UBC Faculty Research and Publications

Real estate capital gains and CCA recapture tax deferral Somerville, Tsur; Wetzel, Jake Oct 31, 2014

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52383-CG deferral v3a.pdf [ 254.01kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52383-1.0052293.json
JSON-LD: 52383-1.0052293-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52383-1.0052293-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52383-1.0052293-rdf.json
Turtle: 52383-1.0052293-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52383-1.0052293-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52383-1.0052293-source.json
Full Text
52383-1.0052293-fulltext.txt
Citation
52383-1.0052293.ris

Full Text

	  	                                                                                                                               Centre for Urban Economics and Real Estate        Real Estate Capital Gains and CCA Recapture Tax Deferral:     Tsur Somerville* & Jake Wetzel**  October 2014    *   Real Estate Foundation Professorship of Real Estate Finance, Sauder School of Business,  University of British Columbia, 2053 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z2, Canada.  Tel: (604) 822-8343, Fax: (604) 822-8477. Email:  tsur.somerville@sauder.ubc.ca  **   PhD Student, Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia, 2053 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z2, Canada.  Email:  jake.wetzel@sauder.ubc.ca    We are grateful to the Victoria Real Estate Board for their support of this research and discussion 	  	   	  	   1	  	  Introduction	  	  In	  Canada	  the	  tax	  upon	  income	  from	  capital	  gains	  is	  due	  upon	  the	  sale	  of	  the	  asset.	  	  As	  in	  most	  countries,	  recapture	  of	  excess	  depreciation	  deductions	  taken	  for	  tax	  purposes	  occurs	  at	  the	  same	  time.	  	  This	  potentially	  large	  tax	  incidence	  due	  at	  asset	  sale	  creates	  an	  incentive	  for	  investors	  to	  refrain	  from	  selling	  these	  assets	  to	  defer	  the	  tax	  liability,	  a	  phenomenon	  referred	  to	  as	  “lock-­‐in.”	  This	  discussion	  paper	  examines	  the	  economic	  issues	  generated	  by	  this	  ``lock	  in''	  effect	  in	  real	  estate.	  	  The	  first	  section	  of	  the	  paper	  summarizes	  the	  relevant	  academic	  literature	  on	  the	  theoretical	  and	  empirical	  effects	  of	  lock-­‐in,	  for	  assets	  in	  general	  and	  as	  it	  relates	  to	  real	  estate.	  	  In	  the	  second	  section,	  we	  present	  the	  economic	  theory	  case	  for	  allowing	  investors	  in	  real	  estate	  to	  roll-­‐over	  their	  tax	  exposure	  from	  real	  estate	  assets	  they	  sell	  to	  other	  real	  estate	  assets	  they	  acquire	  with	  the	  proceeds	  from	  those	  sales.	  	  	  	  In	  the	  Canadian	  income	  tax	  system,	  capital	  gains	  are	  treated	  differently	  from	  income	  with	  respect	  to	  timing	  and	  rate.	  While	  income	  is	  taxed	  as	  it	  is	  accrued,	  capital	  gains	  are	  taxed	  at	  the	  point	  where	  the	  gain	  is	  realized.	  	  Consequently,	  there	  are	  many	  rules	  and	  provisions	  relating	  to	  the	  limitation	  of	  loss	  deductions	  and	  the	  definition	  of	  the	  realization	  event.	  The	  rate	  benefit	  is	  affected	  through	  the	  partial	  exclusion	  of	  gains	  and	  in	  some	  cases	  a	  limited	  life-­‐time	  exemption.	  	  For	  instance,	  on	  the	  disposition	  of	  qualified	  small	  business	  corporation	  shares	  (and	  farm	  property)	  to	  publicly	  listed	  shares	  of	  small	  companies.	  	  Or	  the	  roll-­‐over	  and	  deferral	  for	  the	  capital	  assets	  of	  corporations	  acquired	  through	  merger,	  bankruptcy,	  or	  re-­‐organization.	  	  	  There	  have	  been	  numerous	  calls	  to	  address	  this	  phenomenon.1	  The	  Investment	  Industry	  Association	  of	  Canada	  (IIAC)	  has	  long	  been	  lobbying	  for	  a	  reduction	  of	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  Among	  the	  organizations	  that	  have	  called	  for	  a	  policy	  change	  on	  the	  capital	  gains	  taxation	  of	  real	  estate	  are	  the	  Victoria	  Real	  Estate	  Board	  Commercial	  Division,	  the	  British	  Columbia	  Commercial	  Council,	  the	  Canadian	  Commercial	  Council,	  the	  Canadian	  Chamber	  of	  Commerce,	  the	  Calgary	  Real	  Estate	  Board's	  Commercial	  Division,	  the	  Saskatchewan	  Real	  Estate	  Association,	  the	  Winnipeg	  Real	  	   2	  capital	  gains	  taxes	  through	  various	  measures.	  	  The	  2006	  Conservative	  Party	  federal	  election	  platform	  proposed	  that	  capital	  gains	  earned	  by	  individuals	  on	  real	  and	  financial	  assets	  be	  exempt	  from	  taxation	  if	  the	  proceeds	  were	  reinvested	  within	  a	  six	  month	  period,	  a	  form	  similar	  to	  the	  Section	  1031	  Like-­‐Kind	  Exchanges	  in	  the	  US.2	  	  	  	  Authors	  such	  as	  Mintz	  and	  Wilson	  (2009)	  outline	  the	  general	  case	  against	  the	  current	  tax	  treatment	  of	  capital	  assets	  and	  propose	  solutions	  that	  they	  hope	  might	  be	  politically	  palatable.	  	  The	  Fraser	  Institute	  (Clemens,	  Lammam,	  and	  Lo	  2014)	  survey	  the	  literature	  on	  the	  overall	  effects	  of	  capital	  gains	  taxation	  and	  argue	  for	  the	  economic	  benefits	  of	  reductions	  in	  the	  taxation	  of	  capital	  gains	  in	  Canada.	  The	  purpose	  of	  this	  discussion	  paper	  is	  not	  to	  present	  a	  policy	  proposal,	  nor	  even	  to	  make	  a	  case	  for	  a	  particular	  change	  to	  the	  current	  tax	  code.	  	  Instead,	  the	  objective	  is	  to	  answer	  two	  questions:	  what	  do	  we	  know	  about	  the	  affects	  of	  the	  current	  capital	  gains	  tax	  regime	  on	  investment	  behavior	  and	  what	  is	  the	  case	  for	  granting	  a	  roll-­‐over	  provision	  for	  real	  estate	  assets.	  	  In	  this	  paper	  we	  examine	  the	  academic	  literature	  related	  to	  the	  impact	  of	  relaxation	  in	  the	  rollover/reinvestment	  provision	  on	  sales	  (mobility).	  	  This	  includes	  both	  theoretical	  work	  on	  the	  effect	  of	  the	  lock-­‐in	  phenomenon	  on	  portfolio	  choice	  and	  empirical	  studies	  on	  the	  effects	  of	  changes	  in	  capital	  gains	  rules	  that	  reduce	  the	  incentive	  for	  property	  owners	  to	  hold	  properties	  to	  avoid	  tax	  incidence.	  	  The	  second	  part	  of	  the	  paper	  outlines	  the	  theoretical	  argument	  for	  specifically	  targeting	  the	  lock-­‐in	  problem	  in	  real	  estate.	  	  