UBC Faculty Research and Publications

Politics and performance : British Columbia's economic and fiscal experience under the NDP and BC Liberals… Somerville, Tsur May 31, 2013

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52383-Politics and performance 1991-2013.pdf [ 747.59kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52383-1.0052271.json
JSON-LD: 52383-1.0052271-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52383-1.0052271-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52383-1.0052271-rdf.json
Turtle: 52383-1.0052271-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52383-1.0052271-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52383-1.0052271-source.json
Full Text
52383-1.0052271-fulltext.txt
Citation
52383-1.0052271.ris

Full Text

                                                                                                                               Centre for Urban Economics and Real Estate  Discussion Paper 2013– 01     Politics and Performance:  British Columbia’s Economic and Fiscal Experience  under the NDP and BC Liberals 1991-2013    Tsur Somerville*  May 2013     *   Real Estate Foundation Professorship of Real Estate Finance, Sauder School of Business,  University of British Columbia, 2053 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z2, Canada.  Tel: (604) 822-8343, Fax: (604) 822-8477. Email:  tsur.somerville@sauder.ubc.ca    We are grateful for the support of the Real Estate Institute of British Columbia and  the Real Estate Foundation of British Columbia through their contributions to  The UBC Centre for Urban Economics and Real Estate.   	   1	  Introduction	  	  The	  two	  main	  political	  parties	  in	  the	  2013	  British	  Columbia	  provincial	  election	  have	  each	  spent	  considerable	  time,	  energy,	  and	  money	  in	  an	  attempt	  to	  convince	  voters	  that	  they	  can	  be	  trusted	  to	  guide	  responsibly	  the	  provincial	  economy.	  	  At	  the	  same	  time,	  they	  have	  attempted	  to	  persuade	  voters	  that	  the	  other	  party	  will	  be	  wasteful	  or	  ignore	  the	  values	  British	  Columbians	  hold	  dear.	  	  The	  purpose	  of	  this	  brief	  monograph	  is	  to	  examine	  the	  performance	  of	  both	  the	  BC	  economy	  and	  the	  fiscal	  record	  for	  the	  provincial	  budget	  and	  debt	  under	  the	  NDP	  (1991-­‐2001)	  and	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  (2001-­‐2013).	  	  	  	  It	  is	  important	  to	  note	  how	  we	  define	  performance.	  	  We	  are	  not	  looking	  at	  the	  absolute	  levels	  of	  BC	  provincial	  debt,	  budget	  performance,	  or	  employment	  growth.	  Instead,	  the	  definition	  of	  performance	  is	  of	  that	  relative	  to	  the	  performance	  of	  other	  provinces	  during	  the	  same	  period.	  	  So	  one	  party	  might	  have	  run	  deficits	  on	  average	  while	  the	  other	  party	  ran	  surpluses,	  but	  if	  the	  former	  were	  small	  compared	  to	  the	  deficits	  run	  at	  the	  same	  time	  by	  other	  provinces,	  and	  the	  latter	  were	  small	  compared	  to	  surpluses	  achieved	  at	  the	  same	  time	  in	  other	  provinces,	  then	  we	  would	  say	  that	  the	  party	  that	  ran	  deficits	  actually	  had	  a	  better	  fiscal	  performance.	  	  	   	  	   2	  Findings	  Summary	  	   • Relative	  fiscal	  management	  moderately	  better	  under	  the	  NDP	  than	  the	  BC	  Liberals.	  	  On	  average,	  the	  BC	  government’s	  fiscal	  performance	  was	  modestly	  better	  under	  the	  NDP	  than	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals,	  when	  compared	  with	  the	  performance	  of	  other	  provinces.	  	  On	  this	  relative,	  rather	  than	  absolute,	  basis,	  BC’s	  ratio	  of	  net	  debt	  to	  GDP	  and	  the	  ratio	  of	  government	  program	  expenses	  to	  GDP	  were	  lower	  under	  the	  NDP	  than	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals.	  The	  NDP	  averaged	  deficits,	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  surpluses,	  but	  in	  comparison	  to	  the	  performance	  in	  other	  provinces	  at	  the	  same	  time,	  the	  NDP	  managed	  the	  budget	  better.	  	  • Which	  NDP	  matters.	  	  The	  Harcourt	  government	  was	  dramatically	  more	  fiscally	  responsible	  than	  the	  subsequent	  Glen	  Clark,	  Miller,	  and	  Dosanjh	  governments,	  and	  better	  controlled	  the	  provincial	  debt	  and	  expenditures	  compared	  to	  GDP	  than	  the	  have	  the	  BC	  Liberals.	  	  In	  turn	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  outperformed	  the	  Glen	  Clark,	  Miller,	  and	  Dosanjh	  NDP	  governments.	  	  • Higher	  relative	  growth	  in	  median	  income	  under	  BC	  Liberals.	  	  	  Compared	  to	  growth	  rates	  in	  other	  provinces,	  real	  median	  income	  grew	  faster	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  than	  under	  the	  NDP.	  	  • Employment	  growth	  under	  NDP	  driven	  by	  high	  relative	  growth	  in	  public	  sector	  employment	  growth.	  	  In	  relative	  and	  absolute	  terms	  public	  sector	  employment	  growth	  in	  BC	  under	  the	  NDP	  was	  much	  higher	  compared	  with	  that	  in	  other	  provinces.	  	  In	  contrast,	  there	  has	  been	  relatively	  larger	  growth	  in	  private	  sector	  employment	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals.	  	  In	  aggregate,	  employment	  growth	  in	  BC	  under	  both	  the	  NDP	  and	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  relative	  to	  other	  provinces	  was	  fairly	  similar.	  	  	  	   3	  	  Methodology	  	  Most	  of	  what	  determines	  short	  run	  economic	  performance	  is	  out	  of	  the	  hands	  of	  provincial	  governments.	  	  They	  are	  at	  the	  mercy	  of	  world	  commodity	  prices,	  Bank	  of	  Canada	  policies	  on	  interest	  rates,	  the	  strength	  or	  weakness	  of	  the	  Canadian	  dollar,	  and	  the	  economic	  health	  of	  Canada’s	  trading	  partners.	  	  	  A	  simple	  comparison	  of	  average	  performance	  can	  be	  extremely	  misleading,	  as	  even	  an	  incompetent	  provincial	  government	  can	  appear	  to	  generate	  impressive	  economic	  and	  fiscal	  outcomes	  when	  conditions	  in	  the	  global	  economy	  match	  up	  well	  for	  the	  province.	  	  	  	  To	  try	  to	  address	  the	  effect	  of	  broader	  conditions,	  this	  analysis	  is	  based	  on	  the	  performance	  of	  the	  British	  Columbia	  economy	  and	  provincial	  government’s	  fiscal	  management	  when	  compared	  with	  the	  outcomes	  in	  other	  provinces	  over	  the	  same	  time	  periods.	  	  We	  present	  the	  difference	  between	  BC’s	  performance	  and	  that	  of	  Alberta	  and	  Ontario	  individually,	  and	  then	  all	  of	  Canada	  excluding	  BC.	  	  Better	  means	  better	  compared	  with	  others,	  not	  negative	  or	  positive	  in	  any	  absolute	  sense.	  	  So	  running	  deficits	  may	  be	  better	  management	  if	  other	  provinces	  are	  running	  	  extremely	  large	  deficits	  at	  the	  same	  time.	  	  For	  the	  NDP,	  employment	  growth	  is	  calculated	  as	  the	  average	  rate	  of	  growth	  in	  the	  various	  employment	  measures	  between	  November	  1991	  and	  June	  2001.	  	  The	  fiscal	  period	  are	  government	  budgets	  from	  1991-­‐92	  through	  2000-­‐01;	  for	  the	  BC	  Liberals,	  June	  2001	  through	  January	  2013	  and	  then	  2001-­‐02	  through	  2012-­‐13	  respectively.	  	  An	  important	  caveat	  is	  that	  the	  effect	  of	  provincial	  government	  decisions	  and	  policies	  on	  economic	  outcomes	  and	  fiscal	  performance	  does	  not	  coincide	  precisely	  with	  term	  in	  office.	  	  We	  correlate	  the	  data	  during	  a	  party’s	  time	  in	  office	  with	  that	  political	  party,	  recognizing	  that	  this	  at	  best	  an	  imperfect	  assessment	  of	  performance.	  	  This	  analysis	  is	  of	  correlations	  only.	  There	  is	  no	  model	  or	  detailed	  analysis	  that	  attempts	  to	  identify	  causes	  or	  allocate	  shares	  to	  different	  contributing	  factors.	  	  	   	  	   4	  Findings	  –	  Government	  Fiscal	  Performance	  	  Figure	  1	  analyzes	  the	  net	  provincial	  debt	  under	  the	  NDP	  and	  BC	  liberals	  as	  a	  percent	  of	  provincial	  GDP.	  	  Larger	  positive	  values	  indicate	  that	  the	  average	  debt	  to	  GDP	  ration	  was	  higher	  relative	  to	  the	  comparison	  group.	  	  So	  under	  both	  the	  NDP	  and	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  the	  ratio	  of	  provincial	  debt	  to	  GDP	  was	  higher	  than	  it	  was	  Alberta,	  and	  lower	  than	  the	  same	  ratio	  in	  Ontario	  and	  the	  average	  Canadian	  province,	  both	  unweighted	  and	  weighted	  by	  provincial	  population.1	  These	  relative	  net	  debt	  to	  GDP	  ratios	  were	  lower	  under	  the	  NDP	  than	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  (see	  Appendix	  Table	  A1	  for	  the	  annual	  figures)	  indicating	  better	  relative	  performance	  by	  the	  NDP	  than	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  at	  limiting	  the	  size	  of	  the	  provincial	  debt.	  	  