International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges (7th : 2015)

[Conference Program] : 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities & Colleges Budgen, Claire; International Conference on Health Promoting Universities & Colleges (7th : 2015 : Kelowna, (B.C.)) Jun 22, 2015

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10 YEARS AFTER THE EDMONTON CHARTERPROMISING PATHS: RESEARCH, PRACTICE, AND POLICY FOR HEALTHY AND SUSTAINABLE CAMPUSESJune 22-25, 2015Kelowna, CanadaThe University of British Columbia Okanagan Campuswww.internationalhealthycampuses2015.comPRACTICE LEADER PARTNERSantiagoOfficeWith the support ofUnited NationsEducational, Scientific andCultural Organization2 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterConference DescriptionThe 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges / VII International Congress will create a dynamic meeting place for researchers, practitioners, administrators, policy-makers and students to explore pressing issues and identify promising paths for healthy and sustainable campus development. 400+ delegates are expected from all over the world. The Conference will be hosted at a distinctive and growing university campus of the world-renowned University of British Columbia. The campus is located in the scenic Okanagan Valley of British Columbia, Canada, a setting that supports reflection and innovation. The conference is co-sponsored by the International Union for Health Promotion and Education, Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Regional Office for the Americas, Ibero-american Network of Health Promoting Universities (RIUPS), Simon Fraser University, and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Santiago Office (UNESCO Santiago).GoalsThe Conference is designed to mobilize the power, identify the responsibility, and highlight the opportunities for Universities and other Institutions of Higher Education to:	 •	Develop	vibrant	campus	environments	where	everyone	thrives		 •	Provide	exceptional	learning	opportunities	 •	Advance	knowledge	and	practices	that	contribute	to	other	campuses and communities locally and globallyDelegates will co-design a new international Charter to inspire and guide future action. Drawing from the 2005 Edmonton Charter for Health Promoting Universities and Institutions of Higher Education, the new Okanagan Charter will shape a conference outcome that is meaningful for moving forward in the context of other key developments such as the Post-2015 Development Agenda and Health in All Policies.ExhibitorsExhibit space is available for organizations and programs related to health promoting universities and colleges. Space is limited. For more information please contact Amy by phone at 1-604-822-7524 or by email: amy.ipce@ubc.ca.Location & AccommodationsThe University of British Columbia (UBC) is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40 best universities in the world. UBC’s Okanagan campus in Kelowna will provide an excellent venue for this conference. Enjoy the variety of space our campus has to offer, from the state-of-the-art meeting facilities to the various outdoor green spaces. For a list of nearby accommodations, please visit our website at http://www.internationalhealthycampuses2015.com/accommodation/accommodation. Parking & TransportationParking is available on campus. Daily parking fees are applicable to all visitors, and are in effect year round. Please reference the campus map for parking lot locations and ticket dispensers here http://www.internationalhealthycampuses2015.com/accommodation/ubcs-okanagan-campus. For travel and transportation information, please visit http://www.internationalhealthycampuses2015.com/accommodation/getting-to-ubcs-okanagan-campus. RegistrationPlease see the registration form for details. The main registration fee includes conference materials, the Welcome Reception on Monday, June 22, lunch and refreshment breaks on Tuesday, June 23, Wednesday, June 24, and Thursday, June 25, the New Charter Celebration on Thursday June 25, admission to exhibits, and a certificate of attendance. Methods of PaymentOnline: *The most secure method*. Secure, fast, online registration is available for Visa and MasterCard holders at the conference organizer’s website: http://www.internationalhealthycampuses2015.com/registration/ Phone: Register and pay over the phone: Local/International: 1-604-827-3112 or toll-free within Canada/USA: 1-855-827-3112. (VISA or MasterCard)Fax: Fax the registration form to 1-604-822-4835 and indicate that you would like to pay with VISA or MasterCard. We will send you a secure on-line link to enter your credit card information. *Please do not fax credit card information*Mail/Payment by cheque: Send the registration form with cheque to:IN 9579 REGISTRATIONInterprofessional Continuing Education, Room 105 – 2194, Health Sciences Mall, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z3Alternative Payment Methods: Mail or fax complete registration form along with one of the following:1. Signed purchase order (PO)2. Letter of Authorization (LOA) from the manager on the organization’s letterhead stating that they will be paying the registration fees. The letter should include the amount of registration fees, name and contact information of the manager.Refund, Transfer & Cancellation PolicyIf you are not able to attend, we encourage you to transfer your registration to a colleague. Please inform us as soon as possible about registration transfer.Prior to June 1 – no fee for registration transfer; After June 1st – $25 for registration transfer.Please note, if you are paying by credit card outside of North America, please inform your credit card company of the transaction as some banks block credit card payments made outside of your country.Refunds will be made if written notice of withdrawal is received according to the following schedule:Prior to April 1, 2015 – Full refund less $50 processing feeBetween April 1 and May 1 – 50% of registration fee less $50 processing feeAfter May 1 – No refunds will be granted for withdrawal after that date.UBC Faculty of Health and Social Development reserves the right to cancel or move this program if registration is insufficient. In the event of cancellation, full refund of registration fee will be issued.GENERAL INFORMATION3Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus If you are an international delegate and wish to receive a refund upon withdrawal from the conference, please note that the refund process may take up to 3 months. Therefore, we encourage you to finalize travel arrangements prior to registering.No refunds will be granted for the cancellation of the Banquet Dinner or the Wine Tour. You may transfer your registration for the Banquet Dinner or the Wine Tour to another delegate. Please inform us if you need to make a transfer.DisclosureIn keeping with accreditation guidelines, presenters participating in this event have been asked to disclose to the audience any involvement with industry or other organizations that may potentially influence the presentation of the educational material. Disclosure may be done verbally or using a slide prior to the speaker’s presentation.Kelowna TourismTourism BC-Kelowna: 1-800-HELLO.BC (435-5622) or www.hellobc.com/kelowna or Tourism Kelowna: 1-250-861-1515 or www.tourismkelowna.com. MeetingsIf your association or group would like to book a meeting space on Monday, June 22 prior to conference opening, or on June 26 after the conference, please contact Doris Callaghan at doris.callaghan@ubc.ca. Conference Planning CommitteeClaire Budgen, Conference Chair, is the Wellbeing Initiative Director for University of British Columbia Okanagan (UBC Okanagan) and an Emerita Associate Professor, Nursing. Over the past two decades Claire has engaged in research and practice in health promotion and healthy campus/community development.Martin Mroz, Conference Co-Chair, is the Director of Health & Counselling Services for Simon Fraser University where his mandate includes health services, counselling services, health promotion, and mental health strategies, primarily with a focus on students. He has worked all of his life in health, and has a background in psychology, business, crisis management, information systems, performance measurement, process innovation, management and strategy development. Martin’s interests include psychological peace, fairtrade, team-building, care for vulnerable populations, kind communities, the colour orange, chocolate and cheesy movies involving redemption with good soundtracks. His favorite quote is “Every System is perfectly designed to achieve the results it gets.”Judy Burgess is the Director of Health Services at the University of Victoria and oversees student clinical services, as well as strategic planning for campus health promotion. She is an advocate for the concepts of healthy campus and caring community. She received her first nursing degree from University of Calgary and graduate degrees from University of Victoria. She has extensive experience in managing primary health care operations and brings a research lens to health improvements. Being well aware of the demands on young adults in post-secondary settings, she strives to balance individual patient care and population health, especially in areas of mental health, public health, sexual health, and health and wellness. She has also taught in the School of Nursing and has previous clinical experience in a variety of community and acute care settings.Alfonso Contreras is Regional Advisor, Health Education and Social Change, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO/WHO).Dr. Contreras is responsible for the coordination of technical cooperation on health promotion with the countries in the Americas Region. He has extensive experience in working with communities, local institutions and civil society organizations using a bottom-up approach to influence policies to enable equal opportunities for healthy living.Melissa Feddersen, BSN, RN, Masters Student, Host Working Groups Coordinator, Volunteer CoordinationMelissa is a Research Coordinator with Campus Health, VOICE, and the Wellbeing Project at the UBC Okanagan campus. She is passionate about community, capacity expanding, wellbeing promotion and coffee. Melissa is currently enrolled in a Masters of Nursing program at UBCO. She is happiest when she is connected to nature; she loves writing, journaling, reading and road trips with her family.Allison Shaw is Founder and Principal at FlipSide Sustainability, a consulting and coaching firm that focuses on moving cutting-edge sustainability knowledge to action.  Combining two decades of sustainability science-policy research with professional coaching, she guides leaders, organizations and networks through learning processes that build relevant knowledge, partnerships and actionable innovation. Throughout her career Alison has worked to help redefine current relationships between people, planet and prosperity, always with the goal of integrating social and environmental health and wellbeing into communities, organizations and networks for action. In particular, she has used the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS) from the Association for the Advancement of Higher Education, a successful approach for embedding sustainability into institutions of higher learning with many lessons for the Health Promoting Universities movement.GENERAL INFORMATION4 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterGENERAL INFORMATIONAlisa Stanton has a Masters of Public Health from Simon Fraser University (SFU) and has been working as a Health Promotion Specialist since 2011. She has contributed to the development and implementation of SFU’s Healthy Campus Community Initiative and Well-being in Learning Environments work. Alisa is an instructor in the Faculty of Health Science at SFU where she teaches a service learning course in health promotion. Her specific interests include settings-based health promotion, community engagement and mental health promotion in higher education settings.Shaylyn Streatch is the Coordinator of Healthy Minds | Healthy Campuses – a province-wide, multi-stakeholder community of practice initiative in British Columbia that creates connections and inspires change. Prior to joining the Canadian Mental Health Association BC Division to help lead this initiative in 2012, Shaylyn worked with a variety of organizations including local government, a health and productivity firm, provincial non-profit organizations and university student services. A common thread and passion throughout Shaylyn’s career has been supporting knowledge exchange and collective action towards sustainable solutions that address the interrelated factors that influence health and wellbeing. Shaylyn is a graduate of the Master of Public Health program with a specialization in Health Promotion at the University of Toronto and holds a BSc Health Promotion degree in Research and Policy from Dalhousie University.International Charter Working GroupTara Black is Associate Director of Health Promotion at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada. She leads a team of Health Promotion Specialists and SFU’s Healthy Campus Community Initiative focused on socioecological and settings-based approaches whereby the institution itself is viewed as the object of intervention.  The team has received national and international awards for their work and innovation.  Tara has also worked as Acting Director, Student Development and has been at SFU for 10 years.  She has a Master of Science Degree in Health Promotion from the University of Alberta and Bachelor of Science in Dietetics.Mary Guinn Delaney is the UNESCO Regional Health and HIV Education Advisor for Latin America and the Caribbean, and is based at the Regional Office for Education in Santiago, Chile. She is a development and health specialist with extensive experience in the US, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. Since joining UNESCO in April 2008 she has been working on sexuality education and HIV prevention in the formal education sector, inclusion and diversity in sexuality education, and health literacy.Sharon Doherty is based in the Healthy Settings Unit, at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in Preston, England, and has been in her post as Healthy University Co-ordinator for over ten years.  Her post combines the co-ordination of the UCLan Healthy University initiative with a wider development role, supporting the unit’s generic work across settings and contributing to research, lecturing, evaluation, training and consultancy. She has experience of working in public health/health promotion for over twenty years. Previous posts include, Sexual Health Lead, Healthy School Co-ordinator and Health Promotion Specialist for Young People and Sexual Health.  Her public health work has focused on healthy settings, sexual health, drugs issues and young people within the education setting.  Sharon studied Communication Studies (BA) at Sheffield Hallam University and Health Promotion (MA) at the UCLan.  She has previously worked as a Further Education lecturer in Communication & Media Studies and as an Arts Administrator/Project Manager with a community based theatre company specializing in health work. She participated in the development of the 2005 Edmonton Charter.Sigrid Michel is Professor for Social Medicine and Psychopathology at the Faculty of Applied Sciences at the University Dortmund, Germany. Her research focus is Health Promotion in vocational and higher Education. She has Promotion at Workplace a Health promotion in Cities and Communities, and is a represented speaker for the international affairs of the German network of Health Promoting Universities. She is also a member of the Working Group Health Promoting Community and Town Development, German Institute of Urban Affairs Berlin and Advisory member of the Executive Board of the Ev. Johanneswerk. Graduation: Intermediate Diploma in Social Work and Psychology and a state examination in Medicine.Cheryl Washburn is the Director Counselling Services at UBC. She has extensive experience in post-secondary student mental health and has lead the development of a systemic approach to supporting student mental health and wellbeing at the UBC. She co-chaired the CACUSS/CMHA Post-Secondary Student Mental Health initiative responsible for the development of “ Post-Secondary Student Mental Health: Guide to a Systemic Approach” and has been involved been involved in the BC Healthy Minds/Health Campuses community of practice which is a whole-campus approach to promoting student mental health.5Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus Conference and Accommodation, UBC OkanaganThe Office of the Vice President, Students Ana Martínez Pérez, PhD in Anthropology (Sociology and Political Science) in 1998, at Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain. She began her teaching career at the Universitat Jaume I, Castelló, Spain in 1998 as associate lecturer in the Department of Philosophy and Sociology. In 2003 she became lecturer in Sociology at the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, in the Department of Social Sciences. She was positively assessed as a innovative teacher and a researcher, recognized for the period 2003-08 (by ANECA, Quality agency in Ministry of Education). Her research focuses on four areas of interest: visual anthropology, social exclusion, gender and health. Her publications are in Spanish journals such as Sociología del Trabajo, Sociedad y Utopia and in English in Home Cultures and Global health promotion. Her writings have been published in books by publishers such as Sintesis, Celeste, Routledge and Sage. She coordinated the “Healthy University Program” in URJC from 2007 to 2014 and contribute to develop Spanish network of Healthy Universities, REUS. Researcher in Competencies in health promotion, COMPHP Project, funded by the Executive Agency for Health and Consumers of the European Union (2009-12) and member of Global Dissemination Group for CompHP, CWDG in IUHPE. Researcher in COST Action 1210 “Appearance matters” since 2013. Since 2014 researcher in Research Support Unit, in Universidad de las Américas, Quito, Ecuador where is being developed an Ecuadorian network of health promoting universities within the Iberoamerican network, RIUPS.Host Working GroupCasey Hamilton, Chair of Food & Water Working Group, is a Research Coordinator with Campus Health (The VOICE Study and the Wellbeing Project) at the UBC Okanagan campus. Casey’s research focuses on improving campus food systems, healthy built environments, sustainability and natural environments, and physical activity. As a Registered Dietitian, her work focuses on population health and healthy public policy. She has broad experience in community development, having founded two Okanagan based non-profits (the Central Okanagan Food Policy Council, and the Okanagan Fruit Tree Project). In her work with both these groups, she has collaborated on research projects related to the Okanagan food system. Casey is currently completing her M.Sc. (Interdisciplinary Studies); she is researching the Kelowna urban agricultural policy community. Outside of work and studies, Casey is an avid triathlete who is rejuvenated by live music and concerts, and loves spending time with her cat and dog.Rachel Laird, Conference Project Development & International Engagement and Speakers Working Group, is a Strategic Communications Consultant with Campus Health, VOICE, and the Wellbeing Project at the UBC Okanagan campus. Rachel began her career working in not-for-profit programs for youth in Australia. After returning to Canada, she began working in international business development and operations with the Walt Disney Company.  In addition to her work with UBC Okanagan, Rachel is the Project Lead for the Central Okanagan local action team as part of a provincial Child and Youth Mental Health and Substance Use Collaborative. Rachel holds a MA in Human Security & Peacebuilding from Royal Roads University, with a focus on grassroots community peacebuilding through youth educational programming in Israel and Palestine. She loves travel, reading, her friend and family community, and HBO.Barbara Sobol, Chair of the Communication and Dissemination Working Group, holds the position of Librarian, Undergraduate Services at the UBC, Okanagan Campus Library in Kelowna, BC. She coordinates the library’s first year instruction program, supervises the Library Service Desk and manages many projects and campus relationships focused on supporting student success.Robyn Wiebe, Conference Engagement and Sponsorship, is the Research & Policy Liaison with Campus Health (The VOICE Study and the Wellbeing Project) at the UBC Okanagan campus. Robyn’s expertise is in community development, health promotion, primary care, research, and education. She has worked as a researcher for the University of Victoria, UBC, and the University of Alberta, on topics related to Complexity Science, CB-PAR, Public Health Systems & Services, Living with Life-threating Illnesses, and Educating International Students. Robyn has taught at the UBCO School of Nursing, and presented at, and helped implement, national and international conferences. Robyn received her Master of Nursing from the University of Victoria, her thesis topic was Health Campus Development: The International Student Experience. She is a travel enthusiast who enjoys nature, music, and the arts. She is passionate about thriving personal relationships with family and friends.AcknowledgementsWe would like to acknowledge with great appreciation the financial support from the following organizations:Platinum Sponsor Silver SponsorsGold SponsorSupportersKeynote SponsorsPrinting | Signs & Large Format | Cross Media | DesignPrinting SupportGENERAL INFORMATION6 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterTuesday, June 23, 2015  6:30am - 7:30am Yoga7:00am - 5:00pm Registration Desk Open                                                         8:15am - 8:30am Conference News Report   8:30am - 8:45am Introductory Remarks     Mayor Colin Basran, City of Kelowna    Conference & Charter Processes 8:45am - 9:15am Plenary | International Table    Mobilizing Power of Higher Education to      Contribute to World Development   Insights from the World Health Organization (WHO): The     9th Global Conference on Health Promotion and Action     Across Sectors for Health and Health Equity  Kwok-Cho Tang, PhD, Coordinator, Health Promotion with the World Health  Organization (WHO)   UNESCO: Health Promotion Literacy in a Development Context Mary Guinn Delaney, UNESCO Regional Health and HIV Education   Advisor for Latin America and the Caribbean, Regional Office for    Education in Santiago, Chile   Title TBC   Deborah Buszard, Deputy Vice-Chancellor & Principal, UBC Okanagan9:15am - 10:15am Plenary | Keynote   Promising Paths: Health Promoting Higher       Education - Reflections, Challenges & Future      Frontiers   Mark Dooris, PhD, Director, Healthy & Sustainable Settings    Unit, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UKThis presentation will provide an overview of the health promoting higher education movement – outlining its history, context and vision; exploring theory, research and practice; and reflecting on and distilling learning from ‘real world’ experience. It will also set out challenges and opportunities for progressing our vision of ecological, whole system health promoting and Monday, June 22, 2015                                                                 1:00pm - 4:00pm  Optional Workshops & Association Meetings3:00pm - 7:00pm Registration Desk Open                                                   4:00pm - 4:30pm  Guided Campus Tour     Meet at the registration desk to enjoy a guided campus tour5:00pm - 6:00pm           International Welcome Reception  Conference Opening: Welcome from Leaders Deborah Buszard, Deputy Vice-Chancellor & Principal, UBC Okanagan Tom Macauley, President, UBC Okanagan Student Union Shelley Kayfish, Director, Campus Operations & Risk Management, UBC Okanagan Pauline Brandes, Director of Human Resources, UBC Okanagan Opening Prayer | Elder Grouse Barnes, Westbank First Nation Territorial Welcome | Chief Byron Louis, Okanagan Indian Band Geographic Networks, Base Groups and Interest Groups The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO): Networks  and Groups to Support Health and Health Equity Alfonso Contreras, MD, MPH, Regional Advisor, Health Promotion, Special Program,  Sustainable Development and Health Equity, Pan American Health Organization,   Washington, DC, USA 6:00pm - 7:30pm Networking Event, Refreshments & Entertainment      (complimentary) Active Minds/Active Bodies:In addition to the scientific program, the Conference has an integrated active bodyactive mind program. Please plan to dress comfortably so that you are able to enjoy the outdoor walks between campus buildings and, during breaks, select from the (no cost) menu of walking trails, yoga, meditation, outdoor and indoor fitness options, including delegate passes to the Hangar Fitness Centre. Cultural and social experiences also will be integrated within the four days of the conference.