International Conference of Institutes and Libraries for Chinese Overseas Studies (WCILCOS) (5th : 2012)

Chinese picture books at the Northeast Kansas Library System member libraries : a descriptive approach Wong, Anna Ching-Yu May 31, 2012

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Chinese picture books at the Northeast Kansas Library System member libraries: A descriptive approach Anna Ching-Yu Wong Doctoral student Syracuse University Abstract: Children’s picture books provide images and knowledge for small children to learn about other people, places, and cultures. Many public libraries of major cities in the United States have a branch targeting service to Chinese residents such as the Chicago Public Library Chinatown Branch, San Francisco, and Los Angeles public library systems. These libraries have a tremendous collection of Chinese children picture books. As a Chinese American librarian, I am curious to find out, what kinds of Chinese picture books are housed in the Mid-Western public libraries of the United States, where the communities are predominantly Caucasian (European American). This study explores the Chinese picture book collection of the 16 Northeast Kansas Library System libraries. A total of 118 titles of eight hundred and fifty-eight Chinese picture books are recorded. This study suggests that population ethnicity is not a factor for purchasing Chinese children's picture books amongst the local libraries. Despite the demographic statistics, it appears that many Mid-Western residents are interested in exploring Chinese culture and its fascinating folklore stories. The main themes of the Chinese children's books have moved away from the predominant folklores to the contemporary stories. Introduction Children grow up with and love stories. Picture books present stories in a powerful way, with colorful illustrations and big font text. Many children explore the world through picture book stories, which breach boundaries, bridging unique cultures for young readers. Stephens & Lee (2006) addressed that the function of this form of media is to constitute social and cultural identity (p. 1). This type of media exposes young readers to cross-cultural understanding, and has a great impact on children's perceptions and attitudes towards those people who are different from them or people who are from the same cultural background, but from a different generation such as parents or grandparents. As a librarian in the Greater Kansas City area, I am curious to know how many Chinese culture children's picture books are selected and housed at the public libraries in this Mid-Western region where the population is predominantly Caucasian (European American). For this study, I selected the collection of the Northeast Kansas Library System (NELKS) libraries as the case study, which includes the greater Kansas City metropolitan area. NEKLS is one of the seven regional systems of cooperating libraries in Kansas. There are 16 small rural public libraries supported by NEKLS in the Greater Kansas City area. 1According to the Kansas 2010 census the majority population in these 16 cities is predominantly Caucasian (83.8%), while  1 The 16 libraries are Atchison Public Library, Baldwin City Public Library, Basehor Community Library, Bonner Springs City Public Library, Effingham Community Library, Hiawatha, Morrill Public Library, Leavenworth Public Library, Linwood Community Library, Lyndon Carnegie Library, McLouth Public Library, Meriden Community Library, Osawatomie Public Library, Ottawa Public Library, Seneca Free Library, Tonganoxie Public Library, and Valley Falls Delaware Township Library. there are 2.4 % (858) Asian Americans, with 0.35% (115) Chinese.2 The Asian American population is shown in Table 1. Table 1: Asian American Population (2.4%) represented by the 16 cities of the NEKLS  City  Asian American Total Asian Indian Chinese Filipino Japanese Korean Vietnamese Other Asian** Atchison 4 18 9 3 7 6 7 54 Baldwin City 2 5 6 1 0 0 9 23 Basehor 1 3 14 3 1 1 2 25 Bonner Springs 1 2 13 0 1 6 12 35 Effingham 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Hiawatha 0 3 3 2 0 0 1 9 Leavenworth* 55 60 120 35 241 26 85 622 Linwood 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Lyndon 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 McLouth 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 Meriden 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 Osawatomie 3 3 4 1 1 1 1 14 Ottawa 9 15 14 1 4 2 4 49 Seneca 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Tonganoxie 5 6 5 0 1 0 1 18 Valley Falls 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Total 81 115 191 49 256 42 124 858 * The city of Leavenworth is an established military base, which libraries appear to be affected by migrating international (Asian) influence. ** Other Asian alone, or two or more other Asian categories.   2 2010 Census Kansas Profile. Retrieved December 15, 2011 from http://www.census.gov/geo/www/2010census/  81(9.44%) 115 (13.4%) 191 (22.26%) 49 (5.71%) 256 (29.84%) 42 (4.95%) 124 (14.45%) NEKLS Asian American Population Asian Indian Chinese Filipino Japanese Korean Vietnamese Other Asian Literature Review It is notable that Asian American scholars are the major contributors in studying Chinese cultural picture books. Most of their works have been identified within four distinguished areas: cultural- historical approach, cultural values and beliefs, cultural authenticity, and cultural representation. Historical events, especially war times, have played an important role and shaped the content of children’s literature, including picture books. In 1995, Wei completed a comprehensive study of Taiwanese children’s literature from the post-World War II era to contemporary times (1945-1980). This study is considered a capstone of children’s literature in Taiwan. Another contribution to Chinese wartime children’s literature is Chen’s (2009) research. Chen examined the Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) and its related historical events depicted in Chinese youth literature, including stories of orphans, injured children, and inequality of social classes. His study unveiled the inequality between the rich and the poor children while describing the lives of children from the upper class families who affiliated with military and political officials. Compared to the historical approach, cultural authenticity is a more popular topic among Chinese children’s literature. More specifically, cultural beliefs and values are the common themes in children’s picture books, for example, Stephens and Lee (2006) studied Korean American picture books, emphasizing that the core value of these books addresses inherited cultural traditions and social identity (p. 1). Their viewpoint is echoed in Kelley's (2008) study. Kelly highlighted that storybooks commonly present values, beliefs, and attitudes of Japanese culture. She concluded that when introducing culture to children with the picture book, it is very important to illustrate current ideology, social life, and customs (p. 61). In 1995, Harada studied the issues of authenticity and quality in Asian-American picture books that were published between 1983 to1993, arguing that authenticity equals non-stereotyped portrayals. This is contradicted by Mo & Shen's (1997) research, in which they dispute that authenticity does not simply mean non-stereotypes (p. 92). The authenticity topic has attracted other scholars to conduct investigation. In 2011, Cheng performed an inclusive study on the topic. Cheng examined 18 volumes of children books and identified ten themes that covered a wide spectrum of issues pertaining to culture authenticity. The previous studies of Wei (1995), Chen (2009), Mo & Shen (2009) and Chen (2011) suggest that the cultural representation and authenticity are popular topics for Chinese picture books. They also suggest that this form of media have gradually moved away from folklore and historical fiction (Yokota, 2009) to contemporary topics. With this in mind, the goals of this explorative study are to answer the following research questions:  Is the ethnicity of the studied population the main factor for purchasing Chinese picture books in the NELKS?  Have Chinese picture book moved away from folklore stories in the studied population? Data Collection and Findings The collection of Chinese children books at the 16 NELKS libraries Despite the fact that the population of Mid-Western United States is predominantly Caucasian, the NEKLS provides several picture books that depict Chinese culture and customs. A total 118 titles were found at the 16 NELKS branches. The distribution is as follows: Table 2: Distribution of Chinese Culture Related Picture Books in the NEKLS Library Number of Titles City Population3 Chinese Population Atchison Public Library 21 titles (17.8%) 11,021 18 (0.16%) Baldwin City Public Library 18 titles (15.25%) 4,515 5 (0.11%) Basehor Community Library 30 titles (25.42%) 4,613 3 (0.07%) Bonner Springs City Public Library 24 titles (20.34%) 7,314 2 (0.03%) Effingham Community Library 4 titles (3.39%) 546 0 (0%) Hiawatha, Morrill Public Library 16 titles (13.56%) 3,172 3 (0.09%) Leavenworth Public Library 38 titles (32.2%) 35,251 60 (0.17%) Linwood Community Library 15 titles (12.71%) 375 0 (0%) Lyndon Carnegie Library 2 titles (1.69%) 1,052 0 (0%) McLouth Public Library 3 titles (2.54%) 880 0 (0%) Meriden Community Library 4 titles (3.39%) 813 0 (0%) Osawatomie Public Library  4 titles (3.39%) 4,447 3 (0.07%) Ottawa Public Library 31 titles (26.27%) 12,649 15 (0.12%) Seneca Free Library 12 titles (10.17%) 1,991 0 (0%) Tonganoxie Public Library 16 titles (13.56%) 4,996 4 (0.08%) Valley Falls Delaware Township Library 7 titles(5.93%) 1,192 0 (0%) It was not surprising to find that the Leavenworth Public Library houses the most titles of Chinese children's picture books (32.2%), where the established military base is just minutes away from the library. The City of Ottawa has the third largest Chinese population and has the second largest collection (26.27%). The third largest can be located at the Basehor Community Library in which there are 30 titles (25.42%). An interesting finding is that the Chinese population quantity does not appear to be an indicator for library collection development of the selected media; as seen at the City of Atchison branch, which has the third largest Chinese population yet only houses 21 titles. On the contrary, there is no Chinese population recorded in the cities of Linwood, Effingham, Lyndon, McLouth, Meriden, Seneca, and Valley Falls; yet the community libraries house a respectable amount of related titles. Themes of the stories: Nine themes are identified that mirrored the lives of Chinese people and their culture: legends and folktales, heritage and family bond, language and traditional customs, ethnic relations, festivals and celebration, contemporary Chinese Americans stories,  immigration experience, adaptation of Western children stories set in China, and adoption stories. Table 4 represents the number of themes found in the study population from 1980 (oldest book) to 2011.     