:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  II	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Tables	  4.9	  and	  4.10	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  thicker	  buffers	  with	  changing	  proximity	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  II.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  23	  (+16.51%),	  the	  furthest	  buffer	  from	  the	  barn.	  The	  lowest	  (+10.37%)	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  17,	  with	  the	  closest	  buffer	  to	  the	  barn.	  These	  patterns	  are	  similar	  for	  deposition	  on	  the	  target	  zones,	  layout	  17	  is	  again	  the	  least	  effective	  (-­‐1.58%),	  however	  layout	  23	  is	  joined	  by	  layout	  24,	  which	  is	  equivalent	  to	  layout	  23	  but	  without	  the	  southern	  buffer	  section,	  (-­‐7.62	  and	  -­‐7.67%	  respectively)	  as	  most	  effective	  buffer.	  Buffer	  interception	  is	  highest	  in	  layout	  23,	  with	  3.35%	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted.	  Layout	  17	  shows	  a	  poor	  performance	  here	  as	  well,	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   45/114	  	  	  intercepting	  only	  2.84%	  of	  the	  emissions.	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  follow	  the	  same	  pattern;	  layout	  23	  is	  the	  best	  with	  a	  reduction	  of	  -­‐1.48%,	  and	  layout	  17	  is	  the	  worst	  with	  no	  reduction.	  Table	  4.9:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  double	  row	  buffers.	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   6.13	   1.55	   1.35	   -­‐	   90.97	  17	   3.97	   1.10	   1.12	   2.84	   90.97	  18	   4.51	   0.95	   1.12	   3.02	   90.40	  20	   4.88	   0.82	   1.09	   3.20	   90.01	  22	   5.23	   0.71	   1.08	   3.32	   89.66	  23	   5.47	   0.62	   1.06	   3.35	   89.50	  24	   5.05	   0.68	   1.02	   3.30	   89.95	  	  Table	  4.10:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  double	  row	  buffers.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  17	   10.37	   -­‐1.58	   -­‐3.18	   0.00	  18	   10.91	   -­‐3.57	   -­‐2.87	   -­‐0.57	  20	   12.63	   -­‐5.42	   -­‐3.13	   -­‐0.96	  22	   14.76	   -­‐6.66	   -­‐3.47	   -­‐1.31	  23	   16.51	   -­‐7.62	   -­‐3.73	   -­‐1.48	  24	   10.98	   -­‐7.67	   -­‐6.46	   -­‐1.02	  	  Figure	  4.14	  shows	  high	  deposition	  on	  the	  buffer	  and	  a	  slight	  reduction	  in	  the	  plume	  behind	  the	  buffer	  for	  all	  layouts.	  This	  deposition	  is	  most	  intense	  near	  the	  northeast	  corner,	  in	  layouts	  22	  and	  23.	  	  46/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.14:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  17,	  b.	  Layout	  18,	  c.	  Layout	  20,	  d.	  Layout	  22,	  e.	  Layout	  23,	  f.	  Layout	  24.	  4.2.6	  Buffer	  Age	  Layouts	  25	  and	  26	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  changing	  buffer	  age,	  using	  simulated	  younger	  (higher	  porosity)	  and	  mature	  Excelsa	  trees	  (lower	  porosity).	  These	  structures	  are	  mapped	  below	  in	  Figure	  3.15.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  3.16	  makes	  these	  comparisons	  showing	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  are	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  describing	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   47/114	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.15:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  25	  and	  26,	  showing	  buffer	  age.	  	  Figure	  4.16:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  II	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  	  Table	  4.11:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  ages.	  	  Layout	  ID	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   6.13	   1.55	   1.35	   -­‐	   90.97	  25	   5.03	   0.72	   1.05	   3.51	   89.68	  26	   5.10	   0.95	   1.29	   1.16	   91.51	  48/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Table	  4.12:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  II	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  ages.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	   Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  25	   12.17	   -­‐7.23	   -­‐5.93	   -­‐1.29	  26	   -­‐0.17	   -­‐4.75	   -­‐1.44	   0.54	  	  Tables	  4.11	  and	  4.12	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  these	  buffer	  configurations	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  II.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +4.93%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  25,	  which	  uses	  younger	  trees.	  The	  highest	  reduction	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  was	  also	  achieved	  by	  layout	  25	  at	  -­‐7.23%.	  Layout	  25	  also	  achieved	  a	  higher	  interception	  by	  the	  buffer	  (3.51%)	  than	  layout	  26	  (1.16%).	  In	  the	  young	  buffer	  case	  (25),	  total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  by	  -­‐1.29%,	  while	  the	  older	  buffer	  shows	  an	  increase	  of	  +0.54%.	  	  Figure	  4.17	  shows	  the	  deposition	  change	  patters	  for	  both	  buffers.	  It	  appears	  that	  Layout	  6	  diverts	  the	  plume	  such	  that	  it	  does	  not	  intersect	  the	  corner	  of	  the	  buffer,	  thus	  decreasing	  interception	  and	  therefore	  effectiveness	  of	  the	  configuration.	  Layout	  5	  shows	  similar	  patterns	  to	  most	  of	  the	  cornered	  layouts	  examined	  for	  this	  site.	  	  	  Figure	  4.17:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  5,	  b.	  Layout	  6.	  4.3	  Summary	  Overall,	  Site	  II	  can	  benefit	  from	  the	  installation	  of	  a	  buffer	  with	  the	  selection	  of	  the	  proper	  tree	  type	  and	  buffer	  layout.	  Reductions	  in	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  of	  up	  to	  -­‐1.48%	  are	  possible	  in	  the	  case	  of	  the	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   49/114	  	  	  most	  effective	  buffer.	  Table	  4.13	  summarizes	  the	  buffers	  that	  were	  most	  effective	  in	  each	  subcategory	  at	  reducing	  emissions	  in	  the	  target	  zones.	  	  Table	  4.13:	  Summary	  of	  buffer	  effectiveness	  for	  Site	  II.	  Category	   Most	  effective	  layout	   Reduction	  in	  target	  zones	  (%)	   Increase	  on	  property	  (%)	   Buffer	  interception	  (%)	   Environmental	  emissions	  reduction	  (%)	  Proximity	  (Hedge)	   2	   -­‐3.75	   +4.59	   1.10	   -­‐0.35	  Per-­‐Fan	  (Hedge)	   10	   +2.56	   +0.06	   2.67	   +0.50	  Proximity	  (Excelsa)	   12	   -­‐5.23	   +16.53	   3.20	   -­‐0.73	  Doubling	  (Exelsa)	   23	   -­‐7.62	   +16.51	   3.35	   -­‐1.48	  Age	  (Excelsa)	   25	   -­‐7.23	   +12.17	   3.51	   -­‐1.29	  It	  is	  clear	  that	  Excelsa	  cedar	  is	  the	  superior	  tree	  type	  when	  compared	  to	  hedging	  cedar.	  This	  is	  primarily	  due	  to	  its	  additional	  height	  (10	  m	  versus	  3	  m).	  Within	  the	  hedging	  cedar	  category,	  it	  is	  also	  clear	  that	  per-­‐fan	  buffer	  structures	  are	  ineffective,	  increasing	  deposition	  in	  zones	  C	  and	  D	  and	  increasing	  environmental	  emissions.	  The	  most	  effective	  hedging	  cedar	  layouts	  are	  perimeter	  hedges	  that	  are	  placed	  far	  from	  the	  barn.	  These	  layouts	  will	  primarily	  modify	  the	  wind	  pattern	  rather	  than	  filter	  emissions,	  and	  so	  primarily	  redistribute	  emissions.	  This	  means	  although	  the	  total	  emissions	  are	  im	  amy	  cases	  not	  reduced,	  these	  large	  structure	  efficiently	  mix	  emissions	  and	  displace	  them	  upwards.	  The	  Excelsa	  layouts	  provide	  a	  simple	  picture.	  Doubled	  layouts	  are	  most	  effective,	  particularly	  for	  filtration.	  Larger	  hedges	  should	  be	  placed	  far	  from	  the	  barn,	  closer	  and	  smaller	  layouts	  are	  less	  effective.	  The	  combination	  of	  effective	  filtering	  (3.35%	  of	  emissions	  intercepted)	  and	  redistribution	  allows	  strong	  reductions	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (-­‐7.62%)	  and	  increases	  in	  the	  barn	  zone	  (+16.51%)	  In	  the	  tested	  case,	  a	  young	  Excelsa	  tree	  buffer,	  with	  higher	  porosity	  performs	  better	  than	  a	  similar	  mature	  buffer	  with	  higher	  leaf	  density	  in	  the	  same	  configuration.	  	  	   	  50/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  5. Site III 5.1	  Site	  Description	  Site	  III	  consists	  of	  two	  single-­‐story	  barns	  with	  size	  (L	  =67	  m,	  W	  =	  11	  m,	  H	  =	  8	  m).	  Each	  barn	  has	  5	  hooded	  fans	  located	  on	  the	  north	  side	  of	  the	  northern	  barn	  and	  the	  south	  side	  of	  the	  southern	  barn.	  PM10	  sources	  were	  placed	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  5.1a	  at	  the	  locations	  of	  the	  exhaust	  fans	  (1.5m	  a.g.l).	  There	  are	  many	  berry	  fields	  modeled	  to	  the	  south,	  east	  and	  north,	  as	  well	  as	  several	  built	  structures	  on	  the	  northwest	  of	  the	  property.	  The	  entire	  simulated	  site	  covers	  a	  291	  by	  183	  m	  area.	  	  Figure	  5.1:	  a.	  Schematic	  map	  of	  Site	  III,	  showing	  barns	  to	  the	  southeast	  and	  berry	  fields	  to	  the	  north	  and	  east.	  PM10	  source	  areas	  are	  indicated	  in	  red.	  Blue	  arrow	  indicates	  direction	  and	  magnitude	  of	  the	  mean	  wind.b.	  Distribution	  of	  zones	  for	  Site	  III	  showing	  barn	  (A),	  neighboring	  structures	  (B)	  and	  additional	  fields	  (C-­‐D)	  in	  the	  modeled	  domain	  of	  291	  by	  183	  m.	  c.	  Partial	  panorama	  taken	  from	  centre	  of	  Site	  III,	  showing	  barn,	  fans	  and	  fields	  (Photo:	  BC	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture).	  The	  site	  was	  subdivided	  into	  4	  zones	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  5.1b,	  with	  zone	  A	  being	  the	  barn	  area	  delineated	  by	  the	  properly	  line.	  Zone	  C	  comprises	  the	  berry	  field	  to	  the	  east,	  zone	  D	  the	  field	  to	  the	  south.	  Zone	  B	  to	  the	  north	  includes	  more	  berry	  fields	  and	  the	  site's	  built	  structures	  with	  additional	  fields	  and	  neighboring	  properties.	  For	  this	  site,	  the	  target	  zone	  for	  a	  reduction	  in	  PM10	  deposition	  is	  zone	  C.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   51/114	  	  	  5.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  5.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  Thirty	  different	  buffer	  layouts	  were	  simulated	  with	  varying	  buffer	  dimensions,	  placements	  and	  composition.	  Buffers	  were	  divided	  into	  two	  primary	  categories	  -­‐	  those	  using	  hedging	  cedar	  (from	  3	  to	  5	  m	  in	  height)	  and	  those	  using	  Excelsa	  cedar	  (10	  m	  in	  height).	  Table	  5.1:	  List	  of	  layouts	  with	  description	  of	  buffer	  composition	  for	  each	  simulated	  configuration.	  Layout	  ID	   Layout	  Description	  control	   No	  modification	  1	   perimeter	  of	  hedges	  3m	  high	  and	  1m	  wide	  	  	  2	   perimeter	  of	  hedges	  3m	  high	  and	  1m	  wide	  +	  2m	  angled	  hedging	  3	   perimeter	  of	  hedges	  3m	  high	  and	  1m	  wide	  +	  2m	  angled	  hedging	  (opposite	  direction	  as	  2)	  4	   2m	  angled	  hedging	  without	  a	  perimeter.	  5	   2m	  angled	  hedging	  without	  a	  perimeter	  (opposite	  direction	  as	  4)	  6	   perimeter	  of	  hedges	  3m	  high	  and	  1m	  wide	  +	  3m	  high	  hedging	  within	  4	  meters	  on	  each	  side	  of	  source	  and	  extending	  6m	  from	  the	  barn.	  7	   Similar	  to	  6	  but	  with	  extra	  hedging	  that	  partially	  encloses	  around	  source.	  8	   perimeter	  of	  hedges	  3m	  high	  and	  1m	  wide	  +	  3m	  high	  hedging	  perpendicular	  to	  the	  barns	  and	  equally	  spaced	  between	  the	  sources	  2-­‐2.m	  thick	  and	  9-­‐10m	  long.	  9	   perimeter	  of	  hedges	  4m	  high	  and	  2m	  wide.	  	  	  	  10	   perimeter	  of	  hedges	  4m	  high	  and	  2m	  wide	  +	  4m	  high	  angled	  hedging	  	  11	   perimeter	  of	  hedges	  4m	  high	  and	  2m	  wide	  +	  two	  sets	  of	  4m	  high	  angled	  hedging	  facing	  opposite	  directions	  and	  equally	  spaced	  around	  the	  sources.	  	  