Workshop for Instruction in Library Use (WILU) (45th : 2016)

Students, Librarians, and Opportunities at the Intersection of Information Literacy & Scholarly Communication Riehle, Catherine Fraser; Hensley, Merinda Kaye May 30, 2016

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Students, Librarians, and Opportunities at the Intersection of Information Literacy & Scholarly CommunicationCatherine Fraser Riehle & Merinda Kaye HensleyPonderDo our findings resonate your ownimpressions or experiences, based on interactions on your campus? Are any findings surprising? What can or should we do to support students in these areas?SETTING THE STAGEInspiration12013KNOWLEDGE CREATORSThe Framework and high-impact educational practices, with their parallel recognition of students as knowledge creators, provide a foundation for libraries to meet students where they are in the scholarly communication cycle through a wide variety of information literacy opportunities. THE STUDYQuestions, Design / Methods, Key Findings2RESEARCH QUESTIONS◦ What do undergraduate students report to know about scholarly communication?◦ Do they value knowledge of a variety of topics and issues related to scholarly communication?◦ When and how do they expect to gain knowledge about these topics and issues, if at all?Location: West Lafayette, INEnrollment: 29,500 undergraduate + 8,900 graduate studentsInternational students: 9,200Location: Urbana-Champaign, ILEnrollment: 32,000 undergraduate + 11,000 graduate studentsInternational students: 10,000DESIGN / METHODSQualitiative(Interviews)Exploration of connections and anomalies among and between data sources.Quantitative (Surveys) “Immediate Stakeholders”  = Undergraduate researchers, published authors and editorial board members of undergraduate research journalsSURVEY12 questions, including demographic questions, and we invited students to participate in a 15-20 minute follow-up interview.Purdue n=77/221 (35%); Illinois n=64/345 (19%) STEM: Purdue n=68, 94.4%; Illinois n=38, 61.3%  SS&H: Purdue n=15, 20.8%; Illinois n=19, 30.7%SURVEY DESIGN INTERVIEWS: THREE THEMESInterviewees could not accurately address copyright and authors’ rights as it applies to their scholarship.Interviewees rarely receive specific guidance but tend to follow faculty and graduate student mentors’ leads on (often problematic) data management practices.Interviewees struggle to articulate how they determine the impact of research.INTERVIEWS: THREE THEMESInterviewees could not accurately address copyright and authors’ rights as it applies to their scholarship.Interviewees rarely receive specific guidance but tend to follow faculty and graduate student mentors’ leads on (often problematic) data management practices.Interviewees struggle to articulate how they determine the impact of research.““ … I think a lot of students don’t look at it from a legal perspective and they have no idea what rights they have after publication, and where those things go … I mean it is really flattering to get published and you also don’t think of the ramifacations.” (Purdue, Liberal Arts / Health & Human Sciences, Senior)“Interviewer: “So you wrote your own thesis paper. Who owns the copyright to that paper?”Interviewee 1: “Gosh, well, I wish I could confidently say me, but it is probably like the university or something.” (Illinois, Economics, Senior)Interviewer: “Who owns the copyright?” Interviewee 2: “I think probably the University of Illinois because I applied to present at an undergrad research symposium here, and um, they accepted it and they were the ones who published the abstract and everything, so I am guessing them. I am not sure though.”                    (Illinois, Molecular Cellular Biology, Senior)INTERVIEWS: THREE THEMESInterviewees could not accurately address copyright and authors’ rights as it applies to their scholarship.Interviewees rarely receive specific guidance but tend to follow faculty and graduate student mentors’ leads on (often problematic) data management practices.Interviewees struggle to articulate how they determine the impact of research.““ I was keeping track of it [the data] in my notebook basically. And the person in the lab that took over after me, she took that notebook, so I think she is writing a thesis on it now actually.” (Illinois, Mollecular Biology, Senior)INTERVIEWS: THREE THEMESInterviewees could not accurately address copyright and authors’ rights as it applies to their scholarship.Interviewees rarely receive specific guidance but tend to follow faculty and graduate student mentors’ leads on (often problematic) data management practices.Interviewees struggle to articulate how they determine the impact of research.DETERMINING THE IMPACT OF RESEARCH◦Some interviewees did not distinguish between impact of particular project and impact of scholarship◦Others knew about traditional citation metrics◦Interviewees equated impact with project’s novelty, relevance to individuals, or influence on daily lifePeer ReviewInterviewees “get” peer review, at least in the context of coursework.INTERVIEWS: SECONDARY THEMESLearning ContextInterviewees are “learning as they go” and “by trial and error,” for better and for worse.YOUR TURNImpressions, Action3ShareImpressions?What’s an idea or strategy for supporting students at the interesection of information literacy and scholarly communication?CONCLUSIONSLimitations, Our Takeaways4opportunityadvocacystrategic partnershipsQ&ACatherine: cfriehle@purdue.eduMerinda: mhensle1@illinois.edu5ADDITIONAL RESOURCES◦ACRL, Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy, accessed January 31, 2016, http://acrl.ala.org/intersections/◦Stephanie Davis-Kahl and Merinda Kaye Hensley (Eds.), Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication (Chicago: ACRL, 2013).◦ACRL. Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, accessed February 2, 2016, http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework◦George D. Kuh, High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities, 2008).ADDITIONAL RESOURCES, cntd.◦Diane Harley, Sophia Krzys Acord, Sarah Earl-Novell, Shannon Lawrence, and C. Judson King. Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication: An Exploration of Faculty Values and Needs in Seven Disciplines. (UC Berkeley: Center for Studies in Higher Education, 2010), accessed March 4, 2016, https://scholarship.org/uc/item/15x7385g◦Christine Wolff, Alisa B. Rod, and Roger C. Shonfeld. “Ithaka S+R Faculty Survey 2015.” Ithaka S+R. Last modified 4 April 2016. http://sr.ithaka.org?p=277685

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