3Data are from U.S. Census Bureau (2010). 2010 Census Kansas Profile. Retrieved December 21, 2011 from http://www.census.gov/geo/www/guidestloc/odf/20_kansas.pdf and http://www.ipsr.ku.edu/ksdata/city.shtml Table 4: Themes of the Chinese Children's Picture Books at NELKS Libraries Themes 1980-1990 1991-2001 2002-2011 Total Legends and folktales 6  (54.55%) 14 (32.56%) 10 (15.63%) 30 Heritage and Family bond 1  (9.1%) 4 (9.3%) 5 (7.81%) 10 Chinese language and traditional customs (include food culture) 1  (9.1%) 6 (13.95%) 9 (20.93%) 15 Ethnic relations 1  (9.1%) 1 (2.31%) 3 (6.98%) 5 Festivals and celebration 2  (18.18%) 9 (20.93%) 8 (12.5%) 19 Contemporary Chinese Americans stories 0  (0%) 4 (9.3%) 23 (35.94%) 27 Immigration experience 0  (0%) 2 (4.65%) 3 (4.69%) 5 Adaptation of Western stories set in China 1 (9.1%) 1 (2.31%) 0 (0%) 2 Adoption stories 0 (0%) 1 (2.31%) 4 (6.25%) 5 Total 11 43 64 118 As shown in Table 4, legends and folktales are the dominant themes. Yet this genre of stories has been steadily decreasing from 54.55% to 32.56% to 15.63 % over the past three decades. Some folktales have been adapted from Western World stories and are set in China. The data also shows that the contemporary stories have become the major genre representing 35.94% of the total collection in the past decade while traditional customs has risen from 9.1% to 20.93 %. This may infer that there are more interests in Chinese traditional customs and food culture. Stories exploring Chinese festivals are limited to two traditional festivals, the Chinese New Year and Mid-Autumn Moon Festival, the common two events highlighted in the mainstream Western world. Chinese children adoptee stories are popular in the 1990s, which correlates with the increase of American families crossing the ocean to bring home Chinese unwanted baby-girls. Chinese Children Picture Books: 1980 to 1990: Most items published between 1980 to 1990 are in the genre of legends and folklores, mirroring that Chinese culture is full of myths and fantasy. These books contain tales of superhuman power, dragons, the relationships between the Emperor and ordinary people. Plots are generally set in an imaginary world such as Demi's Liang and the Magic Paintbrush, and Bishop & Wiese's The Five Chinese Brothers. In these stories, characters are depicted as supernaturally honest, humble, with high moral values. Some authors have adapted Western stories set in China. The Danish's folktale, The Emperor's New Clothes and Red-riding Hood were turned into the Chinese Emperor's new clothes and Auntie Tiger. This change in theme's is reflected in Yokota's (2009) study in which she found that Asian American children books have moved away from the "long ago and faraway" literature of folklore stories (2009, p. 15) to more contemporary stories. The Chinese New Year is a common theme in the 1990s. Specifically, the Lion dance is depicted as one of the events during the Chinese New Year celebration, which is colorfully painted in Waters & Slovenz-Low's Lion Dancer and Ernie Wan's Chinese New Year. Haskins & Hockerman's Count Your Way through China provides a wide variety of interesting information about China in many subjects, including geography, writing, language, animals, and unique musical instruments. Chinese Children Picture Books: 1991 to 2001: Forty-three Chinese children's picture books published in the 1990s that are available at the NELKS libraries. The Chinese folktales maintain the common theme during this period, yet the Chinese immigrant story has drawn some attention in the 1990s. One of the distinguished stories is told in the book titled Coolies (Yin & Soentpiet). Coolies depicts two brothers who arrive in California in 1865 to build the railroad to the West. They endure exhausting work, discrimination and treacherous avalanches. This story depicts the characters and culture as "outsider" and "alien."  A noticeable "new" theme in the late 1990s is the Chinese girl adoption stories. Traditionally, Chinese people prefer boys to girls simply because boys have the solemn responsibility of bearing the family name. Over the past 30 years, the Chinese government's "one child policy" has forced many families to abandon their newborn girls. In general, the unwanted girls end up in the local orphanage, adopted by Western parents. This real-life story is usually told from the perspective of the adopted families such as, Molner-Fenton's An Mei's Strange and Wondrous Journey.  There are also stories told from the adoptees' perspective, for instance, Coste & Chen's Finding Joy and Cummings & Wang's Three names of me. The contemporary Chinese American is another new theme that appeared in the 1990s. Four contemporary Chinese American picture books are available at the NELKS libraries. These stories illustrate young Chinese children just like any other ethnic group in the US, sharing similar daily lives.. Morgan's The Squiggle pictures a Chinese American girl walking in the park with her teacher and classmates where she finds a "squiggle" on the ground. She demonstrates her treasure's potential and hastily rejoins the group. In Lee & Choi's Nim and the War Effort, an Asian girl named Nim shares the responsibility of her classmates to gather newspapers for her school's paper drive. Overall, these books printed in the 1990s portray Chinese not as a mythical and imaginative culture, but as Chinese Americans that are not outsiders. Chinese Children Picture Books: 2002 t0 2011: This period reveals that folktales have steadily declined. Conversely, contemporary Chinese American stories have continued to raise, especially adoption and gender inequality stories. Chinese gender inequality has a long history. In Bridges & Black's Ruby Wish, it is said that it is bad luck to be born a girl, be born into a house where only boys were cared for," that is exactly what the traditional Chinese family believes. This also reflected in a retold ancient Chinese folktale, Silk Peony, Parade Dragon (Steckman & Inouye) in which the female dragon was the last choice for the well- educated man. Lee & Choi's Landed immigrant story echoes the hardships of the two brothers depicted in Coolies. The story portrayed a young boy entering the United States during the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act period. He arrived and waited for weeks to be called. If he failed the test, he would be sent back to China. Mak's My Chinatown is another contemporary immigrant story, in which he recorded the first year of a young boy who moved to New York City. Written in the boy's voice, it captured the discomfort and fear of the new immigrant. The series concept is a new characteristic of picture books in the 2000s, such as, Tan and Schfields' The Chinese Siamese Cat and Manushkin & Lyon's Katie Woo series. Discussions and Conclusion With respect to the first research question, it is found that there is no correlation between ethnicity (Chinese population) and library collection. The collected data indicates that seven cities in this study reported no Chinese population in the year of 2010, yet the local libraries house at least four titles of Chinese culture related children’s books. This could be related to public library modern policy to have the responsibility of contributing to cultural diversity. With respect to the second research question, this study suggests that the themes of Chinese picture books have changed over three decades, from a folklore and mythical culture to a contemporary setting. Further studies might include the following areas:  A comparative study by region; Midwest verses East and West Coast;  The correlation between demographic profiles and public library children's picture book collection policy.  A comparison of other ethnic groups, such as Latino and African.   References Chen, Minjie (2009). From victory to victimization: The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) as depicted in Chinese youth literature. Bookbird, 2, 27-35. Cheng, Dazhi (2011, May). A study the construction of cultural authenticity in children's picture books portraying Chinese people and Chinese Culture. PhD dissertation, Purdue University. Harada, Violet H. (1995). Issues of ethnicity, authenticity, and quality in Asian-American picture books, 1983-93.Youth Services in Libraries, 8(2), 135-140. KU Institute of Policy and Social Research (2010).Kansas Data. Retrieved December 20, 2011 from http://www.ipsr.ku.edu/ksdata/city.shtml Mo, Weimin & Shen, Wenju (1997).Reexamining the issue of authenticity in picture books.Children's Literature in Education, 28(2), 85-93. Morgan, Hani (2009). Gender, racial, and ethnic misrepresentation in children’s books: A comparative look. Childhood Education, 85(3), 187-190. Stephens, John & Lee, Sung-Ae (2006).Diasporan subjectivity and cultural space in Korean American picture books. Journal of Asian American Studies, 9(1), 1-25. U.S. Census Bureau (2010).2010 Census Kansas Profile. Retrieved December 21, 2011 from http://www.census.gov/geo/www/guidestloc/odf/20_kansas.pdf Wei, Shu-chu (1995). Shaping a cultural tradition: The picture book in Taiwan, 1945-1980.Children's Literature Association Quarterly, 20(3), 116-121. Yokota, Junko (2009). Asian Americans in literature for children and young adults.Teacher Librarian, 36(3), 15-19. Appendix A: Picture Books collection at 16 Northeast Kansas Library System Libraries in Greater Kansas City area (As recorded in December 2011) Publication Year Author Title Libraries own Total copies 1938 [1989] Bishop, Claire Huchet; Wiese, Kurt The five Chinese brothers Atchison Baldwin City Hiawatha, Morrill Leavenworth McLouth Public Valley Falls, Delaware 6 1968 [2009] Mosel, Arlene; Lent, Blair TikkiTikkiTembo Baldwin City Bonner Springs Hiawatha, Morrill Meriden Comm. Ottawa Winchester 6 1980 Demi Liang and the magic paintbrush Hiawatha, Morrill 1 1984 Stock, Catherine Emma's dragon hunt Atchison Ottawa 2 1987 Haskins, James ; Hockerman, Dennis Count your way through China Leavenworth Linwood Comm. Valley Falls, Delaware 3 1987 Leaf, Margaret; Young, Ed. Eyes of the dragon Baldwin City Seneca Free 2 1988 Chang, Heidi Elaine and the Flying Frog Effingham Comm. Ottawa 2 1989 Reeser, Michael; Sakahara, Dick Huan Ching and the golden fish Atchison 1 1989  Young, Ed Lon Po Po: A red-riding hood story from China Baldwin City Basehor Comm. Effingham Comm. Hiawatha, Morrill Leavenworth (2) Linwood Comm. Osawatomie Ottawa Seneca Free Tonganoxie