12	   perimeter	  of	  hedges	  4m	  high	  and	  2m	  wide	  +	  4m	  high	  hedging	  within	  4	  meters	  on	  each	  side	  of	  source	  and	  extending	  6m	  from	  the	  barn.	  13	   as	  09,	  but	  with	  Ex	  trees	  14	   as	  13,	  put	  with	  porosity	  1	  EX	  trees	  15	   as	  13,	  put	  with	  porosity	  3	  EX	  trees	  16	   as	  13,	  put	  with	  porosity	  5	  EX	  trees	  18	   as	  09,	  but	  with	  4	  squares	  of	  EX	  trees	  19	   as	  14,	  but	  with	  porosity	  1	  EX	  trees	  20	   as	  14,	  but	  with	  porosity	  3	  EX	  trees	  21	   as	  14,	  but	  with	  porosity	  5	  EX	  trees	  23	   row	  of	  Ex	  on	  north	  and	  east	  property	  lines,	  with	  v	  structure	  from	  the	  south	  barn's	  SE	  corner,	  pointing	  east	  24	   as	  15,	  but	  east	  hedge	  is	  closer	  to	  barn	  25	   as	  16,	  but	  north	  hedge	  is	  closer	  to	  barn	  26	   perimeter	  of	  Ex	  around	  barns,	  6m	  from	  barns	  to	  N/S,	  12m	  to	  E	  27	   vee	  from	  south	  barn	  as	  in	  15,	  with	  hook-­‐shaped	  structures	  at	  vents	  on	  N	  barn	  28	   as	  19,	  but	  double	  widths	  	  29	   as	  06,	  but	  with	  2m	  wide	  Ex	  trees	  and	  no	  perimeter	  30	   as	  21,	  but	  rows	  are	  closed	  in	  front	  of	  vents	  to	  formboxes	  31	   as	  15,	  but	  with	  inner	  perimeter	  row	  from	  17	  included	  32	   as	  13,	  but	  with	  inner	  perimeter	  row	  52/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Hedging	  cedar	  runs	  were	  divided	  into	  two	  categories,	  examining	  the	  effect	  proximity	  of	  the	  buffer	  to	  the	  barn	  and	  examining	  the	  effect	  of	  small	  buffer	  structures	  placed	  around	  exhaust	  fans.	  The	  vegetation	  configurations	  for	  each	  layout	  are	  described	  below	  in	  Table	  5.1.	  ENVI-­‐met	  simulations	  were	  undertaken	  for	  these	  layouts	  with	  meteorological	  conditions	  typical	  for	  the	  area.	  In	  all	  cases,	  a	  wind	  speed	  of	  3.0	  m	  s-­‐1	  measured	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level	  was	  used.	  A	  225	  degree	  wind	  direction	  was	  used	  for	  all	  runs.	  This	  accounted	  for	  the	  typical	  summer	  wind	  directions	  in	  the	  study	  area.	  In	  total	  31	  simulation	  runs	  were	  completed,	  summarized	  in	  Table	  5.2.	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.2:	  Deposition	  map	  for	  control	  run	  with	  a	  wind	  direction	  of	  225°.	  A	  map	  showing	  deposition	  of	  PM10	  for	  the	  control	  case	  in	  a	  wind	  of	  225°	  is	  shown	  in	  Figure	  5.2	  above.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   53/114	  	  	  Table	  5.2:	  List	  of	  ENVI-­‐met	  runs	  showing	  layout	  used	  and	  corresponding	  wind	  direction	  relative	  to	  geographic	  north.	  All	  wind	  speeds	  were	  3	  m	  s-­‐1	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level.	  Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	   	   Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	  site3_control_225_3	   control	   225	   	   site3_16_225_3	   16	   225	  site3_1_225_3	   1	   225	   	   site3_18_225_3	   18	   225	  site3_2_225_3	   2	   225	   	   site3_19_225_3	   19	   225	  site3_3_225_3	   3	   225	   	   site3_20_225_3	   20	   225	  site3_4_225_3	   4	   225	   	   site3_21_225_3	   21	   225	  site3_5_225_3	   5	   225	   	   site3_23_225_3	   23	   225	  site3_6_225_3	   6	   225	   	   site3_24_225_3	   24	   225	  site3_7_225_3	   7	   225	   	   site3_25_225_3	   25	   225	  site3_8_225_3	   8	   225	   	   site3_26_225_3	   26	   225	  site3_9_225_3	   9	   225	   	   site3_27_225_3	   27	   225	  site3_10_225_3	   10	   225	   	   site3_28_225_3	   28	   225	  site3_11_225_3	   11	   225	   	   site3_29_225_3	   29	   225	  site3_12_225_3	   12	   225	   	   site3_30_225_3	   30	   225	  site3_13_225_3	   13	   225	   	   site3_31_225_3	   31	   225	  site3_14_225_3	   14	   225	   	   site3_32_225_3	   32	   225	  site3_15_225_3	   15	   225	   	   	   	   	  	  5.2.2	  Hedging	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Low	  Per-­‐Fan	  Structures	  Layouts	  1	  to	  8	  were	  used	  largely	  to	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  a	  perimeter	  of	  hedging	  cedar	  placed	  around	  the	  barn.	  In	  addition,	  the	  effects	  of	  using	  a	  thicker	  or	  split-­‐row	  perimeter	  were	  also	  examined.	  These	  three	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  5.3	  below,	  showing	  the	  exact	  configuration	  of	  the	  buffer	  and	  its	  composition.	  54/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.3:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  01	  to	  08,	  showing	  variation	  in	  vegetative	  buffer	  length.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   55/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.4:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  III	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zone	  (C),	  other	  zones	  (B	  and	  D)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  5.4	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  within	  the	  simulated	  area.	  Figure	  5.4a	  shows	  the	  percent	  change	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case,	  and	  Figure	  5.4b	  shows	  how	  deposition	  is	  distributed	  for	  each	  buffer	  layout.	  	  	  56/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Table	  5.3:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  cedar	  per-­‐fan	  structures.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   7.28	   2.91	   0.77	   -­‐	   89.03	  1	   7.34	   3.20	   0.73	   0.89	   87.83	  2	   6.48	   3.11	   0.72	   1.78	   87.91	  3	   6.50	   3.12	   0.72	   1.51	   88.16	  4	   6.55	   2.90	   0.77	   0.98	   88.80	  5	   6.58	   2.91	   0.77	   0.68	   89.06	  6	   4.94	   3.36	   0.73	   2.65	   88.33	  7	   4.76	   3.32	   0.72	   2.74	   88.46	  8	   6.28	   3.13	   0.72	   1.80	   88.07	  	  Table	  5.4:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  cedar	  per-­‐fan	  structures.	  	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  1	   2.84	   -­‐0.12	   -­‐1.30	   -­‐1.20	  2	   2.60	   -­‐0.33	   -­‐1.83	   -­‐1.12	  3	   1.69	   -­‐0.25	   -­‐1.79	   -­‐0.88	  4	   0.63	   0.18	   -­‐0.14	   -­‐0.23	  5	   -­‐0.32	   0.28	   -­‐0.08	   0.03	  6	   -­‐0.02	   2.28	   -­‐1.60	   -­‐0.70	  7	   -­‐0.39	   2.08	   -­‐1.66	   -­‐0.57	  8	   1.84	   0.16	   -­‐1.75	   -­‐0.96	  	  Tables	  5.3	  and	  5.4	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  increasing	  buffer	  length	  on	  deposition	  in	  the	  site.	  Layout	  1	  with	  a	  simple	  buffer	  perimeter	  increases	  deposition	  on	  the	  property	  by	  the	  highest	  amount	  (+2.84%).	  Ineffective	  layouts	  include	  5	  (eastward	  diagonal	  structures	  without	  a	  perimeter),	  which	  reduces	  property	  deposition	  by	  -­‐0.32%,	  6	  and	  7	  (thin	  channel	  structures	  near	  fans).	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  is	  decreased	  by	  -­‐0.33%	  in	  layout	  2	  (westward	  diagonal	  structures	  with	  perimeter),	  -­‐0.25%	  in	  layout	  3	  (eastward	  diagonal	  structures	  with	  perimeter)	  and	  -­‐0.12%	  in	  layout	  1.	  Other	  layouts	  show	  increases.	  Buffer	  interception	  is	  highest	  in	  layouts	  6,	  7	  and	  8	  (2.65,	  2.74	  and	  1.80%	  of	  total	  emissions)	  and	  lowest	  in	  layout	  1	  (0.89%).	  The	  change	  in	  total	  environmental	  emissions	  is	  most	  favourable	  in	  layouts	  1	  and	  2	  (-­‐1.20	  and	  -­‐1.12%),	  and	  the	  worst	  in	  layout	  5,	  with	  a	  +0.03%	  increase.	  	  Figure	  5.5	  maps	  the	  changes	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case	  for	  each	  of	  the	  three	  layouts.	  Change	  is	  minimal	  in	  most	  cases,	  though	  some	  increase	  on	  buffer	  deposition	  is	  visible	  in	  layouts	  7	  and	  8.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   57/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.5:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  1,	  b.	  Layout	  2,	  c.	  Layout	  3,	  d.	  Layout	  4,	  e.	  Layout	  5,	  f.	  Layout	  6,	  g.	  Layout	  7,	  h.	  Layout	  8.	  	  58/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  5.2.3	  Hedging	  Cedar	  -­‐	  High	  Per-­‐Fan	  Buffers	  Layouts	  9	  to	  12	  examined	  the	  effect	  of	  using	  a	  slightly	  higher	  cedar	  buffer	  with	  two	  rows	  in	  similar	  per-­‐fan	  configurations.	  These	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  5.6	  below.	  	  	  Figure	  5.6:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  09	  to	  12,	  showing	  configurations	  of	  higher	  cedar	  buffers.	  Figure	  5.7:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  III	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zone	  (C	  ),	  other	  zones	  (B	  and	  D)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   59/114	  	  	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  5.7	  shows	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition.	  	  Table	  5.5:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  buffers	  with	  higher	  cedar	  hedges.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   7.28	   2.91	   0.77	   -­‐	   89.03	  9	   7.36	   2.83	   0.71	   1.72	   87.37	  10	   6.27	   2.81	   0.70	   1.90	   88.32	  11	   5.41	   2.81	   0.69	   2.60	   88.49	  12	   4.65	   3.01	   0.71	   3.50	   88.14	  	  Table	  5.6:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  buffers	  with	  higher	  cedar	  hedges.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  9	   8.75	   -­‐0.98	   -­‐1.60	   -­‐1.66	  10	   5.71	   -­‐0.78	   -­‐2.15	   -­‐0.72	  11	   4.48	   -­‐0.41	   -­‐2.31	   -­‐0.54	  12	   4.77	   1.80	   -­‐1.98	   -­‐0.89	  	  Tables	  5.5	  and	  5.6	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  per-­‐fan	  buffers	  in	  the	  site.	  The	  largest	  improvement	  in	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  is	  in	  layout	  9	  with	  a	  simple	  perimeter	  buffer	  (+8.75%).	  The	  lowest	  improvement	  is	  in	  layout	  12	  with	  small	  chanelling	  buffers	  (+4.65%).	  Target	  zone	  deposition	  follows	  an	  identical	  pattern,	  layout	  9	  is	  superior	  (-­‐0.98%)	  and	  layout	  12	  is	  the	  worst	  (+1.80%).	  The	  trend	  reverses	  for	  buffer	  interception;	  layout	  12	  intercepts	  the	  most	  at	  3.50%,	  while	  layout	  9	  intercepts	  the	  least	  at	  1.82%.	  However,	  when	  looking	  at	  environmental	  emissions	  reduction,	  layout	  9	  is	  again	  superior	  with	  a	  -­‐1.66%	  change.	  Layout	  11	  is	  the	  least	  effective	  at	  -­‐0.54%.	  Figure	  5.8	  shows	  maps	  of	  deposition	  changes	  for	  these	  four	  layouts.	  Patterns	  are	  similar	  in	  all	  cases	  with	  almost	  no	  change	  outside	  of	  the	  property	  area.	  Deposition	  increases	  and	  minor	  decreases	  are	  visible	  near	  the	  buffer	  structures	  in	  layouts	  11	  and	  12.	  	  	  60/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.8:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  9,	  b.	  Layout	  10,	  c.	  Layout	  11,	  d.	  Layout	  12.	  5.2.4	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Porosity	  Layouts	  13	  through	  16	  were	  configured	  to	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  using	  a	  single	  perimeter	  row	  of	  Excelsa	  cedars	  with	  varying	  porosities,	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  5.9.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  5.10	  shows	  the	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  and	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  in	  each	  layout.	  	