It	  presents	  the	  negative	  costs	  to	  society	  more	  broadly	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Estate	  Board,	  the	  Real	  Estate	  Board	  of	  Greater	  Vancouver,	  the	  Manitoba	  Real	  Estate	  Association,	  the	  Canadian	  Federation	  of	  Apartment	  Associations,	  the	  Canadian	  Urban	  Development	  Institute,	  the	  Federation	  of	  Canadian	  Municipalities,	  and	  the	  Canadian	  Chartered	  Accountant's	  Association	  	  2	  Section	  1031	  of	  the	  IRS	  Code	  allows	  for	  the	  non-­‐recognition	  of	  gain	  or	  loss	  from	  exchanges	  solely	  in-­‐kind.	  The	  Code	  holds	  that	  property	  must	  be	  productive	  or	  investment	  property	  and	  exchanged	  for	  a	  property	  that	  is	  of	  like	  kind.	  In	  general,	  the	  realized	  gain	  at	  sale	  is	  equal	  to	  the	  net	  selling	  price	  of	  the	  property	  minus	  the	  adjusted	  tax	  basis.	  	  Within	  45	  days	  of	  the	  sale	  of	  the	  relinquished	  property,	  the	  taxpayer	  must	  formally	  identify	  the	  replacement	  property.	  The	  taxpayer	  must	  acquire	  the	  identified	  replacement	  properties	  within	  180	  days	  of	  the	  date	  of	  the	  closing	  of	  the	  relinquished	  property.	  	  Mechanisms	  like	  the	  use	  of	  a	  recognized	  third	  party	  to	  act	  as	  trustee	  for	  the	  cash	  from	  the	  initial	  sale	  allow	  for	  a	  sale	  to	  be	  made	  before	  the	  subsequent	  asset	  is	  identified.	  	  	   3	  when	  real	  estate	  investors	  avoid	  selling	  properties	  because	  of	  the	  tax	  incidence	  that	  such	  a	  sale	  would	  trigger.	  	  This	  discussion	  suggests	  that	  there	  are	  clear	  social	  benefits	  from	  allowing	  real	  estate	  investors	  to	  roll-­‐over	  their	  tax	  liabilities	  from	  properties	  they	  are	  selling	  to	  those	  they	  are	  buying	  with	  the	  proceeds	  .	  These	  reflect	  the	  more	  general	  benefits	  of	  enabling	  investors	  to	  rebalance	  their	  portfolios	  to	  optimize	  their	  holdings.	  	  Doing	  so	  would	  increase	  investment	  in	  real	  estate,	  leading	  to	  lower	  rents	  for	  users	  and	  the	  economic	  benefits	  that	  flow	  from	  that	  change.	  	  In	  areas	  of	  the	  country	  with	  pressure	  to	  redevelop	  existing	  assets,	  the	  exposure	  to	  capital	  gains	  will	  inhibit	  investors	  who	  want	  to	  maintain	  their	  real	  estate	  investments	  from	  selling	  properties	  to	  developers.	  	  This	  results	  in	  less	  redevelopment,	  a	  less	  efficient	  urban	  form,	  and	  higher	  rents	  for	  tenants.	  	  	   	  	   4	  A	  Review	  of	  the	  relevant	  Economic	  Literature	  	  Theoretical	  Papers	  on	  “Lock-­‐In”	  	  The	  theoretical	  work	  on	  capital	  gains	  taxation	  and	  investment	  “lock-­‐in”	  studies	  the	  effect	  on	  an	  efficient	  allocation	  of	  capital.	  	  This	  body	  research	  estimates	  the	  potential	  effect	  on	  equilibrium	  asset	  prices	  and	  the	  allocation	  of	  capital	  across	  assets.	  This	  works	  has	  focused	  entirely	  on	  more	  general	  financial	  assets	  rather	  than	  looking	  at	  issue	  specific	  to	  real	  estate	  investment.	  	  However,	  understanding	  the	  effects	  in	  portfolio	  optimization	  is	  important	  as	  it	  highlights	  the	  distortions	  in	  investor	  choices	  that	  emerge	  from	  what	  is	  essentially	  a	  tax	  on	  transactions,	  in	  the	  case	  where	  the	  proceeds	  are	  re-­‐invested	  	  Klein	  (1999)	  develops	  a	  theoretical	  model	  that	  specifically	  highlights	  how	  the	  “lock-­‐in”	  effect	  results	  in	  inefficient	  portfolios.	  His	  result	  can	  only	  occur	  if	  investors	  are	  unable	  to	  replicate	  asset	  returns	  without	  incurring	  taxable	  capital	  gains	  through	  short	  selling	  and	  perfect	  substitute	  securities	  that	  would	  allow	  investors	  to	  re-­‐balance	  their	  portfolios	  without	  realizing	  their	  gains.3	  	  Based	  on	  these	  assumptions,	  investors	  are	  forced	  to	  make	  a	  trade-­‐off	  between	  portfolio	  re-­‐balancing	  and	  capital	  gains	  realization.	  In	  equilibrium	  investors	  skew	  their	  portfolios	  in	  favour	  of	  stocks	  in	  which	  they	  have	  accrued	  capital	  gains	  and	  away	  from	  stocks	  in	  which	  other	  investors	  have	  accrued	  capital	  gains.	  In	  real	  estate,	  there	  are	  no	  financial	  options	  that	  might	  allow	  investors	  to	  create	  synthetic	  portfolios	  that	  replicate	  real	  assets	  without	  exposure	  to	  capital	  gains	  taxation,	  so	  the	  full	  effect	  of	  the	  inefficiency	  identified	  by	  Klein	  is	  present.	  	  	  In	  a	  subsequent	  paper,	  Klein	  (2004)	  relaxes	  the	  assumption	  regarding	  the	  presence	  of	  perfect	  substitute	  securities	  exist.	  Klein	  proves	  that	  relaxing	  this	  assumption	  does	  not	  eliminate	  the	  ``lock	  in''	  effect	  of	  accrued	  capital	  gains	  on	  equilibrium	  prices	  and	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  3	  This	  assumption	  means	  that	  in	  order	  to	  perfectly	  hedge	  a	  position	  in	  the	  risky	  security	  with	  a	  capital	  gain	  the	  investor	  must	  sell	  some	  of	  the	  security	  that	  he	  has	  a	  capital	  gain.	  	   5	  that	  the	  presence	  of	  perfect	  substitutes	  does	  not	  necessarily	  allow	  investors	  to	  re-­‐balance	  their	  portfolios	  without	  realizing	  at	  least	  part	  of	  their	  accrued	  capital	  gains.	  	  This	  paper	  highlights	  the	  problem	  that	  property	  owners	  with	  accrued	  capital	  gains	  problem	  face	  in	  practice.	  Given	  their	  tax	  situation	  it	  may	  be	  less	  costly	  to	  sub-­‐optimally	  rebalance	  their	  portfolios	  without	  selling	  an	  asset	  that	  would	  cause	  them	  to	  realize	  a	  capital	  gain.	  	  	  A	  direct	  modeling	  of	  the	  effect	  of	  deferral	  by	  Auerbach	  (1991)	  introduces	  the	  retrospective	  tax	  on	  investment	  returns	  as	  an	  alternative	  to	  accrual	  (the	  system	  for	  regular	  income	  and	  dividends)	  and	  realized	  based	  capital	  gains	  taxes	  because	  the	  retrospective	  tax	  avoids	  deferral	  and	  lock-­‐in	  problems.	  In	  the	  model,	  the	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  and	  tax	  arbitrage	  possibilities	  associated	  with	  deferral	  are	  eliminated	  by	  effectively	  charging	  interest	  on	  past	  gains	  when	  realization	  finally	  occurs	  in	  addition	  to	  taxing	  capital	  gains	  on	  realization.	  