Valley Falls, Delaware 12 1990 Demi The empty pot Seneca Free 1 1990  Tompert, Ann; Parker, Robert Andrew  Grandfather Tang's story: A tale with tangrams Atchison 1 1990 Waters, Kate; Slovenz-Low, Madeline; Cooper, Martha Lion dancer: Ernie Wan's Chinese New Year Ottawa 1 1990s [n.a.] Happy New Year, Minnie! Adventure in China Atchison 1 1991 Bradford, Elizabeth; Bohlke, Dorothee Mr. Chang and the yellow robe Leavenworth Linwood Comm. Ottawa 3 1991 Jin, Sarunna; Beckes, Shirley V. My first American friend Basehor Comm. Leavenworth 2 1991 Yamate, Sandra S.; Jenkin, Joyce M. W. Char siu bao boy Atchison 1 1992 Tan, Amy; Schields, Gretchen The moon lady Atchison Leavenworth (2) McLouth 4 1992 Sing, Rachel;  Liu, Shao Wei Chinese New Year's dragon Leavenworth 1 1993 Armstrong, Jennifer; Grandpre, Mary Chin Yu Min and the ginger cat Baldwin City Leavenworth 2 1993 Hong, Lily Toy Two of everything: A Chinese folktale Bonner Springs Hiawatha, Morrill Ottawa Tonganoxie (2) Valley Falls, Delaware 6 1993 Yep, Laurence; Yang, Ming-Yi The shell woman & the king: A Chinese folktale Effingham Comm. 1 1994 Lee, Huy Voun At the beach Valley Falls, Delaware 1 1994 Tan, Amy; Schields, Gretchen The Chinese Siamese cat Leavenworth McLouth (2) Tonganoxie 4 1994 Young, Ed. Little plum Leavenworth 1 1995 Chinn, Karen; Van Wright, Cornelius; Hu, Ying-Hwa Sam and the lucky money Leavenworth 1 1995 Lee, Huy Voun In the snow Leavenworth 1 1995 Lee, Jeanne M. The song of Mulan Lyndon Carnegie 1 1995 Yee, Wong Herbert  A drop of rain Leavenworth 1 1995 Young, Ed. Cat and Rat: The legend of the Chinese zodiac Baldwin City Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs Leavenworth (2) Osawatomie  6 1996 Schaefer, Carole Lexa; Morgan, Pierr The squiggle Basehor Comm. Hiawatha, Morrill 2 1996 Vaughan, Marcia K.; Wong, Hoo Foon (Stanley) The dancing dragon Meriden Comm. 1 1997 Demi Happy New Year!: Kung-hsi fa-ts'ai Baldwin City Seneca Free 2 1997 Lee, Milly; Choi, Yangsook Nim and the war effort Atchison Bonner Springs Leavenworth 3 1997 Steckman, Elizabeth; Inouye, Carol Silk peony, parade dragon Ottawa 1 1998 Demi The greatest treasure Baldwin City Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs 3 1998 McCully, Emily Arnold Beautiful warrior : the legend of the nun's kung fu Leavenworth Seneca Free 2 1998 Molner-Fenton, Stephen An Mei's strange and wondrous journey Baldwin City 1 1998 Pomeranc, Marion Hess; DiSalvo- Ryan, DyAnne The American Wei Leavenworth  1 1999 Demi Kites: Magic wishes that fly up to the sky Baldwin City 1 1999 Heo, Yumi One Sunday morning Hiawatha, Morrill Ottawa Seneca Free 3 1999 Lin, Grace The ugly vegetables Bonner Springs Ottawa 2 1999 Look, Lenore; Johnson, Stephen Love as strong as ginger Bonner Springs 1 1999 Tseng, Grace; Tseng, Jean; Tseng, Mou-Sien White tiger, blue serpent Atchison  1 1999 Yang, Belle Chili-chili-chin-chin Hiawatha, Morrill 1 2000 Demi The Chinese emperor's new clothes: A tale set in China Baldwin City 1 2000 Lee, Huy Voun 1,2,3,go! Basehor Comm. 1 2000 Thong, Roseanne; Lin, Grace Round is a moon cake: A book of shapes Bonner Springs Seneca Free 2 2000 Wong, Janet S.; Choi, Yangsook This next New Year Atchison Leavenworth 2 2001  Chen, Zhiyuan On my way to buy eggs Atchison Baldwin City Basehor Comm. 3 2001 Compestine, Ying Chang; Chau, Tungwai The runaway rice cake Leavenworth Ottawa 2 2001 Lin, Grace Dim sum for everyone! Basehor Comm. Seneca Free 2 2001 Look, Lenore; Heo, Yumi Henry's first-moon birthday Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs Seneca Free 3 2001 Schaefer, Lola M; Saunders-Smith, Gail; Shen, Xiaohong Chinese New Year Baldwin City Tonganoxie Valley Falls, Delaware 3 2001  Thong, Roseanne; Lin, Grace Red is a dragon: A book of color Leavenworth Seneca Free 2 2001 Yin; Soentpiet, Chris K. Coolies Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs Tonganoxie 3 2001 Young, Ed. Monkey King Basehor Comm. Ottawa 2 2002 Brett, Jan Daisy comes home Atchison Baldwin City Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs Hiawatha, Morrill Leavenworth (3) Linwood Comm. Meriden Comm. Seneca Free Tonganoxie Valley Falls, Delaware 13 2002 Bridges, ShirinYim; Blackall, Sophie Ruby's wish Atchison 1 2002 Daugherty, George; Santanach, Celestino; Tan, Amy Harvest Festival race Atchison 1 2002 Lin, Grace Kite flying Atchison Basehor Comm. Ottawa 3 2002 Mak, Kam My Chinatown: One year in poems Basehor Comm. Leavenworth 2 2002 Wong, Janet S.; Chodos-Irvine, Margaret Apple pie 4th of July Hiawatha, Morrill Leavenworth 2 2003 Chen, Andrea; Rand, Ted Anna the bookbinder Atchison Bonner Springs Hiawatha Morrill 3 2003 Schaefer, Carole Lexa; Morgan, Pierr Someone says Atchison Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs Linwood Comm. Tonganoxie 5 2003  Tucker, Kathy; Lin, Grace The seven Chinese sisters Basehor Comm. Hiawatha, Morrill Leavenworth 4 2004 Hall, Bruce Edward; Low, William Henry and the kite dragon Baldwin City Basehor Comm. 2 2004 Thong, Roseanne; McLennan, Connie The wishing tree Atchison 1 2004 Yip, Mingmei Chinese children's favorite stories Tonganoxie 1 2005 Berkeley, Jon Chopsticks Leavenworth Tonganoxie 2 2005 Cheng, Andrea; Young, Ed. Shanghai messenger Atchison Baldwin City Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs Leavenworth 5 2005 Gower, Catherine; He, Zhihong Long-Long's New Year: A story about the Chinese spring festival Basehor Comm. 1 2005 Lee, Huy Voun In the leaves Hiawatha, Morrill 1 2005 McMahon, Patricia; McCarthy, Conor Clarke; Jerome, Karen A. Just add one Chinese sister Leavenworth  1 2005 Muth, Jon J. Zen Shorts Atchison (2) Baldwin City Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs Effingham Comm. Leavenworth Linwood Comm. Lyndon Carnegie Meriden Comm. Ottawa Tonganoxie 12 2006 Chen, Jiang Hong; Bedrick, Claudia Zoe  The magic horse of Han Gan Basehor Comm. Linwood Comm. 2 2006 Compestine, Ying Chang; Xuan, Yongsheng D is for dragon dance Basehor Comm. Ottawa 2 2006 Coste, Marion; Chen, Yong Finding joy Leavenworth 1 2006 Cummings, Mary; Wang, Lin Three names of me Basehor Comm. Hiawatha, Morrill Leavenworth Ottawa 4 2006 Haugaard, Kay; Barritt, Carolyn Reed The day the dragon danced Atchison 1 2006 Lee, Milly; Choi, Yangsook Landed Baldwin City Basehor Comm. Leavenworth 3 2006 Look, Lenore; Heo, Yumi Uncle Peter's amazing Chinese wedding Basehor Comm. Seneca Free Tonganoxie 3 2006 Yin; Soentpiet, Chris K. Brothers Linwood Comm.  1 2006 Young, Ed. My Mei Mei Basehor Comm. Leavenworth Ottawa Tonganoxie 4 2007 Compestine, Ying Chang; Jorisch, Stephane The real story of stone soup Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs Linwood Comm. Ottawa 4 2007 Schaefer, Carole Lexa ; Morgan, Pierr Dragon dancing Basehor Comm. Leavenworth Tonganoxie 3 2007  Yu, Li-Qiong ; Zhu, Cheng-Liang A new year's reunion Linwood 1 2008 Chang, Grace; Chang, Chong Jin Jin the dragon Leavenworth 1 2008 Demi The magic pillow Bonner Springs 1 2008 Lin, Grace Bringing in the New Year Tonganoxie 1 2008 Man-Kong, Mary; Chung, Chi Lucky New Year! Leavenworth 1 2008 Niemann, Christoph The pet dragon: A story about adventure, friendship, and Chinese characters Basehor Comm. Bonner Springs 2 2009 Chen, Yong A gift Tonganoxie 1 2009 Compestine, Ying Chang ; Yamasaki, James Boy dumplings Ottawa 1 2009 Gunderson, Jessica ; Hu, Caroline The jade dragon: A story of ancient China Ottawa 1 2009 Ryder, Joanne; Feng, Katherine Panda kindergarten Bonner Springs Hiawatha Ottawa 3 2009 Rocco, John Fu finds the way Bonner Springs 1 2009 Williams, Brenda; Lacombe, Benjamin Lin Yi’s lantern Leavenworth 1 2009 Yoo, Paula; Wang. Lin Shining star: The Anna May Wong story Linwood Comm.  1 2010 Lin, Grace Ling & Ting: Not exactly the same! Basehor Comm. (2) Bonner Springs Linwood Comm. Ottawa 5 2010 Lin, Grace Thanking the moon: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival Leavenworth 1 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie The big lie Ottawa 1 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Boss of the world Bonner Springs Ottawa 2 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie A happy day Ottawa 1 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Katie goes camping Ottawa 1 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Moving day Ottawa 1 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie A nervous night Ottawa 1 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie No more teasing Linwood 1 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Make-believe class Ottawa 1 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Katie in the kitchen Bonner Springs Ottawa 2 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie The tricky tooth Linwood Comm. 1 2010 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Red, white, and blue and Katie Woo Osawatomie 1 2011 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Best season ever Bonner Springs Ottawa 2 2011 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Boo, Katie Woo Osawatomie 1 2011 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Katie Woo has a flu Leavenworth 1 2011 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie No valentines for Katie Ottawa 1 2011 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Katie saves Thanksgiving Osawatomie 1 2011 Manushkin, Fran; Lyon, Tammie Star of the show Linwood Comm. 1 2011 Shang, Wendy Wan Long The Great Wall of Lucy Wu Tonganoxie 1 Total 118 titles   Appendix B: Annotations of Picture Books collection at 16 NEKLS Libraries (Adapted from back cover descriptions, Booklist, and School Library Journal) Publication Year Author and Title Summary 1938 [1989] Bishop, Claire Huchet& Wiese, Kurt: The five Chinese brothers Long ago in faraway China, there were five brothers, who in many ways resembled each other; yet each of them has a special superhuman power – survives fire, stretches his legs, swallows seawater, holds his breath forever, and has an iron neck. They use their super- powers to save an innocent man from being executed. 1968 [2009] Mosel, Arlene & Lent, Blair: TikkiTikkiTembo In faraway China, there was a boy, who had a long name "TikkiTikkiTembo-no Sa Rembo-chari Bari Ruchi-pip PeriPembo. One day he fell into a well. No one could call out his name, but eventually got out of the well with the help of an old man with a ladder. This folktale explains why Chinese parents do not give their children names that are more than one syllable. 1980 Demi: Liang and the magic paintbrush Long ago in China, a beggar boy named Liang Ma, wanted to paint but could not afford to buy a paintbrush. One day he received a magical paintbrush from a mysterious visitor. Everything he painted turned became alive. Liang used this newly gifted power to outsmart an evil emperor who wanted to use the magic paintbrush for his own greedy purposes. 