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   61/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.9:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  13	  to	  16,	  showing	  buffers	  using	  Excelsa	  cedar	  of	  varying	  porosities.	  	  Figure	  5.10:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  III	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zone	  (C),	  other	  zones	  (B	  and	  D)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  62/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Table	  5.7:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  varying	  porosity	  buffers.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   7.28	   2.91	   0.77	   -­‐	   89.03	  13	   9.59	   2.72	   0.66	   2.13	   87.03	  14	   7.58	   4.29	   0.76	   4.62	   82.75	  15	   7.86	   3.14	   0.71	   3.17	   85.11	  16	   7.77	   2.36	   0.61	   2.01	   87.19	  	  Table	  5.8:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  varying	  porosity	  buffers.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  13	   18.05	   -­‐2.94	   -­‐2.71	   -­‐2.00	  14	   23.60	   7.67	   0.37	   -­‐6.28	  15	   20.26	   0.20	   -­‐0.96	   -­‐3.92	  16	   14.65	   -­‐5.75	   -­‐4.76	   -­‐1.84	  	  Figure	  5.11:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  13,	  b.	  Layout	  14,	  c.	  Layout	  15,	  d.	  Layout	  16.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   63/114	  	  	  Tables	  5.7	  and	  5.8	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  varying	  porosity	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  III.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  is	  found	  with	  layout	  14	  (+23.60%),	  using	  medium	  porosity	  trees.	  The	  lowest	  increase	  is	  shown	  in	  layout	  16	  (+14.65%),	  with	  the	  lowest	  porosity.	  Target	  zone	  deposition	  reduction	  is	  highest	  in	  layout	  16	  (-­‐5.75%).	  Lowest	  reduction	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  14	  at	  +7.67%.	  Layout	  14	  also	  shows	  the	  highest	  buffer	  interception	  at	  4.62%	  of	  all	  emissions,	  the	  lowest	  interception	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  16	  at	  only	  2.01%.	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  the	  most	  in	  layout	  14	  (-­‐6.28%)	  and	  the	  least	  in	  layout	  16	  (-­‐1.84%).	  Figure	  5.11	  maps	  the	  deposition	  change	  for	  these	  layouts.	  Deposition	  increases	  are	  strongly	  visible	  on	  buffers	  to	  the	  northeast	  and	  particularly	  on	  the	  corners	  of	  the	  closer	  buffers.	  Minor	  decreases	  are	  visible	  to	  the	  northeast	  of	  the	  barns	  in	  zones	  C	  and	  D.	  	  5.2.5	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Double	  Row	  Porosity	  	  Figure	  5.12:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  18	  to	  21	  showing	  doubled	  Excelsa	  buffers.	  	  64/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Layouts	  18	  to	  21	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  using	  a	  two-­‐row	  Excelsa	  buffer	  with	  varying	  porosities.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  5.13	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  and	  describes	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  shows	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  within	  each	  layout.	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.13:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  II	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zone	  (C),	  other	  zones	  (B	  and	  D)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  5.9:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  porosities.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   7.28	   2.91	   0.77	   -­‐	   89.03	  18	   7.78	   2.10	   0.62	   3.58	   85.91	  19	   7.19	   3.67	   0.71	   8.37	   80.06	  20	   7.58	   2.45	   0.67	   4.86	   84.44	  21	   5.36	   2.29	   0.63	   4.01	   87.71	  	  	  	   	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   65/114	  	  	  Table	  5.10:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  porosities.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  18	   29.37	   -­‐7.12	   -­‐3.65	   -­‐3.12	  19	   51.62	   4.21	   -­‐0.99	   -­‐8.98	  20	   35.69	   -­‐4.31	   -­‐2.06	   -­‐4.59	  21	   14.45	   -­‐4.5	   -­‐4.35	   -­‐1.32	  	  Tables	  5.9	  and	  5.10	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  thicker	  buffers	  with	  changing	  porosity	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  III.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  19	  (+51.52%),	  the	  most	  porous	  buffer.	  The	  lowest	  (+14.45%)	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  21,	  the	  least	  porous	  buffer.	  For	  deposition	  on	  the	  target	  zones,	  layout	  18	  is	  the	  most	  effective	  (-­‐7.12%,	  standard	  porosity	  buffer),	  but	  layout	  19	  is	  the	  least	  effective	  (4.21%).	  Buffer	  interception	  is	  highest	  in	  layout	  19,	  with	  8.37%	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted.	  Layout	  18	  shows	  the	  poorest	  performance	  here	  as	  well,	  intercepting	  only	  3.58%	  of	  the	  emissions.	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  by	  -­‐8.98%	  in	  layout	  19,	  and	  by	  -­‐1.32%	  in	  layout	  21.	  	  Figure	  5.14:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  18,	  b.	  Layout	  19,	  c.	  Layout	  20,	  d.	  Layout	  21.	  66/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.14	  shows	  high	  deposition	  on	  the	  buffer	  and	  a	  slight	  reduction	  in	  the	  plume	  behind	  the	  buffer	  for	  all	  layouts.	  This	  deposition	  is	  most	  intense	  near	  the	  northeast	  corner,	  in	  layouts	  22	  and	  23.	  	  5.2.6	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Buffer	  Proximity	  	  Layouts	  23	  and	  24	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  changing	  buffer	  proximity	  on	  the	  north	  side	  of	  the	  barn	  with	  a	  vee	  shaped	  structure	  to	  the	  southeast.	  These	  structures	  are	  mapped	  below	  in	  Figure	  5.15.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  5.16	  makes	  these	  comparisons	  showing	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  are	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  describing	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts.	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.15:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  23	  and	  24,	  showing	  buffer	  proximity.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   67/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.16:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  III	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zone	  (C),	  other	  zones	  (B	  and	  D)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  5.11:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  proximities.	  	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   7.12	   2.91	   0.77	   -­‐	   88.91	  23	   8.86	   2.70	   0.60	   0.04	   87.80	  24	   5.57	   2.31	   0.66	   2.77	   88.69	  	  Table	  5.12:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  proximities.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  23	   11.92	   -­‐2.99	   -­‐5.94	   -­‐1.24	  24	   7.84	   -­‐3.53	   -­‐4.29	   -­‐0.34	  	  Tables	  5.11	  and	  5.12	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  these	  buffer	  configurations	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  III.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +11.92%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  23,	  with	  a	  further	  buffer.	  The	  highest	  reduction	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  was	  achieved	  by	  layout	  24	  at	  -­‐3.53%.	  Layout	  24	  also	  achieved	  a	  higher	  interception	  by	  the	  buffer	  (2.77%)	  than	  layout	  24	  (0.04%).	  In	  the	  closer	  buffer	  case	  (24),	  total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  by	  -­‐0.34%,	  while	  the	  further	  buffer	  shows	  a	  decrease	  of	  -­‐1.24%.	  	  68/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.17	  shows	  the	  deposition	  change	  patterns	  for	  both	  buffers.	  Neither	  layout	  causes	  appreciable	  changes	  in	  deposition	  patterns	  except	  from	  minor	  increases	  on	  both	  buffers	  themselves	  due	  to	  interception.	  None	  of	  the	  layouts	  is	  effective	  to	  reduce	  emissions	  in	  this	  case.	  	  Figure	  5.17:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  23,	  b.	  Layout	  24.	  5.2.7	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Buffer	  Thickness	  Layouts	  25	  and	  26	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  changing	  buffer	  thickness	  when	  using	  a	  full	  perimeter	  of	  Excelsa	  cedar.	  These	  structures	  are	  mapped	  below	  in	  Figure	  5.18.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  5.19	  makes	  these	  comparisons	  showing	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  are	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  describing	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   69/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.18:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  23	  and	  24,	  showing	  buffer	  thickness.	  	  Figure	  5.19:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  III	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zone	  (C),	  other	  zones	  (B	  and	  D)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  	  Table	  5.13:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  buffers	  with	  increasing	  thickness.	  	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   7.28	   2.91	   0.77	   -­‐	   89.03	  25	   5.04	   2.40	   0.68	   2.75	   89.14	  26	   5.02	   2.05	   0.64	   3.87	   88.43	  70/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Table	  5.14:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  buffers	  with	  increasing	  thickness.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  25	   4.45	   -­‐2.64	   -­‐3.56	   0.11	  26	   11.98	   -­‐5.22	   -­‐4.61	   -­‐0.60	  	  Tables	  5.13	  and	  5.14	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  these	  buffer	  configurations	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  III.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +11.98%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  26,	  with	  a	  double-­‐row	  buffer.	  The	  highest	  reduction	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  was	  also	  achieved	  by	  layout	  26	  at	  -­‐5.23%.	  Layout	  26	  also	  achieved	  a	  higher	  interception	  by	  the	  buffer	  (3.87%)	  than	  layout	  25	  (2.75%).	  In	  the	  thicker	  buffer	  case	  (26),	  total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  by	  -­‐0.60%,	  while	  the	  thinner	  buffer	  shows	  an	  increase	  of	  +0.11%.	  	  Figure	  5.20	  shows	  the	  deposition	  change	  patterns	  for	  both	  buffers.	  Changes	  in	  the	  deposition	  patterns	  are	  limited	  to	  increases	  in	  deposition	  on	  the	  buffer.	  These	  increases	  are	  larger	  in	  layout	  26.	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.20:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  25,	  b.	  Layout	  26.	  5.2.8	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Per	  Fan	  Structures	  Layouts	  27	  to	  30	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  using	  various	  Excelsa	  per-­‐fan	  buffer	  structures.	  These	  structures	  are	  mapped	  below	  in	  Figure	  5.21.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  5.22	  makes	  these	  comparisons	  showing	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  are	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  describing	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   71/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.21:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  27	  to	  30,	  showing	  per-­‐fan	  buffers	  with	  Excelsa	  cedars.	  	  