This	  approach	  eliminates	  the	  incentive	  to	  defer	  realization	  if	  the	  interest	  rate	  on	  accrued	  gains	  held	  for	  longer	  periods	  of	  time	  is	  set	  high	  enough	  to	  offset	  the	  deferral	  advantage.	  	  The	  paper	  also	  shows	  the	  effect	  on	  tax	  revenue	  of	  such	  a	  change	  as	  a	  retrospective	  tax	  extracts	  less	  revenue	  than	  an	  ordinary	  accrual	  tax	  on	  investment	  income	  when	  returns	  are	  high	  and	  more	  revenue	  when	  returns	  are	  low.	  	  Kanemoto	  (1995)	  calls	  into	  question	  the	  argument	  	  that	  there	  is	  always	  a	  ‘‘lock-­‐in’’	  effect	  	  under	  the	  current	  system	  of	  a	  tax	  on	  realized	  capital	  gains	  is	  its.	  Using	  a	  simple	  land	  development	  model	  to	  examine	  the	  impact	  of	  the	  taxation	  of	  realized	  capital	  gains	  he	  finds	  that	  the	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  occurs	  when	  the	  basis	  for	  taxation	  is	  low,	  but	  if	  the	  basis	  is	  high,	  the	  tax	  induces	  the	  owner	  to	  sell	  his	  land	  immediately.	  The	  surprising	  result	  that	  the	  ``lock	  in''	  effect	  does	  not	  arise	  if	  the	  basis	  for	  the	  capital	  gains	  tax	  (usually	  the	  price	  at	  which	  the	  owner	  acquired	  the	  land)	  is	  sufficiently	  high,	  so	  that	  gains	  are	  “low	  enough”	  and	  the	  owner	  has	  perfect	  foresight	  of	  future	  land	  prices.	  In	  this	  particular	  case,	  there	  is	  no	  delay	  or	  lock-­‐in,	  as	  the	  landowner	  sells	  the	  land	  immediately	  even	  if	  development	  occurs	  much	  later.	  	  	  	   6	  A	  sufficient	  condition	  for	  the	  non-­‐existence	  of	  the	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  is	  that	  the	  basis	  is	  the	  purchase	  price	  that	  was	  formed	  under	  perfect	  foresight.	  The	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  arises	  only	  when	  unexpected	  capital	  gains	  exist.	  While	  perfect	  foresight	  is	  easy	  to	  create	  in	  a	  theoretical	  economic	  model,	  it	  is	  rather	  unlikely	  to	  occur	  in	  actual	  market	  conditions.	  	  	  	  Empirical	  Research	  Using	  the	  US	  “Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997”	  	  The	  second	  area	  of	  relevant	  research	  involves	  empirical	  studies	  that	  take	  advantage	  of	  changes	  in	  the	  US	  tax	  code	  to	  identify	  whether	  changes	  in	  capital	  gains	  affect	  asset	  holding	  periods:	  is	  there	  a	  lock-­‐in	  effect.	  	  These	  empirical	  tests	  use	  the	  US	  “Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997”	  to	  see	  how	  residential	  mobility	  changed	  as	  a	  result	  of	  changes	  to	  the	  treatment	  of	  capital	  gains	  for	  households.	  	  While	  the	  focus	  of	  this	  work	  is	  on	  the	  effect	  of	  relaxing	  the	  capital	  gains	  taxation	  lock-­‐in	  on	  investors,	  rather	  than	  homeowner	  behaviour,	  these	  papers	  that	  use	  homeowner	  data	  highlight	  the	  relationship	  between	  capital	  gains	  taxation	  and	  real	  estate	  market	  transaction	  volume,	  	  Prior	  to	  the	  passage	  of	  the	  Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997,	  homeowners	  in	  the	  US	  were	  entitled	  to	  a	  one-­‐time	  capital	  gains	  exclusion	  that	  sheltered	  a	  significant	  portion	  of	  the	  accumulated	  price	  increases	  on	  their	  primary	  residences,	  but	  the	  exclusion	  required	  that	  the	  primary	  wage	  earner	  be	  over	  55	  years	  of	  age.	  Younger	  taxpayers	  could	  only	  avoid	  taxation	  on	  gains	  when	  changing	  primary	  residences	  by	  continually	  trading	  up	  in	  housing	  because	  sales	  proceeds	  that	  were	  not	  reinvested	  in	  a	  more	  expensive	  residence	  were	  subject	  to	  taxation	  at	  the	  capital	  gains	  rate.	  In	  addition,	  the	  capital	  gains	  tax	  rate	  was	  raised	  from	  20%	  to	  28%	  by	  the	  Tax	  Reform	  Act	  of	  1986.	  The	  1997	  legislation	  contained	  three	  important	  changes	  in	  the	  way	  that	  taxes	  were	  assessed	  on	  capital	  gains	  on	  residential	  real	  estate.	  	  	  	   7	  • It	  removed	  any	  age-­‐preference	  restrictions	  so	  that	  all	  homeowners	  were	  subject	  to	  the	  same	  capital	  gains	  treatment.	  	  • It	  allowed	  capital	  gains	  to	  be	  realized	  and	  excluded	  from	  taxation	  as	  often	  as	  every	  two	  years,	  regardless	  of	  whether	  or	  not	  the	  proceeds	  were	  reinvested	  in	  residential	  real	  estate.	  	  • The	  maximum	  capital	  gains	  exclusion	  was	  raised	  from	  $125,000	  to	  	  $500,000,	  ($250,000	  for	  single	  taxpayers).	  	  	  Most	  of	  the	  research	  using	  the	  1997	  tax	  changes	  looks	  at	  the	  effect	  of	  the	  changes	  on	  the	  mobility	  decisions	  of	  homeowners.4	  	  The	  academic	  research	  that	  uses	  this	  tax	  law	  changes	  uniformly	  conclude	  that	  residential	  capital	  gains	  taxes	  lock	  homeowners	  into	  their	  current	  houses	  by	  discouraging	  moves.	  	  While	  we	  cannot	  be	  sure	  that	  investors	  will	  behave	  similarly	  to	  homeowners,	  the	  behavioural	  response	  observed	  in	  homeowners	  should	  be	  replicated	  by	  investors	  when	  faced	  with	  similar	  changes	  in	  the	  tax	  code.	  	  Cunningham	  and	  Engelhart	  (2007)	  focus	  their	  analysis	  on	  homeowners	  just	  below	  the	  age	  threshold	  of	  55,	  as	  they	  would	  be	  most	  likely	  to	  be	  influenced	  by	  this	  change.	  They	  compare	  mobility	  patterns	  between	  homeowners	  aged	  52-­‐54	  and	  56-­‐58	  before	  and	  after	  the	  passage	  of	  Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997.	  The	  authors	  find	  that	  mobility	  rates	  among	  taxpayers	  aged	  52-­‐54	  increased	  by	  20	  to	  30	  percent	  after	  the	  tax	  reform	  became	  effective.5	  The	  increase	  in	  mobility	  is	  consistent	  with	  a	  reduction	  in	  the	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  because	  of	  the	  enhancements	  to	  the	  ability	  of	  homeowners	  to	  defer	  their	  capital	  gains	  on	  the	  sale	  of	  their	  principal	  residence.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  4	  An	  exception	  to	  the	  US	  tax	  code	  change	  work	  is	  Lundborg	  and	  Skedinger	  (1998)	  study	  of	  the	  behavior	  of	  Swedish	  households	  following	  changes	  o	  the	  treatment	  of	  capital	  gains	  for	  a	  principal	  residence	  there.	  	  