1984 Stock, Catherine: Emma's dragon hunt Emma’s Grandfather Wong came from China to live with her family. Upon his arrival, he told Emma dragon stories, which haunted Emma. He then explained to Emma that Chinese dragons are good and he even promised to take her on a dragon hunt! 1987 Haskins, James &Hockerman, Dennis: Count your way through China This book contains a wide variety of interesting information about China in many subjects, including geography, writing, language, animals, and unique musical instruments. 1987 Leaf, Margaret & Young, Ed.: Eyes of the dragon Long ago in China, a magistrate had a wall built around his village to protect it from evil spirits. He hired an artist named Chen Jung to paint a dragon king on the wall. When it was done, the dragon had no eyes and the magistrate refused to pay Chen Jung. When Jung added the eyes on the dragon, the dragon suddenly turned to life and flew up to the sky. 1988 Chang, Heidi: Elaine and the Flying Frog When Elaine’s family moved from San Francisco to Iowa, she felt like an outcast because of her Chinese-American heritage. Yet she quickly developed a friendship with spunky classmate Mary Lewis. They worked on a science project that anything could fly. Elaine’s father was a great kite maker. He helped the girls build a rice-paper frog kite. 1989  Reeser, Michael &Sakahara, Dick: Huan Ching and the golden fish Huan Ching spent many months constructing and painting a five-foot-long kite in a shape of goldfish to enter in the Chinese kite flying competition and holiday, Chung Yang Chieh. His kite resembled a goldfish swimming in the sky and he won the design competition. Yet he lost the kite-flying contest to his father. 1989  Young, Ed.: Lon Po Po: A red-riding hood story from China Three girls left home and went to visit their grandmother. Lon Po Po, the Granny Wolf, pretended to be the girls' grandmother. The girls suspected the greedy wolf's real identity. They tempted the granny wolf with ginkgo nuts and pulled him into a basket at the top of the tree in which they were hiding. They then let go of the rope and killed the Granny Wolf. 1990  Demi: The empty pot The Chinese emperor proclaimed that his successor would be the child who grew the most beautiful flowers from the seeds he distributed. Ping had a green thumb. Anything he planted bursts into bloom but not the emperor's seed, despite months of loving care. Ping went before the emperor with the empty pot. Ping was chosen because the emperor revealed that the seeds he handed out to Ping had been cooked and could not grow. 1990  Tompert, Ann & Parker, Robert Andrew: Grandfather Tang's story: A tale with tangrams A grandfather’s tale about two shape changing fox fairies that become a teaching tool using a Chinese puzzle set called tangrams to spin the fox stories. The fox story progresses creating different shapes and animals with the seven tans (tangrams). 1990 Waters, Kate, Slovenz-Low, Madeline & Cooper, Martha: Lion dancer: Ernie Wan's Chinese New Year Six-year old Ernie Wan lived in New York City Chinatown. This year, he performed in the lion dance in the celebration of the lunar New Year. He danced in the place of honor under the lion's head. This story includes the variety of ways and customs in which Chinese people celebrate this all- important holiday, such as offering food and incense at the altar and wearing new clothes in the New Year. 1990s [Anonymous]: Happy New Year, Minnie! Adventure in China Minnie was on a journey in China where she met Li-Li who was on her way home for the lunar New Year. They talked about the Chinese New Year and Li-Li pointed out the Great Wall as they passed by it. Later, Minnie visited Li-Li and her family. She had the chance to see people doing Tai Chi, and stone lion statues. Minnie also helped Li-li and her baby brother make a lion costume to dance for their parents to chase away the bad spirits before the New Year comes. 1991 Bradford, Elizabeth &Bohlke, Dorothee: Mr. Chang and the yellow robe Mr. Chang lived in the City of Canton. He thought he would be happy if he had a yellow robe like that of the ruling emperor. With the robe, he would distinguish himself as a truly important person. However, after earning the right to wear the special robe, he discovered a different way to be happy. 1991 Jin, Sarunna & Beckes, Shirley V.: My first American friend The move from China to Massachusetts for the third- grader, Sarunna was sad and lonely despite the reunion with her parents. Unable to speak or understand English, she found life was difficult until she befriended her classmate Ali. The girls' special friendship helped Sarunna adjust to her new life. When Ali’s family moved, Sarunna formed new friendships with her classmates, yet she never forgot her first American friend. 1991 Yamate, Sandra S. &Jenkin, Joyce M. W.: Char siu bao boy “Char siu bao” (steamed barbecued pork bun) is a common and popular dim sum among Chinese. Charlie loved char siu bao, and ate it for lunch every day despite his friends' criticisms. This story shows how to learn other cultures through the common bond of food. 1992  Tan, Amy &Schields, Gretchen: The moon lady Three girls named Maggie, Lily and June, were bored on a rainy day because they had to stay inside. Their grandmother (NaiNai) was with them. The grandmother told the girls a story about when she was a young girl in China – she encountered the Moon Lady on the night of the Moon Festival. She learned that the best wishes are those you can make come true yourself. 1992 Sing, Rachel &  Liu, Shao Wei: Chinese New Year's dragon A little girl told the story of the Chinese New Year celebration, including the annual house cleaning, shopping, food preparation, street parades and fireworks. She dreamed that she rode on dragon’s back and watched the New year celebration in ancient time. 1993 Armstrong, Jennifer & Grandpre, Mary: Chin Yu Min and the ginger cat A rich woman named Chin Yu Min was left nothing when her husband died. She descended from the rich to the poor and had no income to live on until she met a ginger colored cat who fished so well with his tail. Chin Yu was able to sell some of the ginger cat’s catches. When the ginger cat disappeared, Chin Yu was so distraught that she humbled herself enough to ask for help. 1993 Hong, Lily Toy: Two of everything: A Chinese folktale In faraway China, a poor farmer, Mr. Haktak dug up a curious brass pot in his garden. He decided to place his coin purse in it and carried it home. Mrs. Haktak's hairpin accidentally slipped into the pot. She reached into the pot and amazingly pulled out two identical coin purses and two matching hairpins. A magic pot! The couple's luck had finally come and kept doubling their coins until Mr. Haktak fell head into the pot. 1993 Yep, Laurence & Yang, Ming-Yi: The shell woman & the king: A Chinese folktale Uncle Wu fell in love with a sea spirit named Shell, who had a super power of shape shifting into human form at will. They were happily married until the emperor heard of Shell's super power. He imprisoned Uncle Wu until Shell performed three tasks. Upon completion of the third task, the king refused to free Uncle Wu and declared that Shell herself would be detained. The emperor spit fire while Shell and Uncle Wu. 1994 Lee, Huy Voun: At the beach A little Chinese boy named Xiao Ming and his mother went to the beach. While playing on the beach, Xiao Ming enjoyed writing Chinese characters in the sand. 1994 Tan, Amy &Schields, Gretchen: The Chinese Siamese cat A feline named Ming Miao told her kittens the true story of their ancestry - they are Chinese cats, not Siamese cats. She proudly informed the kittens that they were descended from Sagwa of China, who lived during the reign of the Foolish Magistrate. 1994 Young, Ed.: Little plum A Chinese folktale about a tiny child who was the size of a plum seed. The tiny child had the wit and power to defeat an evil lord and save the village. 1995 Chinn, Karen, Van Wright, Cornelius & Hu, Ying-Hwa: Sam and the lucky money During Chinese New year, Sam received four red pockets of lucky money (lai see or hongbao). He headed to Chinatown to find something to buy. He met a poor shoeless man along the way. Sam went to the bakery and enjoyed a lion dance. He settled in a toy store but did not have enough lucky money! Everything was expensive. He finally decided to head home and made the poor shoeless man the lucky recipient of the money. 1995 Lee, Huy Voun: In the snow Xiao Ming and his mother walked through the winter forest. The fresh snow was as smooth as paper, inspiring an educational game. While his mother scratched Chinese characters with a stick, Xiao Ming guessed what the characters represent. 1995 Lee, Jeanne M.: The song of Mulan This is a Chinese fairy tale about a young girl named Fad Mulan, who was capable and courageous. Her father had no elder son and became too old to fight in the war. So Mulan disguised herself as a young boy and joined up to fight when her father's name was called. 1995 Yee, Wong Herbert: A drop of rain Parents, grandparents, siblings, and relatives were frustrated by what they perceived as a baby's unhappiness. Drops of rain kept falling and everyone mistook the rain as the little one's tears. Hurrying for a bottle, crackers, or a clean diaper, no one seemed to see the rain as rain. 1995 Young, Ed.: Cat and Rat: The legend of the Chinese zodiac Do you know why a cat is not one of the 12 animals of Chinese zodiac? The Emperor challenged all of the creatures to a race through forest and river, saying he would name each of the 12 years in the cycle after the winners. The Rat and Cat asked the water buffalo to carry them across the river. In sight of the finish line, Rat pushed Cat into the water and jumped off the buffalo's back, coming in first. 1996 Say, Allen: Emma's rug When Emma was born, she was given a plain crème colored rug that her Mother put by her crib. As Emma grew, she got her inspiration and ideas of what to draw from her rug. One day while she was at school, her mother found the rug was dirty and washed it. When Emma came home, she was devastated. She thought her inspiration for drawings was destroyed. After throwing all her artwork, awards, supplies and the rug in the trash, she realized that her creativity was not from the rug.  1996 Schaefer, Carole Lexa&, Morgan, Pierr: The squiggle A group of young children took a walk in the park with their teacher. The last little girl spied a "squiggle" on the ground and picked it up. She twirled, twisted, and turned the long red ribbon, imagining it to be a dragon, a thundercloud, a "full fat moon." She demonstrated her treasure's potential then hastily rejoined the group.  