Figure	  5.22:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  III	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zone	  (C),	  other	  zones	  (B	  and	  D)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  72/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Table	  5.15:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  per-­‐fan	  Excelsa	  buffers.	  	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   7.28	   2.91	   0.77	   -­‐	   89.03	  27	   4.83	   2.82	   0.75	   2.08	   89.53	  28	   4.28	   2.75	   0.73	   2.74	   89.50	  29	   3.03	   3.07	   0.70	   2.52	   90.67	  30	   2.98	   2.92	   0.68	   2.76	   90.66	  	  Table	  5.16:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  per-­‐fan	  Excelsa	  Buffers.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  27	   -­‐0.73	   0.81	   -­‐0.73	   0.50	  28	   0.14	   0.77	   -­‐1.43	   0.47	  29	   -­‐6.91	   5.35	   -­‐3.09	   1.64	  30	   -­‐7.5	   3.53	   -­‐3.86	   1.63	  	  Tables	  5.11	  and	  5.12	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  these	  buffer	  configurations	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  III.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +0.14%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  28,	  thicker	  diagonal	  per-­‐fan	  buffers.	  The	  lowest	  is	  -­‐7.50%	  in	  layout	  30	  with	  square	  enclosures	  around	  each	  fan.	  All	  zones	  showed	  an	  increase	  in	  the	  target	  zones,	  highest	  in	  layout	  25	  at	  +5.35%	  and	  lowest	  in	  layout	  28	  at	  +0.77%.	  Layout	  30	  achieved	  the	  highest	  interception	  by	  the	  buffer	  (2.76%)	  and	  layout	  27	  the	  lowest	  (2.08%).	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  increased	  in	  all	  cases,	  the	  highest	  increase	  is	  of	  +1.54%	  in	  layout	  29	  and	  the	  lowest	  is	  +0.47%	  in	  layout	  28.	  Figure	  5.17	  shows	  the	  deposition	  change	  patters	  for	  both	  buffers.	  Increases	  are	  concentrated	  on	  the	  buffers	  themselves,	  with	  reductions	  in	  deposition	  around	  the	  buffer	  zones.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   73/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.23:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  27,	  b.	  Layout	  28,	  c.	  Layout	  29,	  d.	  Layout	  30.	  5.2.9	  Excelsa	  Cedar	  -­‐	  Split	  Rows	  Layouts	  31	  and	  32	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  using	  various	  split-­‐row	  Excelsa	  buffers,	  as	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  5.24.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  5.25	  makes	  these	  comparisons	  showing	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  are	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  describing	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts.	  	  	  74/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.24:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  31	  and	  32,	  showing	  split-­‐row	  buffers	  with	  Excelsa	  cedars.	  	  Figure	  5.25:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  III	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zone	  (C),	  other	  zones	  (B	  and	  D)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  5.17:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  split-­‐row	  Excelsa	  buffers.	  	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   7.12	   2.91	   0.77	   0.28	   88.91	  31	   6.67	   2.30	   0.57	   2.63	   87.83	  32	   6.20	   2.29	   0.63	   2.69	   88.19	  	  	   	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   75/114	  	  	  Table	  5.18:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  III	  for	  split-­‐row	  Excelsa	  buffers.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  31	   15.63	   -­‐4.23	   -­‐7.36	   -­‐1.21	  32	   14.45	   -­‐4.5	   -­‐4.35	   -­‐0.84	  	  Tables	  5.17	  and	  5.18	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  these	  buffer	  configurations	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  III.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +15.63%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  31,	  which	  uses	  an	  open	  buffer.	  The	  highest	  reduction	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  was	  achieved	  by	  layout	  32	  (closed	  buffer)	  at	  -­‐4.50%.	  Layout	  32	  also	  achieved	  a	  higher	  interception	  by	  the	  buffer	  (2.69%)	  than	  layout	  31	  (2.63%).	  In	  the	  closed	  buffer	  case	  (32),	  total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  by	  -­‐0.84%,	  while	  the	  open	  buffer	  shows	  a	  decrease	  of	  -­‐1.21%.	  	  	  Ambient	  airflow	  with	  an	  open	  buffer	  is	  more	  likely	  channeled	  towards	  the	  buffer	  for	  the	  given	  wind	  direction.	  	  Figure	  5.23	  shows	  the	  deposition	  change	  patters	  for	  both	  buffers.	  Appreciable	  changes	  in	  deposition	  patterns	  are	  not	  visible	  except	  as	  interception	  increases	  on	  the	  buffers.	  	  Figure	  5.23:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  31,	  b.	  Layout	  32.	  5.3	  Summary	  Overall,	  Site	  III	  could	  benefit	  from	  the	  installation	  of	  a	  buffer	  with	  the	  selection	  of	  the	  proper	  tree	  type	  and	  buffer	  layout.	  Moderate	  reductions	  in	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  of	  up	  to	  -­‐3.12%	  are	  possible	  in	  76/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  the	  case	  of	  the	  most	  effective	  buffer.	  Table	  5.19	  summarizes	  the	  buffers	  that	  were	  most	  effective	  in	  each	  subcategory	  at	  reducing	  emissions	  in	  the	  target	  zones.	  	  Table	  5.19:	  Summary	  of	  buffer	  effectiveness	  for	  Site	  III.	  Category	   Most	  effective	  layout	   Reduction	  in	  target	  zones	  (%)	   Increase	  on	  property	  (%)	   Buffer	  interception	  (%)	   Environmental	  emissions	  reduction	  (%)	  Per-­‐Fan	  (Hedge)	   2	   -­‐0.33	   +2.60	   1.78	   -­‐1.12	  High	  Per-­‐Fan	  (Hedge)	   9	   -­‐0.98	   +8.75	   1.72	   -­‐1.66	  Porosity,	  single-­‐row	  (Excelsa)	  16	   -­‐5.75	   +14.65	   2.01	   -­‐1.14	  Porosity,	  double-­‐row	  (Excelsa)	  18	   -­‐7.12	   +29.37	   3.58	   -­‐3.12	  Proximity	  (Excelsa)	  	   24	   -­‐3.53	   +7.84	   2.77	   -­‐0.34	  Thickness	  (Excelsa)	   26	   -­‐5.22	   +11.98	   3.87	   -­‐0.60	  Per-­‐Fan	  (Excelsa)	   28	   +0.77	   -­‐0.73	   2.74	   +0.47	  Split	  Rows	  (Excelsa)	   32	   -­‐4.50	   +14.45	   2.69	   -­‐0.84	  In	  a	  similar	  fashion	  to	  Site	  II,	  Excelsa	  cedar	  is	  the	  superior	  tree	  type	  when	  compared	  to	  hedging	  cedar.	  This	  is	  primarily	  due	  to	  its	  additional	  height	  (10	  m	  versus	  3	  m).	  Within	  the	  hedging	  cedar	  category,	  the	  most	  effective	  layouts	  include	  a	  with	  full	  perimeters.	  Higher	  cedars	  are	  also	  more	  effective,	  and	  if	  per-­‐fan	  diagonal	  structures	  are	  used,	  they	  should	  be	  placed	  perpendicular	  to	  the	  mean	  wind.	  	  The	  Excelsa	  per-­‐fan	  layouts	  simulated	  were	  very	  ineffective,	  with	  the	  best	  layouts	  still	  increasing	  target	  zone	  deposition	  and	  increasing	  environmental	  emissions.	  The	  most	  effective	  Excelsa	  layouts	  have	  a	  full	  perimeter	  located	  far	  from	  the	  barn,	  with	  a	  low	  to	  medium	  porosity.	  The	  most	  effective	  of	  these	  buffers	  are	  double-­‐row	  buffers,	  which	  are	  more	  effective	  at	  target	  zone	  reduction,	  filtering	  and	  environmental	  emissions	  reduction.	  	  	  	   	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   77/114	  	  	  6. Site IV 6.1	  Site	  Description	  Site	  IV	  consists	  of	  a	  large	  two-­‐story	  barn	  (L	  =	  104	  m,	  W	  =	  15	  m,	  H	  =	  8	  m)	  with	  standard	  fan	  ventilation.	  There	  are	  9	  hooded	  fans	  on	  the	  north	  and	  south	  sides	  of	  the	  barn	  on	  each	  story.	  There	  are	  berry	  fields	  to	  the	  south	  of	  the	  property	  and	  various	  neighboring	  properties	  with	  built	  structures	  and	  vegetation	  to	  the	  north	  and	  east.	  The	  area	  was	  digitized	  as	  per	  Figure	  6.1a	  for	  simulations;	  vegetation	  parameters	  were	  matched	  to	  site	  vegetation.	  PM10	  sources	  were	  placed	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  6.1a	  at	  the	  locations	  of	  the	  exhaust	  fans	  (1.5	  m	  a.g.l).	  The	  entire	  simulated	  area	  covers	  a	  286	  by	  164	  m	  area.	  	  Figure	  6.1:	  a.	  Schematic	  map	  of	  Site	  IV,	  showing	  barns	  to	  the	  southeast	  and	  berry	  fields	  to	  the	  north	  and	  east.	  PM10	  source	  areas	  are	  indicated	  in	  red.	  Blue	  arrow	  indicates	  direction	  and	  magnitude	  of	  the	  mean	  wind.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  zones	  for	  Site	  I	  showing	  barn	  (A)	  and	  berry	  plots	  (B-­‐D)	  in	  the	  modeled	  domain	  of	  240	  by	  200	  m.	  c.	  Partial	  panorama	  taken	  from	  centre	  of	  Site	  IV,	  showing	  barn	  and	  surroundings	  (Photo:	  BC	  Ministry	  of	  Agriculture).	  The	  site	  was	  subdivided	  into	  4	  zones	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  3.1b,	  with	  zone	  A	  being	  the	  barn	  area	  delineated	  by	  the	  properly	  line,	  zone	  B	  comprising	  the	  farmer's	  property	  and	  outbuildings,	  and	  zones	  C	  to	  D	  comprising	  the	  neighboring	  structures	  located	  to	  the	  north	  and	  east.	  All	  three	  non-­‐barn	  zones	  contain	  a	  large	  number	  of	  built	  structures	  and	  large	  trees.	  For	  this	  site,	  the	  target	  zones	  for	  a	  reduction	  in	  PM10	  deposition	  are	  zones	  C	  and	  D.	  	  78/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  6.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  6.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  Eighteen	  different	  buffer	  layouts	  were	  simulated	  with	  varying	  buffer	  dimensions,	  placements	  and	  composition.	  Buffers	  were	  divided	  loosely	  into	  five	  categories	  examining	  open	  and	  closed	  buffer	  layouts,	  barn	  proximity,	  using	  diagonal	  structures,	  and	  thickness.	  The	  vegetation	  configurations	  for	  each	  layout	  are	  described	  below	  in	  Table	  6.1.	  Table	  6.1:	  List	  of	  layouts	  with	  description	  of	  buffer	  composition	  for	  each	  simulated	  configuration.	  Layout	  ID	   Layout	  Description	  control	   No	  modifications	  1	   Excelsa	  row	  to	  the	  south,	  bent	  diagonal	  to	  the	  southwest	  2	   As	  01,	  but	  hedge	  extends	  to	  the	  east	  and	  to	  the	  north	  to	  contact	  small	  shed	  3	   Long	  diagonal	  hedges	  of	  Excelsa	  from	  west	  to	  east	  to	  south	  of	  barn	  and	  an	  L	  shaped	  hedge	  to	  NE	  4	   Combination	  of	  2	  and	  3.	  Perimeter-­‐type	  hedge	  from	  2	  plus	  diagonals	  from	  3	  5	   As	  04,	  but	  with	  northeast	  corner	  bent	  inwards	  6	   Long	  hedge	  on	  west	  and	  south	  sides	  of	  property	  7	   As	  06,	  but	  hedge	  extends	  up	  east	  side	  again	  8	   As	  01,	  with	  thicker	  hedge	  9	   As	  02,	  but	  thicker	  10	   As	  03,	  but	  thicker	  11	   As	  04,	  but	  thicker	  12	   As	  05,	  but	  thicker	  13	   As	  06,	  but	  thicker	  14	   As	  07,	  but	  thicker	  15	   Zigzag	  hedge	  on	  south	  side	  of	  barn	  16	   As	  16,	  but	  with	  L-­‐shaped	  hedge	  to	  northeast	  of	  barn	  17	   As	  17,	  but	  L	  hedge	  filled	  a	  bit	  	  ENVI-­‐met	  simulations	  were	  undertaken	  for	  the	  above	  layouts	  with	  meteorological	  conditions	  typical	  for	  the	  area.	  In	  all	  cases,	  a	  wind	  speed	  of	  3.0	  m	  s-­‐1	  measured	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level	  was	  used.	  A	  225	  degree	  wind	  direction	  was	  used	  for	  all	  runs.	  This	  accounted	  for	  the	  typical	  summer	  wind	  directions	  in	  the	  study	  area.	  In	  total	  22	  simulation	  runs	  were	  completed,	  summarized	  in	  Table	  3.2.	  	   	