Their	  results	  are	  similar	  to	  those	  in	  the	  US	  based	  research	  described	  in	  more	  detail	  here.	  	  5	  Segmented	  sample	  results	  indicate	  that	  mobility	  rates	  increased	  by	  more	  if	  the	  homeowners	  could	  be	  classified	  as	  highly	  mobile,	  e.g.	  were	  divorced,	  had	  no	  children	  living	  at	  home,	  faced	  higher	  marginal	  capital	  gains	  tax	  rates	  or	  lived	  in	  states	  that	  experienced	  higher	  nominal	  rates	  of	  house	  price	  appreciation.	  	   8	  Prior	  to	  1997,	  the	  US	  tax	  rules	  on	  capital	  gains	  from	  a	  principal	  residence	  primarily	  affected	  homeowners	  who	  wanted	  to	  downsize,	  or	  reduce	  their	  consumption	  of	  housing.	  	  Biehl	  and	  Hoyt	  (2009)	  examine	  the	  impact	  of	  1997	  changes	  on	  the	  propensity	  of	  some	  homeowners	  to	  decrease	  their	  housing	  consumption	  (which	  can	  only	  be	  achieved	  by	  selling	  the	  current	  home	  and	  purchasing	  another).	  They	  find	  evidence	  that	  groups	  of	  homeowners	  that	  were	  most	  likely	  to	  desire	  less	  housing	  were	  more	  likely	  to	  decrease	  their	  housing	  consumption	  after	  1997,	  when	  homeowners	  buying	  up	  and	  those	  buying	  down	  began	  to	  have	  the	  same	  tax	  treatment.	  These	  results	  suggest	  that	  the	  more	  the	  liberal	  roll-­‐over	  and	  deferral	  provisions	  of	  the	  US	  Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997	  increased	  the	  volume	  of	  residential	  transactions,	  since	  greater	  homeowner	  mobility	  indicates	  more	  frequent	  adjustments	  in	  housing	  consumption	  and	  more	  home	  sales.	  	  	  The	  studies	  described	  above	  use	  large	  data	  sets	  covering	  thousands	  of	  individuals.	  	  Shan	  (2008)	  takes	  a	  different	  approach	  by	  using	  more	  detailed	  data	  from	  16	  towns	  around	  Boston	  to	  identify	  the	  specific	  effects	  of	  capital	  gains	  on	  the	  likelihood	  of	  house	  transactions	  before	  and	  after	  1997.	  She	  finds	  that	  the	  1997	  changes	  in	  US	  tax	  treatment	  of	  principal	  residence	  capital	  gains	  increased	  the	  average	  sales	  rate	  of	  homes	  with	  less	  than	  $500,000	  gain	  by	  13	  to	  22	  percent.	  Among	  homes	  that	  had	  appreciated	  less	  than	  $500,000,	  she	  concluded	  that	  the	  change	  caused	  a	  17	  percent	  increase	  in	  sales	  in	  the	  decade	  after	  1997.	  This	  evidence	  supports	  the	  theory	  that	  the	  ``lock	  in''	  effect	  resulted	  in	  homeowners	  avoiding	  paying	  the	  tax	  by	  simply	  staying	  in	  their	  homes.	  	  One	  paper	  that	  looks	  at	  the	  effect	  of	  the	  1997	  changes	  on	  investors	  in	  real	  estate	  is	  Sinai	  and	  Gyourko’s	  2004	  study	  of	  the	  US	  real	  estate	  investment	  trust	  (REIT)	  pricing	  before	  and	  after	  the	  changes	  in	  capital	  gains	  tax	  rates	  that	  were	  part	  of	  the	  1997	  act.	  	  They	  take	  advantage	  of	  the	  rules	  that	  allow	  owners	  of	  real	  estate	  assets	  who	  sell	  	   9	  them	  to	  Umbrella	  Partnership	  REITs	  (UPREITs)	  to	  defer	  capital	  gains	  taxes.6	  To	  an	  UPREIT,	  the	  capital	  gains	  tax	  deferral	  is	  a	  subsidy	  similar	  to	  an	  investment	  tax	  credit,	  lowering	  the	  prices	  they	  pay	  for	  properties	  and	  increasing	  the	  yield.	  	  	  If	  competition	  among	  REITs	  and	  UPREITs	  for	  acquisitions	  raises	  property	  prices	  until	  all	  firms	  are	  just	  making	  their	  (common)	  required	  rate	  of	  return,	  then	  UPREITs	  and	  REITs	  will	  pay	  the	  same	  pre-­‐tax	  prices	  for	  properties	  and	  the	  entire	  benefit	  of	  the	  capital	  gains	  tax	  deferral	  accrues	  to	  those	  sellers	  who	  sell	  to	  UPREITs.	  However,	  if	  competition	  among	  property	  owners	  to	  sell	  buildings	  makes	  them	  willing	  to	  accept	  a	  lower	  after-­‐tax	  price,	  UPREITs	  conceivably	  could	  capture	  up	  to	  the	  entire	  value	  of	  the	  capital	  gains	  tax	  deferral	  since	  they	  can	  reduce	  the	  price	  they	  offer	  below	  competing	  REITs’	  prices	  until	  the	  after	  tax	  benefit	  to	  the	  seller	  of	  selling	  to	  an	  UPREIT	  or	  REIT	  is	  almost	  identical.	  	  By	  comparing	  the	  performance	  of	  two	  organizational	  forms	  of	  publicly	  traded	  real	  estate	  companies,	  Gyourko	  and	  Sinai	  identify	  the	  effect	  of	  the	  capital	  gains	  tax	  rate	  changes	  on	  investor	  choices.	  They	  find	  that	  the	  capital	  gains	  tax	  rate	  changes,	  which	  favour	  regular	  REITs	  over	  UPREITs	  by	  reducing	  the	  value	  of	  the	  capital	  gains	  deferral	  for	  UPREITs	  led	  to	  an	  8%	  decline	  in	  the	  share	  price	  of	  UPREITs	  relative	  to	  REITs.	  	  The	  contribution	  of	  the	  work	  is	  in	  showing	  unambiguously	  how	  changes	  in	  capital	  gains	  taxation	  affect	  investor	  behavior.	  	  It	  suggest	  that	  allowing	  investors	  to	  defer	  capital	  gains	  if	  they	  can	  rollover	  investments	  from	  one	  real	  estate	  asset	  to	  another	  will	  increase	  investment	  and	  by	  extension	  transaction	  volumes.	  	  The	  difference	  between	  the	  capital	  gains	  tax	  treatment	  for	  conventional	  REITs	  and	  UPREITs	  allows	  Gyourko	  and	  Sinai	  to	  show	  how	  capital	  gains	  taxes	  affect	  real	  estate	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  6	  Unlike	  a	  regular	  REIT,	  which	  must	  pay	  for	  properties	  with	  cash	  or	  stock,	  an	  UPREIT’s	  structure	  permits	  the	  issuance	  of	  operating	  partnership	  (OP)	  units	  in	  exchange	  for	  properties.	  Consequently,	  transferring	  buildings	  to	  a	  traditional	  REIT	  requires	  that	  the	  seller	  pay	  applicable	  capital	  gains	  taxes.	  However,	  transferring	  buildings	  to	  an	  UPREIT	  is	  not	  a	  taxable	  event	  as	  long	  as	  the	  seller	  receives	  OP	  units,	  not	  cash	  or	  stock,	  even	  though	  OP	  units	  are	  typically	  exchangeable	  one-­‐for-­‐one	  into	  common	  shares	  and	  pay	  the	  same	  dividend	  as	  common	  shares.	  In	  this	  case,	  the	  Internal	  Revenue	  Service	  treats	  the	  deal	  as	  a	  tax-­‐free	  exchange,	  with	  the	  building	  seller	  deferring	  her	  capital	  gains	  tax	  liability	  until	  either	  she	  converts	  her	  OP	  units	  into	  stock	  or	  the	  UPREIT	  sells	  the	  contributed	  properties.	  	  	   