1996 Vaughan, Marcia K. & Wong, Hoo Foon (Stanley): The dancing dragon A Chinese-American child described the excitement, preparation, and festivities of the Chinese New Year, culminating in a parade that includes a magnificent dragon carried aloft on sticks.  1997 Demi: Happy New Year!: Kung-hsi fa-ts'ai This book explains the rituals and ideas behind the Chinese New Year festival using a common Chinese New Year greeting, “Kung-hsi fa-ts’ai” (wishing you a prosperous year).  1997 Lee, Milly& Choi, Yangsook: Nim and the war effort A young Chinese-American girl named Nim lived with her multigenerational family in San Francisco's Chinatown during World War II. Nim was absorbed in the last day of a competition to gather newspapers for her school's paper drive. Taking her red wagon into the ritzy Nob Hill area for a last search for newsprint, Nim discovered a treasure trove of collected papers. She transported them to school and won the contest. 1997 Steckman, Elizabeth & Inouye, Carol: Silk peony, parade dragon Long ago, there was a proprietress of a dragon farm named Mr. Ming somewhere in China. One day a rude and scornful Mandarin arrived, hoping to rent a dragon cheaply to lead the New Year's parade. He spitted decisively on the ground in response to small flaws in the first six dragons Mrs. Ming showed him. However, the seventh, Silk Peony was perfect, but there was a problem – she was a female dragon. Eventually, the Mandarin rented her, but only after haggling with Mrs. Ming over the price. Mr. Ming called upon Silk Peony's magical powers to exact money from the greedy Mandarin.  1998 Demi: The greatest treasure This Chinese folktale contrasted a wealthy man, Pang with his poor neighbor, Li. Pang was so busy counting his money that he had no time to play with his five sons or enjoy life. Li worked his small farm, yet also played the flute so that his five daughters could sing and dance. Pang was disturbed by their music and laughter. So he gave Li a bag of gold coins. As Pang expected, Li became obsessive with counting the coins and dreaming of ways to spend them. For a time, the music and laughter were stilled. Then Li's wife recalled a proverb, "He who has heaven in his heart is never poor," which inspired Li to return the money to Pang. 1998 McCully, Emily Arnold: Beautiful warrior : the legend of the nun's kung fu The story of two legendary female kung fu masters who found strength in themselves. A Buddha nun named Wu Mei whose father refused to make her an idle lady with bound feet, instead was taught the five pillars and learned the martial arts. She became a Buddhist nun. Wu Mei saved a young girl named Mingyi, who was forced to marry a hooligan bandit. Wu Mei taught the girl to save herself with kung fu. Mingyi learned that softness and yielding could prevail over hardness and brute force. 1998 Molner-Fenton, Stephen: An Mei's strange and wondrous journey A six-year-old Chinese-born girl, An Mei was adopted by European-American parents. She recalled her birth mother leaving her on the steps of the Wuhan Orphanage. Lying in her crib there, she met her adoptive father, "a man with a bushy black beard and skin the color of an oyster shell." They flew across the ocean and were greeted at the end of their journey by "a woman with eyes as round and gray as pearls." 1998 Pomeranc, Marion Hess &DiSalvo- Ryan, DyAnne: The American Wei A Chinese-American preschooler, Wei was just as excited about his wobbly tooth as he was about his family's part in the naturalization ceremony. On the way to the ceremony, Wei Fong lost his first tooth on the sidewalk outside the federal courthouse. 1999 Demi: Kites: Magic wishes that fly up to the sky Kites were used to send messages and special wishes in ancient China. A woman hired an artist to paint a special dragon kite for her son, hoping that this creature representing wealth, wisdom, power and nobility would be seen by the gods in heaven, who would assist his son in growing up to be big and strong. 1999 Heo, Yumi: One Sunday morning Minho and his father take the subway to the park on a Sunday morning. They rode the carousel, enjoyed a hot dog and a soda, looked at the animals in the zoo, and watched the joggers, bicyclists, and rollerblades. 1999 Lin, Grace: The ugly vegetables A Chinese-American girl and her mother grew a vegetable garden in a neighborhood where everyone else grew flowers. The girl thought that their plants were ugly compared to neighbors' flowers. However, later she learned that vegetables could make a very delicious soup, one that the whole neighborhood wanted to try. 1999 Look, Lenore & Johnson, Stephen: Love as strong as ginger This is a story about the bond between a Chinese American girl named Katie and her grandma. Katie recalled a day in which she accompanied her grandmother to the crab processing plant where she worked. Katie gained a greater appreciation for her grandmother's hard work, personal sacrifice, and dignity. 1999 Tseng, Grace, Tseng, Jean & Tseng, Mou-Sien: White tiger, blue serpent An original fantasy based on a folktale from China's Yunnan Province, a poor and infertile region of China. A young boy named Kai confronted a ferocious white tiger, a monstrous blue serpent, and the greedy goddess Qin. He won prosperity for his people. 1999 Yang, Belle: Chili-chili-chin-chin Chili-Chili-Chin-Chin was a very independent purple donkey. A free spirit, the animal kicked and ran away whenever people tried to catch him. He only associated with the little boy who gave the creature its name. Together, they enjoyed finding flowers in the spring, watching turtles swim in summer, picking persimmons in autumn, and making fresh tracks in the snow. 2000 Demi: The Chinese emperor's new clothes: A tale set in China Based upon several different translations of the original Danish story, Demi's tale is set in ancient China. A weaver and tailor arrived at the palace one day, promising to make the most beautiful, soft clothes the Emperor had ever seen. Furthermore, these clothes were magical – only clever people could see them. 2000 Lee, Huy Voun: 1,2,3, go! This is a book to introduce how to write numbers and action vocabulary in Chinese. 2000 Thong, Roseanne & Lin, Grace: Round is a moon cake: A book of shapes This book prompts children to look at circles, squares, and rectangles through the eyes of a Chinese girl. Chinese celebrate the Mid-Autumn Harvest festival with moon cakes, which are round in shape. 2000 Wong, Janet S. & Choi, Yangsook: This next New Year A Chinese-Korean young boy looked forward to the Chinese New Year celebration. He flossed his teeth and helped his mom scrub the house. His mother cooked a special Korean soup, and his family observed the traditions of house cleaning, lighting firecrackers, and being extra good to ensure a lucky new year. 2001  Chen, Zhiyuan: On my way to buy eggs A young girl's morning errand to the store turned into a sensory adventure. Shau-yu walked through the neighbor-hood streets to the local store to buy eggs for her father. She followed a cat's shadow, viewed her neighborhood through a blue marble, and discovered a pair of glasses that turned her world blurry. After a make-believe game with the shopkeeper, Shau-yu returned home to her loving dad. 2001 Compestine, Ying Chang &Chau, Tungwai: The runaway rice cake It was the Chinese New Year. The Chang Family had only enough rice flour to make one nián-gão, a special New Year's rice cake, for the entire family to eat. But this delicious little nián-gão had other ideas, "Ai yo! I don't think so!" it cried, coming to life and running away. 2001 Lin, Grace: Dim sum for everyone! “Dim sum” is a tasty southern Chinese snack food. A family with three daughters arrived at a restaurant for a meal of "dim sum." Carts were wheeled to each table. Guests selected what they would like to eat. Each of the three girls chose a favorite dish and then they shared with everyone at the table. This book explains the cultural history of dim sum and the customs surrounding the meal. 2001 Look, Lenore &Heo, Yumi: Henry's first-moon birthday There was a big celebration planned for Jenny's baby brother Henry's one-month birthday – his first-moon, as it was called in Chinese. The traditional food for celebrating the first-moon birthday includes dyeing eggs in lucky red, pigs' feet and ginger soup. 2001 Schaefer, Lola M., Saunders-Smith, Gail &Shen, Xiaohong: Chinese New Year This is a great picture book about the Chinese New Year that contains basic information about the Lunar New year celebration with repetition of words and phrases, simple glossaries of subject-specific vocabulary, and colorful photographs. 2001  Thong, Roseanne & Lin, Grace: Red is a dragon: A book of color A beautiful Chinese dragon in several shades of red writhes across a double-page spread, accompanied by children carrying drums, cymbals, and strings of firecrackers - a fitting start for a concept book about colors and Chinese culture. 2001 Yin &Soentpiet, Chris K.: Coolies Shek and his brother, Little Wong arrived in California along with hundreds of other Chinese workers in 1865. They were going to build a great railroad across the West. They hoped to save money to bring their little brother and mother to the America. Despite enduring many hardships-exhausting work, and treacherous avalanches, they did not have money to do so. 2001 Young, Ed.: Monkey King This is a fantastic version of the Chinese legendary Monkey King, a beloved trickster from folklore story. It is a magical children’s rendition of the great Chinese book titled, Journey to the West. 2002 Brett, Jan: Daisy comes home Mei Mei had the six happiest hens in China except one chicken named Daisy. She was unhappy because the other hens always picked her on. Daisy fed up with the other pushy hens. She crawled into one of the baskets by the river, and fell asleep. She quickly learned how to survive. When Daisy found her way home, this plucky little hen was no longer afraid. 2002 Bridges, ShirinYim & Blackall, Sophie: Ruby's wish Ruby, a little girl living in turn-of-the-century China, was so named because she loved red. She also loved to study with her cousins in the school provided by her wealthy grandfather. It was bad luck to be born a girl, worse luck to be born into the house where only boys were cared. Her grandfather questioned her and found out that she would rather attend a university than enter marriage, which was expected of all girls. 2002 Daugherty, George, Santanach, Celestino& Tan, Amy: Harvest Festival race It was the day before the Harvest Festival. The magistrate went into town and announced the festival event. The scene cuts to Sagwa, Dongwa and the alley cats racing. Sagwa beats Dongwa and the alley cats. Sagwa states that the trick to winning the race was to have good balance. 