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   79/114	  	  	  Table	  6.2:	  List	  of	  ENVI-­‐met	  runs	  showing	  layout	  used	  and	  corresponding	  wind	  direction	  relative	  to	  geographic	  north.	  All	  wind	  speeds	  were	  3	  m	  s-­‐1	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level.	  Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	   	   Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	  site3_control_225_3	   control	   225	   	   site4_9_225_3	   9	   225	  site4_1_225_3	   1	   225	   	   site4_10_225_3	   10	   225	  site4_2_225_3	   2	   225	   	   site4_11_225_3	   11	   225	  site4_3_225_3	   3	   225	   	   site4_12_225_3	   12	   225	  site4_4_225_3	   4	   225	   	   site4_13_225_3	   13	   225	  site4_5_225_3	   5	   225	   	   site4_14_225_3	   14	   225	  site4_6_225_3	   6	   225	   	   site4_15_225_3	   15	   225	  site4_7_225_3	   7	   225	   	   site4_16_225_3	   16	   225	  site4_8_225_3	   8	   225	   	   site4_17_225_3	   17	   225	  	  A	  map	  showing	  deposition	  of	  PM10	  for	  the	  control	  case	  in	  a	  wind	  of	  225	  is	  shown	  in	  Figure	  6.2	  below.	  It	  shows	  a	  distinct	  plume	  impinging	  on	  the	  north	  and	  east	  section	  of	  the	  area,	  with	  very	  high	  deposition	  in	  tree	  structures	  and	  some	  deposition	  at	  ground	  level.	  The	  target	  zones	  for	  reduction	  are	  C	  and	  D.	  	  Figure	  6.2:	  Deposition	  map	  for	  control	  run	  with	  a	  wind	  direction	  of	  225°.	  6.2.2	  Open	  Buffers	  Layouts	  1	  and	  6	  were	  used	  to	  examine	  the	  effects	  of	  using	  a	  single	  long	  buffer	  structure	  with	  no	  closure	  on	  the	  east	  side	  of	  the	  barn	  to	  reduce	  wind	  speeds	  near	  the	  fan	  areas.	  These	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  6.3	  below,	  showing	  the	  exact	  configuration	  of	  the	  buffer	  and	  its	  composition.	  80/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  6.3:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  01	  and	  06,	  showing	  two	  possible	  configurations	  of	  open	  buffers.	  	  Figure	  6.4:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  IV	  by	  zone.b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  6.4	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  within	  the	  simulated	  area.	  Figure	  6.4a	  shows	  the	  percent	  change	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case,	  and	  Figure	  6.4b	  shows	  how	  deposition	  is	  distributed	  for	  each	  buffer	  layout.	  	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   81/114	  	  	  Table	  6.3:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  variations	  in	  length	  of	  buffer.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.15	   4.27	   2.55	   -­‐	   91.03	  1	   2.29	   4.18	   2.86	   0.00	   90.67	  6	   2.41	   4.23	   2.89	   0.00	   90.47	  	  Table	  6.4:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  variations	  in	  length	  of	  buffer.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  1	   3.26	   0.23	   4.54	   -­‐0.36	  6	   4.73	   -­‐0.22	   4.56	   -­‐0.56	  	  Figure	  6.5:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  1,	  b.	  Layout	  6.	  Tables	  6.3	  and	  6.4	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  increasing	  buffer	  length	  on	  deposition	  in	  the	  site.	  Layout	  6	  with	  the	  square-­‐cornered	  buffer	  increases	  deposition	  on	  the	  property	  by	  +4.73%	  versus	  layout	  1's	  increase	  of	  +3.26%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  is	  decreased	  by	  -­‐0.23%	  in	  layout	  6	  and	  increased	  by	  +0.23%	  in	  layout	  1.	  Both	  buffers	  do	  not	  actually	  intercept	  any	  particulate	  matter;	  this	  is	  to	  be	  expected	  with	  the	  open	  buffer	  configuration.	  The	  square-­‐cornered	  buffer	  also	  reduces	  site	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  -­‐	  a	  reduction	  of	  -­‐0.56%	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  atmosphere	  outside	  the	  simulated	  area	  was	  found.	  	  82/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Figure	  6.5	  maps	  the	  changes	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case	  for	  each	  of	  the	  three	  layouts.	  The	  effects	  are	  so	  small	  as	  to	  be	  very	  difficult	  to	  see.	  	  6.2.3	  Closed	  Buffers	  Layouts	  2	  and	  7	  examined	  the	  effect	  of	  closing	  the	  buffer	  loops	  to	  the	  east	  of	  the	  buffers	  in	  section	  6.2.3	  (Layout	  3).	  These	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  6.6	  below.	  	  	  Figure	  6.6:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  02	  and	  07,	  showing	  configurations	  of	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  6.7	  shows	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition.	  	  	  Figure	  6.7:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  IV	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   83/114	  	  	  Table	  6.5:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  closed	  buffers.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.15	   4.27	   2.55	   -­‐	   91.03	  2	   2.13	   4.08	   2.80	   0.37	   90.61	  7	   2.28	   4.21	   2.95	   0.41	   90.15	  	  Table	  6.6:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  closed	  buffers.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  2	   7.74	   -­‐0.12	   3.35	   -­‐0.42	  7	   13.03	   -­‐0.54	   6.00	   -­‐0.88	  	  Figure	  6.8:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  2,	  b.	  Layout	  7.	  Tables	  6.5	  and	  6.6	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  various	  corner	  structures	  on	  deposition	  in	  the	  site.	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +13.03%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  7	  and	  the	  lowest	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  2	  at	  +7.74%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  is	  similarly	  decreased	  in	  these	  layouts	  (-­‐0.54%	  and	  -­‐0.12%).	  A	  similar	  pattern	  is	  shown	  with	  buffer	  interception.	  0.41%	  of	  the	  emissions	  are	  intercepted	  in	  layout	  7,	  and	  0.37%	  in	  layout	  2.	  This	  is	  also	  seen	  when	  comparing	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  -­‐	  layout	  7	  shows	  the	  highest	  reduction	  at	  -­‐0.88%,	  and	  layout	  4	  is	  half	  that	  at	  -­‐0.42%.	  84/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Figure	  6.8	  shows	  maps	  of	  deposition	  changes	  for	  these	  four	  layouts.	  Patterns	  are	  similar	  in	  both	  cases	  with	  a	  small	  interception	  by	  the	  buffer	  in	  the	  northeast,	  increasing	  concentration.	  Decreases	  in	  deposition	  on	  trees	  to	  the	  north	  are	  also	  evident.	  	  6.2.4	  Diagonal	  Buffers	  Layouts	  03,	  04	  and	  05	  were	  configured	  to	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  diagonal	  buffers	  with	  partial	  or	  full	  closure	  on	  deposition	  (Figure	  6.9).	  	  	  Figure	  6.9:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  03,	  04,	  and	  05	  showing	  vegetative	  buffers	  of	  doubled	  thickness.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  6.10	  shows	  the	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  and	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  in	  each	  layout.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   85/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  6.10:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  IV	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  6.7:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  width.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.15	   4.27	   2.55	   -­‐	   91.03	  3	   1.69	   4.18	   2.62	   0.28	   91.24	  4	   1.88	   4.03	   2.75	   0.34	   90.99	  5	   1.89	   4.03	   2.78	   0.28	   91.02	  	  Table	  6.8:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  width.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  3	   1.28	   1.61	   0.98	   0.21	  4	   5.11	   0.05	   3.69	   -­‐0.05	  5	   2.72	   0.32	   4.26	   -­‐0.01	  	  Tables	  6.7	  and	  6.8	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  diagonal	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  IV.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +5.11%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  4	  and	  the	  lowest	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  3	  at	  +1.28%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  is	  increased	  across	  the	  board,	  with	  the	  lowest	  increase	  of	  +0.05%	  in	  layout	  4	  and	  the	  highest	  in	  layout	  3	  at	  1.61%.	  Buffer	  interception	  follows	  similar	  patterns,	  with	  highest	  86/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  interception	  in	  layout	  4	  (0.34%)	  and	  similar	  numbers	  in	  the	  other	  two	  layouts.	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  in	  layouts	  4	  and	  5	  by	  a	  small	  amount	  (-­‐0.05	  and	  -­‐0.01%)	  and	  increased	  in	  layout	  3.	  Figure	  6.11	  maps	  the	  deposition	  change	  for	  these	  layouts.	  Patterns	  show	  deposition	  increases	  near	  the	  northeast	  of	  Zone	  A	  and	  decreases	  on	  tree	  deposition	  in	  zones	  B	  and	  C.	  	  	  Figure	  6.11:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  3,	  b.	  Layout	  4,	  c.	  Layout	  5.	  6.2.5	  Zigzag	  Buffers	  Layouts	  15	  through	  17	  examine	  the	  use	  of	  zigzag	  structures	  placed	  in	  front	  of	  the	  barn	  to	  reduce	  wind	  speeds	  and	  a	  corner	  structure	  placed	  to	  the	  northeast	  of	  the	  barn	  to	  intercept	  emissions	  (Figure	  6.12).	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  6.13	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  and	  describes	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  shows	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  within	  each	  layout.	  	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   87/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  6.12:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  15,	  16	  and	  17	  showing	  addition	  of	  deciduous	  rows	  with	  varying	  porosity.	  	  	  	  Figure	  6.13:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  IV	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  	  	  	  88/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Table	  6.9:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  porosities.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.15	   4.27	   2.55	   -­‐	   91.03	  15	   1.25	   4.21	   2.49	   0.01	   92.04	  16	   1.19	   4.24	   2.58	   0.24	   91.75	  17	   1.18	   4.25	   2.59	   0.23	   91.74	  	  Table	  6.10:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  15	   -­‐7.09	   1.41	   0.10	   1.00	  16	   -­‐3.18	   1.75	   1.74	   0.72	  17	   -­‐3.78	   1.86	   2.05	   0.71	  	  Tables	  6.9	  and	  6.10	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  zigzag	  structures	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  IV.	  	  In	  all	  cases,	  deposition	  on	  the	  barn	  property	  is	  decreased.	  The	  lowest	  decrease	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  16	  at	  -­‐3.18%	  and	  layout	  15	  has	  the	  highest	  decrease.	  In	  all	  cases,	  the	  target	  zones	  have	  increased	  deposition	  due	  to	  diversion	  of	  the	  plume	  (1.41%	  to	  +1.86%).	  Interception	  of	  particulate	  matter	  by	  the	  buffer	  is	  highest	  in	  layout	  16	  at	  0.24%	  and	  lowest	  at	  0.01%	  in	  layout	  15.	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  increased	  in	  all	  cases	  by	  0.71	  to	  1.00%.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   89/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  6.14:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  14,	  b.	  Layout	  15,	  c.	  Layout	  16.	  6.2.6	  Double-­‐row	  Buffers	  Layouts	  8	  through	  14	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  adding	  a	  second	  row	  to	  the	  diagonal,	  closed	  and	  open	  layouts	  in	  the	  previous	  sections.	  