10	  investment	  because	  changes	  in	  the	  rules	  around	  these	  taxes	  does	  not	  affect	  the	  two	  types	  of	  investment	  forms	  equally.	  	  	  Effects	  of	  Section	  1031	  Like-­‐Kind	  Exchanges	  	  Section	  1031	  of	  the	  IRS	  Code	  allows	  for	  the	  non-­‐recognition	  of	  gain	  or	  loss	  from	  exchanges	  solely	  in-­‐kind.	  The	  Code	  holds	  that	  property	  must	  be	  productive	  or	  investment	  property	  and	  exchanged	  for	  a	  property	  that	  is	  of	  like	  kind.	  In	  general,	  the	  realized	  gain	  at	  sale	  is	  equal	  to	  the	  net	  selling	  price	  of	  the	  property	  minus	  the	  adjusted	  tax	  basis.	  However,	  under	  Section	  1031	  of	  the	  Code,	  real	  estate	  owners	  who	  dispose	  of	  their	  investment,	  rental,	  or	  vacation	  property	  and	  reinvest	  the	  net	  proceeds	  in	  other	  “like	  kind”	  property	  are	  able	  to	  defer	  recognition	  of	  some	  or	  all	  of	  the	  capital	  gain	  realized	  on	  the	  sale	  of	  the	  relinquished	  property.	  	  	  Within	  45	  days	  of	  the	  sale	  of	  the	  relinquished	  property,	  the	  taxpayer	  must	  formally	  identify	  the	  replacement	  property.	  The	  taxpayer	  must	  acquire	  the	  identified	  replacement	  properties	  within	  180	  days	  of	  the	  date	  of	  the	  closing	  of	  the	  relinquished	  property;	  that	  is,	  the	  45	  and	  180-­‐day	  periods	  run	  concurrently.	  There	  are	  no	  exceptions	  to	  these	  time	  limits	  and	  failure	  to	  comply	  will	  convert	  the	  transaction	  to	  a	  fully	  taxable	  sale.	  	  There	  are	  several	  motivations	  for	  use	  of	  Section	  1031	  exchanges.	  	  	  	   • Exchanges	  serve	  as	  an	  effective	  shelter	  from	  taxes,	  thereby	  preserving	  investment	  capital.	  	  • Exchanges	  can	  be	  used	  to	  upgrade	  portfolios	  (Fickes	  2003).	  By	  deferring	  taxes,	  the	  taxpayer	  can	  also	  leverage	  appreciation	  and	  afford	  to	  acquire	  a	  larger/higher	  priced	  replacement	  property.	  	  • Exchanges	  can	  also	  be	  used	  to	  consolidate	  or	  diversify	  properties,	  exchange	  low-­‐return	  properties	  for	  high-­‐return	  properties,	  or	  to	  substitute	  depreciable	  	   11	  property	  for	  non-­‐depreciable	  property	  (Wayner	  2005a,	  2005b).	  	  Despite	  the	  potential	  advantages	  of	  tax-­‐deferral,	  Section	  1031	  exchanges	  have	  several	  drawbacks.	  	  • The	  larger	  the	  amount	  of	  tax-­‐deferral,	  the	  smaller	  is	  the	  depreciable	  basis	  in	  the	  replacement	  property	  and,	  therefore,	  the	  smaller	  is	  the	  allowable	  annual	  deduction	  for	  depreciation.	  	  • The	  larger	  the	  amount	  of	  tax-­‐deferral,	  the	  larger	  will	  be	  the	  realized	  gain	  if	  and	  when	  the	  replacement	  property	  is	  subsequently	  disposed	  of	  in	  a	  fully	  taxable	  sale.	  	  Until	  recently	  1031	  exchanges	  have	  received	  limited	  attention	  in	  the	  literature.	  The	  large	  appreciation	  and	  subsequent	  decline	  in	  the	  2000's	  have	  brought	  the	  1031	  tax	  provision	  into	  focus.	  In	  particular	  academic	  research	  has	  identified	  that	  section	  1031	  exchanges	  distorts	  behaviour	  of	  the	  asset	  holders	  because	  it	  incentivizes	  investors	  to	  hold	  assets	  eligible	  for	  the	  deferral	  longer	  than	  they	  would	  without	  the	  tax	  advantage.	  The	  deferral	  also	  encourages	  investors	  to	  hold	  assets	  that	  are	  eligible	  for	  deferral,	  particularly	  real	  property	  and	  may	  lead	  to	  inefficient	  portfolio	  allocations	  that	  are	  overweighted	  in	  real	  property.	  This	  is	  in	  contrast	  to	  bond	  owners	  are	  not	  eligible	  to	  defer	  gains,	  and	  therefore	  face	  no	  incentive	  to	  remain	  invested	  in	  bonds	  or	  like	  assets.	  	  Holmes	  and	  Slade	  (2002)	  examined	  the	  impact	  of	  tax-­‐deferred	  exchanges	  in	  the	  commercial	  real	  estate	  market	  of	  Phoenix,	  Arizona.	  They	  evidence	  to	  support	  the	  argument	  that	  increased	  demand	  for	  1031	  eligible	  properties	  by	  investors	  seeking	  sell	  one	  property	  and	  acquire	  another	  causes	  these	  types	  of	  properties	  to	  have	  higher	  prices,	  without	  reducing	  the	  price	  of	  the	  original	  properties	  being	  relinquished.	  This	  is	  consistent	  with	  is	  consistent	  with	  the	  price-­‐pressure	  theories	  of	  Scholes	  (1972)	  and	  Kraus	  and	  Stoll	  (1972).	  Thus	  buyers	  who	  are	  acquiring	  property	  as	  part	  of	  a	  like-­‐kind	  exchange	  pay	  more	  for	  commercial	  property	  and	  take	  on	  more	  	   12	  risk	  than	  buyers	  not	  exchanging	  property.	  Taxpayers	  face	  significant	  time	  constraints	  when	  seeking	  to	  complete	  a	  delayed	  tax-­‐deferred	  exchange	  before	  the	  180-­‐day	  window	  expires.	  In	  a	  perfectly	  competitive	  market,	  a	  weakened	  bargaining	  position	  would	  not	  affect	  the	  transaction	  price.	  However,	  in	  illiquid,	  highly	  segmented	  commercial	  real	  estate	  markets,	  the	  exchanger	  may	  be	  required	  to	  pay	  a	  premium	  for	  the	  acquired	  property	  relative	  to	  its	  fair	  market	  value	  in	  order	  to	  meet	  the	  1031	  requirements	  and	  be	  able	  to	  roll	  capital	  gains	  tax	  liability	  from	  one	  property	  to	  another.	  	  Similarly,	  Ling	  and	  Petrova	  (2008)	  study	  the	  effect	  of	  tax-­‐deferred	  exchanges	  on	  transaction	  prices	  in	  multiple	  commercial	  real	  estate	  markets.	  They	  focus	  on	  a	  buyer’s	  theoretical	  reservation	  price	  and	  observed	  market	  price.	  Using	  a	  large	  dataset	  of	  commercial	  property	  transactions	  they	  find	  that	  tax-­‐motivated	  exchange	  buyers	  pay	  significantly	  more,	  on	  average,	  than	  non-­‐exchange	  investors	  for	  their	  apartment	  and	  office	  properties,	  all	  else	  equal.	  	  This	  research	  highlights	  the	  value	  investors	  place	  on	  the	  ability	  to	  defer	  the	  payment	  of	  capital	  gains	  taxation	  from	  an	  asset	  sale	  until	  when	  they	  exit	  an	  asset	  class	  and	  realize	  the	  gains	  as	  income.	  	  	  The	  higher	  prices	  paid	  for	  1031	  eligible	  transactions	  suggests	  that	  the	  ability	  to	  defer	  capital	  gains	  taxes	  is	  of	  value	  to	  real	  estate	  investors.	  	  