2002 Lin, Grace: Kite flying A Chinese girl describes how the members of her family came together to make and fly a dragon kite - the wind was blowing and it was a good day for flying kites! The whole family made a trip to the local craft store for paper, glue, and paint. Everyone had a job: Ma-Ma joins sticks together. Ba-Ba glues paper. Mei-Mei cuts whiskers while Jie-Jie paints a laughing mouth. 2002 Mak, Kam: My Chinatown: One year in poems This book recorded the first year of a young boy who came from Hong Kong to New York City. Written in the boy's voice, the words capture the fear and discomfort of adjusting to newness. As the year progresses, the boy felt the irresistible vitality of his new community, helped along by signs of the familiar. At the end of the year, he exuberantly celebrated the dragon parade and his new home. 2002 Wong, Janet S. &Chodos-Irvine, Margaret: Apple pie 4th of July A Chinese-American girl was shocked that her parents were cooking Chinese food to sell in the family store on the all-American holiday (Independence Day). She tried to tell her parents how things really were. Nevertheless, as the parade passed by and fireworks lighted the sky, she learned a lesson of her own: Americans do eat Chinese food on the Fourth of July. 2003 Chen, Andrea & Rand, Ted: Anna the bookbinder Anna loved to help her father in his bookbindery. She shared his concern that customers were using cheaper, large-volume operations that glued bindings rather than carefully stitching them by hand. When a special rush job needed stitching just as Anna's mother went into labor, Anna decided to do the work herself. Her father was surprised and delighted to find the job done and done well when he came to tell her of her new brother's birth. 2003 Schaefer, Carole Lexa& Morgan, Pierr: Someone says A class of preschoolers created an imagined world from a ribbon's swirl. In this joyful follow-up, the class found more magic in simple, everyday activities, from entering school to eating lunch noodles. 2003  Tucker, Kathy &  Lin, Grace: The seven Chinese sisters Once upon a time in faraway China, there were seven Chinese sisters who lived together. They took care of each other. Each one had a special talent. When baby Seventh Sister was snatched by a hungry dragon, her loving sisters raced to save her. 2004 Hall, Bruce Edward & Low, William: Henry and the kite dragon Eight-year-old Henry lived in New York City's Chinatown, next to the Little Italy neighborhood. He and his friends loved to visit the kite maker, Grandfather Chin, helping him paste and paint the kites, which Grandfather flied from his roof in dramatic swoops, sometimes chasing pigeons. Then some boys from Little Italy began to throw rocks that destroy the kites. Henry confronted the boys, and learned that they kept pet pigeons, the very birds that Grandfather Chin had chased with his kites. 2004 Thong, Roseanne & McLennan, Connie: The wishing tree Ming and his grandmother visited a wishing tree every Lunar New Year. They wrote wishes on pieces of paper and threw them into the branches of a giant banyan tree. Ming and Grandmother continued their annual visits to the tree until Grandmother grew ill. Bitter when Ming's wish for Grandmother's recovery was not granted, he avoided the tree. Years later, Ming returned to the village and acknowledged the happiness the tree brought. 2004 Yip, Mingmei: Chinese children's favorite stories This is a delightful collection of 13 Chinese traditional folklore and legend stories. These stories feature talking animals, a ghost catcher, a trickster fox, the River Dragon King, the mischievous monkey Wu Kong, and as well as cowherds, scholars, musicians, and emperors. 2005 Berkeley, Jon: Chopsticks There was a floating restaurant in Hong Kong that a mouse named Chopsticks called home. One New Year's night, after the restaurant closed, a wooden dragon that was coiled around one of the large pillars in the entrance told him of his wish to fly. Only Old Fu, the carver, knew how to bring the dragon to life. Chopsticks went to the elderly man to learn his secret and released the dragon. It flew into the night sky, and continued to do so every time the moon is full. 2005 Cheng, Andrea & Young, Ed.: Shanghai messenger 11-year-old Xiao Mei, the child of an American father and a Chinese mother, was persuaded by Grandma NaiNai in America to take up the invitation from Uncle Hai Tao to spend the summer in Shanghai. Once in Shanghai, Xiao Mei was warmly welcomed, and began to learn about and appreciated her heritage. 2005 Gower, Catherine & He, Zhihong: Long-Long's New Year: A story about the Chinese spring festival A little Chinese boy named Long-Long accompanied his grandfather into the city to sell cabbages in order to buy food and decorations for the New Year. Selling cabbages was harder than Long-Long expects. He encountered many adventures before he found a way to help his grandfather. He eventually earned New Year's treats for his mother and little cousin. 2005 Lee, Huy Voun: In the leaves Xiao Ming was excited about a fall outing to a farm with his friends. He was thrilled and enthusiastic to show everyone the Chinese characters he knew. He explained how the characters for grain and fire echo their shapes, and he talked about the meaning behind the character. 2005 McMahon, Patricia, McCarthy, Conor Clarke & Jerome, Karen A.: Just add one Chinese sister It is a story about a Chinese girl, Claire (Guan Yu)'s journey to America. It began with toddler Claire and her adoptive mommy making a scrapbook about Claire, with photos, papers, and bits and pieces that showed how the family went to China and how they brought her home with them. 2005 Muth, Jon J.: Zen Shorts This book introduces readers to a Zen approach to the world, wrapping in a story about three siblings and their new neighbor, a panda named Stillwater. One by one, the children visit Stillwater, enjoying his company and listening to the tales told by him that illustrate Zen principles. 2006 Chen, Jiang Hong &Bedrick, Claudia Zoe: The magic horse of Han Gan This book recounts a legend involving a Chinese painter whose name was Han Gan. Han lived in China about 1200 years ago. He came from a very poor family, yet his talent was recognized early. He was accepted to the academy for official painters. Han loved to paint horses, and always drew them tethered. The horses were so alive that they might leap right off the paper.  2006 Compestine, Ying Chang &Xuan, Yongsheng: D is for dragon dance In this alphabetical celebration of the Chinese New Year, a boy and a girl prepare for the festivities with their family. Dragon dance is a signature event during the Chinese New Year celebration. 2006 Coste, Marion & Chen, Yong: Finding joy A Chinese baby girl was given away because her birth parents had no room for girls. Her parents wrapped her in a blanket and took her to town. They lay her on the ground beneath a bridge. Then she was placed in an orphanage. Meanwhile, on the other side of the world, a husband and wife in North America hoped to adopt a baby from China.  2006 Cummings, Mary & Wang, Lin: Three names of me A sensitive story of international adoption told through the eyes of a Chinese-American girl. Ada Lorane Bennett explained how and why she had several names – the first was from her birth mother and was buried in her heart, another she received at the orphanage, and the third came from her adoptive parents.  2006 Haugaard, Kay &Barritt, Carolyn Reed: The day the dragon danced An African-American girl named Sugar took her grandmother to the Chinese New Year's Day parade. The Grandma was skeptical about a February New Year's celebration. Sugar had learned all about the ceremony. She wanted her grandmother to go for the event because she wanted her to watch her father dancing in the parade.  2006 Lee, Milly& Choi, Yangsook: Landed Entering America from China might be difficult for 12- year-old Sun because of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act. Sun had been studying very hard for months because he wanted to be able to answer all of the questions the American officials would ask upon his arrival. Angel Island was a place where Asian immigrants were held for sometimes up to a year. Sun arrived and he waited four weeks to be called. If he failed the test, he would be sent back to China. Fortunately, with the help of a compass, Sun passed the test and “landed.”  2006 Look, Lenore &Heo, Yumi: Uncle Peter's amazing Chinese wedding Jenny loved being his uncle's special girl. She was having difficulty with the idea of sharing him with a new aunt. Jenny was crying on the inside and wondering how she was supposed to still be Uncle Peter's number-one girl with her new aunt Stella around. This book perfectly captures the child's envy and jealousy as the bride became the center of attention. This book also contains many of the traditions associated with the wedding ceremony, including bargaining for the bride, wearing red for good luck, and bed-jumping. 2006 Yin &Soentpiet, Chris K.: Brothers In the late 1800s, a young boy named Ming, has arrived in San Francisco from China to live with his brother, Shek. Shek ran a grocery store in Chinatown where Ming worked while his brother earns extra money farming. Shek warned Ming not go outside Chinatown; yet Ming defied his brother and went exploring past Stockton Street, he became friends with Patrick, a young boy from Ireland. The two form a close friendship and brought their two different communities together. 2006 Young, Ed.: My Mei Mei It is a story from the perspective of an adoptive daughter about traveling to China to adopt a child. Antonia wanted a little sister ("meimei"), to call her own. She and her mother and father flew all the way to China to get her little sister. Antonia finally met her and found that she is not at all, like Antonia imagined her: She can’t walk; She can’t talk. She just cried and stole attention. 2007 Compestine, Ying Chang &Jorisch, Stephane: The real story of stone soup A stingy fisherman always made his three young helpers do all his work. One day he scolded the “lazy boys” for forgetting to provide lunch. “Don’t worry,” they said. “We can make stone soup.” The boys dug a hole and filled it with water and “flavored” stones. They tricked the fisherman into making bowls and chopsticks, and fetching salt and sesame oil. While he was busy, they stirred in bird eggs, added wild vegetables, and slipped fish into the soup. By the time the fisherman returned, they had a feast fit for a king. 2007 Schaefer, Carole Lexa& Morgan, Pierr: Dragon dancing After reading a book about dragons with their teacher, these inventive preschoolers decided to make their own dragon out of colored paper, yarn, feathers, and . . . themselves! Soon they were out the door, onto the playground, and into the world of imagination. Becoming a magnificent dragon, the children danced over snowy mountains, through tall forests, and into whispery meadows, before returning to school for a wonderful birthday treat. 