Figure	  1:	  Provincial	  Net	  Debt	  as	  Percent	  of	  GDP	  	  British	  Columbia	  Compared	  to	  Other	  Provinces	  	  Difference	  Between	  BC	  and	  Comparison	  Group	  	  	  Notes:	  Weighting	  is	  by	  2011	  provincial	  population	  Source:	  Calculations	  Using	  RBC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  Unweighted	  treats	  all	  provinces	  the	  same	  in	  constructing	  an	  average.	  	  Weighted	  becomes	  much	  more	  a	  function	  of	  Ontario	  and	  Quebec	  numbers.	  	  	  -­‐25.0	  -­‐20.0	  -­‐15.0	  -­‐10.0	  -­‐5.0	  0.0	  5.0	  10.0	  15.0	  20.0	  25.0	  30.0	  AB	   ON	   Provincial	  Average:	  Excld	  BC	  Weighted	  Provincial	  Avg:	  Excld	  BC	  NDP	  in	  Of椫ce	   Liberals	  in	  Of椫ce	  	   5	  The	  ratio	  of	  provincial	  net	  debt	  to	  GDP	  is	  not	  constant	  under	  either	  party.	  	  Figure	  2A	  charts	  out	  British	  Columbia’s	  net	  provincial	  debt	  relative	  to	  provincial	  GDP	  by	  fiscal	  year,	  Figure	  2B	  is	  the	  difference	  between	  BC	  and	  the	  provincial	  average	  across	  Canada.	  	  Under	  the	  NDP,	  this	  ratio	  fell	  in	  the	  Harcourt	  administration	  and	  rose	  dramatically	  under	  Glen	  Clark.	  	  Under	  the	  BC	  Liberals,	  the	  ratio	  of	  debt	  to	  GDP	  fell	  under	  the	  early	  years,	  but	  has	  rising	  since	  world	  financial	  crisis	  in	  2008.	  	  The	  lower	  Harcourt	  numbers	  really	  stand	  out,	  as	  does	  the	  rapid	  increase	  in	  provincial	  debt	  to	  GDP	  under	  Glen	  Clark,	  and	  the	  subsequent	  fall	  in	  the	  same	  in	  the	  first	  two	  Campbell	  administrations.	  	  	  Figure	  2A:	  British	  Columbia	  Net	  Provincial	  Debt	  as	  Percent	  of	  GDP	  	  	  Source:	  Calculations	  Using	  RBC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	  	  	  	   	  10	  12	  14	  16	  18	  20	  22	  1992-­‐93	  1993-­‐94	  1994-­‐95	  1995-­‐96	  1996-­‐97	  1997-­‐98	  1998-­‐99	  1999-­‐00	  2000-­‐01	  2001-­‐02	  2002-­‐03	  2003-­‐04	  2004-­‐05	  2005-­‐06	  2006-­‐07	  2007-­‐08	  2008-­‐09	  2009-­‐10	  2010-­‐11	  2011-­‐12	  2012-­‐13	  Liberals	  in	  Power	  NDP	  in	  Power	  Campbell	  C	  Clark	  Miller/Dosanjh	  Harcourt	  G	  Clark	  	   6	  	  Figure	  2B:	  British	  Columbia	  Net	  Provincial	  Debt	  as	  Percent	  of	  GDP	  Difference	  Between	  BC	  and	  Average	  of	  Other	  Provinces	  	  	  Source:	  Calculations	  Using	  RBC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  3	  compares	  the	  annual	  provincial	  budget	  numbers	  in	  BC	  with	  those	  of	  the	  comparison	  group	  of	  Alberta,	  Ontario,	  and	  the	  average	  among	  the	  provinces.	  	  	  The	  presentation	  in	  Figure	  3	  is	  the	  difference	  between	  average	  provincial	  surpluses	  or	  debt	  and	  not	  the	  actual	  value	  –	  the	  values	  themselves	  by	  year	  can	  be	  found	  in	  Appendix	  Table	  A2.	  	  Here	  larger	  positive	  numbers	  indicate	  better	  fiscal	  management,	  budgets	  more	  in	  surplus.	  	  Under	  both	  parties,	  the	  BC	  budget	  was	  less	  in	  surplus/	  more	  in	  deficit	  compared	  with	  the	  provincial	  budgets	  in	  Alberta.	  	  And	  with	  a	  larger	  surplus	  or	  a	  lower	  deficit,	  than	  the	  provincial	  budgets	  in	  Ontario	  or	  the	  average	  Canadian	  province.	  	  	  As	  with	  the	  case	  of	  debt,	  fiscal	  balance	  was	  more	  positive	  under	  the	  NDP	  on	  average	  than	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals,	  when	  compared	  with	  performances	  of	  all	  of	  the	  comparison	  provincial	  groups.	  	  	  	  -­‐30	  -­‐25	  -­‐20	  -­‐15	  -­‐10	  -­‐5	  0	  1991-­‐92	  1992-­‐93	  1993-­‐94	  1994-­‐95	  1995-­‐96	  1996-­‐97	  1997-­‐98	  1998-­‐99	  1999-­‐00	  2000-­‐01	  2001-­‐02	  2002-­‐03	  2003-­‐04	  2004-­‐05	  2005-­‐06	  2006-­‐07	  2007-­‐08	  2008-­‐09	  2009-­‐10	  2010-­‐11	  2011-­‐12	  2012-­‐13	  NDP	  in	  Power	  	  Liberals	  in	  Power	  	  Harcourt	  	  G	  Clark	   Campbell	  	   7	  	  	  Figure	  3:	  Provincial	  Surplus/(Deficit)	  as	  Percent	  of	  GDP	  	  British	  Columbia	  Compared	  to	  Other	  Provinces	  	  Difference	  Between	  BC	  and	  Comparison	  Group	  	  	  Notes:	  Weighting	  is	  by	  2011	  provincial	  population	  Source:	  Calculations	  Using	  RBC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	  	  	  The	  final	  category	  for	  fiscal	  performance	  is	  government	  program	  expense	  as	  a	  percent	  of	  GDP.	  	  