Consequently,	  policies	  that	  loosen	  the	  exposure	  to	  capital	  gains,	  such	  as	  carrying	  over	  gains	  from	  one	  property	  to	  another,	  should	  increase	  investment	  volume.	  	  The	  Economic	  Theory	  Case	  for	  Deferral	  	  As	  a	  general	  rule	  economists	  do	  not	  support	  policies	  that	  favour	  one	  industry	  or	  asset	  class	  over	  another.	  Advantages	  to	  one	  and	  not	  to	  others	  distort	  the	  decisions	  of	  economic	  actors	  with	  effects	  on	  the	  efficient	  allocation	  of	  resources.	  Allowing	  investors	  to	  defer	  capital	  gains	  earned	  upon	  sale	  of	  real	  estate	  as	  long	  as	  the	  proceeds	  of	  the	  sale	  were	  re-­‐invested	  into	  other	  real	  estate	  assets,	  if	  not	  extended	  to	  all	  other	  investment	  assets,	  would	  thus	  distort	  the	  allocation	  of	  capital	  by	  favouring	  	   13	  real	  estate	  investment	  over	  other	  asset	  classes.	  The	  caveat	  to	  this	  general	  principal	  is	  that	  differential	  tax	  treatment	  that	  addresses	  the	  presence	  of	  externalities	  associated	  with	  one	  asset	  class	  will	  increase	  economic	  efficiency.	  	  So,	  preferential	  tax	  treatment	  for	  an	  asset	  class	  is	  an	  approach	  to	  addressing	  market	  failures	  where	  the	  tax-­‐code	  is	  used	  to	  adjust	  the	  market’s	  undersupply	  or	  under-­‐allocation.	  	  Externalities	  are	  the	  positive	  or	  negative	  effects	  of	  one	  actor’s	  actions	  or	  another	  who	  is	  not	  party	  to	  the	  decision.7	  	  Taxing	  actions	  associated	  with	  negative	  externalities	  or	  granting	  preferential	  treatment	  to	  actions	  that	  result	  in	  positive	  externalities	  encourages	  independent	  actors	  to	  make	  the	  choices	  that	  reflect	  the	  external	  costs	  or	  benefits	  that	  result	  from	  their	  actions.	  In	  real	  estate	  there	  are	  numerous	  instances	  of	  externalities.	  A	  property	  can	  impose	  positive	  benefits	  on	  adjacent	  properties;	  creating	  a	  more	  pleasant	  built	  environment	  that	  raises	  the	  value	  of	  neighbouring	  site	  or	  a	  one	  commercial	  site	  attracting	  shoppers	  who	  then	  shop	  at	  other	  nearby	  properties.	  They	  can	  be	  negative,	  such	  as	  a	  rundown	  building	  lowering	  the	  value	  of	  neighbouring	  properties.	  The	  original	  intention	  of	  zoning	  was	  to	  address	  the	  negative	  external	  effects	  of	  “inconsistent”	  uses,	  particularly	  noxious	  industries,	  by	  keeping	  them	  apart,	  so	  that	  negative	  externalities	  would	  be	  reduced.	  	  	  In	  this	  section	  we	  describe	  how	  allowing	  owners	  of	  commercial	  property	  to	  defer	  their	  capital	  gains	  on	  real	  estate	  for	  funds	  re-­‐invested	  in	  real	  estate	  can	  address	  the	  negative	  externalities	  associated	  with	  inefficient	  and	  inappropriate	  building	  forms	  and	  urban	  sprawl.	  The	  “lock-­‐in”	  effect	  of	  capital	  gains	  and	  depreciation	  recapture	  imposed	  at	  sale,	  which	  encourages	  investors	  to	  continue	  to	  hold	  and	  not	  sell	  assets,	  prevents	  the	  redevelopment	  of	  these	  assets	  as	  developers	  are	  not	  able	  to	  acquire	  the	  sites.	  Instead,	  either	  land	  acquisitions	  costs	  must	  rise,	  with	  affects	  on	  affordability,	  or	  developers	  must	  look	  elsewhere,	  typically	  the	  urban	  fringe	  for	  development	  sites,	  resulting	  in	  increased	  urban	  sprawl.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  7	  The	  classic	  example	  of	  an	  externality	  is	  pollution.	  Those	  affected	  negatively	  by	  pollution	  to	  not	  have	  a	  say	  in	  the	  polluter’s	  decision	  to	  pollute.	  Externality’s	  can	  be	  positive:	  a	  building	  with	  beautiful	  landscaping	  delivers	  benefits	  to	  those	  who	  pass	  by,	  even	  though	  they	  do	  not	  pay	  the	  cost	  of	  creating	  and	  maintaining	  the	  landscaping.	  	  	   14	  	  	  In	  the	  standard	  urban	  economics	  model	  of	  the	  urban	  real	  estate	  market,	  there	  is	  a	  single	  integrated	  market	  for	  land.	  Land	  values	  at	  all	  locations	  will	  move	  together	  as	  they	  react	  to	  the	  same	  changes	  in	  the	  local	  economy	  and	  household	  demand	  for	  real	  estate.	  Prices	  in	  one	  location	  can	  change	  relative	  to	  prices	  in	  another	  only	  when	  unique	  local	  characteristics,	  referred	  to	  as	  neighbourhood	  amenities,	  become	  more	  or	  less	  in	  demand	  or	  re	  created	  or	  destroyed.8	  	  Otherwise	  prices	  in	  all	  locations	  will	  move	  together.	  The	  implication	  for	  an	  investor	  is	  that	  any	  one	  real	  estate	  asset	  in	  a	  given	  market	  is	  an	  extremely	  close	  substitute	  for	  another.9	  	  From	  a	  portfolio	  perspective,	  there	  is	  little	  reason	  to	  sell	  an	  asset	  to	  buy	  a	  close	  substitute.	  	  The	  presence	  of	  transactions	  cost,	  such	  as	  taxes	  and	  fees	  due	  at	  sale,	  means	  that	  no	  owner	  would	  choose	  to	  sell	  a	  real	  estate	  asset	  in	  a	  market	  until	  they	  were	  ready	  to	  exit	  that	  market	  entirely.	  	  In	  reality	  properties	  are	  diverse	  in	  risk,	  performance,	  opportunity	  and	  the	  breakdown	  of	  an	  investor’s	  return	  between	  cash	  flow	  and	  capital	  appreciation.	  As	  a	  result,	  there	  can	  be	  strong	  portfolio	  optimization	  gains	  from	  selling	  one	  property	  and	  buying	  another	  in	  the	  same	  market.	  	  The	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  described	  above	  will	  prevent	  this	  optimal	  portfolio	  rebalancing.	  	  It	  will	  be	  especially	  acute	  for	  investors	  in	  real	  estate	  who	  want	  to	  retain	  assets	  in	  real	  estate	  in	  a	  given	  market:	  selling	  one	  asset	  in	  the	  market	  and	  buying	  another	  will	  only	  reduce	  their	  expected	  return.	  	  	  	  There	  are	  two	  types	  of	  negative	  externalities	  that	  can	  occur	  from	  the	  failure	  of	  investors	  to	  sell	  real	  estate	  assets.	  	  Both	  depend	  on	  the	  inability	  or	  reluctance	  of	  existing	  landowners	  to	  redevelop	  their	  properties.	  	  