These	  structures	  are	  mapped	  below	  in	  Figure	  6.15.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  6.16	  makes	  these	  comparisons	  showing	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  are	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  describing	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts.	  	  	  90/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  6.15:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  08	  through	  14,	  showing	  doubled	  buffers.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   91/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  6.16:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  IV	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  6.11:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  thickness.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.15	   4.27	   2.55	   -­‐	   91.03	  8	   2.45	   3.98	   2.91	   0.00	   90.66	  9	   2.19	   3.84	   2.80	   0.55	   90.62	  10	   1.60	   4.02	   2.52	   0.35	   91.50	  11	   1.85	   3.83	   2.75	   0.53	   91.04	  12	   1.85	   3.84	   2.79	   0.44	   91.08	  13	   2.59	   3.99	   2.95	   0.00	   90.46	  14	   2.35	   3.97	   2.99	   0.62	   90.08	  	  92/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Table	  6.12:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  IV	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  thickness.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  8	   7.24	   -­‐0.7	   7.02	   -­‐0.38	  9	   12.73	   -­‐1.33	   4.63	   -­‐0.41	  10	   2.32	   1.41	   0.88	   0.47	  11	   9.31	   -­‐0.71	   4.49	   0.01	  12	   6.14	   -­‐0.35	   5.43	   0.05	  13	   9.05	   -­‐1.48	   7.25	   -­‐0.57	  14	   21.72	   -­‐2.05	   8.58	   -­‐0.95	  	  Tables	  6.11	  and	  6.12	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  these	  buffer	  configurations	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  I.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +4.93%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  5,	  which	  contains	  slashed	  diagonal	  buffers	  to	  the	  south.	  The	  highest	  interception	  by	  the	  buffer	  (3.08%)	  also	  occurs	  in	  this	  layout.	  In	  both	  cases,	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  increase	  instead	  of	  decreasing	  –	  this	  increase	  is	  lowest	  in	  layout	  5	  (+0.18).	  	  Figure	  6.17	  shows	  the	  deposition	  change	  patters	  for	  both	  buffers.	  It	  appears	  that	  Layout	  6	  diverts	  the	  plume	  such	  that	  it	  does	  not	  intersect	  the	  corner	  of	  the	  buffer,	  thus	  decreasing	  interception	  and	  therefore	  effectiveness	  of	  the	  configuration.	  Layout	  5	  shows	  similar	  patterns	  to	  most	  of	  the	  cornered	  layouts	  examined	  for	  this	  site.	  	  	  Figure	  6.17:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  5,	  b.	  Layout	  6.	  	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   93/114	  	  	  6.3	  Summary	  Overall,	  Site	  IV	  did	  not	  benefit	  from	  the	  installation	  of	  a	  buffer,	  with	  reductions	  in	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  of	  up	  to	  -­‐0.95%	  in	  the	  case	  of	  the	  overall	  most	  effective	  buffer.	  Table	  6.13	  summarizes	  the	  buffers	  that	  were	  most	  effective	  in	  each	  subcategory	  at	  reducing	  emissions	  in	  the	  target	  zones.	  	  Table	  6.13:	  Summary	  of	  buffer	  effectiveness	  for	  Site	  IV.	  Category	   Most	  effective	  layout	   Reduction	  in	  target	  zones	  (%)	   Increase	  on	  property	  (%)	   Buffer	  interception	  (%)	   Environmental	  emissions	  reduction	  (%)	  Open	   6	   -­‐0.22	   +4.73	   0.00	   -­‐0.56	  Closed	   7	   -­‐0.54	   +13.03	   0.41	   -­‐0.88	  Diagonal	   4	   +0.05	   +5.11	   0.34	   -­‐0.05	  Zigzags	   15	   +1.41	   -­‐7.09	   0.01	   +1.00	  Thickness	   14	   -­‐2.05	   +21.72	   0.62	   -­‐0.95	  Open	  buffer	  layouts	  were	  effective	  at	  redistributing	  emissions,	  but	  did	  not	  filter	  emissions	  at	  all	  as	  the	  plume	  did	  not	  impinge	  on	  the	  buffer.	  They	  showed	  a	  small	  reduction	  in	  environmental	  emissions.	  Within	  this	  category,	  square	  cornered	  buffers	  were	  more	  effective	  than	  diagonally	  cornered	  buffers.	  By	  contrast,	  closed	  buffers	  were	  more	  than	  twice	  as	  effective	  at	  redistributing	  emissions,	  with	  the	  addition	  of	  higher	  filtration	  capabilities.	  Thicker,	  doubled	  versions	  of	  these	  layouts	  have	  similar	  properties,	  with	  the	  highest	  performing	  layout	  being	  a	  doubled,	  closed,	  square-­‐cornered	  layout	  (layout	  14)	  with	  up	  to	  -­‐0.95%	  reduction	  in	  emissions	  and	  a	  +21.72%	  increase	  on	  the	  property.	  Diagonal	  and	  zigzag	  based	  buffers	  were	  generally	  inferior,	  with	  zigzag	  buffers	  increasing	  environmental	  emissions	  and	  increasing	  deposition	  on	  target	  zones.	  	  	   	  94/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  7. Site V 7.1	  Site	  Description	  Site	  V	  consists	  of	  a	  north-­‐south	  oriented	  two	  story	  barn	  of	  approximately	  (L	  =	  133	  m,	  W	  =	  13	  m,	  H	  =	  8	  m)	  with	  hooded	  fan	  ventilation.	  There	  are	  12	  hooded	  fans	  on	  the	  east	  side	  of	  the	  barn.	  A	  neighboring	  residential	  subdivision	  with	  many	  built	  structures	  is	  located	  to	  the	  east	  and	  north	  of	  the	  area.	  The	  area	  was	  digitized	  as	  per	  Figure	  7.1a	  for	  simulations;	  vegetation	  parameters	  were	  matched	  to	  site	  vegetation.	  PM10	  sources	  were	  placed	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  1a	  on	  the	  east	  side	  of	  the	  barn	  at	  the	  locations	  of	  the	  exhaust	  fans.	  The	  entire	  simulated	  area	  covers	  a	  193	  by	  249	  m	  area.	  	  Figure	  7.1:	  a.	  Schematic	  map	  of	  Site	  V,	  showing	  barns	  to	  the	  southeast	  and	  berry	  fields	  to	  the	  north	  and	  east.	  PM10	  source	  areas	  are	  indicated	  in	  red.	  Blue	  arrow	  indicates	  direction	  and	  magnitude	  of	  the	  mean	  wind.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  zones	  for	  Site	  V	  showing	  barn	  (A),	  neighboring	  buildings	  (B)	  and	  subdivision	  (C	  and	  D).	  in	  the	  modeled	  domain	  of	  193	  by	  249	  m.	  The	  site	  was	  subdivided	  into	  4	  zones	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  7.1b,	  with	  zone	  A	  being	  the	  barn	  area	  delineated	  by	  the	  properly	  line,	  zone	  B	  comprising	  the	  farmer's	  property	  and	  outbuildings,	  and	  zones	  C	  to	  D	  comprising	  residential	  subdivisions	  to	  the	  east.	  For	  this	  site,	  the	  target	  zones	  for	  a	  reduction	  in	  PM10	  deposition	  are	  zones	  C	  and	  D.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   95/114	  	  	  7.2	  ENVI-­‐Met	  Simulations	  7.2.1	  Simulation	  Overview	  Twelve	  different	  buffer	  layouts	  were	  simulated	  with	  varying	  buffer	  dimensions,	  placements	  and	  composition.	  Buffers	  were	  divided	  loosely	  into	  five	  categories	  examining	  open	  and	  closed	  buffer	  layouts,	  barn	  proximity,	  using	  diagonal	  structures,	  and	  thickness.	  The	  vegetation	  configurations	  for	  each	  layout	  are	  described	  below	  in	  Table	  7.1.	  Table	  7.1:	  List	  of	  layouts	  with	  description	  of	  buffer	  composition	  for	  each	  simulated	  configuration.	  Layout	  ID	   Layout	  Description	  control No modification 1 Diagonal trees to north of barn, long hedge of Excelsa along east perimeter 2 As 1, but long hedge doubled 3 As 1, but long hedge is closer and bent 4 As 3, but long hedge is doubled 5 As 1, but hedge has hook to east at the north end 6 As 5, add rows going inwards 6m to the west towards barn 7 Hedge around barn including diagonal area from 1 8 Perimeter hedge from 7, with bent section from 3 9 As 8, but doubled 10 Perimeter hedge from 7, with hook section from 5 11 As 6, but rows are shorter and denser 12 As 1, but row of deciduous outside east row 	  ENVI-­‐met	  simulations	  were	  undertaken	  for	  the	  above	  layouts	  with	  meteorological	  conditions	  typical	  for	  the	  area.	  In	  all	  cases,	  a	  wind	  speed	  of	  3.0	  m	  s-­‐1measured	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level	  was	  used.	  A	  215	  degree	  wind	  direction	  was	  used	  for	  all	  runs.	  This	  accounted	  for	  the	  typical	  summer	  wind	  directions	  in	  the	  study	  area.	  In	  total	  13	  simulation	  runs	  were	  completed,	  summarized	  in	  Table	  7.2.	  	  	  	  Table	  7.2:	  List	  of	  ENVI-­‐met	  runs	  showing	  layout	  used	  and	  corresponding	  wind	  direction	  relative	  to	  geographic	  north.	  All	  wind	  speeds	  were	  3	  m	  s-­‐1	  at	  10	  m	  above	  ground	  level.	  Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	   	   Run	  ID	   Layout	  ID	  Used	   Wind	  Direction	  (°)	  site5_control_215_3 control 215 	   site5_7_215_3 7 215 96/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  site5_1_215_3 1 215 	   site5_8_215_3 8 215 site5_2_215_3 2 215 	   site5_9_215_3 9 215 site5_3_215_3 3 215 	   site5_10_215_3 10 215 site5_4_215_3 4 215 	   site5_11_215_3 11 215 site5_5_215_3 5 215 	   site5_12_215_3 12 215 site5_6_215_3 6 215 	      	  A	  map	  showing	  deposition	  of	  PM10	  for	  the	  control	  case	  in	  a	  wind	  of	  215	  is	  shown	  in	  Figure	  6.2	  below.	  It	  shows	  a	  distinct	  plume	  impinging	  on	  the	  north	  and	  east	  section	  of	  the	  area,	  with	  very	  high	  deposition	  in	  tree	  structures	  and	  some	  deposition	  at	  ground	  level.	  	  Figure	  7.2:	  Deposition	  map	  for	  control	  run	  with	  a	  wind	  direction	  of	  225°.	  	  	  7.2.2	  Open	  Buffers	  Layouts	  1	  and	  3	  were	  used	  to	  examine	  the	  effects	  of	  buffer	  proximity	  on	  deposition	  using	  an	  open	  layout.	  These	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  7.3	  below,	  showing	  the	  exact	  configuration	  of	  the	  buffer	  and	  its	  composition.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   97/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  7.3:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  01	  and	  03,	  showing	  proximity	  of	  buffers	  to	  the	  barn.	  	  	  Figure	  7.4:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  V	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  7.4	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  within	  the	  simulated	  area.	  Figure	  7.4a	  shows	  the	  percent	  change	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case,	  and	  Figure	  7.4b	  shows	  how	  deposition	  is	  distributed	  for	  each	  buffer	  layout.	  	   	  98/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Table	  7.3:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  V	  for	  variations	  in	  length	  of	  buffer.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.44	   0.00	   2.75	   -­‐	   94.80	  1	   2.44	   0.01	   3.28	   1.45	   92.83	  3	   1.64	   0.00	   2.44	   1.40	   94.52	  	  Table	  7.4:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  V	  for	  variations	  in	  length	  of	  buffer.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  1	   0.31	   0.81	   0.78	   -­‐1.97	  3	   5.29	   -­‐0.11	   -­‐0.95	   -­‐0.29	  	  Figure	  7.5:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  1,	  b.	  Layout	  3.	  Tables	  7.3	  and	  7.4	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  increasing	  buffer	  length	  on	  deposition	  in	  the	  site.	  Layout	  3	  with	  the	  closer	  buffer	  increases,	  under	  the	  simulated	  wind	  direction,	  deposition	  on	  the	  property	  by	  +5.29%	  by	  slowing	  wind	  near	  the	  exhaust	  fans,	  versus	  layout	  1's	  increase	  of	  only	  +0.31%.	  Deposition	  in	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   99/114	  	  	  the	  target	  zone	  is	  decreased	  by	  -­‐0.11%	  in	  layout	  3	  and	  increased	  by	  +0.81%	  in	  layout	  1.	  