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------MONDAY, JUNE 22 & TUESDAY, JUNE 23, 2015Monday, June 221:00 Optional Workshops &   Association Meetings3:00 Registration Opens4:00 Guided Campus Tour5:00 International Welcome   & Opening6:00 Networking Event &   Reception  Tuesday, June 237:00 Registration8:15 Conference News   Report8:30 Introductory Remarks8:45 International Table9:15 Keynote:  Promising Paths10:15 Break & Activities10:45 Concurrent Sessions A12:15 Lunch & Activities1:30 Concurrent Sessions B2:30 Break  & Activities3:00 Journalistic Interview: Global Updates3:45 Collage: Student Voices4:45 Conference News   Report5 - 6:00 Group Events (optional)Charter Design Lab OpenWednesday, June 247:30 Registration8:15 Conference News   Report8:30 Keynote | Defining  Success: Radical   Economics9:15 Keynote | Sustainability  Agendas & Health   Promotion10:15 Break & Activities10:45 Concurrent Sessions C12:15 Lunch & Plant Walk1:30 Concurrent Sessions D3:00 Break & Activities3:30 Keynote: Campus/ Community  Collaborations: Case   Studies4:45 Conference News   Report5 :30-  Group Events (optional)6 :30Charter Design Lab OpenThursday, June 258:00 Registration8:15 Conference News   Report8:30 Keynote: An  International Charter  for Changing Campuses  that Change the World9:30 Break & Activities10:00 Charter Co-design12:00 Lunch & Activities1:00 Charter Activation2:15 Closing Panel:  Future Paths3:00 Celebration &   Network Event4:00 AdjournNetwork, Base & Interest Group OpportunitiesPROGRAM AT A GLANCE7Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus Lina Di Genova, PhD, Organizational Psychologist, McGill University, Montreal, QC, CanadaIndigenous populations are known to suffer from multiple major health issues which are correlated to a variety of life experiences including among others historical trauma. A variety of buffers are theorized to reduce the impact due to these negative factors. This talking circle will be to discuss the pertinent issues to address in developing a culturally appropriate health promotion program for Indigenous university students.Learning Objectives:1. List the factors that are important to address in developing a culturally appropriate health promotion program for Indigenous populations on their campus 2. Share and reflect on successes and hurdles in developing such a program on their campus A3i Integrating Mindfulness into the Culture of the University     – An Unexpected Journey – Learnings in Innovation,     Collaboration, and EntrepreneurshipDerek Gratz, BSc (ID) MEDes (ID), Associate Director, Univ Industry Liaison Office, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaAnnette LaGrange, BEd MEd PhD, Associate Professor and Chair, smartUBC Curriculum, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaThe talking circle intends to invite catalytic sharing of best practices in related disciplines, as well as opening a discussion on the role of entrepreneurship and business-service orientations balancing with academic mandates. Topics may extend into cost-effective options to develop health promoting programs, external sponsorship, and innovative entrepreneurship in academic institutions.Learning Objectives:1. Examine the meaning of organizational compassion and discuss ways in which this can be applied to promoting healthy campus communities using a social-ecological framework2. Generate strategies - individually and collectively - that can foster the creation of compassionate environments within their institutionsA3ii   College Health Promotion in the Digital Age: Online     Healthy Campus Strategies Used by U.S. Universities    and CollegesJody O Early, PhD, MS, MCHES, Associate Professor, School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Washington-Bothell, Bothell, WA, USAMichelle Burcin, PhD, MPH, MCHES, Program Director, UG Programs, School of Health Sciences, Walden University, Minneapolis, MN, USAShelley Armstrong, PhD, MAT, CHES, Program Coordinator, UG Programs, School of Health Sciences, Walden University, Minneapolis, MN, USAThe purpose of this round-table discussion is multi-fold: first, to provide a review of a descriptive, cross-sectional study that used survey design to query college health services directors and staff at U.S. institutions about what types of health promotion strategies they used to engage the non-traditional, online student; second, to discuss the study findings in light of the United States’ Healthy Campus 2020 initiatives; third, to dialogue with participants about ways in which universities can leverage digital and new media technologies to provide health education online for the “new traditional” college student; and finally, to share innovative, exemplar approaches and case studies of online health promotion in higher education. Learning Objectives:1. Review the results of a recent cross-sectional, descriptive study that used survey design to assess U.S. colleges and universities student health services and health promotion resources for online students 2. Describe strategies for leveraging online and/or new media to address the health needs of the “new traditional student”3. Highlight exemplar approaches to and case studies of online health promotionsustainable universities and colleges – and for maximizing their contribution to the health and wellbeing of our communities, our societies and our planet.                                                                                                                                                   10:15am - 10:45am Refreshment Break & Wellness Activities    Interactive Poster Viewing & Exhibits Open                                                                                                                                                  10:45am - 12:15pm Concurrent Sessions A    A1i Exploring Active Classrooms in the College and University            SettingGillian C Barton, MSc, PgCert, FRSPH, FHEA Health Promotion and Public Health Specialist and Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, UKKay Cooper, BSc, MSc, PhD, Reader in Health & Wellbeing Research and Research Coordinator, School of Health Sciences, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, UKThis talking circle will provide an overview of the evidence for incorporating physical activity in classroom settings and an example of how this has been applied in one university in Scotland. It will then explore participants’ views of incorporating physical activity in the college and university setting.  Learning Objectives:1. Learn what evidence exists on active classrooms in various education settings 2. Discuss their own and others’ views on the potential use and consequences (positive and negative) of active classrooms in college and university settingsA1ii Teaching and Learning Health Promotion ExperientiallyKate Tairyan, MD, MPH, Senior Lecturer, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaRosie Dhaliwal, MEd, RD, Health Promotion Specialist, Health and Counselling Services, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaAmber Bolu, Student, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaWe will explore the partnership between the Health Promotion course instructor and the university-based Health Promotion team for experiential learning. As part of the course students generated evidence-based interventions for potential implementation to improve their health and that of their peers at SFU. These interventions informed Health Promotion practice at SFU.Learning Objectives:1.  Explore ideas for teaching health promotion experientially through on campus partnerships   2. Interpret student perspectives on learning health promotion experientially A2i International Students: The Forgotten MajorityAkua Quao, MSc, Health Promotion, Tutor/Health Promotion Specialist, B-Dynamic Training & Consultancy, London, UKInternational students leave their countries with high expectations but for many things go wrong. We provide a health promotion strategy that helps them succeed. Learning Objectives:1. Learn about the key issues hindering the progress of many international students2. Gain practical ideas on how to effectively assist international studentsA2 ii Planning Health Promotion for Indigenous University     Students - What do they Need?Pierre-Paul Tellier, MD, Physician, McGill Student Health Services, McGill University, Montreal, QC, CanadaPaige Isaac, BSc, Coordinator, First Peoples’ House, McGill University, Montreal, QC, CanadaTUESDAY, JUNE 23, 20158 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterLearning Objectives:1. Learn the importance and need of offering a health course for first year students and the challenges of implementing such a course 2. Ideas for course content and course delivery approaches, some statistics/research on student health and academic success in first year, the potential impact of such a course and development of a pilot course which participants could attempt at their own institution A6i  Fearless Conversations about Substance UseRobin A Higgins, MA, Counsellor, Selkirk College, Nelson, BC, CanadaLeslie Comrie, MSW, Selkirk College, Castlegar, BC, CanadaSelkirk College has been experimenting with the use of art, food and conversation to shift the culture of binge drinking on campus. Join us in exploring the ingredients that create safe, engaging dialogues around substance use. You will get a glimpse of our rural campus through a short video on our Dinner Basket Conversation Project and then, together, we will explore the elements that create vibrant discussion around important health topics.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about a philosophy and framework for facilitating meaningful conversations about difficult topics using community engagement and motivational interviewing principles2. Learn different methods to embed meaningful dialogue about substance use into classrooms, gathering places, staff rooms and kitchens on post-secondary campuses3. Learn from a personal experience of a discussion about healthy relationships with substances A6ii Healthy Relationships with Alcohol and Other Substances     in Residence: a Provincial Scan of Principles and Promising    PracticesCatriona Remocker, MPH, BA, Project Manager/Research Associate, Centre for Addictions Research of BC, University of Victoria, Vancouver, BC, CanadaTim Dyck, PhD, Research Associate, Centre for Addictions Research of BC, University of Victoria, Vancouver, BC, CanadaResidences heavily influence the culture of drinking and other substance use on post-secondary campuses. This scan offers insight as to how residence service personnel can shape their environment to affect the patterns of use by residents and improve the overall campus culture around alcohol and other substance use.Learning Objectives:1. Share insights from a process of consulting residence personnel to acquire perspective on crucial components for positively shaping residence life2. Gain an enhanced recognition of principles integral to cultivation of a healthier residence community3. Reflect critically on applying practices that show promise for fostering well-being in relation to substances in the residence context4. Increase appreciation of challenges around offering appropriate guidance and developing useful tools to promote collective mental wellness in residenceA6iii Student’s Perceptions of Alcohol Consumption and      Alcohol Policies on Campus in Denmark Christiane Stock, PhD, Head of Studies, Public Health, Unit for Health Promotion Research, Associate Professor, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, DenmarkThe study showed that alcohol is a central part of Danish student’s lives and therefore it may be a challenge to implement alcohol policies on campus unless students would be involved in the process.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about the perception of students on alcohol consumption on campus2. Discuss the attitudes of students regarding alcohol policies on a Danish A4i Building Respectful and Inclusive LeadershipJenica Frisque, MA, MSc, Equity and Inclusion Office Educator, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaInclusion is an important component of well being and inclusive practices are essential in all levels of leadership. Within this participatory workshop participants will have the opportunity to learn about building inclusive and respectful communities, that take into consideration people with a variety of identities, culturally, ethnically and with regards to sexual orientation, gender identity and ability.Learning Objectives:1. Explore participatory practices for inviting and hosting transformative conversations in community and post-secondary settings 2. Learn skills to build inclusive and respectful practices, and create healthy communities that include diverse voices in their co-creationA4ii Students, Institutions, and the Community: A Provincial     Approach to Mapping a Healthy Post-Secondary CultureLehoa Mak, BA, MEd Student, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, CanadaJesse McDonald, Student, Selkirk College, Castlegar, BC, CanadaThis interactive session will showcase how institutions, students, and a community organization came together to collaborate on initiatives across the province. Learning Objective:1. Engage in a knowledge exchange discussion and critically reflect how you may be able to form or enhance a student group in your home province/countryA5i  Applying a Campus-wide Approach towards Social      InclusionPaola Ardiles, Founder, Bridge for Health, Vancouver, BC, CanadaThis session will introduce the Circle of Belonging: Social Inclusion Model for Mental Health and Substance Use Model as it applies in campuses. The dialogue will focus on critically examining various strategies participants can take to promote collective action towards social inclusion in their own campus setting.Learning Objectives:1. Become familiar with the model and how it can support a common understanding of social inclusion amongst key stakeholders on campus 2. Interact and discuss how the model employs the concepts of hope, knowledge sharing, building community connectivity to support collective action3. Increase knowledge about issues of stigma and social inclusion as they pertain to campus life4. Critically examine various strategies they can take to promote collective action towards social inclusion in your own campus settingA5ii  Healthy Students and their University Experience: Course     Proposal and EvaluationSally R Stewart, PhD, Sr. Instructor and Undergraduate Coordinator, School of Health and Exercise Sciences, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaJack Reimer, DEd (candidate), MEd, BA, Assistant Professor, School of Human Kinetics, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, CanadaIn higher education students are our number one resource, responsibility and commitment. A significant drop in grades (1, 2) and high dropout rates after first year are noticed (1, 2). Student health and fitness also decline in first year. It is imperative that we offer curriculum to provide students with the knowledge, skills and environment to improve and maintain their health, as it will impact their overall university experience. The proposal is to develop and pilot a first year course on health and lifestyle and to evaluate its success based on health and academic outcomes as well as the implementation processTUESDAY, JUNE 23, 20159Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus share results from a UBC classroom-based research project that explored these questions.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about methodology, implementation and outcomes for this classroom-based project2. Reflect on importance of a multi-level approach to well-being promotion and opportunities to enhance the learning environment to positively promote student well-being and academic successA7iii A Comprehensive and Collaborative Healthy      Campus InitiativeAmy Magnuson, PhD, RD, Health Promotion Director, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USAThis presentation addresses the development and application of a comprehensive and collaborative Healthy Campus Initiative. Initiatives vary at institutions and often rely on support, resources, collaborations and priorities. Priority areas identified are: high risk drinking, eating disorders, physical health, mental health, sexual health, sexual violence and tobacco and other drugs.Learning Objectives:1. Identify the steps necessary to develop and implement a Healthy Campus initiative at your university2. Identify the critical evaluative components of a Healthy Campus initiativeA7iv Alicante University Development of a Healthy UniversityJosé Ramón Martínez-Riera, PhD, Nurse, Professor University Campus Vice President and Sustainability-Campus San Vicente del Raspeig Alicante, University of Alicante, Valencia, Alicante, SpainRafael Muñoz Guillena, University of Alicante, Valencia, Alicante, SpainGetting at the University of Alicante (UA) ”creating environments that support health.” Implement action strategy, open, horizontal, transverse and participatory favoring the pride of belonging to a healthy community. Internalize the concept of health from a broad, open and participatory perspective.Learning Objectives:1. Understand the strategy and development of a draft Healthy University on a college campus, planning and implementationA8i  The Association of Nutrition Behaviours and Physical     Activity with General and Central Obesity in Caribbean    Undergraduate StudentsMelecia Wright, Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA This session will describe the prevalence of obesity and central obesity in 1578 Caribbean undergraduate students from Barbados, Grenada and Jamaica (ages 18-30 years). The students completed questionnaires and had physical measurements recorded. Irregular breakfast consumption, age and year of study were also positively associated with obesity. Physical activity was not significantly associated with any obesity measure. There is a low prevalence of healthy behaviours and high prevalence of obesity in this young cohort of Caribbean adults. The strong association of avoidance of fatty foods with obesity indicates some desire to improve weight status.Learning Objectives:1. Discuss the stark sex differences in the prevalence of obesity and central obesity in the undergraduate student population 2. Discuss how the prevalence of obesity is high, but the burden varies depending on which anthropometric measure (i.e. body max index, waist-to-height ratio or waist circumference) is used 3. Discuss how the low levels of physical activity and fruit & vegetable consumption are also worrisomeuniversity campus3. Reflect on changing norms, policies and practices in a participatory mannerA6iv  A ‘Social Norms’- Intervention to Prevent and/or   Reduce Substance Use among University Students in     Germany: Preliminary Findings Of the INSIST (Internet     Based Social Norms Intervention for the Prevention of     Substance Use among Students) StudyStefanie Maria Helmer, MSc, Researcher, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology (BIPS), Bremen, GermanyThe INSIST study is the first multi-site ‘social norms’-intervention delivered to a large German university student sample. The results of the study show discrepancies between perceptions of peer substance use and actual substance use among university students. Correcting perceptions of peer substance use may be an effective prevention strategy.Learning Objectives:1. Identify discrepancies between perceptions of peer use and actual substance use rates among university students2. Based on the theoretical social norms approach and the findings that will be presented attendees can develop own ideas for substance use prevention strategiesA7i Establishing Corporate Health Management in a      University Setting: a Case Example from the      ZHAW Zurich University of Applied Sciences Regula Neck, RN, MPH, Public/Corporate Health Specialist, School of Health Professions, Corporate Health Management Unit, ZHAW University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Zurich, SwitzerlandMarisa Delannay, MSc, Health Psychologist, School of Health Professions, Corporate Health Management Unit, ZHAW University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Zurich, SwitzerlandThe presentation will outline the establishment process of corporate health management at the ZHAW School of Health Professions, thereby offering participants valuable insight into the opportunities and pitfalls of implementing corporate health management in the university setting and provide them with helpful advice on how to go about setting up systematic and sustainable corporate health management in institutions of higher education.Learning Objectives:1. Understand the role corporate health management plays in Swiss universities.2. Learn the criteria for the quality label “Friendly Workspace” set by Health Promotion Switzerland (based on the Luxemburg Declaration on Workplace Health Promotion) and how the ZHAW School of Health Professionals implemented the label’s criteria into practice to establish corporate health management at the school3. Identify the strategic and operational actions that are key to establishing corporate health management  A7ii  Enhancing Campus Wellbeing through Evidence-Based     Projects and a Multi-Level Approach: an Example from    UBC Vancouver CampusNatasha Moore, BSocSci, Research and Evaluation Analyst, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaKaren Smith, BSc, MA, Lecturer, Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaKelly White, MEd, CHES, Acting Student Development Officer, Wellness, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaWhat impact does a classroom environment that promotes engagement, empowerment, and connectedness have on students’ well-being and academic success? How does encouraging and enabling students to create an action plan impact their well-being and academic achievement? We’ll TUESDAY, JUNE 23, 201510 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterA8ii  Incorporating Health Promotion into Every Day Campus     Life: a Challenge for StudentsAudrey Walsh, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Cape Breton University, Sydney, NS, CanadaTo explore the factors that influence campus dwelling university students’ ability to practice healthy living guidelines, 48 students participated in a one week data collection period. Results indicate that students need assistance to practice healthy behaviours that lessen their risk of unintentional weight gain and reduce their risk of developing chronic illness.Learning Objectives:1. Learn the challenges campus dwelling students face in adhering to healthy living guidelines related to eating, exercising, and sleeping2. Learn students’ thoughts on how current broad-based healthy living guidelines could be rewritten to make them more relevant and acceptable to their age group and contextA8iii  Psychology and Universities: Towards the Construction of    Universities That Promote HealthCecilia Chau Pérez-Aranibar, PhD, Psychology, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima, Lima, PerúUniversities that promote healthy lifestyles. Prevention and promotion of health programmes in university students, based on scientific evidence.