While	  budget	  surpluses	  or	  deficits	  depend	  on	  both	  revenues	  and	  expenses,	  provincial	  government	  have	  more	  immediate	  control	  on	  expenses	  than	  revenues,	  which	  are	  subject	  to	  the	  economy	  for	  sales	  and	  incomes	  taxes	  and	  commodity	  prices	  for	  royalty	  revenue.	  	  Figure	  4	  compares	  the	  provincial	  program	  expense	  to	  GDP	  ratios	  in	  the	  same	  manner	  as	  above.	  	  While	  in	  absolute	  terms	  (see	  Appendix	  table	  A3)	  government	  program	  expense	  as	  a	  percent	  of	  GDP	  was	  higher	  under	  the	  NDP	  than	  the	  BC	  Liberals,	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  spent	  more	  as	  a	  percent	  of	  provincial	  GDP	  than	  did	  the	  NDP	  relative	  to	  the	  spending	  patterns	  of	  the	  comparison	  -­‐2.0	  -­‐1.5	  -­‐1.0	  -­‐0.5	  0.0	  0.5	  1.0	  1.5	  2.0	  AB	   ON	   Provincial	  Average:	  Excld	  BC	  Weighted	  Provincial	  Avg:	  Excld	  BC	  NDP	  in	  Of椫ce	   Liberals	  in	  Of椫ce	  	   8	  provincial	  groups.	  	  BC	  provincial	  government	  program	  expenses	  relative	  to	  GDP	  were	  higher	  than	  those	  in	  Alberta	  and	  Ontario,	  and	  compared	  to	  the	  provincial	  average	  it	  depends	  on	  whether	  one	  adjusts	  for	  the	  high	  spending,	  smaller	  maritime	  provinces	  or	  not.	  	  	  In	  all	  cases	  these	  relative	  measures	  show	  greater	  comparative	  expenditure	  by	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  than	  by	  the	  NDP,	  a	  finding	  consistent	  with	  the	  other	  measures	  of	  fiscal	  responsibility	  .	  	  	  Figure	  4:	  Provincial	  Govt	  Program	  Expense	  as	  Percent	  of	  GDP	  British	  Columbia	  Compared	  to	  Other	  Provinces	  	  Difference	  Between	  BC	  and	  Comparison	  Group	  	  Notes:	  Weighting	  is	  by	  2011	  provincial	  population	  Source:	  Calculations	  Using	  RBC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	  	  As	  with	  the	  net	  debt	  to	  GDP	  ratio,	  we	  also	  present	  the	  time	  series	  in	  British	  Columbia’s	  government	  program	  expense	  to	  GDP	  ratio.	  	  Figure	  5A	  shows	  the	  exense	  to	  GDP	  ratio	  for	  BC.	  	  Under	  the	  NDP,	  this	  ratio	  fell	  during	  the	  Harcourt	  administration	  and	  rose	  under	  the	  subsequent	  Glen	  Clark,	  Dan	  Miller,	  and	  Ujjal	  -­‐3.0	  -­‐2.0	  -­‐1.0	  0.0	  1.0	  2.0	  3.0	  4.0	  5.0	  6.0	  7.0	  AB	   ON	   Provincial	  Average:	  Excld	  BC	  Weighted	  Provincial	  Avg:	  Excld	  BC	  NDP	  in	  Of椫ce	   Liberals	  in	  Of椫ce	  	   9	  Dosanjh	  NDP	  governments.	  	  For	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  it	  fell	  until	  the	  world	  financial	  crisis,	  when	  it	  rose	  and	  has	  remained	  higher	  since.	  	  	  Figure	  5A:	  Provincial	  Govt	  Program	  Expense	  as	  Percent	  of	  GDP	  	  	  	  Source:	  Calculations	  Using	  RBC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	  	  	  Figure	  5B	  extends	  this	  analysis	  over	  time	  by	  showing	  the	  difference,	  year	  by	  year,	  between	  government	  program	  expenditures	  as	  a	  percent	  of	  GDP	  in	  BC	  and	  those	  from	  the	  average	  of	  the	  other	  provinces.	  	  	  These	  differences	  were	  lowest	  under	  the	  NDP	  during	  the	  Harcourt	  years.	  	  They	  rose	  dramatically	  during	  the	  period	  that	  Glen	  Clark	  was	  the	  NDP	  premier	  of	  BC.	  	  Under	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  the	  difference	  between	  BC	  program	  expenses	  as	  a	  percentage	  of	  GDP	  and	  the	  average	  of	  other	  provinces	  fell,	  before	  rising	  in	  the	  last	  two	  years.	  	  	  	   	  15	  16	  17	  18	  19	  20	  21	  1992-­‐93	  1993-­‐94	  1994-­‐95	  1995-­‐96	  1996-­‐97	  1997-­‐98	  1998-­‐99	  1999-­‐00	  2000-­‐01	  2001-­‐02	  2002-­‐03	  2003-­‐04	  2004-­‐05	  2005-­‐06	  2006-­‐07	  2007-­‐08	  2008-­‐09	  2009-­‐10	  2010-­‐11	  2011-­‐12	  2012-­‐13	  Liberals	  in	  Power	  NDP	  in	  Power	  Harcourt	   G	  Clark	   Campbell	  C	  Clark	  Miller	  /	  Dosanjh	  	   10	  	  Figure	  5B:	  Provincial	  Govt	  Program	  Expense	  as	  Percent	  of	  GDP	  	  Difference	  Between	  BC	  and	  Average	  of	  Other	  Provinces	  	  	  	  Source:	  Calculations	  Using	  RBC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	  	  	  	  Findings	  –	  Provincial	  Economic	  Performance	  	  In	  this	  section	  we	  compare	  British	  Columbia’s	  economic	  performance	  with	  that	  of	  other	  provinces	  for	  growth	  in	  incomes	  and	  employment.	  	  