Both	  buffers	  have	  similar	  emissions	  interception,	  at	  1.45%.	  The	  closer	  buffer	  has	  a	  lower	  reduction	  in	  environmental	  emissions	  with	  -­‐0.29%	  as	  compared	  to	  the	  higher	  reduction	  in	  layout	  1	  (-­‐1.97%).	  Figure	  7.5	  maps	  the	  changes	  in	  deposition	  from	  the	  control	  case	  for	  each	  of	  the	  three	  layouts.	  The	  effects	  are	  so	  small	  as	  to	  be	  very	  difficult	  to	  see.	  	  7.2.3	  Closed	  Buffers	  Layouts	  7	  and	  8	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  closing	  the	  buffer	  loops	  from	  the	  previous	  section.	  These	  layouts	  are	  mapped	  in	  Figure	  7.6	  below.	  	  	  Figure	  7.6:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  07	  and	  08,	  showing	  configurations	  of	  buffers	  with	  corner	  structures.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  7.7	  shows	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition.	  	  100/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  7.7:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  V	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  7.5:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  V	  for	  closed	  buffers.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.44	   0.00	   2.75	   -­‐	   94.80	  7	   2.38	   0.01	   3.20	   1.47	   92.94	  8	   1.57	   0.01	   2.28	   1.54	   94.61	  	  Table	  7.6:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  V	  for	  closed	  buffers.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  7	   2.69	   1.17	   0.98	   -­‐1.87	  8	   7.79	   0.62	   -­‐1.98	   -­‐0.19	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   101/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  7.8:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  7,	  b.	  Layout	  8.	  Tables	  7.5	  and	  7.6	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  various	  corner	  structures	  on	  deposition	  in	  the	  site.	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +7.79%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  8	  and	  the	  lowest	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  7	  at	  +2.69%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  is	  however	  increased	  in	  these	  layouts	  (+1.17%	  and	  +0.62%).	  Buffer	  interception	  is	  highest	  in	  layout	  8	  at	  1.54%,	  and	  lower	  in	  layout	  7	  at	  1.47%.	  Total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  are	  reduced	  by	  -­‐1.87%	  in	  layout	  7	  and	  -­‐0.19%	  in	  layout	  8.	  	  Figure	  7.8	  shows	  maps	  of	  deposition	  changes	  for	  these	  layouts.	  Additional	  deposition	  is	  visible	  on	  the	  buffer	  near	  the	  northeast	  corner	  in	  both	  layouts.	  Minimal	  changes	  in	  the	  deposition	  patterns	  are	  visible	  in	  zones	  C	  and	  D.	  7.2.4	  Buffer	  Thickness	  Layouts	  02,	  04,	  09	  and	  10	  were	  configured	  to	  examine	  the	  effect	  of	  buffers	  with	  partial	  or	  full	  closure	  on	  deposition	  (Figure	  7.9).	  	  102/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  7.9:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  02,	  04,	  09	  and	  10	  showing	  vegetative	  buffers	  of	  doubled	  thickness.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout.	  Figure	  7.10	  shows	  the	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  and	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  in	  each	  layout.	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   103/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  7.10:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  V	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  7.7:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  V	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  width.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.44	   0.00	   2.75	   -­‐	   94.80	  2	   2.31	   0.02	   2.79	   1.96	   92.91	  4	   1.64	   0.00	   2.28	   1.97	   94.11	  9	   1.63	   0.01	   2.12	   2.16	   94.08	  10	   2.32	   0.01	   2.66	   1.95	   93.06	  	  Tables	  7.7	  and	  7.8	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  doubled	  buffers	  on	  Site	  V	  deposition.	  	  The	  highest	  on-­‐property	  deposition	  increase	  of	  +15.34%	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  9	  and	  the	  lowest	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  2	  at	  +7.45%.	  Deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  is	  increased	  across	  the	  board	  (+1.32%	  to	  +2.12%)	  with	  the	  exception	  of	  layout	  4,	  with	  a	  decrease	  of	  -­‐0.11%.	  Buffer	  interception	  is	  highest	  in	  layout	  9	  (2.16%)	  and	  similar	  in	  other	  layouts	  (1.94	  to	  1.96%).	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  reduced	  in	  all	  layouts,	  with	  104/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  the	  largest	  increase	  in	  layout	  2	  (-­‐1.89%)	  and	  the	  lowest	  in	  layout	  4	  (-­‐0.69%)	  suggesting	  that	  a	  buffer	  that	  is	  further	  away	  is	  slightly	  more	  effective	  to	  reduce	  environmental	  emissions.	  Table	  7.8:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  V	  for	  buffers	  with	  doubled	  width.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  2	   7.45	   2.12	   -­‐0.91	   -­‐1.89	  4	   10.81	   -­‐0.11	   -­‐1.26	   -­‐0.69	  9	   15.34	   1.32	   -­‐2.23	   -­‐0.72	  10	   11	   1.58	   -­‐0.93	   -­‐1.74	  	  Figure	  7.11	  maps	  the	  deposition	  change	  for	  these	  layouts.	  Patterns	  are	  similar	  in	  all	  cases,	  showing	  deposition	  increases	  along	  the	  buffer	  and	  little	  change	  in	  the	  target	  zones.	  	  	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   105/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  7.11:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  2,	  b.	  Layout	  4,	  c.	  Layout	  9,	  d.	  Layout	  10.	  7.2.5	  Other	  Buffer	  Layouts	  Layouts	  05,	  06,	  11	  and	  12	  examine	  various	  other	  buffer	  configurations,	  ranging	  from	  split	  rows	  to	  crenellations.	  Simulations	  were	  performed	  for	  each	  of	  these	  layouts	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  layout	  (Figure	  7.12).	  Figure	  7.13	  graphs	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  and	  describes	  changes	  from	  the	  control	  case	  as	  well	  as	  shows	  the	  distribution	  of	  deposition	  within	  each	  layout.	  	  	  106/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  7.12:	  Maps	  describing	  layouts	  05,	  06,	  11	  and	  12	  showing	  various	  buffer	  configurations.	  	  	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   107/114	  	  	  	  Figure	  7.13:	  a.	  Relative	  change	  in	  deposition	  compared	  to	  the	  control	  case	  for	  Site	  V	  by	  zone.	  b.	  Distribution	  of	  deposition	  between	  the	  property	  (zone	  A),	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D),	  other	  zones	  (B)	  and	  the	  buffer.	  Table	  7.9:	  Distribution	  of	  PM10	  across	  Site	  V	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  structures.	  Layout	  ID	   Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  on	  property	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  the	  target	  zones	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  deposited	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  intercepted	  by	  buffer	  (%)	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emissions	  emitted	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  control	   2.44	   0.00	   2.75	   -­‐	   94.80	  5	   2.41	   0.01	   3.20	   1.46	   92.91	  6	   2.25	   0.01	   3.01	   1.62	   93.12	  11	   2.33	   0.01	   2.82	   1.56	   93.29	  12	   2.21	   0.02	   3.00	   2.56	   92.22	  	  Table	  7.10:	  Changes	  in	  deposition	  and	  emissions	  across	  Site	  V	  for	  buffers	  with	  varying	  structures.	  Layout	  ID	   Change	  in	  deposition	  on	  property	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  (C	  and	  D)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  deposition	  in	  non-­‐target	  zones	  (B)	  (%)	  Change	  in	  total	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  (%)	  5	   1.56	   0.5	   0.14	   -­‐1.89	  6	   3.80	   0.32	   0.23	   -­‐1.68	  11	   4.96	   0.46	   -­‐0.59	   -­‐1.52	  12	   14.51	   2.43	   1.51	   -­‐2.58	  	  	  108/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  Tables	  7.9	  and	  7.10	  summarize	  the	  effects	  of	  these	  various	  buffers	  on	  deposition	  in	  Site	  V.	  	  In	  all	  cases,	  deposition	  on	  the	  barn	  property	  is	  increased,	  but	  up	  to	  +14.51%	  in	  the	  case	  of	  layout	  12	  (separated	  buffer).	  The	  lowest	  increase	  is	  found	  in	  layout	  6	  at	  +3.80%	  using	  a	  sparse	  buffer	  crenellation.	  In	  all	  cases,	  the	  target	  zones	  have	  increased	  deposition,	  the	  highest	  in	  layout	  12	  (+2.43%).	  Interception	  of	  PM10	  by	  the	  buffer	  is	  highest	  in	  layout	  12	  as	  well	  at	  2.56%	  and	  lowest	  at	  1.46%	  in	  layout	  5.	  Total	  environmental	  emissions	  are	  decreased	  by	  -­‐2.58%	  in	  layout	  12,	  and	  by	  -­‐1.25%	  in	  layout	  11.	  	  	  Figure	  7.14:	  Deposition	  maps	  showing	  changes	  after	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  for	  a.	  Layout	  5,	  b.	  Layout	  6,	  c.	  Layout	  11,	  d.	  Layout	  12.	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   109/114	  	  	  7.3	  Summary	  Overall,	  Site	  V	  did	  not	  benefit	  from	  the	  installation	  of	  a	  buffer,	  with	  reductions	  in	  emissions	  to	  the	  environment	  of	  up	  to	  -­‐2.58%	  in	  the	  case	  of	  the	  overall	  most	  effective	  buffer.	  Table	  7.13	  summarizes	  the	  buffers	  that	  were	  most	  effective	  in	  each	  subcategory	  at	  reducing	  emissions	  in	  the	  target	  zones.	  	  Table	  7.13:	  Summary	  of	  buffer	  effectiveness	  for	  Site	  V.	  Category	   Most	  effective	  layout	   Reduction	  in	  target	  zones	  (%)	   Increase	  on	  property	  (%)	   Buffer	  interception	  (%)	   Environmental	  emissions	  reduction	  (%)	  Open	  Buffers	   3	   -­‐0.11	   +0.31	   1.40	   -­‐0.29	  Closed	  Buffers	   8	   +0.62	   +7.79	   1.54	   -­‐0.19	  Doubled	   4	   -­‐0.11	   +10.81	   2.28	   -­‐0.69	  Other	   12	   +2.43	   +14.51	   2.56	   -­‐2.58	  Buffers	  placed	  closer	  to	  the	  fans	  were	  more	  effective	  than	  those	  placed	  further	  away	  at	  reducing	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zones,	  both	  in	  the	  cases	  of	  single-­‐row	  buffers	  and	  double-­‐row	  buffers.	  Double-­‐row	  buffers	  were	  the	  superior	  choice	  because	  of	  their	  higher	  interception	  (1.40	  versus	  2.56%)	  of	  PM10.	  Crenellated	  buffers	  were	  not	  effective	  at	  reducing	  deposition	  in	  target	  areas	  or	  environmental	  emissions.	  It	  is	  not	  entirely	  clear	  which	  buffer	  configurations	  are	  best	  in	  this	  site,	  as	  those	  with	  highest	  environmental	  emissions	  reduction	  (-­‐2.58%,	  split	  row	  case	  in	  layout	  12)	  also	  shows	  a	  large	  increase	  in	  deposition	  on	  the	  target	  zone.	  If	  reduction	  in	  deposition	  in	  the	  target	  zone	  is	  the	  only	  variable	  to	  be	  optimized,	  a	  double-­‐row	  buffer	  close	  to	  the	  exhaust	  fans	  is	  the	  best	  choice.	  	  	   	  110/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  8. Concluding Buffer Design Recommendations 8.1	  Case	  Studies	  Summary	  The	  case	  studies	  performed	  at	  sites	  I	  to	  V	  (Sections	  3	  to	  7)	  show	  that	  with	  appropriate	  choice	  of	  vegetative	  buffer	  (composition	  and	  placement),	  emissions	  from	  poultry	  facilities	  can	  be	  lowered	  and	  deposition	  of	  particulate	  matter	  on	  neighboring	  properties	  can	  be	  moderately	  reduced.	  