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about a new instrument which measures general health behaviors in South America2. Gain knowledge in types of habit changes in health over timeA8iv  Implicit Processes Targeting Healthy Eating In Young     Adults: A Randomized Controlled PilotHannah Rose, MSc Candidate, Masters Student, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, CanadaThe purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of a cue (a modified plate design and/or platesize) on FVC (implicit behaviour) in first year university undergraduates, independent of their explicit attitudes and intentions. This research will use the theory of behaviour economics as a theoretical framework. Learning Objectives:1. Learn the impact of using a modified dinner plate design to influence the consumption of fruits and vegetables and influence their overall portion sizes 2. Understand the role of using behaviour economics as a framework or strategy for healthy behaviour changeA9i   Student Perceptions of a Healthy UniversityMaxine L Holt, M Phil, Principal Lecturer in Public Health, The Centre for Public Health (CIKE), Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, Manchester, EnglandThe healthy university is an example of the settings approach, which adopts a whole system perspective. In order to do this it is important and valuable to find ways to engage with, listen to and respond to the student voice.Learning Objectives:1. Gain insight into student perception of a healthy university2. How this information will contribute to the next steps for universities and the UK Healthy Universities NetworkA9ii  Active Tasmania - How an Australian University     Improves Community Health and Well-BeingLucy Byrne, BA Arts, Senior Project Manager (Regional Development) and Masters Candidate, University of Tasmania, Launceston, Tasmania, AustraliaThe Active Tasmania health promotion initiative demonstrates that it is effective for universities, governments and the community sector to work together, to improve community health and wellbeing, through a capacity building process.Learning Objectives:1. Be provided with a case study of how a university can utilize its resources to engage with the community that it serves and improve overall health and wellbeing outcomes 2. Demonstrate how an initiative such as Active Tasmania can provide valuable leadership, teaching and research opportunities for a universityA9iii  Leveraging Partnerships: ACTUALLY Doing More      with LessJanice MacInnis, M.Ad.Ed., Manager, Organizational Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, CanadaLeaders from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, will share their experiences harnessing internal capacity to advance initiatives and priorities for mutual, and maximum, benefit.Learning Objective:1. Be inspired and committed to leveraging the expertise available to them on their own doorsteps A9iv  The Austrian Network of Health-Promoting Universities     and Institutions of Higher Education: Networking as     Strategy for Successful Setting-Related Health Promotion Waltraud Sawczak, Occupational and Organisational Psychologist, Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt, AustriaKirsten Sleytr, Personnel Development and Health Promoting, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Vienna, AustriaAustria’s universities on the path toward a health-promoting university world of learning, teaching, and working: striking the delicate balance between tradition and modern management. Austrian universities come together to form the Austrian Network of Health-Promoting Universities to jointly develop strategies and methods for the successful implementation of health management.Learning Objectives:1. Gain an insight into the work of the Austrian Network of Health-Promoting Universities. Strategies, quality criteria, and experiences gathered during 5 years of collaboration2. Learn about strategic priorities for the years aheadA10i   Planning Model for the Health Promoting Universities     Movement at the University of Puerto RicoHiram V Arroyo, BS, MPHE, EdD, Professor and Chair Department of Social Sciences, School of Public Health, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico; Director, WHO Collaborating Center for Health Promotion and Health Education, Coordinator of the Iberoamerican Network of Healthy Universities, San Juan, Puerto RicoThe University of Puerto Rico is implementing the international initiative of Health Promoting Universities (UPS) at the eleven campuses of the public higher education system in the country. The Health Promoting Universities are higher education institutions that adopt a culture of health promotion at the universities. It involves the development of an organizational structure of Health Promotion and the development of systematic programmatic actions of health promotion on campus institutional policies. This set of efforts are aimed at increasing access and equity in health and promote human development and social development. The university initiative incorporates participatory and interdisciplinary approach to reach students, faculty, university staff, family and the community in general. The planning model of the initiative at the University of Puerto Rico has five main phases, namely: Get the institutional commitment of the President and the Rectores of the University; Constitute the University Systemic Coordination Committee and Operational Committees in the eleven campuses; Develop and implement the Plan of Action; Develop communication activities, TUESDAY, JUNE 23, 201511Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus with dogs increasingly identified as family members (Coren, 2011) and the integration of dogs into public settings where they had not previously been welcome (e.g., canine buddy school reading programs, therapy dogs in airports, companion animals in the workplace). The aim of this presentation is to illustrate how therapy dogs may be situated with the university context to facilitate the social and emotional well-being of university community members.Learning Objectives:1.  Learn about the contribution of therapy dogs in addressing the mental health and learning objectives of university students2. Learn about strategies for addressing the challenges of risk management in a university context between human and non-human animals A11ii   Operation Transformation UCC - Peer-Inspired     Community ChangeMichael Byrne, MB, BCh, BAO, BSc, DCH, MICGP, MRCGP, UCC Health Matters, Student Health Department, University College Cork, Cork, IrelandWe highlight the effectiveness of peer-support and peer-inspiration, facilitated by the extensive use of social media, to stimulate whole-community change in the university campus environment. Behavioural change becomes fun and sustainable.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about the power of social media in facilitating peer support and peer inspiration2. Learn about the power of the interaction between students, faculty, and professional support staff to engender a social change 3. Learn about the benefits of persistence and gradual incremental change in ensuring sustainabilityA11iii Abilities for Life as a Tool for Health Promotion in      College Students   *Spanish presentation, English interpretation available*Medina-Camacho Orlando, MS, Master in Clinical Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes. Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, MéxicoRodríguez-Juárez María del Carmen, MS, Master in Clinical Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes. Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, MéxicoSeveral studies point that educating in abilities for life is more efficient in the prevention of harmful behavior than teaching in order to solve a concrete or specific issue. The World Health Organization (WHO) promotes the idea that it must be in the academic programs that these abilities shall be thought, and that it must be there where youths acquire the capacity to choose healthy ways of life. As part of the actions implemented to decrease vulnerabilities, a specific intervention program has been designed, based on the strengthening of the abilities for life as a tool to counteract the consumption of alcohol and other drugs, bad eating habits, unplanned pregnancies, among other high vulnerability health indicators. The program searches to strengthen specific abilities through pair work with advanced semester models as well as intermediate semester health promoters from diverse mayors (medicine, public health, marketing, nursery, nutrition, communication, psychology, etc.). The purpose of this modality is to enhance the integral formation model of our University, at the same time that students are profiled as future health promoters inside of the academic community and they get to accomplish one the requirements to obtain their degree.Learning Objectives:1.  Share a work model from and for students that could be replicated in similar contexts2. Share an interdisciplinary work model that has proved to be successfulA11iv Breast Cancer Awareness for Young Women on Campus Lorna Larsen, BScN, President, Team Shan Breast Cancer Awareness for Young Women (Team Shan), Woodstock, ON, CanadaTeam Shan has successfully developed a comprehensive communication awareness and visibility of the initiative; and evaluate the process and results of the initiative. The planning model is being developed during the academic year 2014-2015.Learning Objectives:1. Apply planning approaches in developing initiatives Health Promoting Universities 2. Identify barriers and opportunities in developing initiatives Health Promoting Universities 3. Compare national experience in Puerto Rico with other planning models used in other countriesA10ii  Understanding and Implementation of Health Promotion    at Higher Education Institutions in Colombia Clara Y Duarte Cuervo, MSc, Occupational Therapist, Occupational Therapy Program, Universidad Metropolitana, Barranquilla, Facultad de Medicina, Maestría en Discapacidad e Inclusión Social, Ciudad Universitaria, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, ColombiaParticipants are invited to think about positive concepts of health, analyze the students’ activities at the university settings as opportunities for health and self-realization and learn about health promotion beyond preventive approaches.Learning Objectives:1. Gain deeper reflections about health promotion as a theoretical fieldA10iii  Healthy Sydney University, the University of Sydney,     AustraliaElly Howse, BA (Hons I) Sydney, MPH Sydney, Senior Project Officer, Healthy Sydney University, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia Since 2012 the University of Sydney has supported a whole of university approach to health promotion for its staff and students. This approach is called ‘Healthy Sydney University’. An overview of the initiative will be provided along with some key projects in nutrition, physical activity and mental wellbeing.  Learning Objectives:1. Understand the application of settings-based health promotion to tertiary education settings2. Consider how to engage particular communities in participatory health promotion3. Discuss the importance of organisational culture in driving health promotionA10iv  Health Promoting Universities in Hungary: Breaking     the Ground for Healthier CampusesMózes Székely, PhD, Senior Research Fellow, ELTE University; General Secretary, HUSF, Budapest, HungaryThe main objectives of this presentation is to highlight how the existing Health Promoting Universities concept can be transferred to a post-transition country with long-established tradition of central government control in higher education. Results will show how the adaptation process works, when international experiences are transferred to a local setting with significant domestic expertise.Learning Objectives:1. Provide insight into the Healthy Universities concept which can be adapted to a fit a country’s domestic and cultural model A11i Going to the Dogs: Considerations & Implications of     Structured Human-Animal Interactions on CampusJohn-Tyler Binfet, PhD, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaThe role of canine companions in North American society is changing TUESDAY, JUNE 23, 201512 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterTo guarantee the creation and development of Healthy Universities there is a need for establishing basic requirements that assure the quality of health promoting programs. With this objective, an instrument was developed to evaluate organizational practices and to guide improvement plans. This is the result of a collaborative work between Chilean Universities and the Chilean Ministry of Health.Learning Objectives:1. Establish criteria for good practices within Healthy Universities2. Identify the level of accomplishment of good practices within these Institutions3. Develop an improvement plan that secures the quality of health promotion programsA13i  How Campus Environments Determine Subjective      WellbeingNishtha Parag, Lab Manager, Behavioral Sustainability Lab, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaThis research aims to understand how the campus environment influences momentary affective experiences. By conducting a year-long campus-wide survey at both the UBC campuses, this study will provide spatial and temporal maps of subjective wellbeing. It will also help identify which specific locations and times are predictive of subjective wellbeing.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about the relationship between specific environmental features and wellbeing2. Learn about the implications our study has for informing strategies in urban design that can help promote subjective wellbeing within campus environmentsA13ii UBCO’s ESS: Campus Integration within the Local Food     System and Natural Ecosystems of the OkanaganJennifer Congdon, Social Relations Coordinator, UBCO Environment and Sustainability Society, Kelowna, BC, CanadaPaula Meehan, Public Outreach Coordinator, UBCO Environment and Sustainability Society, Kelowna, BC, CanadaThe Environment and Sustainability Society (ESS) is a club at the UBC Okanagan campus that enables students to take action towards decreasing the environmental impact of the university, and of its students, staff and faculty. Two initiatives will be highlighted: the Karma Bowl campus soup kitchen, and Revegetate UBCO.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how a responsible campus environment promotes healthy relationships within the university, with the local community, and with natural ecosystems of the area2. Discuss the importance of integrating the campus food system with the local food system to improve sustainable living and healthy eating practices A13iii  UBC Okanagan Campus Plan:  Supporting UBC’s Health,     Wellness and SustainabilityLeanne Bilodeau, BHK, MA, SCD Cert., CSP, CSR-P, LEED Green Assoc., Associate Director Sustainability Operations, Campus Planning and Development, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaAnthony Haddad, MCIP, RPP, Director, Campus Planning and Development, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaAbigail Riley, MUP, MCIP, RPP, Associate Director, Campus Planning, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaThis session provides on overview of the UBC Okanagan Campus Plan and how it supports UBC’s health and wellness initiatives through creation of a pedestrian friendly campus core and enhancing the network of informal walkways, bike paths, and trails, and range of amenities/services. Taking advantage of our unique campus environment, the Plan has identified policies to strengthen the visual identity, sense of place and cohesiveness strategy to reach young women with important breast health and breast cancer messages. The model has addressed the breast cancer information and awareness needs for thousands of young women. Team Shan hopes that the success of the campaigns across Western Canada will continue to grow and expand. Learning Objectives:1. Discuss the effectiveness and cost of facilitating breast cancer awareness strategies targeting young women on campus, a population at risk2. Discuss the response from young women on campus to breast cancer messaging, the impact on their breast health and overall wellbeingA12i  WELLNESS = C (D + A) Wellness through Wisdom:     Application of an Innovative and Practical Wellness ModelMichele Regehr, RN,BN, Current MSN Student, Assistant Director of Wellness Centre, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, CanadaDavid Stinson, MEd, Director Equity of Access and Learning Resource and Educator, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, CanadaBehind every healthy behavior is a wise decision. The Stinson Wellness Model helps people make wise decisions that align with who they are. By making wise decisions, individuals are enabled to move toward wellness and thereby increase the wellness quotient in their circle of influence.Learning Objectives:1. Summarize the Stinson Wellness Model and explain the decision making process2. Explain how it is used within the TWU community to facilitate the accomplishment of a student-learning outcome related to wellnessA12ii  Instructional Language Fluency and Self-Efficacy in CollegeAlexis R Georgeson, BA, MA Student, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaItems on a modified version of The College Self-Efficacy were coded for features such as item concreteness, social desirability of a particular response, and the culture of the item to determine if there was a differential response pattern in relation to these features across different levels of English fluency.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about the analysis of item features on questionnaires2. Receive recommendations for developing items on questionnaires keeping linguistic background of participants in mindA12iii Assessing Mental Stress and Associated Risk      Comportments among University Students in Three     Different Socio-Cultural Contexts. A study in Algeria,    France and Hungary, 2011-2013.Joel Ladner, MD, MPH, PhD, Physician, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, Normandy, FranceIn three different socio cultural environments, perceived stress levels were high. These findings increase the need to investigate health risks and behaviours, to initiate specific prevention interventions in student populations using integrated preventive interventions.Learning Objectives:1. Gain better knowledge of stress and associated factors in three different countries2. Establish partnerships with 3 research teams in France, Hungary and AlgeriaA12iv  Guide for the Self Evaluation and Categorization of Health     Promoting Universities Mónica Muñoz Serrano, MCS, EM, Titular Professor, School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Past director- Program Healthy UC and the Chilean Network for Health Promoting Universities, Santiago de ChileTUESDAY, JUNE 23, 201513Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus 3. Learn about disclosure and response mechanisms 4. Discuss how to provide a variety of support options within a respectful and culturally sensitive manner. Learn how one University has created a 24/7 response team, available by phone for students who have experienced sexual violence.5. Engage in a dialogue about reporting and the ways in which institutions support survivors and the community                                                                                                                                             12:15pm - 1:30pm Lunch & Farmers’ Market & Wellness Activities    Lunch provided by Food Trucks, voucher to be received on site       Interactive Poster & Exhibit Viewing12:10pm - 12:50pm Mindfulness Sitting Practice                                                                                                                                              1:30pm - 2:30pm Concurrent Sessions B   B1  Engaging the Whole Community: Campuses that FlourishMichele D Ribeiro, EdD, Psychologist, Interim Assistant Director of Mental Health Promotion, Counseling and Psychological Services, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USABonnie Hemrick, MPH, Mental Health Promotion Coordinator, Counseling and Psychological Services, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USAJacqueline Alvarez, PhD, Associate Dean of Students and Director of the Counseling Center, Amherst College, Amherst, MA, USADemitrius Brown, Associate Dean of Student Life, Amherst College, Amherst, MA, USACreating a culture of flourishing on college campuses is one of the primary responsibilities of college educators, both within and outside of the classroom. Learn how practices at two universities are making a difference in the area of community, resilience, optimism, and life regard. Learning Objectives:1. Identify strategies that reduce student loneliness and isolation2. Be able to list attributes of people who identify as having a flourishing life3. Identify research that supports practices related to flourishing4. Learn how to apply coalition building strategies into creating flourishing campusesB2  A Community-Based Approach to Promoting Student     Health and Wellness as a Precondition of SuccessAnn Tierney, BA(Hons), LLB, MPA, University Administrator, Vice Provost and Dean of Student Affairs, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, CanadaArig al Shaibah, BSc, MPA, PhD, University Administrator, Assistant Dean, Student Life and Learning, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, CanadaAnna Majetic, BA (Hons), MA(c), University Student, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, CanadaQueen’s University has adopted a comprehensive community-based strategy to address student health and wellness. This panel of Student Affairs professionals and a peer leader will outline the strategy, mine the data and highlight unique proactive and responsive first-year transition programs, led in part by students that are supporting well-being and success.Learning Objectives:1. Recognize the value of developing a strategic framework to effectively address student health and wellness, with a particular focus on mental health as it relates to university transition and academic success2. Consider key findings from student health and wellness research conducted at one Canadian university and reflect on how these findings have informed the design and delivery of unique transition and wellness programs and services at Queen’s University3. Contemplate Queen’s transition and wellness program assessment results in the context of desired student outcomes and impacts4. Identify aspects of the Queen’s University strategic framework and related initiatives, which might be adapted and introduced in other institutional settingsof the campus. A whole systems (environmental, economic, social sustainability) approach to planning strategizes a net-positive impact on the well-being of the campus community and ecology.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about the role of UBC Okanagan Campus Planning and Development and its respective portfolios2. Learn about the UBC Okanagan Campus Plan and how it supports UBC’s health, wellness and sustainability initiativesA14i Competencies and Sexuality Education: Conceptual     Frameworks and New Challenges for Health–Education     Sector Collaboration  Mary Guinn Delaney, MPhil, Regional Advisor for Health Education, UNESCO Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean, Santiago, Chile In many countries and contexts, sexuality education is not commonly considered as part of other competency-based learning approaches. UNESCO Santiago’s proposal places competencies related to sexuality education into a broader human development context that provides additional opportunities to strengthen synergies with other priority areas of health, wellbeing and global citizenship.  