The	  comparison	  is	  to	  Alberta,	  Ontario,	  and	  then	  Canada	  excluding	  BC.	  	  Positive	  values	  indicate	  higher	  annual	  growth	  rates	  in	  either	  real	  median	  income	  or	  employment	  n	  BC	  relative	  to	  the	  growth	  rates	  in	  the	  same	  measures	  in	  the	  comparison	  groups	  over	  the	  same	  time	  periods..	  	  -­‐4	  -­‐3	  -­‐2	  -­‐1	  0	  1	  2	  3	  1991-­‐92	  1992-­‐93	  1993-­‐94	  1994-­‐95	  1995-­‐96	  1996-­‐97	  1997-­‐98	  1998-­‐99	  1999-­‐00	  2000-­‐01	  2001-­‐02	  2002-­‐03	  2003-­‐04	  2004-­‐05	  2005-­‐06	  2006-­‐07	  2007-­‐08	  2008-­‐09	  2009-­‐10	  2010-­‐11	  2011-­‐12	  2012-­‐13	  NDP	  in	  Power	   Liberals	  in	  Power	  	  Harcourt	  G	  Clark	   Campbell	   C	  Clark	  	   11	  Figure	  6	  compares	  growth	  in	  the	  real	  provincial	  median	  income	  in	  BC	  compared	  to	  the	  growth	  in	  Alberta,	  Ontario,	  and	  Canada	  (excluding	  BC).	  	  Under	  the	  BC	  Liberals,	  real	  median	  income	  growth	  in	  BC	  grew	  faster	  relative	  to	  other	  provinces	  than	  it	  did	  under	  the	  NDP.	  	  Under	  the	  NDP	  real	  median	  income	  in	  BC	  grew	  slower	  than	  it	  did	  in	  Alberta,	  Ontario,	  and	  the	  rest	  of	  Canada.	  	  Real	  median	  incomes	  in	  Alberta	  grew	  faster	  than	  in	  BC	  while	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  were	  in	  power	  as	  well,	  but	  compared	  to	  both	  Ontario	  and	  Canada	  as	  a	  whole,	  real	  median	  income	  growth	  was	  higher	  in	  BC	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals.	  	  	  	  Figure	  6:	  Annual	  Growth	  in	  Real	  Median	  Income	  British	  Columbia	  Compared	  to	  Other	  Provinces	  Difference	  Between	  BC	  and	  Comparison	  Values	  	  	  Source:	  Calculations	  Using	  Statistics	  Canada	  data,	  Cansim	  Table	  2020404	  	  	  Total	  employment	  growth	  was	  fairly	  similar	  under	  both	  NDP	  and	  BC	  Liberal	  governments:	  slower	  than	  in	  Alberta,	  and	  faster	  than	  in	  Ontario	  and	  Canada	  as	  a	  whole.	  	  	  The	  relative	  employment	  growth,	  BC	  growth	  minus	  growth	  in	  the	  -­‐2.0	  -­‐1.5	  -­‐1.0	  -­‐0.5	  0.0	  0.5	  1.0	  1.5	  AB	   ON	   Canada	  Excld	  BC	  NDP	  in	  Of椫ce	   Liberals	  in	  Of椫ce	  	   12	  comparison	  provincial	  group,	  was	  higher	  under	  the	  NDP	  than	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals.	  	  These	  relative	  growth	  rates	  are	  presented	  below	  in	  Figure	  7.	  	  Figure	  7:	  Annual	  Growth	  in	  Total	  Employment	  British	  Columbia	  Compared	  to	  Other	  Provinces	  Pct	  Point	  Difference	  Between	  BC	  and	  Comparison	  Values	  	  	  	  Source:	  Calculations	  using	  Statistics	  Canada	  data,	  Cansim	  Table	  2020404	  	  	  While	  the	  overall	  rates	  of	  employment	  growth	  are	  similar,	  the	  patterns	  of	  growth	  are	  not.	  	  Figure	  8	  shows	  the	  relative	  rates	  of	  employment	  growth	  in	  public	  sector	  employment.	  Public	  sector	  is	  defined	  as	  those	  sectors	  where	  employment	  is	  overwhelmingly	  dependent	  on	  public	  expenditures:	  public	  administration,	  health	  care,	  social	  services,	  and	  education.	  	  Figure	  9	  displays	  the	  rates	  for	  “core”	  private	  sector	  employment.	  “Core”	  is	  those	  categories	  less	  likely	  to	  be	  affected	  by	  government	  expenditures,	  either	  directly	  as	  in	  construction,	  or	  indirectly	  as	  in	  retail	  trade.	  	  While	  government	  stimulus	  spending	  will	  affect	  employment	  in	  all	  categories	  these	  are	  less	  directly	  linked	  to	  immediate	  government	  expenditures	  than	  others	  -­‐1.4	  -­‐1.2	  -­‐1.0	  -­‐0.8	  -­‐0.6	  -­‐0.4	  -­‐0.2	  0.0	  0.2	  0.4	  0.6	  AB	   ON	   Canada:	  Excld	  BC	  NDP	  in	  Of椫ce	   Liberals	  in	  Of椫ce	  	   13	  and	  are	  available	  for	  the	  entire	  analysis	  period.	  	  These	  groups	  comprise	  one	  quarter	  to	  one	  third	  of	  all	  private	  sector	  employment.	  	  	  On	  an	  absolute	  and	  relative	  basis	  public	  sector	  employment	  was	  dramatically	  higher	  under	  the	  NDP	  than	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals.	  	  The	  difference	  between	  the	  NDP	  and	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  in	  the	  growth	  rate	  in	  these	  areas	  is	  on	  the	  order	  of	  three	  percentage	  points.	  	  