2007  Yu, Li-Qiong& Zhu, Cheng-Liang: A new year's reunion Little Maomao's father worked far away from home. So his return for New Year was cause for annual celebration. Maomao and her mother welcomed him and together they enjoyed the firecrackers and made sticky rice balls. Maomao received the lucky fortune coin. After watching the dragon dance and playing snowballs, Maomao discovered that her lucky coin was missing. At first being inconsolable to the loss, Maomao was restored to happiness before her father had to leave for work again. 2008 Chang, Grace & Chang, Chong: Jin Jin the dragon Jin Jin was a scaly golden creature who wondered what type of animal he was. He befriended a fish, an eagle, a lion, and many more animals, each of which had something in common with him. Yet he was not quite like any of them. On his journey to meet the wise old turtle and crane, he discovered a terrible drought was afflicting the land, and saved the people with his wondrous ability to breathe water. 2008 Demi: The magic pillow A boy named Ping lived in poverty and learned the true meaning of happiness. Ping's family resided on a tiny plot of land and depended on Ping to collect firewood in the mountains. One day a heavy snowfall prevented Ping from returning home. He stayed at an inn. A great magician talked with Ping and learned that Ping believed his family's economic hardship would prevent him from becoming a great person with money, power, and fame. The wise man offered Ping a magic pillow that gave him new insight into the downside of wealth and power, as well as and the source of real happiness. 2008 Lin, Grace: Bringing in the New Year A Chinese American family prepared for the Lunar New Year. Each member of the family helped as they swept out the dust of the old year, put up decorations, and made dumplings. It was also the time to put on new clothes and celebrate with family and friends. There would be fireworks and lion dancers, shining lanterns, and a great, long dragon parade to celebrate New Year. 2008 Man-Kong, Mary & Chung, Chi: Lucky New Year! Lenny and Lili got ready to celebrate the Chinese New Year with their family, clearing out last year’s dirt and welcoming the sweetness of the new. They had long noodles for long life, received little red envelopes full of lucky money, enjoyed firecrackers as well as a dancing lion, too! 2008 Niemann, Christoph: The pet dragon: A story about adventure, friendship, and Chinese characters Lin, a young Chinese girl, received a baby dragon for a gift. The two of them played together until they accidentally broke a vase. Lin's father was so angry that he insisted the little creature be caged. The dragon escaped, and Lin went to look for it. With the help of an old woman, and a witch, she found the dragon living with the other dragons in a cloud. 2009 Chen, Yong: A gift Amy received a gift all the way from China from her mother's sister - a beautiful necklace made from a green stone carved into the shape of a dragon. Amy's aunt and uncles sent the special gift to express their love and their wish to keep the family together even though they lived far apart. 2009 Compestine, Ying Chang & Yamasaki, James: Boy dumplings A hungry ghost in China with pointed ears and sharp teeth searches the dark streets of Beijing in search of food offerings from frightened townspeople. One night, he spied a plump little boy, grabbed him, and carried him home. The boy escaped by suggesting that the ghost gather the ingredients to make dumplings out of him.  2009 Gunderson, Jessica & Hu, Caroline: The jade dragon: A story of ancient China Cheng and Zhou are identical twins. Yet they are also very different. Zhou never seemed to beat his brother Cheng at anything until their 10th birthday. Zhou found a jade dragon and his luck changes. Soon, Zhou was beating Cheng at everything. 2009 Ryder, Joanne &Feng, Katherine: Panda kindergarten School is in session! But this is no ordinary kindergarten class. Sixteen young giant panda cubs at the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda at the Wolong Nature Preserve are ready for class. Under the watchful eyes of the scientists and workers, the cubs learn skills that will help prepare them to be released into the wild. 2009 Rocco, John: Fu finds the way When young Fu inadvertently hit a warrior with a clump of mud, the warrior challenged him to a duel. Terrified, Fu grabbed his father’s sword and got the advice of “the Master,” who had trained “all the great warriors.” Instead of sword fighting and martial arts, the Master instructed Fu in pouring tea, stressing the importance of purpose, patience, and flow. 2009 Williams, Brenda& Lacombe, Benjamin: Lin Yi’s lantern Lin Yi was sent to the market for moon cakes, star fruit, rice, and yams during the night of Moon Festival. He longed for a red rabbit lantern but may only buy one if he had money left over. Although he bargained well for each item, a disappointed Lin Yi returned home only with the things on his list. But his uncle surprised him with the very lantern he desired. 2009 Yoo, Paula & Wang. Lin: Shining star: The Anna May Wong story This is a biography about a Chinese American actress in the early 1920s. The stereotypical characters Chinese actors were forced to portray distressed Anna May Wong. She decided to eliminate the old Asian stereotypes that had become film standards. 2010 Lin, Grace: Ling & Ting: Not exactly the same! Ling and Ting are Chinese-American twins who like to stick together. They look alike and sound alike, but are not as alike as everyone thinks. Six very short stories told tales about how Ling and Ting are not exactly the same. 2010 Lin, Grace: Thanking the moon: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival Under a full harvest moon, a Chinese American family unpacked their car, set out a drop cloth and lanterns, and enjoyed fruit, moon cakes, and tea at a “nighttime picnic.” They honored the mid-autumn moon with moments of quiet thanks and private wishes as they celebrated the traditional holiday with other families. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: The big lie Katie Woo was a 6-year-old Chinese American 1st grader.  She liked Jake's new jet airplane that he got for his birthday. Katie took his plane and lied about not knowing where it was. Katie realized how sad Jake was and returned his plane. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Boss of the world Katie and her two best friends, JoJo and Pedro spent a day at the beach. What started out as a fun day turned out to be not so fun when Katie behaved so bossy. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: A happy day This is a book about things that made Katie happy such as olives, buttons, new crayons and playing soccer. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Katie goes camping Katie loved camping with Pedro and JoJo. Cooking with a campfire and sleeping under the stars was fun! But when it became dark and the shadows came out, camping could be a scary adventure. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Moving day Katie and her family were moving to a new home. Katie was not excited about moving because she liked her bedroom. She left a note for the next person to have her old room. Katie found that her new house was very nice. It had a sunken living room and a whirlpool bath! 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: A nervous night Katie spent a night at her grandparents' house. She did not like the bedroom or bed, but then found out that it was her mother's bed! After some cookies and lullabies and a phone call to mom, Katie made it through the night and dreamed of shooting stars. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: No more teasing Katie had a messy day. First, she fell into mud, then left pizza sauce on her face, which caused her classmate Roddy to pick on her. Finally, Katie figured out to ignore Roddy who was not getting a rise out of her so he stopped. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Make-believe class Katie's teacher, Miss Winkle, was the best teacher around. One day, it was cold and gloomy. Miss Winkle showed Katie and her classmates how to warm up the day by using their imaginations. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Katie in the kitchen While her parents brought soup to a neighbor and fixed the car, Katie decided to make herself useful in the kitchen, where she tried to cook dinner and, predictably, created a mess of epic proportions. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: The tricky tooth Everyone in Katie's class had lost a tooth, except her! She tried everything she could think of to make her wiggly tooth fall out, but nothing worked. 2010 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Red, white, and blue and Katie Woo After a fun fourth of July parade, Pedro and JoJo joined Katie for a party. It turned into a red, white, and blue day as Katie and her friends celebrated. 2011 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Best season ever While Katie thought spring time was best, her friends had different ideas on what was the best season. Pedro liked Winter and JoJo liked Summer. There was a lot of discussion on why each had chosen their season. 2011 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Boo, Katie Woo It was Halloween. Katie Woo was dressing up like a monster. She planned to scare everyone in the neighborhood. However, she was disappointed when everyone knew it was she. 2011 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Katie Woo has a flu It all started with a sneeze! Katie caught the flu. She felt yucky and had to miss a few days of school. 2011 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: No valentines for Katie Katie's class had a special celebration for Valentine's Day. Katie had lots of fun reading the little candy hearts that her teacher handed out. When everyone got a special valentine except her, she felt terrible. 2011 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Katie saves Thanksgiving Pedro and JoJo's families were on their way to Katie's house for Thanksgiving dinner. They were stuck in a snowstorm, and the Woos' oven suddenly broke. Katie wondered what kind of Thanksgiving it would be without sweet potatoes, pie, and most of all, friends. 2011 Manushkin, Fran & Lyon, Tammie: Star of the show Katie could not believe that she was chosen and would cast as a worm in the school play. How could a worm ever be a star? However, even a terrible part could not stop Katie from shining! 