Learning Objectives:1. Review why sexuality education is not commonly considered as part of other competency-based learning approaches2. Learn about a recent proposal that puts competencies related to sexuality education into a broader human development contextA14ii Traumatic Experiences, Mental Health and Risky Sexual     Behavior in Students at a Caribbean University CampusT Alafia Samuels, MBBS, MPH, PhD, Faculty of Medical Science, Cave Hill Campus, University of the West Indies, Bridgetown, BarbadosPowerPoint presentation of results of Student Behavioural Risk Factor Survey among 582 undergraduate students 18-30 years at UWI Cave Hill, to determine the relationship between mental health indicators and risky sexual behaviour.Learning Objectives:1. Analyze the association between mental health indicators and risky sexual behavior2. Determine gender differentials in the association between mental health indicators and risky sexual behaviorA14iii  Responding to Sexual Violence on Campuses:  A Joint    Initiative of the Western Canadian Senior Student Affairs     Administrators (WESTSSAA)Jan Byrd, MA, Executive Director, Wellness and Student Life, The University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB, CanadaJane Fee, PhD, Vice Provost, Students, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Vancouver, BC, Canada Janet Teasdale, MEd, Managing Director, Student Development and Services, UBC, Vancouver, BC, CanadaJanet Mee, Director, Access and Diversity, UBC, Vancouver, BC, CanadaLearn what is happening at three different Universities in Western Canada: University of Winnipeg, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, and the University of British Columbia - each with their own unique contexts. Senior student affairs administrators across the West have responded by engaging in a collaborative process to address sexual violence on campuses. We will profile what is being developed and shared: policies, protocols, and an educational framework as well as the process that we are engaged in. Learning Objectives:1. Gain an understanding of how sexual violence issues are playing out on university campuses across western Canada2. Discuss how buy-in from campus stakeholders leads to the creation of better policy/protocol and guidelines to address sexual violence on your campusTUESDAY, JUNE 23, 201514 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterB6  Situating Campus Health in the Ottawa CharterJudy Burgess, RN, PhD, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada Patty Hambler, MEd, Student Affairs Professional, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaMartin Mroz, Director, Health and Counselling Services, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaMelissa Feddersen, BSN, RN, Masters Student, Host Working Groups Coordinator, Volunteer Coordination, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaSarah Hanson, RPN, BA, Wellness Centre Manager, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, CanadaThis panel will provide participants with an opportunity to explore impor-tant factors to consider in the development of a comprehensive Population Health Strategy in light of the structure and processes of Post-Secondary Institutions across Canada.Learning Objectives:1. Fully examine population health initiatives in light of the current environment of Post-Secondary Institution’s fiscal and organizational realities2. Provide a background of key issues to be considered in development of a comprehensive Campus Population Health Strategy B7  A Systematic and Systemic Wellness Strategy Model     to be America’s Healthiest Campus(r)Suzy Harrington, DNP, RN, MCHES, Chief Wellness Officer, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USATo be America’s Healthiest Campus(r) requires a comprehensive, overarching, evidence based, holistic wellness strategy, one which; empowers our students, employees, and communities, harmonizes the physical, emotional, social, professional, and spiritual dimensions of wellness, and synergizes the personal, interpersonal, organizational(and policy), and environmental levels of change. OSU is committed to sharing wellness successes and knowledge with others.Learning Objectives:1. Be able to translate a comprehensive model, in whole or in part, to their own wellness system or program2. Identify key communication and outcomes focused foundational components necessary for a systematic overarching sustainable population based wellness programB8  Characterizing Food Insecurity among Post-secondary     Students in CanadaNoreen Willows, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Jocelyn Verreault, BSc, Nakota Sioux Staff Member, Yellowhead Tribal College, Edmonton, AB, CanadaSarah Archibald, BSc, Program Manager, Meal Exchange, Toronto, ON, CanadaMany post-secondary students, including Aboriginal students, are food insecure and unable to obtain nutritionally adequate, acceptable or safe foods. Food banks distribute food free of charge. They are proliferating on Canadian campuses. Panel speakers will characterize student food insecurity, the role of campus food banks, and solutions to student hunger.Learning Objectives:1. Learn to identify student risk factors for food insecurity and to learn about possible solutions to post-secondary student food insecurity on campuses across Canada2. Learn about the roles that food banks play on campuses, and their limitations to address student food insecurityB9  The Caring Campus Project – A Multilevel Intervention     to Address Substance Misuse on Canadian CampusesKara Thompson, PhD, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, CanadaShu-Ping Chen, PhD, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Queens University, Kingston, ON, CanadaKeith Dobson, PhD, Professor of Clinical Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaB3   Creating Conditions for Well-Being within       Learning Environments: Bridging Research and PracticeRosie Dhaliwal, MEd, RD, Health Promotion, Health and Counselling Services, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaAlisa Stanton, MPH, Health Promotion, Health and Counselling Services, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaDavid Zandvliet, PhD, Professor and Researcher, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaThis panel presentation introduces the Well-being in Learning Environments project at SFU. Health Promotion Specialists, the Director of Teaching and Learning Centre and a Faculty Member/Lead Researcher will share conditions within learning environments that impact well-being, provide examples of how to create conducive environments, and discuss ways to engage academics.Learning Objectives:1. Describe the correlations between learning environments and well-being2. Identify the importance of and ways to create conditions for well-being within the learning environmentB4  Creating Thriving CampusesNatasha Moore, B-Soc-Sci, Research and Evaluation Analyst, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaTracey Hawthorn, BSc, PT, BHSc Kin, WRAP Coordinator HR, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaKelly White, MEd, CHES, Wellness Centre Coordinator, Wellness Student Health Services, UBC Vancouver, BC, CanadaJan Byrd, MA, Executive Director Wellness and Student Life, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Thrive is a mindset and a week-long series of events that encourages the campus community to think about ways to increase mental wellbeing through resiliency, awareness, healthy choices and social support. It is a collaborative community-based model that can be adopted or adapted to suit the needs of a variety of populations and environments.Learning Objectives:1. Understand the value and potential benefits of a coordinated community approach to mental health promotion on campus2. Take away key strategies, ideas, tools for actively promoting positive mental health to a variety of post-secondary audiencesB5        Addressing Well-being through PolicyTara Black, MSc, BSc, Associate Director, Health Promotion, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaSu-Ting Teo, MD, Physician & Director Student Health & Wellness, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, CanadaCheryl Washburn, PhD, Director, Counselling Services, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaJo Hinchliffe, BA, MALS, Associate Registrar, Senate and Academic Services, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaJanet Teasdale, Managing Senior Director, Student Development and Services, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaMona Maleki, Chair, Mental Health Network, Co-chair, Student Caucus, University of British Columbia, BC, CanadaAddressing policy can be a daunting and elusive undertaking for health practitioners. Three Canadian institutions have been exploring how policies and practices can be considered in relation to well-being. In this panel session, Ryerson University, Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia will share their unique approaches to impacting well-being through policy.Learning Objective:1. Increase understanding of how well-being can be addressed through policy, including practical examples through learning about how 3 different Canadian institutions are addressing policies and practicesTUESDAY, JUNE 23, 201515Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus B12       Connecting Health, Sustainability and Climate Change:     A Whole University ‘Co-Benefits’ Approach Illustrated     with reference to Food Examples from UK UniversitiesMark Dooris, PhD, Director, Healthy & Sustainable Settings Unit, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UKSharon Doherty, MA, Healthy University Co-ordinator, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UKLizzie Sabine, BSc (Hons.), Healthy University Co-ordinator, Health and Applied Social Sciences, University of the West of England, Health and Applied Social Sciences, Bristol, UKSue Powell, PhD, Head, Centre for Innovation and Knowledge Exchange, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, Greater Manchester, UKMaxine Holt, MPhil, Principal Lecturer, Centre for Innovation and Knowledge Exchange, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, Greater Manchester, UKThis talking circle will explore how three UK universities have connected health, sustainability and climate change agendas by applying a ‘co-benefits’ perspective – with a particular focus on whole system approaches to food.Learning Objectives:1. Increase awareness and understanding of the importance of connecting health, sustainability and climate change agendas and of the benefits of a ‘co-benefits’ approach2. Gain insight into how they can take tangible steps to join up agendas and ensure that a ‘whole university’ approach supports the health of people, place and planetB13       The Challenges of Change: Improving Health and      Sustainability in the Built EnvironmentModerator: Robert Parlane, Architect AIBC BSc BArch, Architect, Thinkspace, Kelowna, BC, Canada Presenters:Donna Lomas, BA(Hons), MA, Regional Dean South Okanagan-Similkameen, Okanagan College, Penticton, BC, Canada Teresa Syrnyk, Architect AIBC, BA, BArch, Senior Planner, Infrastructure Development – Facilities Planning, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Leanne Bilodeau, BHK, MA, Associate Director Sustainability Operations, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, Canada Our panel will discuss how the collective design decisions driving the built environment on campus impose many health decisions upon the individual. Changes to construction, programming and culture can be used to bring about significant health improvements for users, while also targeting the greater sustainable aspirations of the institution.Learning Objectives:1. Discuss practical examples of healthy Campus environments2. Learn how to implement change in Campus culture through the built environment                                                                                                                                                     2:30pm - 3:00pm Refreshment Break & Wellness Activities    Interactive Poster & Exhibit Viewing                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  2:30pm - 3:00pm Campus Compass | Outdoor Performance EventGoal: To engage participants in multiple sensory ways of being connected to place. This event encourages active participation in collecting sensory, emotional and relational data and reflecting on meanings derived from those embodied experiences.                                                                                                                                          This panel will present data from the Caring Campus Project, a Movember funded research study to develop and evaluate a multi level prevention program to reduce the risks associated with mental health and substance misuse and create a more supportive campus environment for male freshmen across three Canadian Campuses.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about new and ongoing student-led campus initiatives to reduce substance misuse and improve mental health among first year male students2. Opportunity to reflect on their own campus culture and discuss how they might adapt the Caring Campus strategies to their own campus environmentB10  Health Literacy in Latin America: New Opportunities for     Research, Health Education and ActionMary Guinn Delaney, MPhil, Regional Advisor for Health Education, UNESCO Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean, Santiago, Chile Martin Zilic, MD, MSc, Faculty of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Chile   Miguel Angel Cañizales, PhD, University of Panamá, Panama Health literacy, defined as the set of skills and abilities that enable our ability to access, understand appraise and apply health information to decisions in daily life, is an essential element of self care and public health. Health literacy is largely determined by abilities constructed in basic, secondary and tertiary education. This panel session will review the health literacy conceptual framework, adaptations to the Latin American context, and potential programme and policy implications in university communities and beyond. Panelists will describe ongoing innovative efforts to measure health literacy levels in university communities in the region, with three presentations by members of the Regional Working Group on Health Literacy in Latin America, followed by discussion among participants:  The presentations are:  •	 Health	Literacy	in	Latin	America	-	Mary	Guinn	Delaney•	 Measurement	 of	 health	 literacy	 levels	 through	 application	 of	 the	 HLS	among first year health sciences and health education studies at the University of Concepcion - Martin Zilic•	 Preliminary	study	of	health	of	the	reliability	and	validity	of	the	HLS-EU	in	the University of Panama - Miguel Angel CañizalesLearning Objectives:1. Learn how and why the Latin American Regional Working Group on Health Literacy has adopted and adapted the health literacy framework2. Review ongoing measurement of health literacy levels in university communities in the regionB11  Inter-disciplinary Collaboration in Designing      Physical Spaces That Support Well-BeingCrystal Hutchinson, MEd, Health Promotion Specialist, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaMarc Fontaine, General Manager, Build SFU, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaMarcos Eric Olindan, Project Manager, Campus Planning and Development, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaThis panel introduces perspectives on the Well-being through Physical Spaces project at SFU. A Health Promotion Specialist, the General Manager of Build SFU and the Project Manager from Campus Planning and Development will address why spaces are a strategic opportunity to impact student well-being and how a collaborative inter-disciplinary approach is key to the creation of successful spaces.Learning Objectives:1.  Understand how physical space features impact health and well-being2.  Recognize the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in designing successful post-secondary student spacesTUESDAY, JUNE 23, 201516 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton Charterenhancing action on HP” (Arroyo, 2009). The movement of Health Promoting Universities has been propelled forward through the Ibero-American Network of Health Promoting Universities (RIUS). The networks’ successes (and failures) become compelling illustrations to understand what the main contributions of a regional network are (e.g. linking at diverse scales) and ways to evaluate the principal achievements both for the health promotion movement and for the Iberoamerican region. Key features and distinctive aspects of the RIUPS will be discussed. 3:45pm - 4:45pm Plenary | Student Voices: A Collage  What Makes a Thriving Campus and Transformative Academic    Experience?  Nishat Tasnim, Shira Sneg, Gabriel Tobias, Lauren Oleksewich4:45pm - 5:00pm Conference News Report 5:00pm - 6:00pm Meeting - Open to the public    Shaping the Technical Programme on Health      Promotion    Kwok-Cho Tang, PhD, Coordinator, Health Promotion with      the World Health Organization (WHO)                                                                                                                                              Optional Events5:00pm - 6:00pm Base Groups/Interest Groups/Network Meetings5:10pm   Wine Tour pre-registration & payment required    Visit 3 local wineries, enjoy beautiful views, and learn      about Okanagan industry!5:30pm - 6:30pm Boot Camp6:30pm - 9:00pm Students: Evening Event & Outdoor Dinner    All student delegates and volunteers are welcome!      Join students from around the world for dinner, live      music and an opportunity to contribute to the new      International Charter.                                                                                                                                          -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Wednesday, June 24, 2015  6:30am - 7:30am Yoga 7:30am - 5:00pm Registration Desk Open                                                      8:15am - 8:30am Conference News Report 8:30am - 9:15am Plenary | Keynote    Defining and Achieving “Success”     The Mission and Business of Higher       Education: Power, Ethics, Relationships and      Opportunities   Reclaiming the Human in Health: Radical Economics,     New Cultural Capital, and the Accountability of Universities    Richard P Keeling, MD, Principal & Senior Executive Consultant, Keeling &     Associates, Provincetown, MA, USAThe roots of health and well-being arise from the human conditions of care, community, capacity, and peace; those conditions nourish the emergence and development of whole, integrated persons and sustain individuals and groups. Promoting health equally requires fostering those conditions and confronting the forces and factors that challenge them.  In universities, we lose awareness of the foundation that health creates for learning; our engagement with students and our obligation to their success, driven by an ethic of care, are weakened when we no longer attend to their well-being. 3:00pm - 3:45pm Plenary | Journalistic Interview: Global Update  The “German HPU Network” and the Role of Networks  Christiane Stock, PhD, Head of Studies, Public Health, Unit for Health Promotion    Research, Associate Professor, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark(in German: Arbeitskreis Gesundheitsfördernde Hochschulen) Founded in 1995 with initially five network members, the German HPU network has since defined its goals and ways to support member organisations in their processes towards becoming a Health Promoting University. During the last 20 years the network has grown to more than 80 member universities and is now representing the largest network of Health Promoting Universities world-wide, and thus healthy working, living and learning environments for students and staff. Only a few studies have focused on evaluating the structures, processes and outcomes of health promotion networks, important for measuring goal attainment as well as analysing reasons for success and failure. The importance of evaluation will be discussed and suggestions will be made on ways to expand and enhance this network into the future of Health Promoting Universities in Europe.  Healthier Lives for all at the University of West Indies  T Alafia Samuels, MBBS, MPH, PhD, Senior Lecturer, Epidemiology and Public   Health, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill    Campus, BarbadosThe University of the West Indies in Barbados has more than 1,000 staff and over 7,000 students spending many hours at the Cave Hill campus. This environment needs to help in promoting healthy lifestyles, and making healthy options available. During Health Day in 2010, the University’s Administration commissioned a survey of risk factors for chronic diseases (high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and diabetes) among staff. The study showed that only one out of every twenty (5%) female staff got the recommended amount of physical activity each week and one out of 20 (5%) ate enough fruits and vegetables. In 2011 the Healthy Campus Initiative was started by the Faculty of Medical Sciences in collaboration with other UWI departments and associations.  The challenge is to make the healthy choice the easy choice on the campus, and to have many of these choices available on campus on an ongoing basis. Successes to promote healthier living at UWI will be shared and the ways UWI is turning attentions to support student’s to promote a healthier life for all.  Health Promotion in the Asia-Pacific University Network:    Rethinking Strategy  Lancelot W H Mui, PhD, Lecturer, JC School of Public Health and Primary    Care, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong KongThe landmark 2007 Asia-Pacific Conference on Healthy Universities marks the introduction of the healthy university concept into the region. It attracted attention of many universities from around the region and even gained the support of the WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific. The Asia-Pacific Network of Healthy Universities was founded after the conference to further promote the healthy university concept. Unfortunately, the Network did not gain enough momentum to significantly influence the development of health promotion strategies within universities. While the top-down approach to promote health within universities enjoyed a certain level of success, is it time to try a more bottom-up approach?  