Public	  sector	  employment	  growth	  under	  the	  NDP	  was	  higher	  by	  nearly	  two	  percentage	  points	  than	  under	  any	  of	  the	  comparison	  groups,	  while	  under	  the	  Liberals,	  the	  annual	  growth	  in	  public	  sector	  was	  0.5	  to	  1.0	  percentage	  points	  lower	  than	  in	  Alberta,	  Ontario,	  or	  Canada	  as	  a	  whole.	  	  Figure	  8:	  Annual	  Growth	  in	  Estimated	  Public	  Sector	  Employment	  British	  Columbia	  Compared	  to	  Other	  Provinces	  Difference	  Between	  BC	  and	  Comparison	  Values	  	  	  Notes:	  Public	  sector	  employment	  is	  comprised	  of	  employment	  in	  public	  administration,	  health	  care	  and	  social	  assistance,	  and	  educational	  services.	  	  Source:	  Calculations	  using	  Statistics	  Canada	  data,	  Cansim	  Table	  2020404	  -­‐1.5	  -­‐1.0	  -­‐0.5	  0.0	  0.5	  1.0	  1.5	  2.0	  2.5	  3.0	  AB	   ON	   Canada:	  Excld	  BC	  NDP	  in	  Of椫ce	   Liberals	  in	  Of椫ce	  	   14	  	  The	  annual	  rate	  of	  growth	  in	  private	  sector	  employment	  in	  the	  select	  sectors	  was	  higher	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  than	  under	  the	  NDP,	  when	  compared	  to	  growth	  rates	  in	  Alberta,	  Ontario	  and	  Canada	  as	  a	  whole.	  	  While	  growth	  rates	  in	  Alberta	  were	  higher	  in	  absolute	  terms,	  the	  relative	  better	  performance	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  was	  a	  consistent	  finding,	  with	  the	  difference	  at	  between	  0.75	  and	  1.5	  percentage	  points.	  	  In	  absolute	  terms	  the	  growth	  rate	  under	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  was	  higher	  than	  growth	  in	  Ontario	  and	  Canada	  as	  a	  whole.	  	  During	  BC’s	  NDP	  government	  years	  the	  growth	  rate	  in	  this	  core	  private	  employment	  was	  lower	  in	  BC	  than	  in	  Ontario	  or	  Canada	  as	  a	  whole	  	  	  Figure	  9:	  Annual	  Growth	  in	  Core	  Private	  Employment	  British	  Columbia	  Compared	  to	  Other	  Provinces	  Pct	  Point	  Difference	  Between	  BC	  and	  Comparison	  Values	  	  	  Notes:	  Core	  private	  employment	  is	  comprised	  of	  employment	  in	  forestry,	  mining,	  quarrying,	  and	  oil	  and	  gas	  extraction,	  manufacturing,	  transportation	  and	  warehousing,	  and	  professional,	  scientific	  and	  technical	  services.	  Source:	  Calculations	  using	  Statistics	  Canada	  data,	  Cansim	  Table	  2020404	  -­‐3.0	  -­‐2.5	  -­‐2.0	  -­‐1.5	  -­‐1.0	  -­‐0.5	  0.0	  0.5	  1.0	  1.5	  AB	   ON	   Canada:	  Excld	  BC	  NDP	  in	  Of椫ce	   Liberals	  in	  Of椫ce	  	   15	  	  	  In	  concluding	  this	  comparison	  it	  is	  important	  to	  note	  the	  differences	  in	  the	  economic	  contexts	  under	  which	  the	  NDP	  and	  Liberal	  governments	  operated.	  	  While	  the	  approach	  used	  here	  of	  comparing	  the	  difference	  between	  BC	  outcomes	  and	  those	  in	  other	  provinces	  addresses	  part	  of	  this	  context,	  it	  does	  not	  do	  so	  perfectly.	  	  World	  economic	  events	  do	  not	  affect	  all	  provinces	  equally.	  	  For	  instance,	  rising	  commodity	  prices	  and	  a	  strengthening	  Canadian	  dollar	  are	  of	  a	  greater	  benefit	  to	  western	  Canadian	  commodity	  producers	  that	  they	  are	  to	  central	  Canadian	  manufacturers.	  	  	  	  Figures	  10	  and	  11	  provide	  some	  insight	  to	  the	  larger	  economic	  conditions	  over	  the	  period	  of	  analysis.	  	  	  Figure	  10	  presents	  the	  time	  series	  for	  Canadian	  government	  bond	  yields.	  	  The	  NDP	  ruled	  during	  a	  period	  of	  substantially	  higher	  interest	  rates	  than	  did	  the	  BC	  Liberals.	  	  Real	  interest	  rates	  show	  the	  same	  falling	  pattern.	  	  Figure	  10:	  Canadian	  Interest	  Rates:	  Yield	  3	  to	  5	  Year	  Government	  Bond	  	  	  	  Source:	  Bank	  of	  Canada	  	  	  	  0.0	  1.0	  2.0	  3.0	  4.0	  5.0	  6.0	  7.0	  8.0	  9.0	  10.0	  1991	  1992	  1993	  1994	  1995	  1996	  1997	  1998	  1999	  2000	  2001	  2002	  2003	  2004	  2005	  2006	  2007	  2008	  2009	  2010	  2011	  2012	  2013	  	   16	  	  Figure	  11	  shows	  the	  growth	  rates	  for	  different	  commodities	  for	  the	  years	  when	  the	  NDP	  formed	  British	  Columbia’s	  government	  and	  the	  years	  when	  the	  BC	  Liberals	  formed	  the	  same.	  	  These	  are	  based	  on	  $US	  prices	  and	  are	  not	  converted	  into	  $C	  values.	  	  They	  values	  are	  for	  a	  basket	  of	  all	  commodities,	  fuel	  (coal,	  gas,	  oil,	  etc.),	  metals	  and	  minerals,	  and	  then	  index	  values	  for	  plywood	  and	  for	  softwood	  lumber.	  	  