This	  may	  occur	  because	  they	  lack	  the	  ability,	  willingness,	  or	  capital	  to	  do	  so	  or	  the	  property	  is	  too	  small	  to	  be	  effectively	  redeveloped	  on	  its	  own,	  and	  would	  more	  profitably	  be	  assembled	  with	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  8	  The	  construction	  of	  a	  subway	  station	  might	  increase	  the	  values	  of	  properties	  close	  to	  the	  stop	  relative	  to	  others	  in	  the	  market.	  As	  a	  neighbourhood	  becomes	  more	  or	  less	  popular	  relative	  to	  others	  as	  consumer	  tastes	  or	  demographics	  change	  9	  Idiosyncratic	  property	  specific	  risk	  and	  differences	  across	  real	  estate	  classes	  in	  the	  effect	  of	  economic	  shocks	  means	  that	  returns	  will	  not	  be	  equal	  for	  all	  properties	  and	  investors	  would	  still	  benefit	  from	  holding	  a	  portfolio	  of	  properties	  within	  one	  market.	  	   15	  adjacent	  parcels	  or	  doing	  so	  triggers	  a	  capital	  gains	  /	  depreciation	  recapture	  tax	  incidence	  they	  wish	  to	  avoid.	  	  The	  first	  is	  that	  the	  property	  has	  a	  negative	  effect	  on	  its	  neighbours	  because	  it	  is	  older	  and	  rundown,	  or	  as	  a	  corollary	  does	  not	  bring	  as	  many	  shoppers	  to	  the	  location	  as	  a	  newer	  larger	  structure	  would.	  	  The	  second	  is	  that	  if	  urban	  neighbourhoods	  are	  more	  difficult	  to	  redevelop,	  both	  blight	  and	  sprawl	  increase	  (see	  Bruckner	  and	  Helsley	  2011),	  with	  the	  extremely	  well	  documented	  costs	  of	  each.	  	  	  	  Smaller,	  core	  urban	  properties	  are	  particularly	  subject	  to	  these	  negative	  externalities	  from	  the	  reluctance	  of	  landowners	  to	  sell	  properties	  to	  developers.	  	  First,	  redevelopment	  requires	  the	  assembly	  of	  multiple	  lots	  to	  transform	  small	  lots	  into	  a	  site	  of	  an	  economically	  efficient	  size	  to	  develop.	  	  One	  property	  owner	  who	  is	  reluctant	  to	  sell	  can	  stop	  an	  entire	  development.10	  	  As	  this	  is	  primarily	  a	  problem	  in	  core	  urban	  areas,	  the	  effect	  is	  to	  force	  development	  further	  out	  of	  the	  urban	  core,	  contributing	  to	  sprawl.	  	  	  	  It	  is	  the	  correlated	  nature	  of	  the	  land	  market	  described	  above	  that	  removes	  the	  pressure	  on	  the	  landowner	  to	  sell.	  	  Since	  the	  land	  retains	  its	  attractiveness	  for	  future	  development,	  the	  failure	  to	  sell	  to	  a	  developer	  at	  one	  point	  in	  time	  need	  does	  not	  lead	  to	  the	  loss	  of	  the	  land’s	  value.	  	  From	  the	  landowner’s	  perspective,	  selling	  just	  incurs	  the	  tax	  incidence,	  and	  if	  the	  proceeds	  would	  just	  be	  re-­‐invested	  in	  real	  estate	  in	  the	  same	  market,	  it	  is	  preferable	  to	  not	  sell	  and	  retain	  the	  land	  until	  the	  landowner	  is	  ready	  to	  exit	  the	  real	  estate	  market	  in	  that	  city.	  	  The	  consequence	  is	  that	  parcels	  remain	  underdeveloped	  and	  sprawl	  increases.	  	  	  	  Within	  the	  context	  of	  sustainability,	  the	  effects	  of	  lock-­‐in	  on	  redevelopment	  may	  be	  especially	  pernicious.	  	  Redevelopment	  tends	  to	  occur	  in	  older	  core	  urban	  areas,	  those	  with	  existing	  infrastructure	  and	  better	  transit	  service	  than	  greenfield	  sites	  in	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  10	  The	  theoretical	  issues	  and	  problems	  of	  land	  assembly	  is	  studied	  in	  Eckart	  (1985),	  Strange	  (1995),	  and	  O’Flaherty	  (1994).	  	  Fu,	  McMillen,	  and	  Somerville	  (20060	  demonstrate	  the	  empirical	  validity	  of	  these	  models.	  	   16	  the	  suburbs.	  	  As	  Glaeser	  and	  Kahn	  (2008)	  demonstrate,	  cities	  have	  lower	  carbon	  emissions	  than	  suburbs,	  and	  this	  gap	  is	  most	  pronounced	  for	  older	  cities,	  exactly	  where	  the	  problems	  of	  lock-­‐in	  are	  likely	  to	  be	  most	  acute.	  	  This	  also	  effects	  affordability,	  as	  a	  reduction	  in	  the	  supply	  of	  rental	  units	  raises	  rents	  from	  the	  level	  where	  they	  might	  otherwise	  be.	  	  The	  second	  factor	  is	  that	  older	  urban	  parcels	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  be	  rundown	  and	  under-­‐developed.	  	  This	  creates	  a	  higher	  probability	  of	  a	  negative	  amenity	  externality	  on	  adjacent	  properties.	  	  If	  the	  properties	  are	  ripe	  for	  redevelopment,	  and	  the	  landowner	  expects	  them	  to	  be	  redeveloped	  upon	  sale,	  this	  reduces	  the	  incentive	  for	  the	  property	  owner	  to	  maintain,	  improve,	  or	  renovate	  the	  property.	  	  The	  subsequent	  developer	  buyer	  values	  the	  land	  alone,	  not	  the	  improvements,	  effectively	  reducing	  the	  return	  to	  maintaining	  the	  property.	  	  	  	  These	  conditions	  suggest	  that	  tax	  provisions	  which	  encourage	  the	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  for	  real	  estate	  investors	  increase	  urban	  sprawl	  and	  blight	  by	  reducing	  the	  incentives	  to	  sell	  to	  developers	  for	  redevelopment	  or	  to	  maintain	  the	  property.	  	  Under	  these	  conditions,	  the	  appropriate	  tax	  policy	  for	  increased	  economic	  efficiency	  and	  improved	  social	  welfare	  would	  be	  to	  grant	  preferential	  treatment	  that	  removes	  the	  lock-­‐in	  effect.	  	  Allowing	  real	  estate	  investors	  to	  roll	  their	  tax	  liability	  upon	  the	  sale	  of	  one	  property	  to	  another	  subsequent	  purchased	  property	  would	  ease	  the	  ability	  of	  developers	  to	  acquire	  urban	  properties	  and	  redevelop	  them,	  rather	  than	  leading	  development	  to	  occur	  at	  more	  distant	  less	  sustainable	  single	  owner	  suburban	  sites	  or	  limiting	  redevelopment	  all	  together.	  	  Theory	  suggests	  that	  the	  overall	  effect	  of	  lock-­‐in	  is	  to	  reduce	  the	  supply	  of	  new	  units,	  increase	  the	  price	  of	  developed	  properties	  and	  weaken	  affordability	  because	  by	  reducing	  market	  liquidity	  and	  property	  turnover,	  less	  redevelopment	  occurs	  leading	  to	  a	  reduction	  in	  the	  stock	  of	  properties.	  	  As	  well,	  it	  encourages	  the	  development	  of	  more	  distant	  vacant	  parcels,	  leading	  to	  more	  sprawl	  and	  a	  less	  sustainable	  city.	  	  	   	  	   17	  Bibliography	  	  Altus	  Group	  Economic	  Consulting.	  (2009).	  Economic	  Impact	  of	  Commercial	  Multi-­‐Unit	  Residential	  Property	  transactions	  in	  Toronto,	  Calgary,	  and	  Vancouver,	  2006-­‐2008.	  Consulting	  report	  prepared	  for	  Canadian	  Real	  Estate	  Association.	  	  	  