Advancing Network Dialogue: Health Promotion Evaluation   and Evidence    Hiram V Arroyo, BS, MPHE, EdD, Professor and Chair Department of Social   Sciences, School of Public Health, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto   Rico; Director, WHO Collaborating Center for Health Promotion and Health   Education, Coordinator of the Iberoamerican Network of Healthy Universities, San   Juan, Puerto RicoThe concept of Health Promoting Universities “refers to Higher Education Institutions promoting an organizational culture that is based on the values and principles of the global Health Promotion (HP) movement, which translates into an institutional policy for sustaining and continuously JUNE 23 & 24, 201517Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus C1ii Moving from Theory to Practice: Applying a Healthy     Settings Approach in Developing the Healthy Campus     Community Initiative at Simon Fraser UniversityTara Black, MSc, BSc, Associate Director, Health Promotion, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada Martin Mroz, Director, Health and Counselling Services, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaAlisa Stanton, MPH, Public Health / Health Promotion, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaRosie Dhaliwal, MEd, Health Promotion Specialist, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaCrystal Hutchinson, MEd, Health Promotion Specialist, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaThis session will provide a case-study of the application of a settings-based approach to health promotion in a Canadian post-secondary context, including the development of specific projects, objectives, core principles and areas for action which have enabled the initiative to focus on systemic and whole campus action. Rationale and examples of settings-based interventions as well as lessons learned and strategies for engaging stakeholders will be shared.Learning Objectives:1. Be equipped with practical examples of how Healthy Settings theory can be moved into strategic and systemic action within a higher education setting 2. Gain insight into the process of shifting to settings-based health promotion including common challenges, opportunities and lessons learned 3. Learn techniques for engaging diverse campus stakeholders to become involved in creating healthy settings C2i R U a Lifesaver at College? : Understanding Suicide,     Supporting Students, & Promoting HopeStephanie Szigethy, MA, LAC, Licensed Associate Counselor, The Wellness Centre, Rowan University, Gassboro, New Jersey, USAAllison Pearce, MA, Healthy Campus Initiatives, The Wellness Centre, Rowan University, Gassboro, New Jersey, USASuicide is a leading cause of death for young adults, and universities often have insufficient prevention efforts. Rowan University has a unique approach to combining local and regional resources to increase help-seeking behavior and connect at-risk students to resources using empirically supported approaches. Learning Objectives:1. Recognize the need for student and staff training in suicide risk assessment and referral to on and off campus resources 2. Understand key aspects of a comprehensive postvention response, including the development of a multidisciplinary consortiumC2ii   Promoting Mentally Healthy CampusesLesley E Beagrie, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, ON, CanadaYork University’s Mental Health and Wellness initiative aims to promote a healthy, inclusive and supportive environment that fosters mental health and wellbeing among members of the York community. How do we develop policies to promote mental health for an institution whose mandate is education?Learning Objectives:1. Discuss the role of universities in mental health promotion of its community2. Build a strategy that is comprehensive and holistic3. Address policy development in an educational institution4. Discuss the role of universities in the implementation of policies in the mental health arenaHealth and well-being do not grow from systems, organizations, and services alone; to promote health and well-being, we must reclaim the human, refocus our priorities, and embrace a radical economics of health that privileges human and community outcomes. This will require revolutionary thinking, exquisite resistance, and the creation of new cultural capital; health is not health care, students are not consumers, and corporations are not people.9:15am - 10:15am Plenary          Sustainability Agendas and Health Promoting     Campuses: Exploring Potential Synergies,      Ecosystems in Focus   Next Generation Sustainability: Beyond Harm Reduction     toward Social and Ecological Well-being Facilitator: Matt Dolf, PhD Candidate, Wellbeing Initiative Director, UBC   Vancouver, Vancouver, BC, Canada   James Tansey, PhD, Associate Professor, Executive Director of Sauder S3i,    Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC,     Canada Lael Parrott, Director of the Okanagan Institute for Biodiversity,       Resilience, and Ecosystem Services (BRAES), UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC,   CanadaConventional approaches to sustainability focus on a harm reduction and damage limitation agenda. The theoretical emergence of regenerative sustainability argues we should place social and ecological imperatives on equal footing, organizing around the idea that human activity can simultaneously improve environmental and human wellbeing. This session will be used to explore the potential and practice of this sustainability narrative on higher education campuses. Universities and other higher education settings are unique in their ability to serve as living labs and agents of change for sustainability: they are single owner/occupiers, have a public mandate to create new knowledge and practices for community benefit, and integrate teaching and learning. To that end, UBC is transforming its campuses into living laboratories for sustainability. Faculty, staff and students, along with private, public and NGO sector partners, use the University’s physical setting, as well education and research capabilities, to test, study, teach, apply and share lessons learned, technologies created and policies developed. This talk will report on how academic and operational sustainability activities can support a vision for enhancing environmental and human well-being.   Q&A with Mark Dooris                                                                                                                                              10:15am - 10:45am Refreshment Break & Wellness Activities    Interactive Poster & Exhibit Viewing                                                                                                                                           10:45am - 12:15pm Concurrent Sessions C    Includes 25% of interaction and/or Q&AC1i  Student Voice: An Active Medium to a Healthy Campus     CommunityKatie Mai, Student, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaRavina Gill, Student, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaCrystal Hutchinson, MEd, Health Promotion Specialist, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaThis talking circle will introduce practical examples of using student voice to create a healthy campus community. It will be facilitated by student leaders with experience in student engagement and advocacy for action.Learning Objectives:1. Gain insight into the process of using student voice as a medium to a healthy campus community, including challenges, successes, and suggestions in moving forward2. Understand the value of and positive outcomes linked to engaging students in decision making processes particularly within the context of higher educationWEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201518 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton Charterand Social Development, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaWhile health promotion and sustainability efforts have flourished at universities and colleges over two decades, programs and services have been more prevalent than whole-organization development. This roundtable discusses how the discourses of health promotion and sustainability offer insights into a new approach to furthering human and ecological well being.Learning Objectives:1. Engage in a discussion around how sustainability and health discourses can team up to further well being efforts in a university setting2. Exchange ideas about promising theories and strategies in health and sustainability-related campus developmentC5i  From Health Promotion in a Setting to a Settings-Based     Approach: Shifting Health Promotion Practice at Three    Post-Secondary Institutions in AlbertaAshley Humeniuk, MPH, Facilitator, Provincial Mental Health Strategy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaRachelle McGrath, MPH, Health Education Team Lead, Wellness Services, Mount Royal University, Calgary, AB, CanadaMelissa Visconti, MSc Candidate, Healthy Campus Unit Team Lead, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaThis presentation will encourage discussion about effective strategies to address student health and wellbeing from a whole campus approach. With an emphasis on providing practical tips and strategies, we will provide an overview of our lessons learned, as well as key factors and methods we as health promotion practitioners found essential for making this shift. Specific topics covered include: student engagement and developing capacity; building a comprehensive framework; community participation; leadership buy-in; and collaboration across sectors.Learning Objectives:1. Focus on fostering a rich conversation about effective strategies for implementing health promotion programming on campus2. Learn the differences between doing health promotion in a setting vs. a settings-based approach3. Highlight examples from our institutions on how to achieve this4. Learn key factors for utilizing a health promotion approach to promote wellness at a post-secondary institution C5ii  Canadian Standards for Health Promotion in      Higher EducationJuannittah Kamera, RN, BScN, MScHPPH, Health Promotion Program Coordinator, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, CanadaBe directly involved in the creation of a “Guideline for Health Promotion in Canadian Higher Education Institution”. Having an established guideline can support the integration of health and well-being in post-secondary settings. This session presents a draft guideline and solicits feedback through an engaging discussion.Learning Objectives:1. Become familiar with health promotion theories commonly utilized in Student Affairs and Health and Wellness departments2. Share experiences and best practices for health promotion in Higher Education3. Assist in the creation on a Canadian Health Promotion Standards for Higher Education documentC6i  Policy Analysis of Smoke-free Universities in AustraliaPatricia Louise Ritchie, BPH/HP, Associate Lecturer, School of Health & Social Development, Deakin University, Burwood, Melbourne, AustraliaAn analysis of smoke-free University policies in Australia. Findings suggest a diverse approach to development and implementation. Why such variation exists needs further investigation.C3i Alcohol Consumption among University Students: Using     a Taxonomy of Alcohol Consumption to Frame InterventionsMichael Byrne, MB, BCh, BAO, Head of Student Health Department, University College Cork, Ireland Much research has been published outlining the high levels of consumption among university students. This paper aims to provide a framework to practitioners and universities to tackle alcohol use among students. This has been done in a relatively novel way, employing Q-methodology. This in essence uses aspects of both quantitative and qualitative research methods.C3ii  Changing the Culture of Substance Use on       Post-Secondary Campuses: an Interactive ExplorationCatriona Remocker, MPH, BA, Project Manager/Research Associate, Centre for Addictions Research of BC, University of Victoria, Vancouver, BC, CanadaTim Dyck, PhD, Research Associate, Centre for Addictions Research of BC, University of Victoria, Vancouver, BC, CanadaCulture change is a vibrant lens through which to address alcohol and other substance use on post-secondary campuses.  This session will highlight the work from a multi-year project to change the culture of substance use on British Columbia’s campuses and will engage the audience in an in-depth discussion of the means to successfully undertake such an initiative. Learning Objectives:1. Reflect on a basis for and process of constructing a multi-campus community of practice (CoP) focused on addressing substance use in post-secondary settings2. Wrestle with challenges and issues around effecting cultural rather than just behavioural change in relation to substances in the campus context3. Share insights gained on encouraging local campus CoPs to identify strategic initiatives to pursue and to draw on expertise from fellow provincial partners in a collaborative endeavor4. Relate and discuss mechanisms and tools which have been developed in the CCSU project and their implications for similar efforts on the part of other campusesC4i  Developing Healthy Campus Coalitions at Five Institutions     of Higher Education in the United StatesHeather A Zesiger, MPH, MCHES, Director, Office of Health Promotion, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USAStarr J Wharton, MS, MCHES, Area Consultant, BACCHUS Initiatives of NASPA, Associate Director of Campus Wellness, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USAMarci Torres, MPH, Director, Office of Health Advancement, Montana State University, Student Health Service, Bozeman, MT, USAPaula Swinford, MS, MHA, Director, Office for Wellness and Health Promotion, University of Southern California, Engemann Student Health Center, Los Angeles, CA, USAThis Talking Circle will examine the experiences (practice) of at least five institutions in the United States (public and private universities, large and small) as they have developed healthy campus movements in response to multiple stimuli: grassroots interest; business considerations; topical or policy concerns; research and funding opportunities; and social good.Learning Objectives:1. Identify characteristics of health promoting universities based on the Ottawa and Edmonton Charters2. Compare and contrast Healthy Campus Coalitions from at least five U.S. campuses3. Outline next steps in developing/advancing a healthy campus coalition for their institutionC4ii  A Wellbeing Initiative at the University of       British Columbia: Health Promoting University      and Regenerative Sustainability Theories Inform a      New Framework for Whole-organization DevelopmentMatt Dolf, PhD Candidate, Wellbeing Initiative Director, UBC Vancouver, Vancouver, BC, CanadaClaire Budgen, Associate Professor Emerita Nursing, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201519Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus In 2010 the Catalan Healthy Universities (US.CAT) was promoted by the University of Girona, the Autonomous University of Barcelona, the University Rovira and Virgili, the Spanish Healthy Universities network and the Health Department of the Government of Catalonia. The US.CAT main objective is to promote the university as a healthy setting for the university community and the whole society.Learning Objectives:1. Discuss the added value of this experience is the establishment of a joint work programme and other coordination elements2. Discuss the network seeks to optimize the information and knowledge transfer as well as the available resources for the university community and the general populationC7ii Active Healthy at the University of Alicante - Promotora   University Health / Healthy University. A Challenge and an    OpportunityJosé Ramón Martínez-Riera, PhD, Nurse. Professor University Campus Vice President and Sustainability-Campus San Vicente del Raspeig Alicante, University of Alicante, Valencia, Alicante, SpainRafael Muñoz Guillena, University of Alicante, Valencia, Alicante, SpainMeet the strategy we are developing to identify health healthy active enhancers.Learning Objectives:1. Within the strategy of Healthy Universities, the University of Alicante (UA) initiated a project to learn, disseminate and promote health assets 2. Provide the proposed empirical content Ziglio Morgan and using the model of public health assets identified by the university communityC7iii Physical Activity and Well-Being in University StaffKay Cooper, BSc, MSc,PhD, Reader; Research Degrees Co-ordinator, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, UKAn electronic survey of 502 Scottish university staff, followed by focus groups with a small sample of respondents was undertaken to explore physical activity and well-being. Twenty-three percent of staff did not meet physical activity guidelines, and low levels of physical activity were statistically significantly related to lower well-being scores. Several barriers to enhancing physical activity were highlighted, with some practical suggestions for overcoming them.Learning Objectives:1. Learn that a proportion of university staff, like the general population, would benefit from interventions to increase physical activity and well-being2. Learn that several barriers exist in the workplace setting which prevent university staff from increasing their physical activity levels3. Learn that several practical steps could be taken in the university setting to promote physical activity and well-being in university staffC7iv  Workplace Health Management in Practice The example     of the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences,    Vienna and the Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt      (Austria)Waltraud Sawczak, Occupational and Organisational Psychologist, Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt, AustriaKirsten Sleytr, Personnel Development and Health Promoting, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Vienna, AustriaIn the working world of the university changes and ongoing development are imperative, but can also elicit resistance. Bound to their social responsibility and the pursuit of sustainability, the BOKU and the AAU, both members of Austrian’s Network of Health-Promoting Universities, are fully committed to systematic and evidence-based health management. Learning Objectives:1. Outline the process undertaken to analyse Australian Universities smoke-free policies2. Discuss the findings from the analysis will be articulated and highlight the variation in development and implementation3. Outline the next phase of the investigation which will focus on why such diversity exists across UniversitiesC6ii  Deakin University’s Health Promotion Path to      Smoke-Free CampusesCatherine M Bennett, BSC(Hon), M.App.Epid, PhD, Head of School Health & Social Development, Deakin University, Burwood, Melbourne, AustraliaA health promotion campaign to encourage staff and students to reduce or quit smoking as part of smoke-free campuses. A collaborative approach across the University to develop and implement a multi-faceted design that has seen a significant reduction in smoking on campus and an increase in staff and students quitting smoking.Learning Objectives:1. Outline the health promoting strategy employed to bring the university executive on board to resource a multifaceted health promotion approach to moving to smoke-free campuses2. Discuss the results of the surveys we present indicate the readiness of the staff and student communities, and our evaluations reveal the most effective initiatives employed, and those we recommend for the sustained support of smoke-free campusesC6iii  Moving Victorian University Campuses to Tobacco-Free;     Collective Responsibility and CollaborationCatherine M Bennett, BSC(Hon), M.App.Epid, PhD, Head of School Health & Social Development, Deakin University, Burwood, Melbourne, AustraliaA health promotion focused, coordinated evidence-based movement to smoke-free university campuses State-wide in Victoria, Australia. The successes of collaboration through collective responsibility. Learning Objectives:1. Highlight an effective framework for universities to work together and demonstrate joint public health leadership to address increasing rates of life-style related diseases2. Discuss the unprecedented degree of collaboration between 9 Universities builds a sound evidence-base for the most effective strategies in these settingsC6iv  Smoking is Bad… We know that: A Gender-sensitive     Smoking Cessation Resource for Young Adult MenJoan L Bottorff, PhD, RN, FCAHS, FAAN, Professor, School of Nursing and Director, Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, UBC, Kelowna, BC, CanadaA men-friendly, web-based intervention specifically designed to motivate and support men in their efforts to reduce and quit smoking was developed and evaluated. This innovation demonstrates how attention to gender-related influences and technology holds great potential for engaging young adult men in health promotion.Learning Objectives:1. Explain how gender-related factors influencing health behaviours are integrated into a smoking cessation program for men2. Identify how men’s health promotion principles and Web 2.0 technologies can be used to develop innovative interventionsC7i The Catalan Healthy Universities Network / La Xarxa     Catalana d’Universitats Saludables (US.CAT)Dolors Juvinyà-Canal, Prof. PhD, Director of the Health Promotion Chair, Health Promotion Chair, University of Girona, Girona, Catalonia, SpainCarme Bertran-Noguer, PhD, Director of the Nursing Department, Faculty of Nursing, University of Girona, Girona, Catalonia, SpainWEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201520 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterThis session will provide an overview of the original 2008 study of Postsecondary Institutions as Healthy Settings: The Pivotal Role of Student Services that was commissioned and supported by ACCC, as well as the outcomes and actions that resulted from the 2009 National Policy Roundtable sponsored by the Young Adult’s Working Group of the Canadian Council on Learning that  resulted in both an adaptation of the Population Health Model (2001) to focus on Campus Population Health Promotion as well recommendations for Specific Actions and Next Steps in creating healthier campus communities.Learning Objectives:1. Understand the findings of the 2008 study of Postsecondary Institutions as Healthy Settings: The Pivotal Role of Student Services2. Explore the implications of both the findings from this study and the recommendations for future actions and for future policies, such as any revisions to the Edmonton Charter (2006)3. Refocus attention on the importance of the promotion of student and community health and well-being on college and university campuses worldwideC9i  Between Health Promotion and Health HazardsDagmar Gasperl, MSc, Health Manager, FH JOANNEUM University of Applied Sciences, Graz, AustriaBetween health promotion and health hazards. The risks of providing workplace health promotion to employees by fellow employees and how to deal with it.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how to do deal with the health promotion experts’ lack of health awareness2. Learn how to keep the whole staff healthy3. Learn what the role of multipliers is and about resilience at our University of Applied SciencesC9ii  Going the Distance to Support Student Success Now    and in their FutureStephanie McKeown, PhD, BA, MA, Director, Okanagan Planning and Institutional Research, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC, CanadaTrudy Kavanagh, PhD, BA, MSc, BEd, Senior Instructor, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaIn 2011 we launched a structured mentoring program at our campus to support young women studying sciences and engineering. We share the methods by which we collect and analyses data for the prospective longitudinal study that accompanies the mentoring program, as well as some of the results that have emerged.Learning Objectives:1. An overview of the design of the prospective longitudinal study2. A summary of the results to-date, with a discussion on the usefulness of rubrics for analyzing these data3. A discussion on the use of the modified focus group approach and its benefitsC9iii Measuring Student Success; a Tool to Identify      Stakeholder Views of Student SuccessJoanne Sheehan, Master of Clinical Psychology, Clinical Psychologist, Counselling and Psychological Services (CAPS), Student Support Services, Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Registrar Portfolio, The University of Sydney, Sydney, AustraliaWe report on a project being conducted at the University of Sydney aimed at developing a brief, quantitative measure capturing the key dimensions of student success. Preliminary results from a survey of stakeholders within the university (e.g., students and academic staff) will be presented, and ideas for how to address potential differences in the way student success is defined will be discussed. Learning Objective:1. Learn case reports looking at the Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt and the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna provide participants with an insight into the daily workings of setting-related health promotion at Austrian universities C8i  Healthy University Program at Universidad Rey Juan     Carlos, Madrid, Spain: an Application of Charter      of Edmonton Objectives (2005-15)Ana M Martínez Pérez, PhD, Researcher Faculty Member and Anthropologist, Universidad de las Americas, Quito, Pichincha, EcuadorCarmen Gallardo, PhD, Medical Doctor, Dean of Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Madrid, SpainThe Healthy University Program is an experience of health promotion incorporating health education and training of the university community as health promoters linking institutions of higher education with the society which they participate.Learning Objectives:1. Learn the octahedron is a methodological device result of theoretical reflection and implementation of a set of experiences that can be applied in other universities2. Discuss the context of budget restrictions in the countries of southern Europe, the experience of Healthy Universities is a model of health promotion by institutions of higher education that ensures a comprehensive approach to biological, psychological, social and environmental health transferable to other areas of education and healthC8ii  Development of the Healthy University Movement      in the Asia-Pacific RegionLancelot WH Mui, PhD, MPH, Lecturer, JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong KongThe authors will present a summary of the development of the healthy university movement in the Asia-Pacific region since the 2007 conference. Findings from key stakeholders from universities in the region will be presented and discussed.Learning Objective:1.  