For	  a	  natural	  resource	  economy	  based	  province,	  the	  BC	  liberals	  formed	  the	  province’s	  government	  under	  a	  much	  more	  favourable	  economic	  environment,	  one	  that	  saw	  much	  higher	  growth	  in	  commodity	  prices,	  except	  for	  softwood	  lumber,	  when	  compared	  with	  the	  price	  pattern	  in	  the	  years	  that	  the	  NDP	  formed	  the	  BC	  government.	  	  	  Figure	  11:	  Annual	  Growth	  in	  World	  Commodity	  Prices	  Nominal	  $US	  Vales	  for	  Indexes	  	  	  	  	  Source:	  International	  Monetary	  Fund,	  posted	  on	  	  http://www.indexmundi.com	  	  	  0.0%	  2.0%	  4.0%	  6.0%	  8.0%	  10.0%	  12.0%	  Commodities	   Fuel	   Metals	   Plywood	   Softwood	  NDP	  in	  Of椫ce	   Liberals	  in	  Of椫ce	  	   17	  Appendix	  Table	  A1	  –	  Ratio	  Provincial	  Government	  Net	  Debt	  to	  GDP	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Budget	  Year	   B.C.	   ALTA	   ONT	  Provincial	  Average	  -­‐Excld	  BC	  Weighted	  Provincial	  Average	  Excld	  BC	  1981-­‐82	   -­‐3.1	   -­‐15.5	   10.5	   	  10.7	  	   	  8.8	  	  1982-­‐83	   -­‐0.9	   -­‐13.1	   12.2	   	  12.8	  	   	  10.8	  	  1983-­‐84	   1.2	   -­‐12.4	   13	   	  14.1	  	   	  11.9	  	  1984-­‐85	   3.2	   -­‐11.6	   13.2	   	  15.6	  	   	  13.1	  	  1985-­‐86	   4.8	   -­‐9.5	   15.3	   	  17.7	  	   	  15.3	  	  1986-­‐87	   6.6	   -­‐2	   15.1	   	  19.2	  	   	  16.6	  	  1987-­‐88	   6	   2.5	   14.7	   	  20.1	  	   	  17.0	  	  1988-­‐89	   5.1	   5.6	   13.8	   	  19.5	  	   	  16.6	  	  1989-­‐90	   7.3	   8.8	   12.7	   	  19.8	  	   	  16.6	  	  1990-­‐91	   8	   7.8	   13.6	   	  20.4	  	   	  17.3	  	  1991-­‐92	   10.8	   10.9	   17.4	   	  23.9	  	   	  20.7	  	  1992-­‐93	   12.1	   15.8	   21.6	   	  29.1	  	   	  24.9	  	  1993-­‐94	   12.2	   16.5	   27.5	   	  35.4	  	   	  29.1	  	  1994-­‐95	   11.9	   14.4	   29.2	   	  36.1	  	   	  30.0	  	  1995-­‐96	   11.5	   12.6	   30.9	   	  35.3	  	   	  30.5	  	  1996-­‐97	   11.3	   8.8	   32.2	   	  34.5	  	   	  30.8	  	  1997-­‐98	   10.9	   5.6	   31.4	   	  36.2	  	   	  33.3	  	  1998-­‐99	   19	   4.5	   30.4	   	  35.8	  	   	  32.3	  	  1999-­‐00	   19	   1.8	   32.9	   	  35.1	  	   	  32.2	  	  2000-­‐01	   17.6	   -­‐3	   30.1	   	  32.0	  	   	  29.1	  	  2001-­‐02	   18.6	   -­‐3.3	   29.1	   	  32.1	  	   	  28.9	  	  2002-­‐03	   20	   -­‐4.5	   27.8	   	  31.7	  	   	  27.9	  	  2003-­‐04	   19.8	   -­‐6.2	   28.2	   	  31.3	  	   	  27.6	  	  2004-­‐05	   17.2	   -­‐8	   27.3	   	  29.7	  	   	  26.4	  	  2005-­‐06	   15.9	   -­‐10.4	   28.4	   	  27.7	  	   	  26.4	  	  2006-­‐07	   13.1	   -­‐12.7	   27.4	   	  26.7	  	   	  26.8	  	  2007-­‐08	   12.1	   -­‐12.2	   26.2	   	  23.8	  	   	  25.0	  	  2008-­‐09	   12.9	   -­‐9.1	   28.1	   	  23.1	  	   	  26.4	  	  2009-­‐10	   15.1	   -­‐9.7	   32.6	   	  25.7	  	   	  30.0	  	  2010-­‐11	   15.4	   -­‐6.8	   34.3	   	  25.9	  	   	  31.2	  	  2011-­‐12	   16.5	   -­‐5.6	   36	   	  26.0	  	   	  32.1	  	  2012-­‐13	   17.2	   -­‐3.5	   37.7	   	  27.3	  	   	  33.7	  	  NDP	  in	  Office	   13.9	   8.6	   29.6	   34.4	   30.2	  Liberals	  in	  Office	   16.2	   -­‐7.7	   30.3	   27.6	   28.5	  	  Notes:	  Weighting	  is	  by	  2011	  provincial	  population	  Source:	  BC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	  	   	  	   18	  Appendix	  Table	  A2	  –	  Ratio	  Provincial	  Budget	  Surplus	  (Deficit)	  to	  GDP	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Budget	  Year	   B.C.	   ALTA	   ONT	  Provincial	  Average	  -­‐Excld	  BC	  Weighted	  Provincial	  Average	  Excld	  BC	  1981-­‐82	   -­‐0.3	   4	   -­‐1.4	   -­‐1.3	   -­‐1.3	  1982-­‐83	   -­‐2.8	   -­‐1.4	   -­‐2.3	   -­‐2.9	   -­‐2.5	  1983-­‐84	   -­‐2	   0.2	   -­‐2	   -­‐2.3	   -­‐2.0	  1984-­‐85	   -­‐1.6	   2	   -­‐1.5	   -­‐2.1	   -­‐1.9	  1985-­‐86	   -­‐1.6	   -­‐1.1	   -­‐1.4	   -­‐2.4	   -­‐2.1	  1986-­‐87	   -­‐1.1	   -­‐7	   -­‐1.3	   -­‐3.4	   -­‐2.7	  1987-­‐88	   0.1	   -­‐2.3	   -­‐1.1	   -­‐2.0	   -­‐1.6	  1988-­‐89	   1.3	   -­‐3.1	   -­‐0.6	   -­‐1.4	   -­‐1.2	  1989-­‐90	   0.7	   -­‐3.1	   0	   -­‐1.2	   -­‐0.9	  1990-­‐91	   -­‐0.8	   -­‐2.5	   -­‐1.1	   -­‐1.8	   -­‐1.6	  1991-­‐92	   -­‐2.9	   -­‐3.6	   -­‐3.9	   -­‐2.8	   -­‐3.4	  1992-­‐93	   -­‐1.7	   -­‐4.4	   -­‐4.3	   -­‐3.2	   -­‐3.8	  1993-­‐94	   -­‐1	   -­‐1.7	   -­‐3.8	   -­‐2.4	   -­‐3.0	  1994-­‐95	   -­‐0.2	   1.1	   -­‐3.3	   -­‐1.2	   -­‐2.4	  1995-­‐96	   -­‐0.3	   1.3	   -­‐2.7	   -­‐0.6	   -­‐1.7	  1996-­‐97	   -­‐0.7	   2.5	   -­‐2	   -­‐0.1	   -­‐1.0	  1997-­‐98	   -­‐0.1	   2.5	   -­‐1.1	   -­‐0.1	   -­‐0.5	  1998-­‐99	   -­‐0.8	   1	   -­‐0.5	   -­‐0.3	   -­‐0.2	  1999-­‐00	   0	   2.4	   0.2	   -­‐0.4	   0.3	  2000-­‐01	   0.9	   4.5	   0.4	   0.4	   