Auerbach,	  Alan	  J.	  (1991).	  Retrospective	  Capital	  Gains	  Taxation.	  	  American	  Economic	  Review,	  81,	  167-­‐178.	  	  Biehl,	  A.	  M.	  and	  W.	  Hoyt	  (2009).	  The	  Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997	  and	  homeownership:	  Is	  smaller	  now	  better?	  Working	  Papers	  2009-­‐04,	  University	  of	  Kentucky,	  Institute	  for	  Federalism	  and	  Intergovernmental	  Relations.	  	  Brueckner,	  Jan	  K.	  and	  Robert	  W.	  Helsley.	  	  (2011).	  Sprawl	  and	  Blight.	  Journal	  of	  Urban	  Economics,	  69	  (2),	  205-­‐13	  	  Cadigan,	  John,	  Pamela	  Schmitt,	  Robert	  Shupp,	  and	  Kurtis	  Swopes.	  (2011).	  	  The	  Holdout	  Problem	  and	  Urban	  Sprawl:	  Experimental	  Evidence.	  Journal	  of	  Urban	  Economics,	  69	  (1),	  72-­‐81.	  	  Canadian	  Real	  Estate	  Association.	  (2008).	  Reinvestment	  in	  Real	  Property:	  The	  Canadian	  Real	  Estate	  Association’s	  Submission	  on	  Why	  Canada	  Needs	  Capital	  Gains	  Tax	  Deferrals.	  	  Clemons,	  Jason,	  Charles	  Lammam,	  and	  Mathew	  Lo.	  (2014).	  The	  Economic	  Cost	  of	  Capital	  Gains	  Taxes	  in	  Canada.	  In	  Capital	  Gains	  Tax	  Reform	  in	  Canada:	  Lessons	  from	  Abroad.	  Fraser	  Institute	  	  Couzin,	  Robert.	  (1995).	  Capital	  Gains:	  Tax	  Policy	  Alternatives.	  Canadian	  Public	  Policy/Analyse	  de	  Politiques,	  S225-­‐S241.	  	  Cunningham,	  C.	  R.	  and	  G.	  V.	  Engelhardt.	  (2008).	  Housing	  Capital	  Gains	  Taxation	  and	  Homeowner	  Mobility:	  Evidence	  from	  the	  Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997.	  Journal	  of	  Urban	  Economics,	  63,	  803-­‐815.	  	  Eckart,	  Wolfgang.	  (1985).	  On	  the	  land	  assembly	  problem.	  Journal	  of	  Urban	  Economics,	  18,	  364-­‐378.	  	  Fu,	  Yuming,	  McMillan,	  Daniel,	  and	  Tsur	  Somerville.	  (2006).	  Measuring	  the	  Cost	  of	  Hold-­‐out:	  Size	  and	  Sequencing	  in	  Land	  Assembly.	  UBC	  Centre	  for	  Urban	  Economics	  and	  Real	  Estate	  working	  paper.	  	  Glaeser,	  Edward	  L.	  and	  Matthew	  E.	  Kahn.	  (2008).	  The	  Greenness	  of	  Cities:	  Carbon	  Dioxide	  Emissions	  And	  Urban	  Development.	  NBER	  Working	  Paper	  Series,	  Working	  Paper	  No.	  14238	  	  	  	  	   18	  Holmes,	  Andrew,	  and	  Barrett	  A.	  Slade.	  (2001).	  Do	  Tax	  Deferred	  Exchanges	  Impact	  Purchase	  Price?	  Evidence	  from	  the	  Phoenix	  Apartment	  Market.	  Real	  Estate	  Economics,	  29	  (4),	  567-­‐588.	  	  Johnson,	  Ken	  H.	  and	  Jonathan	  A.	  Wiley.	  (2008).	  1031	  Exchanges	  and	  the	  Sale	  of	  Commercial	  Office	  Properties.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Real	  Estate	  Portfolio	  Management,	  14	  (3),	  203-­‐211.	  	  Kanemoto,	  Yoshitsugu.	  (1996).	  On	  the'Lock-­‐In'Effects	  of	  Capital	  Gains	  Taxation.	  Journal	  of	  Urban	  Economics.	  40	  (3),	  303-­‐315.	  	  Klein,	  Peter.	  (1999).	  The	  capital	  gain	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  and	  equilibrium	  returns.	  Journal	  of	  Public	  Economics,	  71	  (3),	  355-­‐378.	  	  ______________.	  (2004).	  The	  capital	  gain	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  and	  perfect	  substitutes.	  Journal	  of	  Public	  Economics,	  88	  (12),	  2765-­‐2783.	  	  Kraus,	  A.	  and	  H.	  Stoll.	  (1972)	  Price	  Impacts	  of	  Block	  Trading	  on	  the	  New	  York	  Stock	  Exchange.	  Journal	  of	  Finance,	  27:	  569-­‐588.	  	  Ling,	  David	  C.,	  and	  Milena	  Petrova.	  (2008)	  Avoiding	  taxes	  at	  any	  cost:	  the	  economics	  of	  tax-­‐deferred	  real	  estate	  exchanges.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Real	  Estate	  Finance	  and	  Economics,	  36	  (4),	  367-­‐404.	  	  Lundborg,	  Per,	  and	  Per	  Skedinger.	  "Capital	  gains	  taxation	  and	  residential	  mobility	  in	  Sweden."	  Journal	  of	  Public	  Economics	  67.3	  (1998):	  399-­‐419.	  	  Mintz,	  Jack	  M.,	  and	  Thomas	  A.	  Wilson.	  Removing	  the	  Shackles:	  Deferring	  Capital	  Gains	  Taxes	  on	  Asset	  Rollovers.	  CD	  Howe	  Institute,	  2009.	  	  Newburn,	  D.A.,	  Berck,	  P.	  (2011).	  Exurban	  development.	  Journal	  of	  Environmental	  Economics	  and	  Management,62:	  323-­‐336.	  	  O’	  Flaherty,	  Brendan	  (1994).	  	  “Land	  Assembly	  and	  Urban	  Renewal.”	  	  Regional	  Science	  and	  Urban	  Economics	  24	  (3),	  287-­‐300.	  	  Painter,	  Gary	  and	  	  Andrea	  Heuson.	  (Forthcoming).	  The	  Impact	  of	  the	  Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997	  on	  Housing	  Turnover	  in	  the	  U.S.	  Singler	  family	  Residential	  Market.	  	  Real	  Estate	  Economics.	  	  	  Pietola,	  Kyösti,	  Sami	  Myyrä,	  and	  Eija	  Pouta.	  (2011).	  The	  Effects	  of	  Changes	  in	  Capital	  Gains	  Taxes	  on	  Land	  Sales:	  Empirical	  Evidence	  from	  Finland.	  Land	  Economics,	  87	  (4),	  582-­‐594.	  	  	  	  	   19	  Scholes,	  Myron.	  (1972).	  The	  Market	  for	  Securities:	  Substitution	  Versus	  Price	  Pressure:	  The	  Effects	  of	  Information	  on	  Share	  Prices.	  Journal	  of	  Business,	  11(1),	  179-­‐211.	  	  	  Shan,	  H.	  (2008).	  The	  effect	  of	  capital	  gains	  taxation	  on	  home	  sales:	  evidence	  from	  the	  Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997.	  Finance	  and	  Economics	  Discussion	  Series	  2008-­‐53,	  Board	  of	  Governors	  of	  the	  Federal	  Reserve	  System	  (U.S.).	  	  Sinai,	  Todd,	  and	  Joseph	  Gyourko.	  (2004).	  The	  asset	  price	  incidence	  of	  capital	  gains	  taxes:	  evidence	  from	  the	  Taxpayer	  Relief	  Act	  of	  1997	  and	  publicly-­‐traded	  real	  estate	  firms.	  Journal	  of	  Public	  Economics,	  88.(7),	  1543-­‐1565.	  	  Steele,	  Marion.	  (2009).	  Capital	  Gains	  Rollovers	  and	  the	  Two-­‐Sector	  Rental	  Housing	  Market:	  A	  Simulation	  Study	  of	  Toronto.	  Canadian	  Tax	  Journal,	  57	  (3),	  460-­‐88.	  	  Strange,	  William	  C.	  (1995).	  	  “Information,	  holdouts,	  and	  land	  assembly,”	  Journal	  of	  Urban	  Economics,	  38,	  317-­‐332.	  	  Yamazaki,	  Fukuju,	  and	  Takako	  Idee.	  (1997).	  An	  estimation	  of	  the	  lock-­‐in	  effect	  of	  capital	  gains	  taxation.	  Journal	  of	  the	  Japanese	  and	  International	  Economies,	  11	  (1),	  82-­‐104.	  	  Zodrow,	  George	  R.	  (1995).	  Economic	  issues	  in	  the	  taxation	  of	  capital	  gains.	  Canadian	  Public	  Policy/Analyse	  de	  Politiques,	  S27-­‐S57.	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52383.1-0052293/manifest

Comment

Related Items