Learn about the latest development of the health university movement in the Asia-Pacific regionC8iii  Towards a Thriving University: from Design to DeliveryRachel Riedel, B.PhysHlthEd, PhD, Wellbeing Educator and Advisor, Student Counselling Service, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New ZealandGlobally there are rising concerns about the mental health and wellbeing of university students. To respond to this concern, Victoria University of Wellington has developed a university wide approach to mental health and wellbeing promotion. Phase one of the roll out is currently underway, which aimed to develop personal skills, strengthen community action and create supportive environments by embedding wellbeing into the curriculum, establishing and working with student and staff wellbeing teams, and rolling out co-curricular life skill education programs.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how to harness appreciative inquiry research to gain stakeholder buy in and action regarding university wide mental health and wellbeing promotion2. From ideas to action: example initiatives that promote mental health and wellbeing of university studentsC8iv  Healthy Settings, Healthy Students: Outcomes and      OpportunitiesPeggy Patterson, EdD, Professor, Educational Studies in Leadership, Policy and Governance, Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaWEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201521Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus C10iii MYBENEFIT@UPB.DE – Health Campus at      Paderborn UniversityUli Kussin, MSc, Head of Collegiate Sports Federation, University of Paderborn, Paderborn, NRW, GermanyDennis Fergland, MSc, Senior Lecturer, University of Paderborn, Paderborn, NRW, GermanyMelissa Naase, MSc, Head of Healthy Settings Circle, University of Paderborn, Paderborn, NRW, GermanyActive and healthy lifestyle among students. Program and intervention studies to help students gain knowledge and enhance working, learning and life skills to become active and healthy citizens as policy of universities.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how to create programs, what sort of methods and criteria could help and how important the combination of scientific data and transfer is 2. Learn the importance of networking and building of expertise in questions of practicability and policy makingC10iv  Increased Wellness amongst Active Commuters to a     Newly Urban University Campus in AlbertaSuzanne McIntosh, Human Resources, Wellness & Recognition Coordinator, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, CanadaSue Kovach, Scholarships and Finance, Wellness Team Member, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, CanadaSession will provide brief overview of wellness programing at U of L, then focus on design, methods, and results of a student research study of work- and non-work-related benefits from active commuting.  Special attention will be given to on and off campus features that encourage active commuting, and how these have been maintained and enhanced during suburban to urban evolution around the U of L campus.Learning Objectives:1. Learn metrics for examining activity and occupational wellness2. Learn barriers, opportunities, and ‘nudges’ for active commuting to a university campusC11i  Engaging the Un-Engageable: LiveWellNYU as a Path     to Student Well-beingAllison J Smith, MPA, Manager of Public Health Initiatives and Assessment, New York University, New York, NY, USA National College Health Assessment data have demonstrated a significant disparity between students’ self-perceptions of being healthy and their actual health behaviors, outcomes, and quality of life indicators.  Students may not perceive the need to address many of the most prevalent health issues with a health or mental health professional. As such, innovative strategies that extend beyond traditional clinical models are needed to successfully foster student wellbeing.  This presentation will introduce LiveWellNYU, a university-wide, multi-dimensional framework that leverages evidence-based, public health interventions combined with innovative strategies to engage NYU students in being active partners in their health and wellbeing. Attendees will learn about: a behavioral economics and grassroots approach to facilitating students into a process of behavior change and help-seeking; leveraging the many touch points on campus that a student encounters; and the LiveWellNYU strategy for mobilizing administrators, faculty members, student leaders, and parents to proactively support and influence the full spectrum of students’ health.  Learning Objectives:1. Identify frameworks for implementing effective campus-wide health intervention 2. Detail approaches for mobilizing likely partners in your campus community to support student health 3. Discuss the role of grassroots tactics for engaging students in being active partners in their own health and wellbeingLearning Objectives:1. Learn about challenges in the definition of student success, and the value of reaching a shared understanding of this concept2. Hear preliminary results from a survey of stakeholders within the University of Sydney exploring how student success is defined and supported3. Hear discussion of ideas for addressing identified areas of potential differences in understanding and supporting student successC9iv  From a Traditional Perspective to a Standpoint that      Promotes Health and Adaptation: the Case of Peruvian     Universities in LimaCecilia Chau Pérez-Aranibar, PhD, Professor, Psyhcology, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Avenida Universitaria, Lima, PeruThis presentation includes two studies. The first one describes the relationship between university adaptation and self-perceived health among university students in Lima (Peru). The second one analyses how university adaptation and perceived stress can predict physical and mental health among college students.Learning Objectives:1. Learn a psychosocial perspective of university adaptation and how this is related to overall health2. Learn state of the art in university health promotion in Peruvian UniversitiesC10i  MoveU: Collaborative Planning to Increase Student      Physical Activity on Campus Michelle Brownrigg, Director, Physical Activity & Equity, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Physical activity is often overlooked in student services as a key strategy to enhance student engagement.  This session will focus on physical activity initiative planning, highlighting the University of Toronto MoveU strategy partner initiatives.  Participants will have the opportunity to discuss physi-cal activity as a student engagement strategy, identifying objectives and planning processes to deliver initiatives. Learning Objectives:1. Learn about the role of physical activity as it pertains to student academic success, engagement and connection to the university and about the MoveU initiative in particular2. Consider and discuss principles of partnership and collaboration in relation to planning cross-division initiatives, with physical activity as a focus3. Consider and discuss effective student leader engagement models, and key considerations in student-staff collaborations and project planning4. Be able to reflect on the Hierarchy of Effects Model as one method of assessment in relation to collaborative social marketing interventions with a health promotion focusC10ii Physical Activity and Well-Being in University StudentsGillian C Barton, MSc, PgCert, FRSPH, FHEA, Health Promotion and Public Health Specialist and Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, UKAn electronic survey of self-reported health behaviours was completed by 693 students at one Scottish university. Ninety-one percent of students reported physical activity levels in keeping with current guidelines; low levels of physical activity were related to lower mental well-being scores. Several health promotion opportunities exist within this population group.Learning Objectives:1. Learn self-reported health behaviours of a cohort of Scottish university students2. Discuss opportunities for improving the health and well-being of university students exist, and possible ways of addressing health behaviours WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201522 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterC12ii  A Health Promotion Intervention to Improve the Social     Wellbeing of University Students in the Rajarata      University of Sri LankaHarshi Bhagya Karawita, BSc in Health Promotion, Scientific Officer, National Science Foundation Sri Lanka, Colombo, Western Province, Sri LankaA health promotion intervention conducted to improve the social well being of university students. Current status of social well being was assessed and identified determinant factors by using innovative data collection methods. Those factors were addressed through several health promotion activities such as mood chart and it significantly improved the social well being status.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how the social well being could be improved within the group without expense high amount of money2. Learn innovative health promotion tools to improve the social wellbeing3. Discuss how this project produced a detailed document on components of social well being and its definition created according to the local settingC12iii Interventions in Health Promotion and Prevention in     Public Spaces on Campus: The Experience of the Pontificia     Universidad Católica de Chile    *Spanish presentation, English interpretation available*María Soledad Zuzulich, MSc, Nurse Midwife, Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile Náyade Rodríguez, Nurse Midwife, Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile How to implement awareness activities with a brief intervention in campus courtyards. To promote healthy habits; water consumption and reduced sodium intake are encouraged and heart-attack risk is evaluated. A significant group who do not consult spontaneously is captured, because they are not symptomatic and unaware of their own health habits.Learning Objectives:1. Learn about the experience of health interventions in non-traditional settings, installing a provisional basic infrastructure and high traffic areas in college2. Learn the pattern of brief counseling intervention based on motivational interviewing to encourage water consumption, reduce sodium intake and to detect coronary riskC12iv  Growing Healthy, Active and Happy in my GardenNelson Enrique Rodriguez Sanchez, PhD, MPH, Bogota, ColumbiaThis research project was born from the Professional Social Responsibility of a teacher of physical education area of preschool educational institution of the city of Bogotá, which was impossible to attack a public health problem as childhood obesity is individually decides to make an intersectoral, interdisciplinary and par-ticipatory of all actors that are part of the institution and the people who interact with interventionLearning Objectives:1. Learn how organized, implemented and evaluated a health promotion program for the prevention and mitigation of overweight in early childhood educational institution that does not mean to 2. Learn about the results after being executed various intervention strategies for the prevention and mitigation of overweight in children between 4 and 6 years individually and collectively 3. Learn about the major difficulties and enemies in promoting health in early childhood lives in the investigative process                                                                                                                                                12:15pm - 1:30pm Lunch (provided) & Wellness Activities    Interactive Poster & Exhibit Viewing12:30pm - 1:30pm Plant Walk with Dr. Melanie Jones    Join Dr. Jones (UBCO Biologist) for an extraordinary opportunity to      explore Okanagan campus plant life!                                                                                                                                                 C11ii Anti-Bullying Intervention for Nursing Students:              Qualitative Evidence towards Up-skilling Students              Through the Use of Cognitive Rehearsal Training (CRT) Michelle Seibel, RN, BN, MA, Senior Lecturer, Thompson Rivers University School of Nursing, Kamloops, BC, CanadaFlorriann Fehr, RN, MN PhD, Assistant Professor, Thompson Rivers University, School of Nursing, Kamloops, BC, CanadaAnti-Bullying Intervention introduced to and evaluated by 3rd year BScN students at Thompson Rivers University. Brief description of study background, methods and findings. A brief demonstration of the intervention will be provided followed by discussion.Learning Objectives:1. Have an increased awareness of bullying, how it impacts students, and its effects2. Have the ability to recognize and address bullying3. Be able to use the tools presented in the workshop4. Understand their role in the prevention and management of bullyingC11iii Approaching to Mechanisms of Action that make Possible     the Operation of an Inclusion Program of People with     Disabilities Javeriana University in Bogotá    *Spanish presentation, English interpretation available* Clara Viviana Aldana Sierra, Healthy University Program Assistant, Center for Psychological Counseling and Health, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Wellfare Vicerrectoría University, Bogota, ColombiaThis session is directed for the people who work at healthy universities and university authorities about the possible actions that can promote the recognition, appreciation, solidarity and cooperation towards the people of the Javeriana educational community with limitations, decreasing the barriers that generate disability in this population.Learning Objectives:1. Describe the sociodemographic characteristics of undergraduate students and administrative staff of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá, regarding any limitations that may cause disability, according to information recorded in the first half of 20142. Identify the elements of context that are related to the barriers that create disability3. Determining the mechanisms that the University can provide to reduce the barriers that create disability4. Suggest mechanisms of action that can be integrated into the plan of action that is required to operate the Program for inclusion of people with disabilities at the Pontificia Universidad JaverianaC12i  An Enabled Group of Health Promotion Undergraduates,    to Improve the Wellbeing of Communities Harshi Bhagya Karawita, BSc in Health Promotion, Scientific Officer, National Science Foundation Sri Lanka, Colombo, Western Province, Sri LankaA health promotion process conducted by a group of health promotion undergraduates of the Rajarata University of Sri Lanka in order to improve the wellbeing of rural community and theirs. The process included with effective and innovative intervention methods to address determinant factors of malnutrition, tobacco use and gender based violence. Further more the intervention package included with innovative tools and methods to improve the wellbeing of the student group.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how people could empower to increase and control over their health without expense high amount of money/funds and within the students’ capacity2. See the difference of health promotion approach and stressfulness innovative methods in promoting health among general population and university studentsWEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201523Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus Learning Objectives:1. Understand the benefits of engaging external peer support training resource on campus2. Address liability issues associated with engaging external resources3. Success and challenges encountered during the Ryerson and SHRC collaboration4. Seeing the evolution of peer-to-peer support on campus and how participants can leverage powerful student networks that already exist at their schools5. Principles of Intentional Peer Support that focus on what’s strong instead of what’s wrongD3i  Collaboration Is Key: How Strategic Alliances Helped     to Establish a Sustainable Tobacco Prevention, Reduction,     and Cessation Program at Thompson Rivers UniversityChelsea L Corsi, RN, BScN, BSc, Wellness Coordinator, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC, CanadaJanine Chan, BSc, BA, RRT, CAE, Lecturer, Respiratory Therapy, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC, Canada Participants will learn how TRU respiratory therapy and wellness centre faculty collaborated to establish a sustainable tobacco prevention, reduction, and cessation program on campus. They will learn how RT faculty transformed the existing curriculum in the required pharmacology and second year clinical lab courses to include new content about nicotine replacement and pharmacotherapies for tobacco reduction/cessation; brief intervention and motivational interviewing skills; health promotion, community development, and population health theories; and student research opportunities. Finally, we will discuss feedback from the student’s perspective about their experience in being involved in curriculum changes and health promotion work as historically this has not been a component of the RT curriculum.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how TRU respiratory therapy and wellness centre faculty collaborated to establish a sustainable tobacco prevention, reduction, and cessation program on campus2. Learn how RT faculty transformed the existing curriculum in the required pharmacology and second year clinical lab courses to include new content about nicotine replacement and pharmacotherapies for tobacco reduction/cessation; brief intervention and motivational interviewing skills; health promotion, community development, and population health theories; and student research opportunities3. Discuss feedback from the student’s perspective about their experience in being involved in curriculum changes and health promotion work as historically this has not been a component of the RT curriculumD3ii  Social and Psychological Factors Related to Lifestyle    Profiles among University Students in a Chilean UniversityGabriela Nazar, PhD, Associate Professor/Psychologist, Facultad Ciencias Sociales, University of Concepcion, Concepcion, Chile Health promoting and damaging behaviours are shown in clusters configuring certain profiles. Four classes of lifestyles’ profiles were identified among university students using a latent class regression model. Only a 17.2% of the students surveyed showed a healthy lifestyle. Healthier lifestyle profiles were related to living with family, be involved in religious and sport activities and positive academic, family and physical self concept. Risk profiles were related to gender (male) and positive social self concept.Learning Objectives:1. Characterize the lifestyle behaviours in university students 2. Identify lifestyle profiles and related variables1:30pm - 3:00pm Concurrent Sessions D    Includes 25% of interaction and/or Q&AD1i Building a Post-Secondary Mental Health Program - It     takes a Village! Lorelei (Lori) D Weber, Lethbridge, ABThis presentation outlines how one Canadian University started a post-secondary mental health initiative and breaks it down to assist in with a useful toolkit for adoption in other post-secondary institutes. Learning Objectives:1. Overview of program development of a post-secondary mental health program2. A useful reality based toolkit to assist with creation or expansion of participant’s mental health program D1ii Post-Secondary Student Mental Health: A Guide to a    Systemic ApproachSu-Ting Teo, MD, Associate Professor, Director of Student Health and Wellness, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, CanadaCheryl Washburn, PhD, Registered Psychologist, Director Counselling Services, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaPatricia Kostouros, PhD, Psychologist, Associate Professor, Mount Royal University, Calgary, AB, CanadaJonathan Morris, MA, Director, Public Policy, Research and Provincial Programs, Canadian Mental Health Association- BC Division, Vancouver, BC, CanadaCanadian Association of College and University Student Services (CACUSS) in collaboration with the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) created a guide to assist campus personnel with a systemic approach to assess their spaces in seven key areas. Discussions and exercises will engage participants in using the guide.Learning Objectives:1. Understand the guide as a tool that will provide strategies and promote mental health on campuses2. Understand the seven key areas of the guide3. Develop strategies for using the guide on their campusD2i  The Role of Career Education in Contributing to a      Healthy Campus CommunityTony Botelho, MA, Director, Career Services & Volunteer Services, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, CanadaRosie Dhaliwal, MEd, RD, Health Promotion Specialist, Health and Counselling Services, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaThis session explores how a career development lens supports mental well-being at post-secondary institutions. This will be done by sharing of research and examples of practice. Participants will be encouraged to discuss the principles within their own contexts.