Although	  in	  some	  cases,	  a	  substantial	  reduction	  in	  deposition	  is	  achieved	  (such	  as	  in	  Site	  I),	  in	  other	  cases	  very	  little	  improvement	  is	  found	  (Site	  IV	  and	  V).	  	  Prior	  to	  the	  addition	  of	  a	  vegetative	  buffer,	  between	  89.0%	  and	  94.8%	  of	  the	  total	  emissions	  from	  sources	  were	  exported	  to	  neighboring	  properties	  and	  the	  atmosphere.	  Total	  emissions	  and	  adjacent	  property	  deposition	  decreased	  with	  the	  addition	  of	  buffers.	  As	  a	  result,	  generally	  deposition	  on	  the	  facility’s	  property	  is	  increased	  (by	  as	  little	  as	  +10.8%	  and	  up	  to	  29.4%,	  see	  Table	  8.1	  for	  a	  summary	  of	  buffer	  metrics).	  In	  the	  best	  configurations,	  the	  zones	  with	  highest	  deposition	  in	  the	  control	  case	  showed	  reductions	  of	  between	  -­‐2.0%	  and	  -­‐7.6%,	  which	  is	  within	  the	  range	  reported	  in	  Pauls	  and	  Christen	  (2012).	  Table 8.1: Buffer performance metrics by site. The final row is an evaluation of the buffer's effectiveness based on its ability to filter particulate matter (PM10) and reduce the amount exported to the atmosphere. 	   Site	  I	   Site	  II	   Site	  III	   Site	  IV	   Site	  V	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emitted	  PM10	  leaving	  property	  without	  buffer	  (%)	   92.05	   90.97	   89.04	   91.03	   94.80	  Fraction	  of	  total	  PM10	  leaving	  property	  with	  the	  most	  effective	  buffer	  (%)	   91.32	   80.50	   85.91	   90.08	   -­‐0.69	  Change	  (reduction)	  in	  total	  emissions	  with	  most	  effective	  buffer	  (%)	   -­‐0.72	   -­‐1.48	   -­‐3.12	   -­‐0.95	   -­‐2.58	  Relative	  change	  (increase)	  in	  deposition	  in	  barn	  zone	  with	  most	  effective	  buffer	  (%)	   +11.53	   +16.51	   +29.37	   +21.72	   +10.81	  Relative	  change	  (reduction)	  in	  deposition	  in	  target	  zone	  with	  most	  effective	  buffer	  (%)	   -­‐6.51	   -­‐7.62	   -­‐7.12	   -­‐2.05	   -­‐0.11	  Fraction	  of	  total	  emitted	  PM10	  intercepted	  by	  the	  buffer	  (%)	   4.38	   3.35	   3.58	   0.62	   2.28	  General	  effectiveness	  of	  buffers	   ✭	  ✭	  ✭	   ✭	  ✭	  ✭	   ✭	  	   ✭	  	   ✭	  ✭	  	  	  	   	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   111/114	  	  	  8.2	  General	  Design	  Guidelines	  The	  most	  effective	  vegetation	  type	  in	  this	  study	  was	  the	  10	  m	  Excelsa	  cedar	  across	  all	  sites.	  The	  2	  to	  4	  m	  hedging	  cedar	  was	  ineffective	  compared	  to	  similar	  layouts	  using	  Excelsa	  trees	  in	  Site	  II	  and	  Site	  III.	  	  Site	  I	  incorporates	  a	  second	  layer	  of	  high	  porosity	  deciduous	  trees	  outside	  of	  an	  Excelsa	  hedge,	  which	  was	  effective	  in	  filtration	  and	  environmental	  emission	  reduction,	  but	  less	  effective	  at	  emission	  redistribution.	  Using	  an	  outer	  perimeter	  of	  shelterbelt	  trees	  in	  Site	  II	  was	  not	  significantly	  more	  effective	  than	  using	  simple	  Excelsa	  layouts.	  Pauls	  and	  Christen	  (2011)	  found	  that	  particulate	  matter	  filtering	  was	  not	  significantly	  increased	  when	  buffer	  trees	  were	  over	  10	  m	  in	  height,	  so	  the	  use	  of	  10	  m	  Excelsa	  trees	  is	  adequate.	  In	  all	  cases,	  buffer	  thickness	  played	  an	  important	  role	  in	  increasing	  interception	  (filtering)	  and	  redistributing	  deposition	  (deflection).	  Thicker	  buffers	  were	  more	  effective,	  because	  there	  is	  a	  higher	  chance	  of	  particulate	  matter	  to	  deposit	  as	  air	  flow	  though	  the	  buffer.	  At	  most	  sites	  the	  most	  effective	  simulated	  layout	  was	  comprised	  of	  a	  double-­‐row	  Excelsa	  buffer.	  	  The	  effect	  of	  buffer	  proximity	  to	  barns	  and	  source	  fans	  was	  less	  clear	  and	  site	  specific.	  In	  some	  cases	  (Site	  I),	  placing	  the	  buffer	  directly	  in	  front	  of	  the	  fans	  close	  to	  the	  barn	  was	  effective	  as	  the	  plume	  impinges	  directly	  on	  the	  buffer	  and	  interception	  occurs.	  However,	  in	  most	  other	  layouts,	  buffers	  were	  best	  placed	  along	  the	  perimeter	  of	  the	  property	  to	  affect	  wind	  patterns,	  lower	  overall	  wind	  speeds,	  thus	  increasing	  deposition	  on	  the	  property.	  This	  is	  very	  visible	  in	  Site	  II	  (Section	  4.2.5),	  which	  shows	  stepwise	  increasing	  distance	  from	  the	  barn.	  The	  most	  effective	  buffers	  are	  those	  furthest	  from	  the	  barn,	  this	  trend	  is	  repeated	  in	  Site	  III,	  IV	  and	  V.	  It	  should	  be	  noted	  that	  this	  wind	  speed	  reduction	  is	  most	  effective	  with	  a	  fully	  closed	  buffer,	  so	  that	  buffer	  structures	  exist	  upwind	  and	  downwind	  of	  the	  barn	  and	  shelter	  the	  air	  inside	  the	  buffer.	  Ensuring	  that	  buffers	  include	  corners	  seems	  to	  be	  an	  important	  design	  criterion	  for	  reducing	  emissions.	  Site	  I	  presents	  a	  strong	  case	  for	  this,	  were	  a	  linear	  buffer’s	  performance	  was	  improved	  significantly	  through	  the	  addition	  of	  corner	  structures.	  These	  structures	  decrease	  wind	  speeds,	  avoid	  simple	  deflection	  and	  further	  trap	  the	  plume,	  increasing	  both	  buffer	  interception	  and	  deposition	  on	  the	  ground	  near	  the	  buffer.	  It	  can	  also	  be	  seen	  that	  a	  variation	  in	  mean	  wind	  directions	  might	  invalidate	  a	  simple	  linear	  buffer	  if	  the	  plume	  no	  longer	  impinged	  upon	  it;	  adding	  corner	  structures	  makes	  the	  buffer	  more	  effective	  under	  varying	  wind	  directions.	  	  112/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  The	  effects	  of	  buffer	  closure	  were	  also	  studied.	  Open	  buffers,	  where	  the	  entire	  barn	  was	  not	  completely	  encircled	  by	  the	  vegetation,	  generally	  performed	  worse	  than	  fully	  closed	  buffers.	  Closed	  buffers	  cause	  wind	  speed	  reduction	  upwind	  of	  the	  source	  areas	  to	  be	  realized	  and	  maximize	  increases	  in	  deposition	  on	  the	  property.	  Of	  course,	  a	  side	  effect	  is	  that	  this	  will	  worsen	  on-­‐site	  concentrations.	  When	  placing	  a	  closed	  buffer	  along	  the	  property	  edge,	  very	  significant	  changes	  to	  the	  deposition	  pattern	  and	  reductions	  in	  environmental	  emissions	  can	  be	  seen.	  A	  large	  number	  of	  per-­‐fan	  structures	  were	  also	  examined.	  Universally,	  these	  structures	  performed	  worse	  than	  simple	  perimeter	  or	  hedge-­‐type	  buffers.	  Though	  a	  wide	  variety	  of	  shapes	  were	  tried	  (boxes,	  channels,	  diagonal	  rows,	  vees,	  zigzags),	  none	  were	  particularly	  effective	  and	  in	  many	  cases	  had	  the	  opposite	  effect	  desired	  (deposition	  increased	  in	  target	  zones).	  This	  held	  true	  between	  vegetation	  types	  as	  well	  (see	  Sites	  II	  and	  III),	  with	  per-­‐fan	  structures	  using	  hedging	  cedar	  and	  Excelsa	  cedar	  both	  being	  ineffective.	  The	  cases	  where	  improvements	  did	  occur	  generally	  included	  non	  per-­‐fan	  structures,	  such	  as	  a	  perimeter	  row	  as	  well.	  	  In	  summary,	  the	  addition	  of	  vegetative	  buffers	  to	  the	  simulated	  study	  sites	  allowed	  moderate	  reductions	  of	  up	  to	  3.12%	  of	  the	  total	  emissions.	  This	  fraction	  is	  not	  emitted	  to	  the	  atmosphere	  and	  not	  deposited	  on	  neighboring	  properties.	  However,	  this	  can	  vary	  significantly	  depending	  on	  site	  layout	  and	  the	  exact	  buffer	  layout	  used.	  More	  importantly,	  it	  was	  found	  that	  the	  buffers	  can	  redistribute	  deposited	  particulate	  matter	  around	  the	  simulated	  area	  by	  deflecting,	  lifting	  or	  otherwise	  modifying	  the	  dispersion	  of	  the	  emissions	  plume.	  Zones	  affected	  by	  PM10	  deposition	  showed	  relative	  reductions	  of	  up	  to	  -­‐7.6%	  and	  deposition	  on	  the	  facility’s	  property	  could	  be	  increased	  by	  up	  to	  +29.4%.	  This	  is	  beneficial	  as	  particulate	  matter	  would	  not	  leave	  the	  property	  unless	  resuspended.	  	  Although	  this	  report	  shows	  that	  buffers	  can	  be	  a	  justified	  and	  effective	  tool	  to	  control	  (reduce,	  redirect)	  deposition	  on	  sensitive	  neighboring	  properties	  (up	  to	  7.62%	  reduction),	  their	  impact	  is	  limited	  in	  terms	  of	  overall	  emission	  reduction	  to	  the	  environment	  (<	  3.12%)	  under	  the	  current	  model	  assumptions.	  However,	  over	  the	  course	  of	  an	  entire	  season,	  these	  reductions	  could	  still	  lead	  to	  important	  decreases	  in	  deposition	  over	  time,	  and	  effects	  might	  be	  stronger	  under	  stable	  and	  low-­‐wind	  conditions	  at	  night	  when	  the	  plume	  is	  disperses	  near-­‐ground.	  	  Atmospheric	  boundary	  layer	  theory	  predicts	  that	  the	  effectiveness	  is	  less	  under	  a	  well-­‐mixed	  daytime	  atmosphere	  with	  considerable	  winds.	  Finally,	  the	  simulations	  were	  performed	  assuming	  a	  typical	  size	  distribution	  for	  PM10	  (particle	  diameter	  <	  10	  µm).	  Although	  relative	  effects	  between	  various	  buffer	  layouts	  are	  not	  expected	  to	  change	  much,	  the	  absolute	  efficiency	  of	  Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers   113/114	  	  	  buffers	  depends	  on	  particle	  size.	  The	  efficiency	  of	  buffers	  is	  substantially	  higher	  for	  larger	  particles,	  and	  it	  will	  be	  less	  for	  smaller	  particles,	  such	  as	  PM2.5	  (particle	  diameter	  <	  2.5µm)	  or	  ultrafine	  particulate	  matter.	  Future	  studies	  must	  investigate	  and	  characterize	  the	  size	  distribution	  of	  emissions	  from	  poultry	  facilities	  so	  models	  can	  actually	  simulate	  realistic	  particle	  size	  distributions.	  	    114/114	   	   Evaluation of the performance of vegetative buffers	  	  	  	  9. References Bruse,	  M.	  (2007,	  January	  31).	  ENVI-­‐met	  implementation	  of	  the	  gas	  /	  particle	  dispersion	  and	  deposition	  model	  .	  Retrieved	  March	  2014,	  from	  http://www.ENVI-­‐met.com/documents/sources.PDF	  Bruse,	  M.,	  &	  Fleer,	  H.	  (1998).	  Simulating	  surface-­‐plant-­‐air	  interactions	  inside	  urban	  environments	  with	  a	  three	  dimensional	  numerical	  model.	  Environmental	  Modelling	  &	  Software	  ,	  13	  (3-­‐4),	  373-­‐384.	  Jerez,	  S.	  B.,	  Mukhtar,	  S.,	  &	  Faulker,	  W.	  (2013).	  Evaluation	  of	  electrostatic	  particle	  ionization	  and	  Biocurtain(tm)	  technologies	  to	  reduce	  air	  pollutants	  from	  broiler	  houses.	  Applied	  Engineering	  In	  Agriculture	  ,	  975-­‐984.	  Lacey,	  R.	  E.,	  Redwine,	  J.	  S.,	  &	  Parnell,	  C.	  B.	  (2203).	  Particulate	  matter	  and	  ammonia	  emission	  factors	  for	  tunnel-­‐ventilated	  broiler	  production	  houses	  in	  the	  Southern	  US.	  Annual	  Meeting	  of	  the	  American-­‐Society-­‐of-­‐Agricultural-­‐Engineers	  ,	  (pp.	  1203-­‐1214).	  Chicago,	  Illinois.	  Oke,	  T.	  R.	  (1987).	  Boundary	  Layer	  Climates.	  London:	  Routledge.	  Pauls,	  D.,	  &	  Christen,	  A.	  (2011).	  Simulating	  the	  effect	  of	  adding	  vegetative	  buffers	  around	  poultry	  barns	  on	  mean	  wind	  and	  concentrations	  of	  PM10.	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  Vancouver,	  B.C.	  http://circle.ubc.ca/handle/2429/42449	  Plewa,	  K.,	  &	  Lonc,	  E.	  (2011).	  Analysis	  of	  Airborne	  Contamination	  with	  Bacteria	  and	  Moulds	  in	  Poultry	  Farming:	  a	  Case	  Study.	  Polish	  Journal	  of	  Environmental	  Studies	  ,	  725-­‐731.	  Seinfeld,	  J.	  H.,	  &	  Pandis,	  S.	  N.	  (2006).	  Atmospheric	  Chemistry	  and	  Physics	  -­‐	  From	  Air	  Pollution	  to	  Climate	  Change	  (2nd	  ed.).	  Wiley-­‐VCH.	  1232	  p.	  	  	  	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52383.1-0103596/manifest

Comment

Related Items