0.8	  2001-­‐02	   -­‐0.8	   0.7	   0.1	   -­‐0.2	   0.1	  2002-­‐03	   -­‐1.9	   1.4	   0	   -­‐0.5	   0.0	  2003-­‐04	   -­‐0.9	   2.4	   -­‐1.1	   -­‐1.0	   -­‐0.4	  2004-­‐05	   1.7	   2.7	   -­‐0.3	   0.3	   0.2	  2005-­‐06	   1.7	   3.9	   0.1	   0.9	   0.7	  2006-­‐07	   2.1	   3.6	   0.4	   0.9	   0.8	  2007-­‐08	   1.4	   1.8	   0.1	   1.2	   0.5	  2008-­‐09	   0	   -­‐0.3	   -­‐1.1	   1.1	   -­‐0.3	  2009-­‐10	   -­‐0.9	   -­‐0.4	   -­‐3.2	   -­‐1.0	   -­‐1.8	  2010-­‐11	   -­‐0.1	   -­‐1.3	   -­‐2.2	   -­‐0.5	   -­‐1.4	  2011-­‐12	   -­‐0.8	   0	   -­‐2	   -­‐0.5	   -­‐1.2	  2012-­‐13	   -­‐0.5	   -­‐1.3	   -­‐1.8	   -­‐1.0	   -­‐1.2	  NDP	  in	  Office	   -­‐0.4	   1.0	   -­‐1.9	   -­‐0.9	   -­‐1.0	  Liberals	  in	  Office	   0.1	   1.1	   -­‐0.9	   0.0	   0.0	  	  Notes:	  Weighting	  is	  by	  2011	  provincial	  population	  Source:	  BC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	  	   19	  Appendix	  Table	  A3	  –	  Ratio	  Provincial	  Program	  Expenses	  to	  GDP	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Budget	  Year	   B.C.	   ALTA	   ONT	  Provincial	  Average	  -­‐Excld	  BC	  Weighted	  Provincial	  Average	  Excld	  BC	  1981-­‐82	   16.3	   16.2	   13.6	   22.4	   17.9	  1982-­‐83	   19.2	   20.6	   14.7	   23.7	   19.2	  1983-­‐84	   19.4	   20	   14.2	   22.9	   18.8	  1984-­‐85	   19.1	   19	   13.6	   22.3	   18.2	  1985-­‐86	   18.3	   20.8	   13.5	   22.6	   18.3	  1986-­‐87	   18.1	   23	   13.7	   22.5	   18.2	  1987-­‐88	   16.8	   21.1	   13.5	   22.2	   17.8	  1988-­‐89	   16.3	   20.5	   13.5	   21.9	   17.4	  1989-­‐90	   16.9	   20.5	   13.4	   21.9	   17.3	  1990-­‐91	   18.3	   20.1	   14.9	   22.6	   18.3	  1991-­‐92	   20.2	   20.6	   16.8	   23.1	   19.6	  1992-­‐93	   19.6	   21.6	   17.1	   23.3	   20.0	  1993-­‐94	   19.1	   18.6	   18.9	   22.3	   20.1	  1994-­‐95	   18.9	   15.3	   18.1	   21.4	   19.1	  1995-­‐96	   18.1	   13.8	   17.7	   20.4	   18.3	  1996-­‐97	   18	   12.9	   16.7	   19.8	   17.4	  1997-­‐98	   16.9	   12.9	   15.8	   19.6	   16.5	  1998-­‐99	   20.1	   13.4	   14.8	   19.7	   16.4	  1999-­‐00	   19.8	   14	   14.5	   19.5	   16.0	  2000-­‐01	   19.4	   12.4	   13.5	   18.3	   15.2	  2001-­‐02	   20.7	   13.3	   13.6	   18.8	   15.5	  2002-­‐03	   20	   13.3	   13.6	   18.5	   15.4	  2003-­‐04	   19.2	   12.6	   14.3	   19.2	   15.9	  2004-­‐05	   18	   12.6	   14.8	   18.9	   16.0	  2005-­‐06	   17.9	   12.2	   15.2	   19.0	   16.2	  2006-­‐07	   17.7	   12.3	   15.3	   19.0	   16.3	  2007-­‐08	   17.6	   12.8	   15.7	   18.9	   16.4	  2008-­‐09	   18	   12.4	   15.8	   19.2	   16.5	  2009-­‐10	   19.3	   14.8	   18	   21.5	   18.4	  2010-­‐11	   18.6	   14	   17.8	   20.9	   18.1	  2011-­‐12	   18.3	   12	   17.2	   20.2	   17.4	  2012-­‐13	   18.3	   12.4	   17	   19.8	   17.2	  NDP	  in	  Office	   19.0	   15.6	   16.4	   20.7	   18.0	  Liberals	  in	  Office	   18.6	   12.9	   15.7	   19.5	   17.0	  	  Notes:	  Weighting	  is	  by	  2011	  provincial	  population	  Source:	  BC	  Economics	  Research:	  Provincial	  Fiscal	  Tables,	  http://www.rbc.com/economics/market/pdf/prov_fiscal.pdf	  	   	  	   20	  Appendix	  Table	  A4	  –	  Real	  Median	  Income	  Year	   Canada	  Excluding	  BC	   Canada	   BC	   AB	   ON	  1986	   52000	   52100	   52500	   53400	   58600	  1987	   52400	   52000	   49200	   52400	   59900	  1988	   53000	   53000	   52900	   54400	   61200	  1989	   54600	   54600	   54500	   55300	   62300	  1990	   52100	   52100	   51800	   53900	   59900	  1991	   49200	   49200	   49400	   51000	   55000	  1992	   49000	   49100	   49900	   48300	   55700	  1993	   47800	   48000	   49500	   51000	   53900	  1994	   48300	   48400	   49000	   51600	   54200	  1995	   48000	   48200	   49500	   50500	   53800	  1996	   47500	   47500	   47600	   50300	   53100	  1997	   47300	   47300	   47300	   52800	   53000	  1998	   48800	   48700	   48300	   52200	   54900	  1999	   50400	   50200	   48600	   54300	   57600	  2000	   51300	   50900	   48000	   55900	   59000	  2001	   52700	   52100	   48500	   58500	   59200	  2002	   52200	   51800	   49100	   58300	   58800	  2003	   52300	   51800	   48300	   57100	   59500	  2004	   52700	   52400	   50600	   59300	   59200	  2005	   53400	   53100	   51400	   61000	   60400	  2006	   54700	   54500	   53400	   65800	   60700	  2007	   55800	   55700	   54900	   68500	   61300	  2008	   56200	   56500	   58300	   71100	   62000	  2009	   55600	   55400	   53800	   69700	   60200	  2010	   55800	   55400	   52800	   69100	   60500	  	  Source:	  Statistics	  Canada,	  Cansim	  Table	  2020404	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52383.1-0052271/manifest

Comment

Related Items