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how a career development lens supports mental well-being2. Learn how the principles of health and well-being can be central in any campus service or departmentD2ii  Transforming how we Assist Students with      Peer-to-Peer SupportJuannittah J Kamera, BScN, MSc, HPPH, Nurse and Health Promotion Programs Coordinator, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, CanadaCan bringing in external resources for informal peer-to-peer student groups assist health promotion staff to support and positively impact the work the groups perform? Ryerson University and the Self-Help Resource Centre discuss their collaboration to meet growing demand for mental health support and equip student leaders to function more effectively.WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201524 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterThis session will offer participants an opportunity to explore the connections between programming for Indigenous students (both academic and student support) and health-promoting activities on campus, focusing on lessons learned from the experiences of LE,NONET. Learning Objectives:1. Identify ways that health promoting activities and Indigenous programming intersect2. Describe the holistic character of Indigenous programming and the ways in which it can be influenced by Indigenous models of health3. Describe the ways in which support for Indigenous students, faculty, staff and community members can contribute to other programs fostering diversity on campusD5ii   Aboriginal Health Promotion: an Approach and Program     at the University of AlbertaFay L Fletcher, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaPatricia Makokis, EdD, Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaStatistics show that First Nations and Metis people in Alberta experience a disproportionate amount of ill health and are underrepresented in post-secondary institutions. Participants will hear about a community based participatory research project that resulted in a health promotion education program engaging Aboriginal learners at the University of Alberta.Learning Objectives:1. Discuss a process for including the priorities of First Nations and Metis people in programs of continuing education2. Discuss a model for university wide engagement of Aboriginal learnersD5iii  Academy of Indigenous Scholars; Vision Questing Anthony Isaac, BHSc, MSc, Aboriginal Services Coordinator, Okanagan College, Kelowna, BC, CanadaOkanagan College is currently piloting a multidimensional support program focused on enhancing first year transition to post-secondary for Indigenous students. This holistic program strives to empower youth through engaging them in the process of creating a self-constructed achievement plan. Their tailor-made achievement plan details their involvement in academic supports across existing  departments with the overarching goals of reducing attrition, supporting program completion and demonstrating a higher GPA than those not in the program. Learning Objectives:1. Learn how to co-create achievement plans for incoming post-secondary students  2. Have an enhanced understanding of how to implement their own holistic Academy of Indigenous Scholars framework  3. Have an enhanced understanding the importance of utilizing Indigenous ways of knowing and doing in academia D6i  Creating an Inclusive Campus: Supporting Health and     Human Service Students with DisabilitiesLaura Bulk, BSW, MOT, PhD Student, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaBuilding inclusive learning communities and facilitating constructive learning experiences for all students requires that campuses are welcome a diversity of perspectives. The underrepresentation of individuals with disabilities in the health and human service professions and professional programs must be addressed. The Inclusive Campus project aims to address the barriers, challenges, and facilitators experienced by students with disabilities.Learning Objective:1. Discuss one major barrier to promoting healthy, inclusive, and diverse campus communities, specifically in the health and human service programsD3iii Active Ageing in an Intergenerational Perspective: A     Strategy for a Health Promoting UniversityElza Maria de Souza, Professor, Departamento de Saúde Coletiva, Universidade de Brasília, Campus Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, BrazilHealth promotion movement has become the main type of approach to change the old paradigm of health and health systems. However, it is still ongoing as the biomedical model is still hegemonic, as there are plenty of financial and political interest involved in it. However, the health promoting universities movement offers a chance to change this scenery by changing attitude of students and community to transform rhetoric in practice.Learning Objectives:1. Learn that simple and non expensive programmes can be effective in promoting intergenerational trust and solidarity, self perception of health status, social participation and intersectorial integration2. Learn that older persons and adolescents are potential source of human capital for health promotion and community improvementD4i Organizational Compassion: an Approach to      Building Healthy Campus CommunitiesAnne H Simmonds, RN, PhD, Nursing, Lawrence S. Bloomberg School of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada In this interactive roundtable discussion, we will consider the philosophical underpinnings of compassion and examine the organizational conditions that foster the recognition of suffering, empathetic concern and compas-sionate responses within campus communities. We will also explore individual and collective actions that can promote healthy, compassionate campus environments.Learning Objectives:1. Examine the meaning of organizational compassion and discuss ways in which this can be applied to promoting healthy campus communities using a social-ecological framework2. Generate strategies - individually and collectively - that can foster the creation of compassionate environments within their institutionsD4ii  Healthy Campus 2020: Connect, Collaborate, CreateAllison J Smith, MPA, Manager of Public Health Initiatives and Assessment, New York University, New York, NY, USA Michelle Burcin, PhD, MPH, MCHES, Program Director, UG Programs, School of Health Sciences, Walden University, Minneapolis, MN, USAData show there is a gap in implementing effective strategies on college campuses associated with population-level improvements. The Healthy Campus 2020 framework, with national 10-year objectives and an evidence-based action model, provides a roadmap to improve the health of all students, staff, and faculty on college campuses across the United States. This session, led by the current and immediate past Chair of the American College Health Association’s Healthy Campus Coalition, will lay the groundwork for building a movement around Healthier Campuses. An interactive discussion will explore the value of public health interventions on college and university campuses and the imperative to demonstrate improved student outcomes.  Learning Objectives:1. Describe Healthy Campus 2020 principles and action model for achieving improved population-level improvements2. Discuss strategies for communicating to key stakeholders the value of investing in effective public health interventions on college and university campuses D5i  Learning from LE,NONET: Holistic Supports for     Indigenous StudentsRobert L A Hancock, PhD, LE,NONET Academic Coordinator, Office of Indigenous Affairs; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology and School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Victoria, CanadaWEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201525Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus D7ii Identifying Actions to Improve Student Mental Wellbeing     at a Large Canadian UniversityKathleen Lane, MBA, Project Coordinator, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaMichael Lee, PDOT, MBA (Health), Senior Instructor, Dept. of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaThe Mental Health Needs Assessment examined student, staff and faculty perceptions of student mental health and wellbeing at a large research university. Participants were asked to suggest action items that could be implemented to create a more health-promoting campus community. Students will subsequently be asked to prioritize the study results through a campus-wide student survey. Learning Objective:1. Learn about the aspects of life at a large university that students, faculty and staff have identified as negatively affecting student mental health and wellbeing and the potential solutions suggested by study participantsD7iii  Healthy Minds/Healthy Campuses Facilitating Student     Mental Health in Higher Education through a Provincial     Community of PracticeJonathan Morris, MA, Director, Public Policy, Research and Provincial Programs, Canadian Mental Health Association- BC Division, Vancouver, BC, CanadaShaylyn Streatch, MPH, Provincial Coordinator, Healthy Minds | Healthy Campuses, Canadian Mental Health Association- BC Division, Vancouver, BC, CanadaSarah Joosse, MEd, Knowledge Exchange and Social Learning Coordinator, Healthy Minds | Healthy Campuses, Canadian Mental Health Association- BC Division, Vancouver, BC, CanadaHealthy Minds | Healthy Campuses is a provincial Community of Practice that has developed into a vibrant social learning space that supports colleges and universities to better promote mental health on their campuses. We will share how processes of “social artistry” have been applied to engage community members to design healthy campuses.Learning Objectives:1. How to apply a Community of Practice (CoP) approach within the context of higher education and the common goal of mentally healthy campus communities (e.g. community stewardship, activities, processes of “social artistry,” and the inclusion of value creation as an evaluation framework)2. Engage multiple stakeholder groups within and across organizations and post-secondary institutions to facilitate knowledge exchange, innovation and mobilization3.  Learn how the value proposition for implementing CoPs within higher education settings that can help augment student educational success4.  Discuss key learnings, challenges and opportunities underpinning the community’s continued growthD7iv  The Healthy University: Promoting Wellbeing at      Universities in Ecuador Ana M Martínez Pérez, PhD, Researcher, Lecturer and Anthropologist, Universidad de las Americas, Quito, EcuadorCheryl Martens, PhD, Head of Research, Universidad de las Americas, Quito, Ecuador, Senior Lecturer, Bournemouth UniversityHealth promotion in Ecuador is particularly important due to the high rates of non-infectious, preventable illnesses. Service learning provides the opportunity to make the promotion of health and wellbeing at the university level available to the wider community. Learning Objectives:1. Discuss the improvement of the health conditions of the university community and wider society2. Discuss the creation of a community development model based on service learning methodology D6ii  HiFIVE Initiative: an Anti-stigma Initiative for Social HealthErika Horwitz, PhD, R Psych, Associate Director, Counselling, Health and Counseling Services, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaThe Success of any Mental Health Strategy is dependent on how much a certain community stigmatizes against mental illness. Unfortunately, we live in an era in which this type of stigma is still very real. Erika Horwitz will present the HiFIVE initiative that has been launched at SFU and will provide ideas on how others can bring this movement to their campus. It is hoped that this initiative with its pledge, logo and safe spaces will become an international movement to end stigma.Learning Objectives:1. Explain mental health in a continuum2. Describe what Social Marketing is3. List the many ways in which stigma impacts people and society overall4. PLAN a campaign at their campus5. Communicate to their campus communities why this type of initiative is important6. Implement a step by step plan to establish this initiative in their campusD6iii  The Relationship between Depression and Physical      Activity in Undergraduate University StudentsPatricia K Doyle-Baker, Dr. PH, MSc, BSc, Public Health, Associate Professor, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaKaitlyn Verge, Undergraduate Student, Faculty of Science, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaA scoping literature review identified exercise as a modality for prevention of mental health issues (depression) in university students. An additional study on the overall health of university students was carried out based on this literature review. We hope the results will engage universities to improve the well-being of their students through practical methods.Learning Objectives:1. Be the first to review the data collected on physical activity and mental health as measured through the SF362. Be inspired to follow with a RECESS study of your ownD7i  The Healthy Universities Self Review Tool: has it      Supported Higher Education Institutions to Understand    and Embed a Whole System Healthy University      Approach?Mark Dooris, PhD, Professor in Health and Sustainability, Healthy & Sustainable Settings Unit, School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UKSue Powell, PhD, Director, Centre for Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, Greater Manchester, UKSharon Doherty, MA, Healthy University Co-ordinator, Healthy & Sustainable Settings Unit, School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UKMaxine Holt, RN, Principal Lecturer, Public Health, Centre for Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, Greater Manchester, UK This presentation will focus on the use of the UK Healthy Universities Network’s online Self Review Tool, reviewing its development and reporting on research exploring how it has been used and whether it has enhanced understanding and implementation of the ‘whole system’ Healthy Universities approach.Learning Objectives:1. Be encouraged to reflect on what characterises a ‘whole system’ Healthy Universities approach 2. Learn about how the UK’s Healthy Universities Self Review Tool has been developed and used – and what findings have emerged from a research study exploring its use by Network membersWEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201526 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterD8iv  Public Health Applied Baccalaureate in the Washington     State Technical College SystemGrace Lasker, PhD, Director, Bachelor of Applied Science Public Health, Lake Washington Institute of Technology, Kirkland, WA, USAThe American Association of Schools & Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) highlights a critical need to develop educational pathways into public health in the community and technical college system. Lake Washington Institute of Technology (Kirkland, WA) has developed an applied baccalaureate degree in public health that includes associate degrees in allied health programs (nursing, dental, physical therapy, occupational therapy, medical assisting, etc) as the first two years of the program. To meet technical college strategic planning, the second two years of the public health curriculum is hands-on and applied, with workforce readiness as a primary driver.Learning Objectives:1. Recognize the role of applied, hands-on training in public health or related degree programs for workforce readiness2. Investigate the contribution toward interprofessional education opportunities by involving allied health programs in public health and associated degreesD9i  Consumer Research & Concept Pilot Indicate that      the “Healthy Kitchen” Retail Foodservice Concept      is Poised for Success with the Right Healthy Menu      and Marketing MixKaren Williams, MSc, Director of Health, Wellness & Sustainability, Aramark Canada Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaA study of university student & faculty eating habits confirms strong demand for a food concept that that promises healthy balanced meals made from scratch with simple, whole ingredients. Locally and/or sustain-ably sourced food provides a solid foundation contributing to positive perceptions of the brand by supporting local farmers and addressing concerns about the environmentLearning Objectives:1. Discover how healthy eating is perceived by university students, faculty, and staff2. Differentiate between the influences of “healthy eating” and “local and/or sustainable sourcing” on consumer decision-making3. Understand the elements that make up the right menu and right marketing mix for a successful retail foodservice concept focused on healthier choices sourced locally and sustainably whenever possible D9ii  Life Style in a University in Southeastern MexicoAlejandra Rosaldo Rocha, ME, Professor, UJAT-DAMC, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Comalcalco, Tabasco, MéxicoThe predominant lifestyle in students at a university in southeastern Mexico is Appropriate, so that universities should act as promoters of health and perform actions so that the lifestyle is excellent. The concept of lifestyle is complex, the Fantastic instrument let get an overview of the behavior of a person; this view should be deepened in each category on future studies. Universities are responsible for generating diagnostics of its students´ lifestyles to implement the necessary actions and become healthy environments.Learning Objectives:1. Understand how the everyday behaviors of a person make their lifestyle and become in risk agents or health prevention2. Know the Fantastic instrument and how its applying allows evaluating different categories that make up the concept of lifestyle3. View the results of applying this instrument in undergraduates from a Mexican universityD8i  Promoting Wellness: Application of a Wise      “Decision-Making Grid” for Community NursingDeborah A Gibson, MScN, RN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, CanadaMichele Regehr, BN, RN, current MSN Student, Assistant Director of Wellness Centre and Campus Nurse, Wellness Centre, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, CanadaThe current complexity and acuity of patient care can create decision-making challenges for nurses. Consequently, nurses may experience moral distress without the necessary resources to respond to the challenging nature of various work environments. The decision making grid is adapted from the Stinson Wellness Model. It utilizes ‘the pillars of wellness’ and offers an innovative framework to equip nurses to practice in a purposeful, balanced, congruent and sustainable manner; both personally and professionally. Through a partnership with the Wellness Center, fourth year Community Health Nursing Students incorporate the wellness model through the application of a ‘Decision making Grid.’ Students discover balanced and congruent interventions to support wellness for the client, healthcare professional and institution. Participants of this presentation will understand how the Decision-making Grid is utilized in wellness promotion within the 4th year TWU nursing community nursing clinical experience. Learning Objective:1. Understand how the decision-making grid is utilized in wellness promotion within the 4th year TWU community health nursing clinical experienceD8ii  Piloting Professional Development in Health Education    for BEd Students: a Call to Action Angela S Alberga, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaMichelle Tkachuk, BSc, MA student, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Alana Ireland, MA, PhD student, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Although teachers are expected to be key agents of health promotion in schools, many lack confidence in teaching about health. Our pilot research shows that a professional development workshop on health catered to students in a BEd program improves confidence, competence and attitudes toward health.Learning Objectives:1. Identify the gaps in health education in teacher training programs in Canada2. Understand the effects of a professional development workshop on improving confidence and attitudes about health education in BEd studentsD8iii  Experience in Youth Health Leadership, a Participatory    Training-Action Proposal in the University EnvironmentMaría Fernanda Rivadeneira, PhD Student, Public Health, Department of Health Promotion, Catholic University of Ecuador, Quito, Pichincha, EcuadorThe project “Youth Health Leadership” is a proposal by the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, whose main objective is to train university leaders in health promotion. Leaders are able to identify health problems and implement improvement actions. Experience shows that the participation is essential to address problems and implement actions for university peers. Learning Objectives:1. Learn the experience of “Leadership in Youth Health” will allow to identify how it has developed and how it could be implemented a participatory process of training in health promotion, where the main actors are the same students who are trained to develop proposals to improve health quality of life of their peers2. Learn through experience, participants are invited to know how the project, what were the main outcomes, the observed constraints and best practices developed3. Reflect on the importance of empowering students to design, implement and evaluate proposals for health promotion at the university levelWEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201527Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus D11i  Healthy Sydney University, Mental Wellbeing ReviewElly Howse, BA (Hons I) Sydney, MPH Sydney, Senior Project Officer, Healthy Sydney University, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia In line with Healthy Sydney University’s guiding principle of ‘evidence-informed and evidence-generating’, members of our Mental Wellbeing working group have prepared a systematic review of the scientific literature monitoring the effectiveness of population-based interventions to promote mental wellbeing within university settings. Interventions were included that were population based and whose primary objective was to improve participants’ mental health. Learning Objectives:1. Understand the current literature on mental wellbeing promotion (including drug and alcohol) in university settings2. Explore the gaps in the literature and the possible reasons for these gaps;3. Consider and discuss recommendations arising from the review, and how these could be implemented in other universities4. Consider ways of improving this field of literature through supporting more research and evidence-generation in this areaD11ii  Creating a Culturally Competent Depression      Prevention Program in SchoolsWing Yan (Annabelle) Wong, BSc, MPH, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada One out of five adolescents experiences depressive disorder in North America. Given that ethno-cultural background and the risk of getting depression are strongly related, development of culturally competent depression prevention programs should be promoted for reducing adoles-cent depression and creating healthy campus. Learning Objectives:1. Learn the relationship between ethno-cultural background and depression2. Learn some commonly used theoretical components of depression prevention initiatives3. Learn a proposed structural framework for the development of cultural competent depression prevention programs in schoolsD11iii  The Students’ Perspective: Supporting Student      Mental Health through Campus ChangeMegan E Tanner, BA, working on MOT, Occupational Therapy Student, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaSarah Slocombe, BSc, working on MOT, Occupational Therapy Student, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaUsing a survey, this study seeks students’ perspectives on how the campus can be transformed to best support student mental health and engagement in campus life. Results will be used to inform universities on how to prioritize changes in order to create a healthier campus that best supports its learners. Learning Objectives:1. Explain how the campus environment impacts student mental health2. Identify strategies that universities can use to better support the mental health and well being of students3. Identify ways in which the university environment can be adapted in order to better support the metal health and well being of studentD11iv  Adapting the Guarding Minds @ Work Tool to Better     Understand Systemic Impacts on Student Psychosocial     Well-being in Higher EducationAlisa Stanton, MPH, Public Health / Health Promotion, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaThis research builds upon literature from workplace settings in adapting the Guarding Minds @ Work tool to explore psychosocial risk factors within the higher education context. The findings are relevant to all higher education institutions interested in improving student well-being through a systemic and campus wide approach. D9iii  Texting-Based Sexual Health Initiative: SextEd,      a Case StudyIradele Plante, BSc, MPH Student, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada SextEd is a texting based sexual health service that answers questions via text while providing prompts to local and online resources that are sex-positive, harm-reductive and LGBTQ+ inclusive. This interactive presentation will explore sexual health knowledge acquisition and internet habits among Canadian youth and explain some of the merits and challenges of implementing a program like SextEd. Learning Objectives:1. Gain a solid understanding of the research base that covers sexual health knowledge acquisition and habits among Canadian youth2. Gain insight to the design, production, implementation and evaluation of a texting-based sexual health program, using SextEd as a modelD10i  Universities as a Strong Partner in the Process of     National Health Policies ImplementationIrena Miseviciene, Professor, PhD, Dr .habil., Medical doctor, Lithuanian Sports University, Lithuanian Association of Health Promoting Hospitals, Kaunas, LithuaniaUniversities are strong partners for National health policies development and implementation. WHO coordinated health promotion movements very often are initiated by research groups from universities.Learning Objective:1. Learn what Universities can do for national health policy development and WHO Health Promotion movements’ initiation D10ii  Promoting Campus and Community Health      through Interdisciplinary Cultural Safety Education      in the Health SciencesDonna Kurtz, PhD,RN, Associate Professor, Faculty of Health & Social Development School of Nursing, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, Canada Shuswap Elder Jessie Nyberg, Elder Advisor, Canoe Creek Band/Adjunct Professor UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaThis presentation shares our journey of integrating and honouring local Indigenous knowledge within the campus environment and buildingLearning Objectives:1. Discuss the importance of Indigenous knowledge and traditions within university environments2. Learn ways to foster inclusiveness and voice in curriculum development, delivery, evaluation and research when working in university - Indigenous community partnershipsD10iii  Safety and Sanity in the PhD ProcessJenny Tucker, PhD, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand and the Education Network for West and Central Africa (ERNWCA),The Gambia ChapterThe impact of a group of post graduate students from the Institute of Public Policy at the Auckland University of Technology who promote empowerment and encouragement, student well-being and academic success.Learning Objectives: 1. Gain insight, into student perceptions of safety and mental health, during a PhD process2. Understand the benefits of collective learning processes which can develop personal and collective confidenceD10iv Health Promoting Universities: a Moemoeā from      Aotearoa New Zealand (video)Heather Came, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health and Psychosocial Health, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New ZelandKeith Tudor, Associate Professor, Head of Department of Psychotherapy & Counselling, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New ZelandWEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201528 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterD12iv Professional interventions in Health Promotion and      Prevention to Prevent Skin Cancer in the University      Community of the Catholic University of Chile   *Spanish presentation, English interpretation available*María Soledad Zuzulich, MSc, Nurse Midwife, Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile Náyade Rodríguez, Nurse Midwife, Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile To know the experience of performing health professional interventions while working with other departments or units from the university as well as the most effective awareness strategies.