2011 Shang, Wendy Wan Long: The Great Wall of Lucy Wu Lucy planned to have the best sixth-grade year ever. She thought it was not going to happen when Yi Po, her beloved late grandmother's long-lost sister from China came to visit for half the school year and shared Lucy's room. Lucy built a wall of furniture that separated her side of the room from Yi Po's and vowed she would not like her great aunt.   Chinese Children picture books in Kansas 堪薩斯州中國兒童圖畫故事書 Anna CY Wong May 2012 @ the 5th WCILCOS Conference, Vancouver Canada Introduction  Previous researchers (Wei, 1995; Chen, 2009; Mo & Shen, 2009; and Chen, 2011) suggested that:  Cultural representation and authenticity are popular titles of Chinese children picture books  Chinese picture books have gradually moved away from folklore and historical fiction (Yokota, 2009)  The goals of this study, therefore, are: • To examine whether the picture books housed in the Northeast Kansas Library System (NEKLS) reflect the suggestions of previous studies • To investigate whether there is a relationship between the Chinese population and the Chinese picture book collections         NEKLS Libraries and user’s profiles   Northeast Kansas Library System (NEKLS)   NEKLS is one of the seven regional systems of cooperating libraries in Kansas  There are 16 small rural public libraries supported by NEKLS  The majority population in these 16 small cities is predominantly Caucasian, 83.8% with 2.4% Asian Americans (n=858).             Design and Methodology  The data were collected from the NELKS online library catalog  Cross reference searching was conducted when duplications were found  A title with a different publication date was counted as one title  Compare the ratios of Chinese population and the Chinese picture books housed in the local public library                   Research questions This study is designed to answer the following research questions:  What are the themes of the Chinese picture books?  Is there a relationship between the population and library development policy amongst the 16 NEKLS libraries?  Have the represented Chinese children literature books moved away from folklore stories?                    The descriptive data A total 118 titles were found at the 16 NEKLS libraries. The distribution is as follows:            Library Number of Titles Atchison Public Library 21 titles (17.8%) Baldwin City Public Library 18 titles (15.25%) Basehor Community Library 30 titles (25.42%) Bonner Springs City Public Library 24 titles (20.34%) Effingham Community Library 4 titles (3.39%) Hiawatha, Morrill Public Library 16 titles (13.56%) Leavenworth Public Library 38 titles (32.2%) Linwood Community Library 15 titles (12.71%) Lyndon Carnegie Library 2 titles (1.69%) McLouth Public Library 3 titles (2.54%) Meriden Community Library 4 titles (3.39%) Osawatomie Public Library  4 titles (3.39%) Ottawa Public Library 31 titles (26.27%) Seneca Free Library 12 titles (10.17%) Tonganoxie Public Library 16 titles (13.56%) Valley Falls Delaware Township Library 7 titles(5.93%)           21 18 30 24 4 16 38 15 2 3 4 4 31 12 16 7 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Titles  City Asian American Total Asian Indian Chinese Filipino Japanese Korean Vietnamese Other Asian** Atchison 4 18 9 3 7 6 7 54 Baldwin City 2 5 6 1 0 0 9 23 Basehor 1 3 14 3 1 1 2 25 Bonner Springs 1 2 13 0 1 6 12 35 Effingham 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Hiawatha 0 3 3 2 0 0 1 9 Leavenworth* 55 60 120 35 241 26 85 622 Linwood 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Lyndon 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 McLouth 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 Meriden 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 Osawatomie 3 3 4 1 1 1 1 14 Ottawa 9 15 14 1 4 2 4 49 Seneca 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Tonganoxie 5 6 5 0 1 0 1 18 Valley Falls 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Total 81 115 191 49 256 42 124 858 * The city of Leavenworth is an established military base, which libraries appear to be affected by migrating international (Asian) influence. ** Other Asian alone, or two or more other Asian categories.         81(9.44%) 115 (13.4%) 191 (22.26%) 49 (5.71%) 256 (29.84%) 42 (4.95%) 124 (14.45%) NEKLS Asian American Population Asian Indian Chinese Filipino Japanese Korean Vietnamese Other Asian         Discussion and conclusion Research question #1: What are the themes of these Chinese picture books? A total of nine themes are identified that mirrored the lives of Chinese people and their culture:  Legends and folktales  Heritage and family bond  Chinese language and traditional customs, including food culture  Ethnic relations  Festivals and celebration  Contemporary Chinese Americans stories  Immigration experience  Adaptation of western stories set in China  Adoption stories            The number of stories in the nine themes are distributed as follows:            Themes 1980-1990 1991-2001 2002-2011 Total Legends and folktales 6  (54.55% ) 14 (32.56%) 10 (15.63%) 30 Heritage and Family bond 1  (9.1%) 4 (9.3%) 5 (7.81%) 10 Chinese language and traditional customs (include food culture) 1  (9.1%) 6 (13.95%) 9 (20.93%) 15 Ethnic relations 1  (9.1%) 1 (2.31%) 3 (6.98%) 5 Festivals and celebration 2  (18.18% ) 9 (20.93%) 8 (12.5%) 19 Contemporary Chinese Americans stories 0  (0%) 4 (9.3%) 23 (35.945) 27 Immigration experience 0  (0%) 2 (4.65%) 3 (4.69%) 5 Adaptation of Western stories set in China 1 (9.1%) 1 (2.31%) 0 (0%) 2 Adoption stories 0 (0%) 1 (2.31%) 4 (6.25%) 5 Total 11 43 64 118 The previous table shows that:  Legend and folktale stories are the main themes of from the 1980-s thru 1990s and has declined in the last decade  Chinese heritage and family bond became the popular theme. The libraries housed only one title in this category before the 1990s and increased to 9 titles in the last ten years  The biggest increased category is the contemporary Americans stories, which yield 23 titles compared to no titles before the 1990s  Adoption is another theme not found in the collections before the 1990s          Research question#2: Is there a relationship between the population and library development policy amongst the 16 NEKLS libraries?  Cities Chinese population Number of Chinese Children picture book titles housed at the public libraries Atchison 18 21 titles (17.8%) Baldwin City 5 18 titles (15.25%) Basehor 3 30 titles (25.42%) Bonner Springs 2 24 titles (20.34%) Effingham 0 4 titles (3.39%) Hiawatha 3 16 titles (13.56%) Leavenworth 60 38 titles (32.2%) Linwood 0 15 titles (12.71%) Lyndon 0 2 titles (1.69%) McLouth 0 3 titles (2.54%) Meriden 0 4 titles (3.39%) Osawatomie 3 4 titles (3.39%) Ottawa 15 31 titles (26.27%) Seneca 0 12 titles (10.17%) Tonganoxie 6 16 titles (13.56%) Valley Falls 0 7 titles (5.93%) Total 115 118 The data suggest that there is no relationship between the Chinese population and the library collection development policy:  The US census (2010) shows that there is no Chinese residents in the City of Valley Falls, yet the public library records show 7 titles related to Chinese culture  Despite only 3 Chinese residents living in City of Basehor, the public library houses 30 titles of Chinese children picture books (ratio is 3:30)  City of Leavenworth has 60 Chinese residents, yet the local library only houses eight more titles (60:38) than the City of Basehor          Research question#3: Have Chinese children literature books moved away from folklore stories?  The collected data shows that the Chinese legends and folktales were the major themes in 1980s and 1990s which yielded 54.55% of the Chinese book collections. In the last decade, this category has decreased to 15.63%. However, the data were from one particular library system in Kansas. Thus, a further investigation would be needed to confirm that there is a trend for Chinese children books moving away from folklores genre considered as a general library trend.          Of the 118 Chinese children picture books retrieved from the 16 NEKLS libraries, some other interesting findings occurred:  Some authors recognized that the Chinese culture consists of diverse ethnic groups which have their own spoken language; the most obvious being Mandarin and Cantonese. This was reflected in Dim Sum for everyone!, Char siu bao boy,  and Kung-hsi fa-ts’ai.  The portrayal of Chinese character in these stories is generally docile and easily adapted to new environments, where they are able to establish friendships with other ethnic groups, for instance, My first American friend.       Folktales contain Chinese cultural believes and values: • Gender inequality: e.g. Beautiful warrior, Silk peony. • Filial piety: e.g. The song of Mulan. • Zen principles: e.g. Zen shorts • Family bond: e.g. The seven Chinese sisters • Inter-generational relationship such as stories about  grandparents and grandchildren: e.g. Dragon hunt • The meaning of happiness: e.g. The magic pillow  Historical stories are not a common theme. Of the 118 titles of this study, only one story was found in this category, Nim and the war effort, which is a story set in the Sino-Japanese war.                  Limitations and Future Studies  There are 38 libraries in NEKLS system. This study is limited to NEKLS 16 small rural libraries in which house Chinese picture books; it is also excluded Kansas City Metropolitan public libraries.  Only the children picture books that contain Chinese cultural context are selected for this study.  This study also excluded children and young adult fiction books.         This study is limited to NEKLS 16 rural area libraries. A broader study should include the Kansas City metropolitan public libraries where the libraries serve a much larger Chinese population compared to the selected libraries in this study. Projected further studies are:  Compare an authorship study between Asian and non Asian authors  A comparative study of the Chinese cultures with other cultures  Chinese culture mirrored in young adult fiction books  Demographic profiles and public library children picture book collection policy  A comparative study by region, such as Midwest versus East and West coasts        References Chen, Minjie (2009, Spring). Seeking accurate cultural representation. Multicultural Education, 2-10. Mo, Weimin & Shen, Wenju (1997).Reexamining the issue of authenticity in picture books. Children's Literature in Education, 28(2), 85-93. U.S. Census Bureau (2010).2010 Census Kansas Profile. Retrieved December 21, 2011 from http://www.census.gov/geo/www/guidestloc/odf/20_ka nsas.pdf Wei, Shu-chu (1995). Shaping a cultural tradition: The picture book in Taiwan, 1945-1980.Children's Literature Association Quarterly, 20(3), 116-121. Yokota, Junko (2009). Asian Americans in literature for children and young adults. Teacher Librarian, 36(3), 15-19.     

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