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how to prevent skin cancer in the university community2. Learn about an awareness strategy and screening of possible abnormal moles from university people who barely use sunscreen3. Learn about awareness activities that interest the students and workers that would not consult spontaneously and that are in serious risk of developing a melanomaD13i Prevalence of Chronic Malnutrition (Stunting) and      Associated Factors among Children Aged less than 24     Months in East Wollega Zone, Western EthiopiaTsedeke Wolde, Department of Public Health, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, EthiopiaThis paper presentation a brief description engages university researchers, health workers, public health policy makers and students in assessing, describing, selecting and evaluating public health interventions. It traces the different public health approaches for improving health of the large community, practices the evaluation of such approaches, and introduces students to the health promotion, diseases prevention and rehabilitation principles  that underlie the public health interventions.Learning Objectives:1. Able to use information and communication technology to assist in health promotion and disease prevention measures for individuals, and families 2. Mobilize communities for health interventions3. Implement effective and feasible health promotion, disease prevention and control activities D13ii Assessing the Impact of the Diploma “Training Health     Promoters University Students FES Zaragoa UNAM”,    in their Self-perception of LifestylesCecilia Mecalco Herrera, Healthy coordinator university, Faculty of higher education Zaragoza, UNAM, MexicoThose who are trained must have positive changes in lifestyles to ensure generating a significant change between peers, assuming the slogan that characterizes the program: Health is transmissible. Learning Objective:1. Highlight the importance of assessment as well as the program compliance of the diploma course, the generated impact in students in training of health promoters in which success is demonstrated only in 60% of the self-care actions, which forces redirect issues and implement strategies which support the enhancement of the items, in this case, addictions in general  D13iii  Participatory Models as the Basis for Consolidation of     National UPS Networks: REDCUPS Lessons Learned    *Spanish presentation, English interpretation available*María Constanza Granados Mendoza, Psychologist, REDCUPS, Bogota, Columbia Lessons learned from the consultation of the Colombian Network of Health Promoting Higher Education Institutions and Universities:  Contributions of a participatory model.  Aprendizajes derivados de la consolidación de la Red Colombiana de IES y Universidades Promotoras de Salud REDCUPS, aportes de un modelo participativo.Learning Objectives:1. Describe the process of adapting the Guarding Minds @ Work Tool for the university context2. Understand the significance of the findings in terms of creating higher education settings that are more conducive to psychosocial well-beingD12i Health Risk Behaviours, Psychological Distress and     Passive Coping Clustering among University Students in    Ireland: Implications for College Health PromotionChristine Deasy, MEd, BSc, Lecturer, Nursing and Midwifery, University of Limerick, Limerick, IrelandThis paper details students’ experiences of stress, the prevalence of their psychological distress, coping and lifestyle behaviours. It will illuminate how health risk behaviours, psychological distress and passive coping aggregate in this population and will make the case for more effective health promotion interventions in the college university setting.Learning Objectives:1. Gain more in-depth understanding of the determinants of student psychological health and lifestyle behaviours2. Gain insight into the prevalence of and link between health risk behaviours, psychological distress and passive coping amongst university students in a large regional university in Ireland3. Understand the potential impact of student health risk behavior and psychological distress on health and academic achievement4. Appreciate the need for education providers to actively engage in promoting the health of students arising from deeper understanding of student lived experience of psychological distressD12ii Application of an Orientation Program on Sexual Health for     College Students in Northwestern MexicoLiliana Vizcarra Esquer, Instituto Tecnológico de Sonora, Sonora, México It is important to realize the risk behavior of young people in the exercise of their sexuality, for effective action and self-care education and promotion of healthy lifestyles in a university student population.Learning Objectives:1. Learn how working with youth requires constant effort as within health promotion work is inexhaustible2. Learn how it is crucial to be a day to have the ability to impact on their education as this will determine which young people move from knowledge to action and to pursue the development of a culture of healthy living D12iii CANCELLED Attitudes, Behaviours and Sexual Knowledge    in University Students Elizabeth Carmona Díaz, MSc, Professor, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Comalcalco, Tabasco, MéxicoConceptualization of sexuality in Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco-Division Academica Multidisciplinaria de Comalcalco nursing students increases significantly after training through courses and workshops taught by a sexologist. Students gain a holistic view of sexuality by restructuring ideas and attitudes through their own experiences or sexual behavior of others, this within a framework of respect and tolerance.  Learning Objectives:1. Learn the diversity of thoughts about sexual behavior2. Learn to respect the diversity of sexual expression and behavior from professional health care3. Encourage a humanistic education that enables holistic health care and human development of peopleWEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 201529Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus Learning Objectives: 1. Discuss strengths of a participative model as experienced from a national network’s process of consolidation2. Discuss strategies that favour consolidation of work teams in areas that bring together a variety of actors, strengthen synergies, promote sustainable relationships with government while preserving the autonomy of higher education institutions and universities                                                                                                                                           3:00pm - 3:30pm Refreshment Break & Wellness Activities    Interactive Poster & Exhibit Viewing                                                                                                                                          3:30pm - 4:45pm Plenary | Keynote & Case Studies    University/College and Community Cross-     Sector Collaborations Successful Implementation of the Ottawa Charter Strategies   in Balanga City: a Partnership of Local Government, University   and Health   Joet Garcia, Mayor of Balanga, Philippines Facilitator: Jan Appleton, Senior Manager Public Health and Preventive Programs Interior Health AuthorityEducation is the key for sustainable progress recognizing that for learning to be truly effective, the right environment must be cultivated. These realizations put into motion our vision for Balanga “to be a University Town by the year 2020.” Attaining this aim would involve the replication of a “university setting” within the entire city to encourage optimum learning. The City of Balanga earned the Philippine Department of Health’s (DOH) Hall of Fame “Red Orchid Award” for a 100% smoke-free environment and the Outstanding Healthy Lifestyle Advocacy Award. This endeavor would not have been possible without the cooperation and involvement of the entire Balanga community, the establishment of the University Town Education Council (UTEC) encouraging open communication among the public/private sector and the academe. Balanga City’s goal to promote a conducive learning environment has resulted in transforming the youth into well-informed citizens who value a healthy lifestyle and actively participate in community health development. Case Studies Evan Adams, MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer, First Nations Health Authority Facilitator: Ian Cull, AVP Students, UBC Okanagan 4:45pm - 5:00pm Conference News Report 5:00pm - 6:00pm Meeting - Open to the public    Input for the Development of Training and      Implementation Modules for the Framework      for Country Action Across Sector Framework      for Health and Health Equity    Kwok-Cho Tang, PhD, Coordinator, Health Promotion with      the World Health Organization (WHO)                                                                                                                                              Optional Events5:30pm - 6:30pm Boot Camp | Exercise on the outdoor fitness loop      with certified instructors6:30pm - 9:00pm Dinner Banquet | an evening of wine tasting and      delicious foods!     Pre-registration & payment required    Laurel Packinghouse, 1304 Ellis St, Kelowna, BC                                                                                                                                          -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Thursday, June 25, 2015  6:30am - 7:30am Yoga 8:00am - 3:00pm Registration Desk Open                                                      8:15am - 8:30am Conference News Report 8:30am   Opening Remarks Arvind Gupta, 13th President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of British   Columbia & Professor of Computer Science, BC, Canada Cathy McLeod, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health and for Western  Economic Diversification, Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo, Kamploops, BC,    Canada 8:35am - 9:05am Plenary | Keynote An International Charter for Changing Campuses that Change   the World Trevor Hancock, PhD, Public health physician and health promotion consultant and professor and senior scholar at the new School of Public Health   and Social Policy, University of Victoria, BC, Canada9:05am - 9:30am Reflections from PAHO/WHO & Others Structure of the Day & Engagement Options                                                                                                                                  9:30am - 10:00am Refreshment Break & Wellness Activities    Interactive Poster & Exhibit Viewing                                                                                                                                          10:00am - 12:00pm Workshop    New Charter Co-design    Synthesis of Charter Development to Date: Gaps      and Questions                                                                                                                                          12:00pm - 1:00pm Lunch (provided) & Wellness Activities                                                                                                                                          1:00pm - 2:15pm Workshop    New Charter Activation    Strategies & Timeline2:15pm - 3:00pm Plenary | Closing Panel    Future Paths: Reflections by Keynote Speakers     & Thought Leaders    Closing Prayer    Elder Grouse Barnes, Westbank First Nation3:00pm - 4:00pm Charter Celebration (complimentary refreshments)    Signing & Networking Event  Arvind Gupta, 13th President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of British   Columbia & Professor of Computer Science, BC, Canada Jim Hamilton, President, Okanagan College, Kelowna, BC, Canada Tom Macauley, President, UBC Okanagan Student Union, Kelowna, BC, Canada Enoch Weng, President, Simon Fraser University Student Society, Burnaby, BC, Canada  Leaders of Networks, delegates, and others    4:00pm  AdjournTHURSDAY, JUNE 25, 201530 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges  |  10 Years After the Edmonton CharterPOSTER LISTINGAssociation of Quality Of Life, Physical Activity, and Overweight in the Administrative Worker of the University Of Costa RicaJeancarlo Córdoba, MSc, Professor, University of Costa Rica, San Pedro, San José, Costa RicaThe Health Promoting Experience at King Saud University, Saudi ArabiaSulaiman Alshammari, MBBS, MSc, FRCGP, MFPH, Professor and Family Physician, Department of Family and Community Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaImplementing Health Promoting Universities Initiatives in FinlandSirpa Tuomi, PhD, Principal Lecturer in Health Promotion, School of Health and Social Studies, JAMK University of Applied Sciences, Jyväskylä, FinlandTaking a Whole University Approach to Enhancing Health and Wellbeing in One UK University - Examples of Good PracticeLizzie Sabine, BSc (Hons), Healthy University Co-ordinator, University of the West of England, Bristol, United KingdomPredictors of Drop-Out among Canadian Postsecondary Students: A Secondary AnalysisTricia L da Silva, MA, PhD student, Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaEvaluating Process, Outcome and Impact of the Program “University Spaces 100% Smoke Free Tobacco” (EULHT) in a Promoter Health University: the Case of the Universidad VeracruzanaGeorgina E Martínez Bonilla, MPH, Student, Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz, MéxicoParticipation in Health Promotion Activities by Students of an Institution of Higher Education in the Northeast and Southeast BrazilNatália Olegario, MSc, Physiotherapist, University of Fortaleza, Fortaleza, Ceará, BrazilCampus Nutrition Education Center: Potential and ImpactSally R Stewart, PhD, Sr. Instructor and Undergraduate Coordinator, School of Health and Exercise Sciences, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaAgents of Change: A Framework for Student SuccessLesley E Beagrie, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, ON, CanadaMaking Supervision Supportive and Sustainable in Primary Health Care Services in Abia State, NigeriaEzinna Ezinne Enwereji, PhD, BSc, PGD, MSc, M Phil, Lecturer, College of Medicine, Abia State University, Aba, Abia, NigeriaDeterminants of Disabilities among the Thai Elderly in 2002, 2007 and 2011: A Cross-sectional StudyPattaraporn Khongboon, PhD, Student, College of Public Health Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandTechnological Literacy in Health Professional EducationLilli Dam, MD, MPH, Nurse, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Nursing, VIA University College, Aarhus N, Region Midt, DenmarkFor The Health of It!Rhonda C McCreight, MN, Professor, Educator, Thompson Rivers University, Williams Lake, BC, CanadaSandra L Lachapelle, MNP, Family Nurse Practitioner, Interior Health, Williams Lake, BC, CanadaWhat are Nurses Contributing to Environmental Sustainability? Findings from an Integrative ReviewCheryl Van Vliet-Brown, BSc, BSN, RN, Registered Nurse/PhD student, School of Nursing, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaOnline Peer Wellness Coaching: A Promising Practice to Enhance Student Mental Health and ResiliencyPatty Hambler, MEd, Student Affairs Professional, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaDiana Jung, MA (in progress), Student Affairs Professional, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaA Faculty of Education’s Roles toward a Thriving Educative InstitutionMargaret Macintyre Latta, PhD, Professor, Director, Centre for Mindful Engagement and Graduate Programs, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaAnnette LaGrange, PhD, Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaJohn Tyler Binfet, PhD, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaThe Catalan Healthy Universities Network / La Xarxa Catalana d’Universitats Saludables (US.CAT)Carme Bertran, PhD, Director of the Nursing Department, Faculty of Nursing, University of Girona, Girona, Catalonia, SpainDolors Juvinyà, PhD, Director of the Health Promotion Chair, Health Promotion Chair, University of Girona, Girona, Catalonia, SpainParque De La Vida: An Open and Creative Health Promotion Initiative Created By the Universidad De Antioquia, Colombia as a Way to Promote Health and Human DignityMarcela Garces, MD, MSPH, Physician, Associate Professor, School of Medicine, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin, Antioquia, ColombiaGreta Romero, Economist MSc, Director, Parque de la Vida, School of Medicine, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin, Antioquia, ColombiaPromoting Healthy, Inclusive and Respectful Communities through Leadership DevelopmentIlliana Mijares, MEd, MSc, Student Development Educator, Student Engagement and Retention, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaKimberly Thee, BA, Student Development Educator, Student Engagement and Retention, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaAssessment of the Food Supply in Cafes at a Public UniversitySara Elena Castaños López, BEd, Bachelor Degree Intern in Nutrition, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, MéxicoMaría Del Carmen Rodríguez Juárez, MD, Master in Clinical Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, MéxicoOrlando Medina Camacho, MD, Master in Clinical Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, MéxicoBaseline Dietary Analysis in First Year University Students Enrolled in the R.E.C.E.S.S. Study Brendan Concannon, Bkin, Research Assistant, RECESS study, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaLouise Smith, BSc, Research Coordinator, RECESS study, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaPatricia K Doyle-Baker, Dr. PH, MSc, BSc, Public Health, Associate Professor, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaA Practicum Student’s Investigation into Health-Promoting Activities for University of Calgary StudentsBenjamin J Smith, Student, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaPatricia K Doyle-Baker, Dr. PH, MSc, BSc, Public Health, Associate Professor, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaBuilding Synergy in Promoting Mental Health Awareness across University CampusMichael Lee, PDOT, MBA (Health), Senior Instructor, Dept. of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaGender Differences in Text Message Use May Lead To Relational ConflictDiana M Lisi, BA, MA Student, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaThe Legitimization Process of Students with Disabilities in Health and Human Service Educational ProgramsAdam Easterbrook, PhD (Sociology), Research Coordinator, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaLaura Bulk, MOT, PhD Student, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaSomething for U!Genevieve Jin, BA, Health Sciences, Project Initiator, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaTwenty Years of Health Promoting Universities in GermanyKerstin Baumgarten, Professor of Health Sciences and Health Promotion, Hochschule Magdeburg-Stendal, Magdeburg, GermanyPartnerships for Campus Mental Health PromotionLesley E Beagrie, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, ON, CanadaCauses of Irritability in University StudentsAlexa Rempel, Undergraduate Honours Student, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, CanadaSocial Determinants of Health among African Students: Effects on Psychological HealthJohannita Mills-Beale, Student, University of Regina, Regina, SK, CanadaAn Interdisciplinary Study of Climate Change Impact on the Health of Inuit People of CanadaOsayomwanbor Osazuwa, Student, Department of Sociology/Social Studies, University of Regina, Regina, SK, CanadaEnhancing Campus Wellbeing through Evidence-Based Projects and a Multi-Level Approach: An Example from UBC Vancouver CampusNatasha Moore, BSocSci, Research and Evaluation Analyst, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaKaren Smith, BSc, MA, Lecturer, Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaKelly White, MEd, CHES, Acting Student Development Officer, Wellness, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaPromoting Health in a Costa Rican Community  Marcela Gutiérrez, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Center For General Studies, Heredia, Costa RicaApplication of an Orientation Program on Sexual Health for College Students in Northwestern MexicoLiliana Vizcarra Esquer, Instituto Tecnológico de Sonora, Sonora, MéxicoLife Style of Students upon University Entry Maria Elisa Bazán-Orjikh, Physical Therapist, Universidad Mayor, Santiago, ChileCanadian BEd Curricula: Are Health and Wellness Topics Addressed in Teacher Training Programs?Alana Ireland, MA, PhD Student, , University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaAngela S. Alberga, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaPoster presenters will be available at their posters for Q&A during the scheduled breaks and lunches. POSTER LISTING31Kelowna, Canada  |  The University of British Columbia  |  Okanagan Campus Prevalence and Predictors of Hypertension and Prehypertension among University of the West Indies (UWI) Cave Hill students in BarbadosT Alafia Samuels, MBBS, MPH, PhD, Faculty of Medical Science, Cave Hill Campus, University of the West Indies, Bridgetown, BarbadosA Proposed Health-promoting Curriculum for Health Professional Pre-licensure ProgramsLaura Lee MacDonald, Doctoral Student, Applied Health Sciences PhD, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CanadaSwknaqinx Health Modules - Health within a Culturally Safe Context: Indigenous Perspectives Course  Donna Kurtz, PhD,RN, Associate Professor, Faculty of Health & Social Development School of Nursing, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, Canada POSTER LISTING CONT.                                                                                                                                          Optional Social ActivitiesUBC Okanagan Walking Tour | Explore the campus trails and natural           environment with our self-guided tour.Sustainability Walking Tour | Take a self-led campus sustainability walking       tour and visit a series of sustainable stations       around campus.Residential School Art Installation Prayer & Meditation | Space will be available for prayers and meditation                            throughout the conference.Design Lab/Charter Development | Lab will be open throughout the conference                                                                                                                                          Please visit our website at www.internationalhealthycampuses2015.com

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